Chinese Central Planners Forecast “Weak Growth” in Manufacturing and Housing…

Panda Reacts To Finding Lion Tracks Amid Shrinking Bamboo Forest !

A Chinese central planner, Zhang Yong, the vice-head of the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), made a statement today (during the communist party congress) that carries much more significance than most people recognize.

The statement was made on behalf of communist China’s central planners and is directed toward what sectors of their economy they will focus investment (emphasis mine).

BEIJING (Reuters) – China will introduce measures aimed at guiding private investment into areas that have a higher growth potential, a senior official with the state planning agency said on Saturday.

China also would take steps to lower the investment threshold for private investors, said Zhang Yong, the vice-head of the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), during a briefing on the sidelines of China’s Communist Party Congress.

The manufacturing industry as well as the property market, which have been driving private investment, are now quite weak, Zhang said.

“Now we want to attract investment in sectors with growth potential such as subway projects.” (link)

Notice two key points: #1 forecast growth in manufacturing is seen as “quite weak”, and #2 they are shifting toward building their own domestic transportation infrastructure.

[*Note* China currently has massive empty housing projects (ie. ghost towns), and now shifts toward funding massive transportation projects.]

These two aspects are very important, and also confirmational, as they highlight their shift (a reaction) in response to U.S. President Trump, and the globally strategic economic shift Trump is executing.

Panda Reacts To Finding Lion Tracks Amid Shrinking Bamboo Forest !

China’s inherent economic weakness – To understand the China ‘One-Belt / ‘One-World‘ economic trade strategy it becomes necessary to understand how structurally weak the Chinese economy was when created.

People often talk about the ‘strength’ of China’s economic model; and indeed within a specific part of their economy -manufacturing- they do, according to the party apparatus ‘did’, have economic strength.

However, the underlying critical architecture of the Chinese economic model is structurally flawed and President Trump with his current economic team understand the weakness better than all international adversaries.

Lets take a stroll and lightly discuss.

China is a central planning economy. Meaning it never was an outcropping of natural economic conditions. China was/is controlled as a communist style central-planning government; As such, it is important to reference the basic structural reality that China’s economy was created from the top down.

This construct of government creation is a key big picture distinction that sets the backdrop to understand how weak the larger Chinese economy really is.

Any nations’ economic model is only as stable (or strong) as the underlying architecture or infrastructure of the country’s economic balance.

Think about economic strength and stability this way:

If a nation was economically walled off from all other nations, can it survive? …can it sustain itself? …can it grow?

In the big picture – economic strength is an outcome of the ability of a nation, any nation, to support itself first and foremost. If a nations’ economy is dependent on other nation for itself to survive, it is less strong than a nation whose economy is more independent.

Most Americans don’t realize it, but China is an extremely dependent nation.

When the central planning for the 21st century Chinese Economy was constructed, there were several critical cultural flaws, dynamics exclusive to China, that needed to be overcome in order to build their economic model. It took China several decades to map out a way to economic growth that could overcome the inherent critical flaws.

Critical Flaws To Exploit:

♦Because of the oppressive nature of the Chinese compliant culture, the citizens within China do not innovate or create. The “Compliance Mindset” is part of the intellectual DNA strain of a Chinese citizen.

Broadly speaking, the modern era Chinese are not able to think outside the box per se’ because the reference of all civil activity has been a history of box control by government, and compliance to stay (think) only within the approved box. The lack of intellectual independent thought-mapping needed for innovation is why China relies on intellectual theft of innovation created by others.

American culture specifically is based around freedom of thought and severe disdain of government telling us what to do; THAT freedom is necessary for innovation. That freedom actually creates and drives innovation.

Again, broadly speaking Chinese are better students in American schools and universities because the Chinese are culturally compliant. They work well with academics and established formulas, and within established systems, but they cannot create the formula or system themselves.

The Chinese Planning Authority skipped the economic cornerstone. When China planned out their economic entry, they did so from a top-down perspective. They immediately wanted to be manufacturers of stuff. They saw their worker population as a strategic advantage, but they never put the source origination infrastructure into place in order to supply their manufacturing needs. China has no infrastructure for raw material extraction or exploitation.

China relies on: importing raw material, applying their economic skill set (manufacturing), and then exporting finished goods. This is the basic economic structure of the Chinese economy.

See the flaw?

Cut off the raw material, and the China economy slows, contracts, and if nations react severely enough with export material boycotts the entire Chinese economy implodes.

Insert big flashy sign for: “One-Belt / One-Road” HERE

Again, we reference the earlier point: Economic strength is the ability of a nation to sustain itself. [Think about an economy during conflict or war] China cannot independently sustain itself, therefore China is necessarily vulnerable.

China is dependent on Imports (raw materials) AND Exports (finished goods).

♦The 800lb Panda in the room is that China is arguably the least balanced economy in the modern world. Hence, China has to take extraordinary measures to secure their supply chain. This economic dependency is also why China has recently spent so much on military expansion etc., they must protect their vulnerable interests.

Everything important to the Chinese Economy surrounds their critical need to secure a strong global supply chain of raw material to import, and leveraged trade agreements for export.

China’s economy is deep (manufacturing), but China’s economy is also narrow.

China could have spent the time to create a broad-based economy, but the lack of early 1900’s foresight, in conjunction with their communist top-down totalitarian system and a massive population, led to central government decisions to subvert the bottom-up building-out and take short-cuts. Their population controls only worsened their long term ability to ever broaden their economic model.

It takes a population of young avg-skilled workers to do the hard work of building a raw material infrastructure. Mine workers, dredge builders, roads and railways, bridges and tunnels etc. All of these require young strong bodies.

The Chinese cultural/population decisions amid the economic builders precluded this proactive outlook; now they have an aging population and are incapable of doing it.

[*insert* consideration for conscripted N-Korean labor here]

This is why China has now positioned their economic system as dependent on them being an economic bully. They must retain their supply chain: import raw materials – export finished goods, at all costs.

This inherent economic structure is a weakness China must continually address through policies toward other nations. Hence, “One-Belt / One-Road” is essentially their ‘bully plan’ to ensure their supply chain and long-term economic viability.

This economic structure, and the reality of China as a dependent economic model, also puts China at risk from the effects of global economic contraction. But more importantly it puts them at risk from President Trump’s strategic use of geopolitical economic leverage to weaken their economy.

Nuance and subtlety is everything in China. Culturally harsh tones are seen as a sign of weakness and considered intensely impolite in public displays between officials; especially within approved and released statements by officials representing the government.

Historic Chinese cultural policy, the totalitarian control over expressed political sentiment and diplomacy through silence, is evident in the strategic use of the space between carefully chosen words, not just the words themselves.

China has no cultural or political space between peace and war; they are a historic nation based on two points of polarity. They see peace and war as coexisting with each other. China accepts and believes opposite or contrary forces may actually be complementary, interconnected, and interdependent in the natural world, and they may give rise to each other as they interrelate to one another. Flowing between these polar states is a natural dynamic to be used -with serious contemplation- in advancing objectives as needed.

The Chinese objective is to win, to dominate, using economic power.

Peace or war. Win or lose. Yin and Yang. Culturally there is no middle position in dealings with China; they are not constitutionally capable of understanding or valuing the western philosophy of mutual benefit where concession of terms gains a larger outcome. If it does not benefit China, it is not done. The outlook is simply, a polarity of peace or war. In politics or economics the same perspective is true. It is a zero-sum outlook.

Therefore, when you see China publicly use strong language – it indicates a level of internal disposition within Beijing beyond the defined western angst. Big Panda becomes Red Dragon; there is no mid-status or evolutionary phase.

U.S. President Donald Trump and the U.S. economic team fully understand this dynamic and fully understand the inherent needs of China. When you are economically dependent, the ‘bully plan’ only works until you encounter a ‘stronger opponent’. A stronger opponent is an economic opponent with a more broad-based stable economy, that’s US.

President Trump, Commerce Secretary Ross, Treasury Secretary Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Lighthizer, represent the first broad-based national team of economic negotiators who know how to leverage the inherent Chinese economic vulnerability.

Every American associated with investment, economics and China would be well advised to put their interconnected business affairs in order according to their exposure.

President Trump will not back down from his position; the U.S. holds all of the leverage and the geopolitical economics must be addressed. President Donald Trump and his team are entirely prepared for this.

Donald Trump has been discussing this for more than two decades. We are entirely engaged in economic combat with China and the Chinese planners are awake to the confrontation.

China’s historic objective is conquest. China’s tool for conquest is economics. President Trump’s entire geopolitical strategy, using economics in a similar way, is an existential threat to China’s endeavor. Communist Beijing calls the proverbial DPRK shots.

President Trump is putting on a MASSIVE economic squeeze.

Squeeze #1. Trump and Mnuchin sanctioned Venezuela and cut off their access to expanded state owned oil revenue. Venezuela now needs more money. China and Russia are already leveraged to the gills in Venezuela and hold 49% of Citgo as collateral for loans outstanding.  Venezuela has been paying back China and Russia with oil, but Venezuela needs money.   Now China and Russia will need to loan more, directly.  EXAMPLE:

Squeeze #2. China’s geopolitical ally, Russia, is already squeezed with losses in energy revenue because of President Trump’s approach toward oil, LNG and coal. Trump, through allies including Saudi Arabia, EU, France (North Africa energy), and domestic production has driven down energy prices. Meanwhile Russia was spending heavily in Syria.

(Via CNBC) Russia has accounted for oil at £30.1 ($40) a barrel in its budget, finance minister Anton Siluanov said. Oil prices have fluctuated this year, falling below $45 a barrel and going above $59.

Russia has accounted for oil at $40 a barrel in its budget, the country’s finance minister Anton Siluanov told CNBC in a TV interview on Friday.

*Note* Iran is the financial reserve, but they too are energy price dependent; and part of President Trump’s strategy has been to tell EU allies to “take the money”.

Q Have you spoken with Theresa May or Emmanuel Macron about the Iranian Deal?

THE PRESIDENT: Yes.

Q What did they say to you? What did you say to them?

THE PRESIDENT: They would love me to stay in, only for one reason: Look at the kind of money that’s being sent. You know, Iran is spending money in various countries.

And I’ve always said it, and I say to them: Don’t do anything. Don’t worry about it. Take all the money you can get. They’re all friends of mine.

Actually, Emmanuel called up, and he talked to me. And I said, look, Emmanuel, they just gave Renault a lot of money. Take their money; enjoy yourselves. But we’ll see what happens.

Squeeze #3. Trump and Tillerson put Pakistan on notice they need to get involved in bringing their enabled tribal “extremists” (Taliban) to the table in Afghanistan. Pakistan’s primary investor and economic partner is China. If U.S. pulls or reduces financial support to pressure Pakistan toward a political solution in Afghanistan, China has to fill void.

“The Pakistani people have suffered greatly from terrorism and extremism. We recognize those contributions and those sacrifices, but Pakistan has also sheltered the same organizations that try every single day to kill our people. We have been paying Pakistan billions and billions of dollars, at the same time they are housing the same terrorists that we are fighting. But that will have to change. And that will change immediately. (link)

Squeeze #4. China’s primary economic threat (competition) is next door in India. President Trump has embraced India as leverage over China in trade and pledged ongoing favorable trade deals. The play is MFN (Most Favored Nation) trade status might flip from China to India. That’s a big play.  If you don’t think India is critical – READ THIS.

“China, while rising alongside India, has done so less responsibly, at times undermining the international, rules-based order even as countries like India operate within a framework that protects other nations’ sovereignty.” (more)

Squeeze #5. President Trump has launched a USTR Section 301 Trade Investigation into China’s theft of intellectual property. This encompasses every U.S. entity that does manufacturing business with China, particularly aeronautics and technology, and also reaches into the financial services sector.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The United States on Friday formally launched an investigation into China’s alleged theft of U.S. intellectual property, a widely expected move following a call from President Donald Trump earlier this week to determine whether a probe was needed.

The probe is the administration’s first direct measure against Chinese trade practices, which the White House and U.S. business groups say are bruising American industry. (link)

Squeeze #6. President Trump, Secretary Ross, Secretary Mnuchin and USTR Robert Lighthizer are renegotiating NAFTA. One of the primary objectives of team U.S.A. is to close the 3rd party loopholes, including dumping and origination, that China uses to gain backdoor access to the U.S. market and avoid trade/tariff restrictions. [China sends parts to Mexico and Canada for assembly and then back-door entry into the U.S. via NAFTA.]

[USTR- Lighthizer] … As difficult as this has been, we have seen no indication that our partners are willing to make any changes that will result in a rebalancing and a reduction in these huge trade deficits. Now I understand that after many years of one-sided benefits, their companies have become reliant on special preferences and not just comparative advantage. Countries are reluctant to give up unfair advantage.

But the President has been clear that if we are going to have an agreement going forward, it must be fair to American workers and businesses that employ our people at home.  (link)

Squeeze #7. President Trump has been open, visible and vocal about his intention to shift to bilateral trade renegotiation with China and Southeast Asia immediately after Team U.S.A. conclude with NAFTA renegotiation.

Squeeze #8. President Trump has positioned ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) as trade benefactors for assistance with North Korea. The relationship between ASEAN nations and the Trump administration is very strong, and getting stronger. Which leads to…

Squeeze #9. President Trump has formed an economic and national security alliance with Shinzo Abe of Japan. It is not accidental that twice North Korea’s Kim Jong-un fired his missile over the Northern part of Japan. Quite simply, Beijing told him to.

Add all of this up and you can see the cumulative impact of President Trump’s geopolitical economic strategy toward China. The best part of all of it – is the likelihood China never saw it, meaning the sum totality of “all of it”, coming.  Beijing’s central planning statements today reflect a reactionary position as they are catching up to the ramifications.

The Olive branch and arrows denote the power of peace and war. The symbol in any figure’s right hand has more significance than one in its left hand. Also important is the direction faced by the symbols central figure. The emphasis on the eagles stare signifies the preferred disposition. An eagle holding an arrow also symbolizes the war for freedom, and its use is commonly referred to the liberation fight of righteous people from abusive influence. The eagle on the original seal created for the Office of the President showed the gaze upon the arrows.

The Eagle and the Arrow – An Aesop’s Fable

An Eagle was soaring through the air. Suddenly it heard the whizz of an Arrow, and felt the dart pierce its breast. Slowly it fluttered down to earth. Its lifeblood pouring out. Looking at the Arrow with which it had been shot, the Eagle realized that the deadly shaft had been feathered with one of its own plumes.

Moral: We often give our enemies the means for our own destruction.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Big Government, China, Communist, Economy, India, Iran, media bias, Pakistan, President Trump, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Secretary of State, Secretary Tillerson, Trade Deal, Typical Prog Behavior, Uncategorized, US Treasury, USA, Venezuela. Bookmark the permalink.

193 Responses to Chinese Central Planners Forecast “Weak Growth” in Manufacturing and Housing…

  1. rsanchez1990 says:

    What a backwards way of doing it. Develop vast swathes of territory and have it do nothing for you, because you didn’t build an infrastructure to connect that territory to the wider economy. Communists are stupid.

    Liked by 21 people

    • Yes rsanchez, China has made a lot of mistakes.

      A huge country with lots of undeveloped territory.

      An aging population, more young males than females.

      A huge population with no creativity, unable to solve new and growing every day problems.

      A country that based its prosperity on being a world wide bully.

      Sundance could go on and on about all the mistakes that China made in it’s quest for world dominion.

      It looks like China make almost every single mistake in the book.

      Liked by 24 people

      • Victor Adam Smith says:

        LOL

        Really I had to laugh out loud reading Sundance’s great write up of how Hillary Clinton’s Economics…….ER……I mean…..How Communist China’s “economy” works(?).

        Got another big laugh reading the linked Rooters article.

        “China also would take steps to lower the investment threshold for private investors…..:”

        LOL You have NO private investors when you have NO free thinking and NO creativity!

        Liked by 6 people

      • MVW says:

        Planned economies are vulnerable to the mistakes of the few, and all eggs in a basket.

        China’s goal to be dominant in Pharmaceuticals is well on its way, and look, Trump is talking about pharma prices. Add that to your list, it ain’t tiny… to say the least, it is uber massive.

        Liked by 7 people

      • RodS says:

        “It looks like China make almost every single mistake in the book.”

        No, China made only one serious mistake: They did not anticipate Trump beating Hillary. All their other “mistakes” could have been eventually corrected given time, which the Globalist were more than happy to grant them.

        Liked by 11 people

      • chbailey says:

        vs. our Christian free West MAGA. I mean, look at the decor in that Commie Central room.. that heavy clunk of a hammer and sickle symbol of the comrade Workers. The dregs.

        Liked by 4 people

        • Christianities teachings of Free Will is something that the communists will fight with their last breath.

          Until they give up making their citizens worship the government they will never ever prosper.

          Liked by 5 people

        • Apfelcobbler says:

          It is pretty grim. Moochelle will surely comment on the lack of color in and on the audience!

          Like

          • Cuppa Covfefe says:

            Barf. And Oblowhole’s older sistah’ (Auma) is over here in Germany telling us how to raise our children to be good little Marxists, or something… (co-sponsored by our government-owned “mist-media”) (mist = bs or manure).

            Somehow jugears and his family are always popping up over here. Maybe Merkel misses the “good old days”. She sure misses the “East German Way”…

            Like

        • DGC says:

          Careful. One of the more surprising development in China is the rapid rise of Christianity.

          According to Prof. Fenggang Yang, a professor of sociology at Purdue University and author of “Religion in China: Survival and Revival under Communist Rule”, the number of practicing Christians in China will swell to around 160 million by 2025; that number should continue to increase after that.

          This is a positive development, against a communist regime.

          Like

          • chbailey says:

            Wikipedia Main article: Religion in China
            “Freedom of religion is guaranteed by China’s constitution, although religious organizations that lack official approval can be subject to state persecution.[245][464] The government of the People’s Republic of China is officially atheist. Religious affairs and issues in the country are overseen by the State Administration for Religious Affairs.[465]”
            Of course there are Christian conversions in China. My point was that there is no religious freedom in China. The state decides what is taught and what isn’t. The official atheist governance largely crushes any Christian influence in official policy.

            Like

          • Bill in Lexington,NC says:

            Read recently (sorry, can’t recall where, so no link), that China was still actively raiding “house churches” .. unregistered churches.

            Like

      • And have throughout their long history.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Those young males getting Russian young females from Siberia, because Russian males drink too much.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Only in China- the trees in the forest, the grass of the fields, the flowers in the door yards all sprout in the clouds, grow down to the earth, and spread roots.

      Liked by 2 people

    • There is nothing 100 miles in from the coasts… literally nothing. The people come from the interior work for 2 months and then go back to the interior and then a new group comes in… directly from a woman who owns 51% of 13 companies in CHINA. She also told me that there is no innovation because people are not allowed to “think” for themselves.

      Liked by 1 person

      • BeePee says:

        That’s why when you look at night time satellite pictures of lights, there is a thin line along China’s East coast and the rest of the country is mostly dark.

        Like

    • wondering999 says:

      They have developed a lot of infrastructure… Chinese railworkers built the Western rail system in the United States, and didn’t get sick as often as Irish workers because they didn’t drink water unboiled (tea). Later on, Chinese military built train systems to get into formerly inaccessible parts of the country. The Chinese military still builds trains/tunnels — their Second Artillery Corps.
      It is always a mistake to consider other people as “stupid”, although I have often thought of our own U.S. leadership as “stupid” — in fact they are simply working on a different agenda, one which is destructive to people like me
      https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/georgetown-students-shed-light-on-chinas-tunnel-system-for-nuclear-weapons/2011/11
      http://eng.mod.gov.cn/ArmedForces/second.htm/16/gIQA6AmKAO_story.html?utm_term=.2d7c25bcf8a8

      Liked by 1 person

      • cheeflo says:

        It’s not that the people are stupid. It’s that the powers that be are collectivists — they have a hive mindset and cannot tolerate the threat to their power that is independent thinking. Impose conformity and compliance forcibly on the populace and the entire country becomes “stupid” by design, although that eventually and inevitably comes back to bite them.

        The same employ of groupthink undermines the governance, culture, and prosperity of the United States. Our educational establishment, from public K-12 to the universities, continues to crank out the “educated” hothouse flowers who have no clue about much of anything real or true, ensuring an enfeebled and obedient herd that awaits instructions from a self-defined, credentialed elite. The word “citizenry” barely even applies.

        Liked by 1 person

      • rsanchez1990 says:

        That doesn’t really apply here. In the first case, it was Chinese immigrants who built the western rail system, not “the Chinese.” Their work was directed by American industrialists who expected continued migration out west and wanted to capitalize on it. In the second case, the Chinese military built those trains with a strategic objective, not an economic objective and definitely not a backwards economic objective. It’s the same reason why the interstate highway system was invented, and then people’s individual economic activity made it valuable beyond military applications. The Chinese (communists) are putting the cart before the horse with these cities.

        Liked by 1 person

        • wondering999 says:

          All true. I just want to guard against the mistake of thinking that the Chinese are somehow stupider than we are… both countries are liable to do foolish things, and the last few decades have been pretty disastrous in the U.S. despite lots of smart people. Trump gives me hope, but his predecessors sure didn’t

          Liked by 2 people

    • Nope says:

      I always viewed their massive ghost cities as economic manipulation–they built the cities to keep their economy looking robust.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. TwoLaine says:

    “It takes a population of young avg-skilled workers to do the hard work of building a raw material infrastructure. Mine workers, dredge builders, roads and railways, bridges and tunnels etc. All of these require young strong bodies.

    The Chinese cultural/population decisions amid the economic builders precluded this proactive outlook; now they have an aging population and are incapable of doing it.”

    Let’s not forget China’s ridiculous one child policy and the deleterious effect it has had.

    Liked by 7 people

    • JoAnn Leichliter says:

      Yes. As Mark Steyn so succinctly put it, “China will be old before it’s rich,” and that’s not good.

      Liked by 5 people

      • TwoLaine says:

        All that empty housing. Maybe they could take in some “refugees”…….

        Liked by 12 people

        • I find it quite interesting that China taken an extremely hard stance against Islam.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Islam is not just religion. It is also sharia, which is its own form of govt. China is not going to allow competition.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Jenny R. says:

            First, the government sees them as a threat. Second, never underestimate the average Han Chinese person’s dislike of foreigners…in this case, it is perhaps well grounded. The Chinese government monitors the internet there and disallows anti-Islamic remarks, but the people have developed their own code words to get around it.

            Like

        • mireilleg says:

          Yes they could and in fact they need those “children” illegally crossing borders but they won’t. They are not equipped to handle a dissenting group of people. Then there is the fact that if the economy declines they really cannot feed their own people.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Tegan says:

            They have to import a lot of food, something I find astounding.

            Liked by 6 people

            • FrenchNail says:

              Actually no. It is to be expected. China is a country of mountains with narrow valleys not that fertile. The open fields either natural or man made (they bulldoze entire mountains!) are exposed to the harsh winds coming from the north. Growing anything in China is an struggle. They have pushed Vietnam to produce 3 rice growing cycles (vs. the traditional two) in order not too starve. China historically always had a famine problem. It still has. It is a country unable to feed itself. It was stuck and is still stuck between the need for labor (Chinese Mandarins needed a large population of minions to work their unproductive fields, yet could not feed them) and the impossibility to create a middle class for lack of food. You may have the money to buy food, but for imports there is none to buy.

              On top of that, their policy for national economic growth was based on providing employment for the masses. They produced without demand. But ironically by building these towns in order to create employment, they appropriated the very little fertile lands they had. Traditionally, towns spurred along rivers. These lands are the most fertile. In the natural wisdom of things, towns are built on one side of the river to leave the other side to crops. Organically, development of both sides of a river is made with preservation of culture zones. Only nations having developed strong interior structures can afford to sacrifice both sides of a river to urbanization. Chinese have skipped the natural process of development to reach an unsustainable end. Not only they have appropriated their best lands to turn them into ghost cities, but they have reduced their farmers to unemployment. They have eradicated an entire generation of farmers and prevented the generational transfer of farmer skills.

              Liked by 1 person

        • Take em in, work em and pay for em.

          Liked by 1 person

        • With China’s population, they should be taking FOUR times what the USA has taken.

          SOLUTION: Ship ALL migrants and immigrants to China – from the Mideast and Latin America – until they make up their shortfall!

          Border Patrol and ICE can FILL those EMPTY SHIPS on their return trips to China until our Trade and Immigration Deficits are EVEN.

          DACA and DAPA for China.

          No child left behind.

          Liked by 6 people

        • BeePee says:

          And a huge homeless population.

          Like

    • Millions of horny men looking for wives to have family’s with. I’d think the value of a women is sky high in China. Just trying to be honest. I be some of those men escape looking for women in other countries.

      Liked by 3 people

      • The only alternative to that would make China look like San Fransicko. 😉

        Liked by 2 people

      • Setsukogermanaro says:

        You are so right, Molly. This situation might bring women put on the pedestal that will end of human rights abuse. Cross my fingers.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Bill in Lexington,NC says:

          It leads to a LARGE number of young men willing to risk death in order to have access to women to make families with … ie, go to war.

          Like

      • mireilleg says:

        I read somewhere that sex robots are in high demand in China.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, it is the younger men that will be having a problem. The older women from the one child only policy have been kicked to the curb by their husbands for the younger Chinese woman. The younger Chinese women want the status and wealth of the older men and lets face it, the older men are thrilled, and divorce their same age wives like hot potatoes. Many of the divorced Chinese women are desperate since there are no men their age. They have become all about the money, looking younger than their age and finding an somewhat older foreign rich husband. Younger women valued more, older (45+) divorced women not so much, if they have no family they are housed in dormitories provided by their employer until they retire. Very sad one child only result.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Alligator Gar says:

          That’s ok. Stupid American men will take in all of those used-up Chinese women. They’ll happily kick their same-age American wives to the curb for a Chinese hag that looks like every other Chinese hag–MGTOW, baby, MGTOW–MGTOW’s hate on the American woman and blame her for everything but oh, no, not the little Asian woman. Who let these MGTOW clowns out of the clown car, anyway? God bless lovely American women!

          Liked by 1 person

          • TreeClimber says:

            Easy – MGTOW is men’s answer to feminists. Each is as bad as the other, and arguing with either is practically interchangeable – just change the pronouns.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Cuppa Covfefe says:

              I’m sure Kalifornistan has a few pronouns left over…

              What I worry about is that a large disparity M-F in the population means that the only solution is a war (in order to bring back balance). At least that’s the way it used to be.
              Thinking of the millions in the army of the North in Revelation…

              Like

        • FrenchNail says:

          Until they retire….. That’s the keystone of the entire Chinese polarity.

          China has absolutely no structure in place for retirement. Retirement was traditionally provided by the family. The one child policy (absolutely needed at the time but resulting into tens of millions of single men) has obliterated the family. Aging men and women (if they do not have a child to take them in) have nowhere to go and no money to live.

          China therefore looks at a possible war as a positive in that aspect. They have millions and millions of people to kill. It is imperative to their survival as a nation. The income and time needed by the productive generation to care for their aging parents will slow the economy to unsustainable levels compounded to the infrastructure needed for the ones without children.

          Like

          • AM says:

            Old people don’t fight wars. They have a surplus of young unmarried men…but they are the only sons of sometimes 2 families. The protests against losing their only sons would be overwhelming.

            Like

      • TreeClimber says:

        Was wondering which country they’d target to start kidnapping young women…

        Like

      • G. Willikers says:

        > I’d think the value of a women is sky high in China.

        Recent reports suggest about $1,450 a day (no, not of the “Escort” variety).

        =============
        And to avoid prying questions from inquisitive parents, some are even resorting to hiring “fake” girlfriends to present to their parents using apps such as Hire Me Plz. . Reports suggest hiring a girlfriend can cost up to 10,000 yuan ($1,450) a day.
        =============

        http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20170213-why-millions-of-chinese-men-are-staying-single

        Like

    • Tegan says:

      I had a guide in China who had the one allowed child. However, this young boy has severe developmental problems. In China it is the son that takes care of the elderly parents. So far, the government will not allow another child in this family…see the problem?

      Liked by 2 people

      • TreeClimber says:

        Read an article a month or so ago where China now allows a second child, most just don’t want one. I’m on my phone so I can’t really find it, but a bit of research would probably turn it up.

        Like

        • FrenchNail says:

          China is still operating in a system where Children are your retirement plan. One child is not enough to insure such a plan. On the other hand, the land cannot naturally provide for a large population. The problem is not solvable on the actual scale. The Chinese need to reduce their population to less than the one of the US, which they will never do since they are planning on a labor-based growth.

          Like

          • AM says:

            I love how we can all determine exactly how many people China can hold. We’re just that good. ahem

            Anyway, if they had allowed for free market capitalism or at least telling most people they couldn’t have children and others to have large families, rather allotting them 1 they would be better off. It’s not like the US or Europe is growing at all. Roughly speaking, that’s what’s happening to us. Few to no children with certain groups and families having large ones.

            Like

        • Jenny R. says:

          Yes, they recently changed their one child policy to two for some families. I think there is some debate as to ordering that the second child be the opposite sex from the first, or something like that. That may be the reason for not wanting the second one (China’s traditional favoring of sons has truly helped to create the seeds of its destruction).
          A little to little and too late and not standing on a firm traditional foundation = won’t work at all.

          Like

        • AM says:

          Yep. Once you get it ingrained that your patriotic duty is not to raise children, it’s hard to find the off switch for that. Children are hard work. In the end, if you get government saying “Children are just mouths to feed, you can make love anyway, and we’ll take care of you”, most people will take that deal.

          Like

    • chbailey says:

      Brutal…forced abortion and all kinds of other immoral evils.

      Liked by 3 people

    • So China will build “SUBWAYS”
      … and use Subways as a cover to move their Infrastructure & Defenses Underground.

      Did they read SUNDANCE’s INSIGHT:

      “It takes a population of young avg-skilled workers to do the hard work of building a raw material infrastructure. Mine workers, dredge builders, roads and railways, bridges and tunnels etc. All of these require young strong bodies.“

      Liked by 3 people

    • They can always import a few gazillion “refugees” from the ME to amp up their population of fine young workers.

      Liked by 1 person

    • cheeflo says:

      Another unintended consequence of the one-child policy that I was reading about recently is when the adult, single child of a household dies, the aging parents are left without the support and posterity of their offspring, creating a significant segment of society further dependent on the government, and demoralized socially.

      Liked by 1 person

      • TwoLaine says:

        Yes, and that very contrary to their culture. Their culture believes in families being together throughout the generations. It’s just a sick and twisted policy, with so many sick consequences.

        Like

  3. Sharon says:

    I find it easier to follow, with some expectation of consistency, what’s going on with China on the world stage right now (in the context of Mr. Trump’s well-tested skills) than it is to follow what’s going on with our own governance.

    Mr. President has a freer hand in dealing with China than he does in leading our own nation ~ because of Congress. His world leadership is accomplished more directly with less effective interference. Disgusting.

    Liked by 12 people

  4. ok4ayl says:

    Another GEM Sundance, its so refreshing to come to the Treehouse and read intellectually stimulating analysis on all things politics. We’ll rarely find this in the MSM, they’re too concerned with bashing POTUS and are clueless to the real world in which POTUS occupies. Thanks again for another lesson in FACTS….:)

    Liked by 21 people

  5. freddiel says:

    SD, I absolutely enjoyed this article. The title is perfect! I learn so much at CTH. Thank you.

    Liked by 14 people

    • Tegan says:

      Adding my sincere thank you for this bit of education, Sundance. Having spent some time in China fairly recently, it was especially fascinating. Wouldn’t you think that at least SOME of the MSM and talking heads on TV would read and learn. Yet you continue to have comments about POTUS being so stupid he doesn’t even know what’s in the bills he’s signing. Uhh…that would be Obama, folks….there goes that projection b.s. again.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Visited China (HK {not yet China} and Beijing) in the winter of ’89. Street vendors selling roasted sweet potatoes (surrounding snow orange from the peels), bought one for equivalent $2 (large tuber, seemed cheap). Was later told by Chinese tour guide that UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES WAS I ALLOWED TO BY ANYTHING AGAIN WITHOUT GUIDANCE. Seems I had (in her view) been “ripped off”.
        The Chinese people, like all people, in freedom know how to make a “buck” and are quite creative. ‘Nuff said.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. jbrickley says:

    Wait for it… Check… and… Mate…
    Game Over, Shall we play again?

    The MSM refuses to talk about any of this economic news. Instead they are distracted by Trumps tweets and battles. Battles he hardly has to invest any real time implementing. He just picks up a smartphone and tweets away. An ensuing MSM storm erupts and grows running it’s course of several weeks or months. The Left and MSM refuse to let the story die. Their anger increases with every battle, their masks slip and the public witnesses their ugly and is awakened to their lies and deception. Meanwhile Trump AMD his cabinet are moving chess pieces unnoticed and unannounced.

    A tipping point will eventually occur and like a snowball rolling down a hill it will have a huge impact when it hits ground level. That’s when it will be obvious to everyone that America is suddenly Great Again. There will be no denying it as it will be YUGE! At that point Trump will list his accomplishments, take no questions, drop the Mic and exit stage Left. Mission Accomplished. Another four years guaranteed.

    Liked by 19 people

  7. The Boss says:

    I saw a lot of China 20+ years ago. Weaknesses were evident then, and I’m not all that smart. The events brought about by President Trump and his team are highlighting what few dared even speak of until now. It was NOT politically correct to point out that the emerging market of China was like the growing dotcom bubble on NASDAQ. It was NOT politically correct to suggest that the old geezers running China were pretending to embrace a hybrid capitalist system. Censorship continues to this very moment. Guaranteed an essay like this one will never be seen by the masses in China.

    Liked by 11 people

    • You make an interesting point Boss.

      No one was ever “allowed” to point out that China’s mix of communism and capitalism was not really working out.

      No one was ever allowed to point out the obvious flaws of this disastrous soul killing system.

      All of the economic and political guru’s in charge in the last 30 years told the rest of us that we did not know what we knew.

      Everyone who was anyone praised China to the high heavens.

      But so many of us “average joes” knew it was only a matter of time.

      We have seen it before and we will probably see it again.

      Liked by 1 person

      • The Boss says:

        Good points. Reminds me of “Japan Inc.” Another over-hyped foreign success story that we Americans could only wish to emulate. And where is their economy today? [Howie – Please post photo of a commode].

        Liked by 4 people

        • http//visualioner.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/t1.jpg

          Like

        • I was thinking Japan also.

          You probably remember the 1970’s and 80’s when we were told how much “over” the United States was and how big Japan was becoming.

          Japan was the next big thing, going to run the whole wide world.

          The US was going to be out of the global moving and shaking business.

          Everybody who was anybody was sending their kids to “conversational Japanese” classes and thinking of moving their families to Japan because it was “the place to be”.

          Move on to the 1990’s and it was all about China.

          So which communist, loser country will the globalist progressive cabal try to phony baloney into an amazing can’t lose deal for investors next?

          One of the third world loser sink holes in Africa?

          Liked by 1 person

          • Bill in Lexington,NC says:

            Likely the Dutch will get the food contracts. They will sell the technology for their greenhouses and clean up.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Bill in Lexington,NC says:

              For the record, especially if you have ever grown a tomato, you really should see the National Geographic of September, 2017. No naked tribal women (this time), but some major innovations in food production.

              Here’s the significance of that. The Georgia Guide Stones, and the Zero Population Growth movements had as a basic assumption that we would out-strip our ability to feed ourselves and devolve into some sort of tribal warfare over orange juice and slugs (or something).

              The Dutch are calling that assumption into serious question. Think everything you know about intensive gardening + fish farming and ramp it up x 7-8. Under glass. Under lights.

              Like

      • The Chinese people know.

        Liked by 1 person

      • FrenchNail says:

        I had a conversation in China with a very intelligent official where I pointed out the deficiencies of their economic growth. I told him: “you are going too fast. You are skipping necessary steps.” We never came to discussed what steps they were skipping, the entire discussion got focused on the brilliance of the Chinese people who had figured out how to do grow faster and better….. Ha! Until they don’t!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Phil aka Felipe says:

      ” Censorship continues to this very moment. Guaranteed an essay like this one will never be seen by the masses in China.”

      Yes, Boss. And it won’t be seen by the masses in the United States either. The MSM will censor it.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Ironic- China rediscovering Confucianism now(?) Yet all along, and still, ruled by “old geezers”. Some cultures rot and some cultures are mummified before they are exposed to the air and rot.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. mikebrezzze says:

    The only export China will have after Trump is through with them will be chopsticks

    Liked by 7 people

  9. chbailey says:

    What a headline…hahaha. Image so pleasing.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. WonkoTheSane says:

    “Subway projects” haha. Lefties. Public transportation will save us. Always.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Tegan says:

      They do have a fabulous high speed train out of Shanghai…of course, only tourists can afford to use it. But, in fairness it shows our transportation system seem as antiquated as it really is. Japan, as well….so easy to travel there….as well as clean and efficient.

      Like

    • jbrickley says:

      Gotta get people into those Ghost cities eventually. Too bad their one child policy is going to cause a serious population reduction from which it will take many generations executing a baby-boom to recover. Granted, their population was unsustainable and starvation was a real threat but if they are not careful it will be too late.

      Like

  11. Qbinky says:

    FTA: “Every American associated with investment, economics and China would be well advised to put their interconnected business affairs in order according to their exposure.” Would someone be so kind as to explain this statement in real world terms for me? Should I be sending this article off to my financial advisor and telling him to pull me out of certain market products, stocks, international funds? Anything remotely connected to China, markets that do business with China or both?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Be SURE to tell all your globalist-kissing Leftist friend to invest in China-First, International-Second and Bonds-Third … where the SMART money is just as the SMART energy went … cause President Trump is clueless on International Relations and Economics. [/s but do it anyway]

      Liked by 2 people

    • Jenny R. says:

      Yeah, in a nutshell: if you’ve invested in China (in any form) it might be a good idea to keep a weather eye and be able to move quickly, aka. get out while you still can.
      Because when that sucker goes, it’s really going to go.
      I’d say the same thing for Germany…which has some of the same dynamic as China and a growing “refugee” welfare problem.

      Like

  12. Apfelcobbler says:

    China has seen the abysmal failure of Soviet Communism and is not going down that route. The next revolution in China will be a capitalist revolution. It’s well on its way down that route, but there are some cultural prerequisites not in place that made capitalism flourish so naturally in the West. Imagine trying to produce full-functioning markets out of nothing, let alone do it in a hurry. Truly a daunting project.

    It’s not surprising their first major efforts produced entire “ghost cities” and other central planning drawing board disasters. Maybe not right this minute, but soon the male-female ratio is going to be a full-blown crisis, and simultaneously the country’s well on it’s way to being a net food importer. Hence the importance of Africa, where they are buying up farm land like crazy.

    Establishing trade ties to Europe and the single land mass market has been written about extensively in political economics. Theoretically, it could diminish the chance of nuclear exchange. I know Bannon is very deep into understanding China. It’s likely Mattis would be too since they are on the same page on military history.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. POP says:

    China’s final solution to domestic economic crisis will be a unicorn for the population.
    “Look over there, Taiwan/Sth China Sea territorial waters being invaded by Occidentals/ etc….. big Patriotic War solves most problems for the Chinese oligarchy. Pretend Communists, ya gotta laugh.

    Like

  14. The Chinese objective is to win, to dominate, using economic power.
    • China News Flash: This is how President Trump rolls, TOO.
    Peace or war. Win or lose. Yin and Yang.
    • Perfect: We WIN, They LOSE.
    Culturally there is no middle position in dealings with China; they are not constitutionally capable of understanding or valuing the western philosophy of mutual benefit where concession of terms gains a larger outcome. If it does not benefit China, it is not done. 
    • Great: President Trump’s Trade Deals are America First. NO DEAL.
    • Message to Globalist Corporations: GTHO to keep your SHIRTS.

    Liked by 3 people

    • You are so right BlackKnight.

      President Trump’s whole objective is to win for the US.

      This will be a huge new experience for the Chinese.

      A very unpleasant experience.

      Liked by 2 people

      • China has had their ass kicked in the past; they do not learn.

        Like

        • No Anonymoushorse they do not.

          They stagger from one disastrous experience to another.

          Most of their people live in ramshakle filthy conditions.

          Almost every idea their (now) communist leaders come up eventually plunge the country into more and more difficulty.

          Revolutions and uprising one after another.

          The Emperors of China ( Sons of Heaven), did not do a whole lot better though.

          China’s history seems to be nothing but perpetual starvation for many, government upheaval, outsiders invading and internal government instability.

          Liked by 1 person

        • FrenchNail says:

          China has no respect nor understanding of History. Everything of trading value was stamped with the Emperor seal. Every time the Emperor died, EVERYTHING stamped with his seal had to be destroyed. The only things of the past to survived are the poems written by the few elite members able to do it. Chinese do not understand lessons of history because they have nothing left of their past. Their museums are meager and few. They operate in a timeless vacuum. To the masses, history begun with Mao and his little book.

          Like

      • wondering999 says:

        Trump works for win/win. If the Chinese leadership plays their cards right, Trump will be win/win for both China and the United States. The Chinese are very, very hard workers, savers, investors, and “Overseas Chinese” live all over the world; most are admirable citizens where they live. I want Trump to stand up for the United States, but I will never dislike Chinese people and Chinese culture. There is so much in it to appreciate and to learn from (just like our own).

        An associate who grew up in China has told me that she has stopped offering to help elderly people at the supermarket because several times the response to her helpfulness was anger — “What? You think I”m to old to do this by myself?” Chinese elderly feel entitled to help, and young people feel it is appropriate to offer assistance. This woman takes the very best care of her own 90-year-old mother. I’d have her for a neighbor any day

        Liked by 1 person

        • Everything you say about Pres Trump is true.

          But if the Chinese must make this a win/lose situation then guess who will be the loser.

          We here in the United States can live with win/win but can the Chinese?

          Liked by 1 person

          • wondering999 says:

            I hope that the Chinese are trying to emulate the best out of our culture. Oldiadguy recently posted some samples of advertisements that seemed lifted from the U.S. They have an overriding theme that sounds a lot like “Make China Great Again”. I don’t mind if China is great, so long as it isn’t at our expense… we can learn from China, they can learn from us, we can all get better. And lose the collectivist Marxist garbagethink

            Liked by 2 people

  15. Not lost on Treepers:

    The Olive branch and arrows denote the power of peace and war. The symbol in any figure’s right hand has more significance than one in its left hand.
    • Peace-FIRST from the RIGHT & PATRIOTS
    • War-FIRST from the LEFTIES & GLOBALISTS

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I still recall, ,,
    The Story a friend from GE Aviation, here in WILM., (where a Majority of OUR aircraft engine Parts are manufactured), (We “shot-peened” them in our Shop) ..
    A Chinese delegation, of OUR “Sister-city” was invited into GE, caught wearing “sticky-Gummed” shoes, picking up Metal bits from the CNC Room(s), to capture Metal from the floor to analyze Later … For Metallurgy purposes..
    GE Security took their shoes!

    Liked by 6 people

  17. James Jones says:

    BRICS= China’s play to exercise power

    Like

  18. stinkfoot63 says:

    Add me to the chorus citing the one child policy being somewhat implicated in the expected malaise. Surely housing changes are often responses to a growing family. If the bureaucracy mandates severe limits then it effectively is keeping its boot on the throat of the housing market… no?

    Like

  19. gregorian says:

    Grab the popcorn, take a comfortable seat, and watch the show as the Panda tries to protect and enforce ‘the belt’. History repeats itself.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Alison says:

    The Squeeze Play by DJT.

    Brilliant post, SD.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Howie says:

    Photo looks like Daly City, City Hall. The clones.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. H&HC, 2nd-16th says:

    Excellent analysis by Sundance. I don’t fear the Chinese in the world marketplace as much as I fear Mueller, Rosenstein and McCabe in the American justice system. THAT bothers me.

    Liked by 6 people

  23. Howie says:

    IOW. China can not sell in to China to survive. We can. never leave the house without an edge.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Apfelcobbler says:

    It’s all rivetting, but esp starting at 25:00 where Bannon spells out the threat of China (and folly that Bush started). I never had quite made the Bush connection re China before.

    One Belt, One Road => Bannon and Trump are WOKE.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. NC PATRIOT says:

    So in about 10 days the President makes his trip to China (among other Asian countries) He and Xi are cordial. Will de-nuclearization of the Korean area be discussed—-or is that further down the road? If China does take that step at some point, I would imagine our lion will praise China profusely and publicly. Right ? (and take no outward credit for any of this)

    Liked by 1 person

    • President Trump to Xi:

      We look forward to beginning work with you on Bilateral Trade … just as soon as we have verified that the NORKS have been IRREVERSIBLY DE-NUCLEARIZED.

      In the meantime, stay tuned as we close Bilateral Trade Deals with Japan, ASEAN Allies and of course our new Most Favored Nation Trading Ally India.

      Unfortunately, the delays in solving the NORK Nuclear problem made it politically and militarily impossible to follow any other course.

      China has taught America well, and my supporters are demanding that we further hold China accountable for your trade infractions that looted our manufacturing industry over the past 3 Presidencies.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Self-sufficiency. We have it. They don’t.

    Liked by 3 people

  27. SSI01 says:

    Like most of the socialists/communists in this country, one of the things they are going to pump money into is public transportation. Gee, that sounds familiar. You know, one of those things that costs $500 million/mile, takes forever to build, suffers from ballooning cost overruns – and then runs maybe 5 miles and no one ever rides it.

    Liked by 3 people

    • M. Mueller says:

      So the Chinese are just Democrats that speak politely? I’ll buy that.

      Liked by 2 people

    • quintrillion says:

      Public transport (un-elected bureaucrats / city council) raised property taxes $800/year for every house in the county to subsidize the lite rail and bus fares. Agenda 21, now called Agenda 2030 is still moving forward in many municipalities. The sustainable development bs has not stopped. Now main thoroughfare streets are being narrowed for bike lanes and can not even park on these streets any longer. There is a bike rack behind the new city hall – in 5 years, never, ever has even 1 bike been chained there. Minimum, 6 months of the year is snow! Rare to see a bike on the new street bike paths. This city is FUBAR.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Small business owners in rural America are all into the Main Street programs which offer large infusions of cash into their economy. They go to the pre planning promotion meetings and leave with stars in their eyes. They have been delphied and don’t realize the eventual price they will have to pay, like what you mentioned above. It is all part of the Agenda 2030, ICLEI, and Obama EO 13575 Rural Counsil. They end up being told how and where and what to build and how it will be used including who will live there. Maybe this is an EO President Trump needs to revisit.

        Liked by 2 people

  28. If the Chinese ever discovered freedom, ever discovered the value of the individual, the creativity and productivity of individuals come together in freedom, for the Chinese it would be a true fork in the road, and truly we would all be forked.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Grandma Covfefe says:

    Looks like Xi is trying to do the “Save Face” method.

    Like

  30. lfhbrave says:

    “Again, broadly speaking Chinese are better students in American schools and universities because the Chinese are culturally compliant. They work well with academics and established formulas, and within established systems, but they cannot create the formula or system themselves.”

    I wonder, where did Sundance get his insightful and intimate knowledge of China and Chinese culture?

    It seems this cultural phenomenon is not unique among Chinese. It also applies to other far east countries (Japan, Taiwan and Korea) and India.

    Liked by 1 person

    • jakee308 says:

      Japan’s about to implode due to an aging work force and a large pool of retirees.

      This means trouble as they will have to import workers or decline in economic power. Not pleasant choices for the very nationalistic Japanese.

      Like

      • AM says:

        It’s okay to be poor. It happens. I suspect that’s what they’ll choose.

        Part of the reason our feckless leaders are so crazy to import inappropriate populations is the fear that they might be broke. Well, being poor is not the end of world.

        Liked by 2 people

  31. jakee308 says:

    Be cautious and not over confident. China has been around for a long time. They have inherent advantages for the long term. They may be vulnerable economically but all they need do is upset the political stability (such as it is) and things could be quite different in only 3 years.

    The changes must stick and be made to stick.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jenny R. says:

      That’s why I’m kinda seeing some sort of revolution in China’s near future: the culture has been around for what seems like forever; they’ve never had a government that has done the same.
      Thinking that timeline hasn’t changed that much. We could be dealing with all sorts of stability problems on the Pacific Rim.

      Like

  32. NJF says:

    Always learning here, thank you SD & Co.

    And our POTUS is so very smart!

    Like

  33. trapper says:

    I’m sorry, but it doesn’t make any difference whether it is the Chinese communists, the Chavistas in Venezuela, Castro, the Sandinistas, Code Pink, DSA, or the Bolsheviks in Moscow, they are all just money grubbers, stealing the fruits of somebody else’s hard work, and every time I think of any of them the first thought that pops into my head is … you got it! BIG Pimpin!

    Big pimpin, spendin cheese…

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Apfelcobbler says:

    I truly believe Trump was the ONLY presidential candidate in over 2 decades who could possibly comprehend the magnitude of the problem and manage this situation. Obviously he has thought about this LONG and hard.

    The short-sightedness of allowing China into the WTO is staggering. Yes, it’s in retrospect, but seriously, what were the State Dept, the intelligence services and Pentagon thinking?? It was their job to see past short term expediencies and develop long term strategic goals. What scholar, historian or even serious bureaucrat with his hat on straight would convince themselves that China would suddenly develop a consensus democratic tradition? Foolish wishfulness or sheer incompetance? I shudder to think what nonsense Hillary would be basing her foreign policy on if she had won.

    If North Korea were absorbed by South Korea, the US could establish a balancing regional presence. I could see Trump aiming for something like that while beefing up the navy. Everyday we hear comic book opinion pieces on Trump’s dealings with the Fat Boy, implying a cavalier attitude. Nothing could be further from the truth. I wholeheartedly support whatever PT deems necessary in North Korea, as it is all intertwined with China.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. jeans2nd says:

    Re: China’s importing of raw materials – China seems to be burning through its’ own natural resources rapidly (from my own research), and are currently what Mining.com calls “in the red zone.” China also seems to lack water. (my conclusions only; high probability to be incorrect)

    Having listened to a Charlie Rose interview with Dr. Henry Kissinger from 7 Sep 2017 this afternoon, it is striking how similar your views are to Dr. K’s re: China and China’s current economic situation. Dr. K still seems to regard to communist approach as the better one. Sad.

    Dr. Kissinger makes the point of the difference between the U.S. and China in how we present our respective exceptionalism to the world.
    “We do it more on a missionary basis, and they do it more on a performance basis.”

    Dr. Kissinger further makes the point that we see an instability as a problem that we fix, and stability returns. The Chinese see a solution to a problem as “an admissions ticket to another problem” such that the Chinese think of a problem as a process, not an opportunity to make a deal for a win-win, as you said.

    No wonder the Chinese never saw Pres Donald J. Trump coming and were unprepared. The Chinese were expecting more of the same from the U.S.

    Dr. K approves of Pres Trump’s approach to China and NoKo; Dr. K would have presented it more diplomatically. Dr. K’s approach to the NoKo situation seems to be identical to Pres Trump’s, other than the “presentation.” Recall Dr. K visited Pres Trump 10 Oct 2017.

    Rose repeatedly pressed Dr. K to denounce or criticize Pres Trump. Dr. K says Pres Trump has the opportunity to go down as a great president; Dr. K is hopeful.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Mongoose says:

    Does anyone have any idea just who that man, with all those people sitting behind him, is talking to? That sure is a large assembly of Commie members and I always see that kind of picture but no one ever shows the “other” side of the audience. Just wondering???

    Like

  37. Jenny R. says:

    One quibble, but it actually supports your general thesis: Having worked with many Chinese students, the truly good ones (quite a lot of them are definitely NOT good students) can and do better critical thinking/outside the box ideas than many of their American counterparts (who have become woefully bad at it during the course of my 20+ years of teaching college and high school level classes; we have to fix that). At least the ones in my literature class — where they tend to write papers very insightful and critical of institutions or groups which seek to control the individual (one girl wrote a truly wonderful paper about Animal Farm and the cyclical process of fascism; nice stuff, shocked some of the American students and faculty though — sad).
    The problem for them in their own country is this: they are not ALLOWED to think outside the box, and the Chinese government has found many successful ways to ensure this — they manipulate the thoughts/emotions of their people quite effectively, but there are always those that slip through the conditioning at least a little.
    And that is perhaps a bit more ominous (for China at least, perhaps us) than if this was some natural thing.

    Like

    • Jenny R. says:

      As to China’s economic situation: many of them are aware of what their greatest problem is, which is exactly what you have described. Again however, their government is not allowing, has not allowed, a remedy — likely for the usual reasons: corruption, greed, and simply ego on the part of the leadership and its cronies.
      They truly are, and were, a paper dragon. We should take heed.

      Like

  38. wondering999 says:

    Dr. Hudson Taylor, China Inland Mission.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hudson_Taylor
    Taylor
    Taylor testified against opium imports which devastated China during his time, just as the opioid epidemic is devastating U.S. communities in our time

    Like

    • wondering999 says:

      This is an old NYT article (1997) about the opium trade. There were a few traders who benefitted from selling opium, notably the Delano family. This doesn’t make it into most school textbooks but it’s worth knowing, for those willing to own the downside of things

      “Along with the slave trade, the traffic in opium was the dirty underside of an evolving global trading economy. In America as in Europe, pretty much everything was deemed fair in the pursuit of profits. Such was the outlook at Russell & Company, a Boston concern whose clipper ships made it the leader in the lucrative American trade in Chinese tea and silk…Delano’s problem, as with all traders, European and American, was that China had much to sell but declined to buy. The Manchu emperors believed that the Middle Kingdom already possessed everything worth having, and hence needed no barbarian manufactures.

      “The British struck upon an ingenious way to reduce a huge trade deficit. Their merchants bribed Chinese officials to allow entry of chests of opium from British-ruled India, though its importation had long been banned by imperial decree. Imports soared, and nearly every American company followed suit, acquiring ”black dirt” in Turkey or as agents for Indian producers…”

      Like

  39. David R. Graham says:

    I might be less downright about alliance between Russia and China. I see cooperation on specifics there but not fundamental common interest or presence in being. Russia has considerable common interest and presence in being with both India and USA. And they with Russia. So I would factor, as a “squeeze,” an alliance among those three leaving China no chair to sit in. Frankly, that alliance — USA, India, Russia — is the grand throttle on China’s hegemonic aspirations. There is not another one entirely able to do the job.

    Like

  40. Pingback: Suggested Alternative News Sites – Pastor Mathis

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s