Prepare – MAGAnomics Is The Battle – The Restoration of a Balanced Economy is The Goal…

For those who follow closely the strongest argument against the U.S. trade and economic policies of the past 30 years has been the outcome. We don’t need to guess what the pro’s and con’s of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce position is, we are living them. We don’t need to guess what the Wall Street economy delivers, we are living through them.

For the past 30 years the U.S. has lost jobs, wages have been depressed, and the middle-class has suffered through the implementation of economic trade policy that destroyed the U.S. manufacturing base. None of this is in question – the results stare us in the face – yet the Wall Street and multinational corporate club(s) [U.S. CoC chief among them] now demand a continuance of the same.

The economic and trade policies of the Trump administration are adverse to those interests. As we have shared for several years, candidate Trump, now President Trump is an existential threat to the multinational program.

All opposition to President Trump is about the underlying financial and economic policy of America-First. There are trillions at stake.

Those who have read here will note the media are generally oblivious to America-First economic policies; this includes the financial media.

As an example today they are trying to figure out how Steel/Aluminum tariffs would work. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross stated clearly exactly how the Steel and Aluminum policy would be carried out; yet for the financial media they claim to be clueless. The level of intellectual dishonesty is off-the-charts.

The truth is, well, two points: •Point #1 – the media don’t want to know; they are committed to selling the prior policy. •Point #2 – there’s almost no-one within the professional economic punditry class who have ever given thought to what happens during the space between two fundamentally different economic policies as executed.

What happens in the space between taking the U.S. economy off the path of ‘service-driven-globalism’, and reasserting the economy back to a balanced ‘production-based national economy’? None of the key participants within the larger discussion have ever contemplated this dynamic.

CTH is one of the few, perhaps the only source, who has gamed-out MAGAnomics.

Allow me to re-emphasize:

All opposition to President Trump stems from the underlying financial and economic policy. All opposition is about money!

When you ask the “why” question five times you end up discovering the financial motive for all opposition. It doesn’t matter who the group is; the opposition is ultimately about money. There are trillions at stake.

When Main Street economic principles are applied Wall Street will initially lose. There’s no way for this not to happen. Most of Wall Street is built on the Multinational platform of economic globalism. Weaken the grip of the multinational corporations and financial interests on the U.S. economy and Wall Street will drop… this is not difficult to predict. This is also necessary.

U.S. stocks, centered around U.S. domestic companies, will go up. U.S. stocks, centered around multinational companies, will go down.

As Secretary Wilbur Ross, U.S.T.R. Robert Lighthizer and U.S. President Trump have previously affirmed, they are going to restore the U.S. manufacturing and production economy -OR- lose office trying.

The U.S. Steel and Aluminum tariffs are just one component of the larger economic issue. Bringing back U.S. production on those sectors is vital to the infrastructure of a manufacturing and production economy.

Additional steps will come from exits of NAFTA and renegotiated trade deals with ASEAN nations, China and Europe. We either have a stable broad-base economy, or we follow the former path and eventually lose the country.

On the specifics of inflation, we have discussed this issue at great length. As stated three years ago, inflation will happen within this cycle –especially in the space between the policy as constructed– however, it will not affect the larger economic restoration because the growth of U.S. wages will exceed the rising prices of durable goods…. AND simultaneously energy prices and high-consumable goods’ prices (food, fuel) will drop. [Exit NAFTA and U.S. food prices will drop 25% within a year]

In this transitional phase (the space between) wage growth will remain ahead of aggregate inflation. No former economic models have any way to measure or gauge this dynamic. We have never been between two entirely different sets of economic policy before. No amount of immediate fed monetary policy will effect what happens on Main Street in this “space between” the two economies.

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345 Responses to Prepare – MAGAnomics Is The Battle – The Restoration of a Balanced Economy is The Goal…

  1. fleporeblog says:

    What our President is going to do next week on trade is a necessary evil! Will it cause prices to go up that rely on steel and aluminium products. Yes! However, in order to get our country over the 3% GDP Annual threshold, we have to cut into the enormous trade imbalance. This year, we imported $652 billion dollars more than we exported. That is completely subtracted from our GDP.

    I wrote the following yesterday:

    Another slap in the face when BEA updated the 4th Quarter GDP from 2.6% on January 26th to 2.5% on February 28th! Our Imports are absolutely killing us. By now we all know this was the intention of the previous 4 administrations. From GHB to BHO.

    NAFTA and China 🇨🇳 becoming part of the WTO have completely destroyed our ability to manufacture in our country. This was intentionally done to destroy our economy while building up the economies of the entire world.

    If you read the first few pages of the report below, you will see it repeated over & over that IMPORTS have been accelerated which is a SUBTRACTION from our GDP.

    https://bea.gov/newsreleases/national/gdp/2018/pdf/gdp4q17_2nd.pdf

    From the article linked above:

    Keep in mind that the two paragraphs I share below hold true for not only the 4th Q but the Annual GDP Rate for 2017 which was 2.3%.

    The increase in real GDP in the fourth quarter reflected positive contributions from personal consumption expenditures (PCE), exports, nonresidential fixed investment, residential fixed investment, state and local government spending, and federal government spending that
    were partly offset by a negative contribution from private inventory investment. Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased (table 2).

    The deceleration in real GDP growth in the fourth quarter reflected a downturn in private inventory investment that was partly offset by accelerations in PCE, exports, state & local government spending, nonresidential fixed investment, and federal government spending, and an upturn in residential fixed investment. Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, turned up.

    Our President and his Killers absolutely understand this phenomenon. That is why 2018 is going to be all about fixing the trade deficits with Mexico 🇲🇽, Canada 🇨🇦, China 🇨🇳, South Korea 🇰🇷, Japan 🇯🇵, Germany 🇩🇪 etc.

    The RINOs, CoC, Globalist, MSM and others will scream and holler that our President doesn’t believe in free trade and that he is a protectionist and that everyday Americans are going to have to pay 💰more because of his policies when it comes to trade. We live in a Global Economy. The world is coming to an end etc.

    All of it is complete NOISE! We need a major correction. We may have to pay a little more but it is for the good of our country and its citizens. This is the only way our LION 🦁 can truly MAGA!

    Liked by 41 people

    • yy4u says:

      Oh, damn! Does this mean I’ll have to pay more for my steel girder? Rats! Guess I’ll have to hire more illegals and pay them under the table in order to continue to afford the mortgage on my 20 million dollar penthouse on Fifth Avenue. Oh, wait. I’m smart; I can work out a way to have the company finance it. (snark).

      I don’t want to pay $10.00 more for a pair of sneakers, but I’d rather do that than see my fellow Americans standing in line for a welfare check, trading their dignity for my $20.00 sneakers. At my age (up there) I would have survived a Clinton presidency because I survived Bush-Clinton-Bush presidencies. But would my country? Not sure about that.

      Liked by 18 people

      • fleporeblog says:

        You see it the same way I do! I also think a lot of other Americans would see it this way as well. This is about our country!

        Liked by 9 people

      • Questioning says:

        Let’s talk about the actual increase at consumer levels. Aluminum is going up 7%. Most consumer facing aluminum is used in packaging (Bud Lite?). I package our product in aluminium cans; these cans make up 10% of the wholesale cost of our product. Can YOU afford a 7% increase of 10%?

        Exactly.

        Liked by 5 people

        • Cuppa Covfefe says:

          That’s what you get for drinking Bud Lite… 🙂

          I prefer products in bottles; having said that, enduring a short-term increase in price more than compensates for risk to long-term stability of the USA and protection of strategic interests.

          The idiocy of groups like the US CoC has all but ruined Germany, a once-great manufacturing country. Add the unelected EC (European Commission), the EP (the elected but powerless European Parliament), and Merkel and her ilk, and it looks dark over here indeed, but for the AfD.

          Better American-Made Steel, Aluminum, and other products, than cheap Chinese $#!+ …
          (We have to put up with that stuff here, too – their tools, for instance, are often dangerous in all but the simplest tasks)…

          Liked by 5 people

          • beigun says:

            60 years of consecutive trade deficits with Japan.
            30 years of consecutive trade deficits with Korea.
            20 years of consecutive trade deficits with China.

            What does the US receive in return? A minority middle class!

            Liked by 4 people

          • sat0422 says:

            FYI, this must be the big debate about beer. I just read yesterday that aluminum keeps beer fresher longer. No light what so ever. Who knows?

            Like

          • CC says:

            Here is a thought on beer….try out your Local, I mean locally owned and managed, craft brewery! Skip the big boys, esp. since if I am not mistaken, Bud is now owned by someone outside America? Yes, the horses are gorgeous…and a marketing tactic with click bait included.

            We have three in line of site of my squirrel nest and I would rather patronize any of them!

            Like

        • talkietina says:

          I guess I should stop throwing out my Coors Light cans.

          Liked by 2 people

        • starfcker says:

          Let’s do the math. I will use your figures with no argument. Let’s say Bud Light cost a buck. And the can is 10% of the wholesale cost of fifty cents. So the can costs a nickel. And the cost of that can just went up 7%. Correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe that is a third of a penny. So the answer to your question is, yes I can afford it

          Liked by 2 people

          • CC says:

            I was shopping for doggie kibble and treats….in the last week my go to brand of dog food increased in price by 50 cents….if all the other products on the market go up, especially food…can we say good bye to our “higher wages” and “tax break”?

            If ten dollars per pair of sneakers were the only cost increase, I would not mind but I am afraid all other entities will jump on that price increase bandwagon…and then there goes my bottom line…?

            Illinois is already rubbing their grubby little hands together and wanting to add a new toll on a stretch of I-80…..heavily travelled by the good ol’ middle class…..

            Like

        • Dekester says:

          So a consumer pays an extra little bit.

          It is about everyone pitching in, that means everyone.

          Naive maybe, but so what. One has to try.

          Your magnificent President has sure sacrificed plenty for the American folks in flyover country.

          Here was a gentleman that could spend the rest of his life in opulence in N.Y., Florida, or any of his luxury properties throughout the world.

          Yet he spent days and weeks in Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa etc. All the while risking everything, including his LIFE.

          Geesh…a few nickels more on ones weekly case of beer.

          God bless PDJT

          Liked by 3 people

        • Deplorable_Infidel says:

          Aren’t we suppose to be recycling a lot of this aluminum, especially for beverage cans? There is a big truck that comes around here to empty the recycle bins. That is one item that takes a fraction of the cost to recycle, vs. smelting from ore because of the huge amount of electricity it takes to break the molecular bonds. (time to fast track a few nuke power plants for that and obummer’s electric cars)
          I think they only use virgin aluminum for aircraft alloys, though.

          Like

      • frank field says:

        $800 in steel in the average American car. Add 25% to that for the tariff. No big deal. The car price just went up only about $150. This is no problem. Simple. Easy.

        DRAIN IT

        Liked by 10 people

    • magacombover says:

      short term pain for long term gain

      Liked by 5 people

    • razor1 says:

      Fleporeblog one thing most folks miss on this tariff thing is…..IT”S TAX MONEY! It goes right into the federal tax stream! I’m ok with china paying some of my tax bill! Now NO ONE in the msm is bring out this important point! The difference between this price and the old price….used to be called MARGIN because the “big guys” were buying and selling at a profit between the points….now much of that is going to go too the federal revenue coffers.

      The most important thing we have to sell is OUR CONSUMPTION ABILITY…..(biggest by 10X). Trump understands this and is playing that card for it’s VALUE….no other president in my lifetime has done this….it’s about time, and he’s done a masterful job…. BIG kudos to WILBUR who I just love!

      Liked by 18 people

      • fleporeblog says:

        Incredibly important point! I remember watching that round table from a few weeks back and our president said that certain countries will eat the tariff because they need to make sure their people still have jobs. We know he was talking specifically about China.

        China has 50 ghost cities that have almost no one living in them. They look like modern US cities. The reason they build them is to make sure that their population are constantly working so that they don’t return back to the fields and will rise up.

        Our President is an EXTREMELY smart man and knows that the US Government will make out BIGLY on those taxes. Just watch what it means in terms of the deficit and our GDP. You will see it more next year than this year since many countries produced more in 2017 knowing this day was coming.

        Liked by 16 people

      • USTerminator says:

        Everyone on MSM and WS state that the price of steel will go up due to tariff. Really?? What China is going to do with all the steel overproduction? layoff their workers and shut down their industry. Fat chance!! They will collapse the price and sell them at the loss to keep export engine going. We will take their money for free as tariff and build up our steel industry at the same time.

        Liked by 5 people

        • Winston says:

          Sorry Sundance you don’t have the first clue.
          Until the private Federal Reserve is abolished and money becomes money again, not debt
          coupons,none of this will happen how you foresee it.
          The parasites that suck all wealth to the 0.0001% must be gotten rid off,along
          with the hidden inflation tax and pofligate wasted MIC dollars and other govt. boondoggles.
          That was bleeding the country dry long before the trade policies which just extended the looting by the parasites. Attack the cause not the symptoms.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Winston, what led you to believe that President Trump isn’t triggering these parasites to overplay their hand and be “TERMINATED”.

            Liked by 5 people

            • Jedi9 says:

              I agree it’s a process, one that takes time, but the fact still remains that the FED is still a private institution and that such can charge what ever it wants to lend money to the US Gov with interest. The US Gov doesn’t need to be in debt, it has the power to create its own currency debt free! Hence the bills marked in red vs. the ones marked in green. Lincoln did it with “Greenbacks” and as a result the economy flourished! Remember 25 years prior, Jackson foresaw the dangers of the banking cabal and expelled them. Is it any coincidence that shortly after Lincoln’s assassination the banks returned? This was basis of Frank L Baum’s book, “The Wizard if Oz”, because by then the banks were reducing the money flow in the system making many Americans destitute and poor. While I agree with the trade issues and reducing America’s trade deficit is a great starting point, the FED needs to be abolished in favour of issuing debt free currency! If one looks at banks in general from a human historical perspective, then it really is easy to see that most of the wars throughout humanity have been caused by banks defending their interests. All or most wars are or have been about or over commerce and trade, and of course there are exceptions to this, but this is more true than it is not. Now we have crypto currencies entering the fray and presents an even greater danger, as banks see this as an opportunity for a more easier way to control and manipulate the worlds money supply as well as having a mechanism for controlling people. Orwell was indeed a profet for he had seen this before anyone else could!

              Like

          • trialbytruth says:

            Please support your position.

            I understand what you are saying, I am also very sympathetic to the idea that the fed should be abolished. However it is not nor is it about to be. The discussion here on economics is fairly elevated as is usually the case here at the Treehouse.

            Most of the discussion here is sourced and presented in a way to support the opinion of the writer so please elaborate. Please provide some background as to how what Sundance has suggested will not happen in the economy as it is presently constructed Wallstreet and being transformed into Mainstreet.

            Liked by 3 people

            • CirclinTheDrain says:

              Do you know what the value of of the dollar was in 1913, compared to what it is today ? It’s been devalued by 96%, accomplished by the 2% inflation target

              https://www.thetrumpet.com/3237-why-the-us-dollar-constantly-loses-value.

              Liked by 1 person

            • TheWanderingStar says:

              In my experience when people start off a comment with an insult, it really means that they don’t have anything of importance to say and are only interested in self aggrandizement. I doubt Winston will provide much support for his assertion.

              Liked by 1 person

            • Never say never! The feral “reserve” truly needs to go, and right now the feral “reserve” is positioning itself to take a couple of trillion back in its fold. All I personally can do is hope that Trump is doing what was mentioned above, and simply providing them more rope.

              They need certainly to hang themselves in order for the masses to understand that they must go. I certainly believe and understand, (knew it was what President Trump would do when I wrote him a letter upon announcing his run, urged it my own self) that the economy will thrive with a true free market and free capitalism for ALL, not just the CoC and Wall Street/Yuge Corporations… but for Main Street. A level playing field, and the death of globalism is in order.

              For that to last, the fed must not.

              Liked by 1 person

          • Blacksmith8 says:

            Ya know, even if SD posted some nonsense about the sky being purple and the sun rising in the west, I’d check the window and wait for tomorrow just to be sure.

            However I’m going to guess that you don’t do history so much do you?
            Yea, that’s what I thought. Run along junior, the adults are talking amongst themselves.

            Like

            • Winston says:

              Remain in your rompers sonny,you’re as clueless as he.
              A private corporation OWNS all the money in the USA,not the US,not you or me.
              At least PDJT understands that, not exactly sure how he’s going to change it though.
              Slave owners made around 6% net profit, the same the Federal Reserve skims on every dollar they create.”The best slaves are the ones that think they’re free”.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Winston,

                While you are correct about the privately owned central bank, I truly wish you had never posted. I certainly would have brought it up, I can’t help but bring it up. It’s the beast system of fiat monies and a credit economy. It’s private, and with foreign interest. It is the # 1 cause of American’s living in debt all their lives (most do, anyway).

                But your rude and nearly hateful if not outright so way of putting your position into play negates any serious discussion as you have simply insulted one hell of a man that runs this blog, and those who have grown to trust and respect him. He is aware of the feral “reserve”, you don’t think he is?

                Baby steps bro, u mad? President Trump is also aware of the feral “reserve”, you think he’s too “stupid” to understand the nature of it too? Hardly. But, he is President, and Sundance is Sundance… and you are just “winston”.

                Buckle up buddy, the ride ain’t 8 seconds or less, we’ll be at this a while. Work on your manners too, Sir, so that we may not kill discussion of feral things not at all federal that most do actually have a clue about and incredibly, to your amazement I surmise, wish to see the end of as well.

                But they’re polite and have learned how to “play well with others”… I usually am, but man you ticked me off with your rude and unnecessary verbage, and blew a perfect thread for the mention of the absolute eradication of the globalist takeover of our economy in 1913.

                Nah. It’s still out there. Just not with insult to our incredibly gracious and informed host!

                Bye now! Don’t forget to grab a cup of hot chocolate on your way out, Sir!

                😉

                Liked by 4 people

          • Matthew LeBlanc says:

            Good luck trying to educate others on nothing will change until MIC doesn’t own congress and much of Trump’s staff. They don’t see any other way of keeping America great without permanent warfare.

            Like

          • What you are missing is that debt drives our economy and the entire world economy. We are not the only country with a central, fractional banking system. In fact, today, there are only a hand-full of countries without one.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_central_banks

            A lot of good will come to the economy of a third world country once you explain to them the concept of how a mortgage works.

            In fact, the more debt that occurs in a fractional banking system, the more money is added into circulation in its economy. It works like this:

            I make $10,000 from a landscaping job and I put that check into my savings account. By law, the bank must keep 10% in reserve to cover potential bank runs, but they may loan out 90% of it. So they do.

            Small grocery store owner Bob borrows $9000 of my money to increase his inventory, I still have $10,000 in my account, so now there is $19,000 dollars instead of $10,000 circulating in the economy. So the economy benefits, Bob benefits, and I benefit when I go into Bob’s store due to him carrying a better inventory.

            Yes, economically speaking, debt is good.

            Where did that extra money come from? It is all just computer strokes.

            I’m afraid that Sundance DOES have a clue.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Deplorable_Infidel says:

            “The parasites that suck all wealth to the 0.0001% must be gotten rid off”

            We will always have the rich, but we do not have to let them get any wealthier at our expense. I hope you meant that, and not something more sinister.

            Luke 16:19 There was a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine linen, and fared sumptuously every day:
            20 And there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, which was laid at his gate, full of sores,
            21 And desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man’s table: moreover the dogs came and licked his sores.
            22 And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham’s bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried;
            23 And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.
            24 And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame.
            25 But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Use the tariffs to fund Steel and Aluminum Plant Construction … once we’ve paid for The Wall.

          Liked by 2 people

      • So a 25% tariff on $100 Billion of steel imports would fund The Wall…
        Thanks, Mexico.

        Liked by 7 people

  2. fleporeblog says:

    The Manufacturing data was truly a BIG positive sign!

    From the article linked above:

    From the article linked above:

    The Institute for Supply Management (ISM) manufacturing index (PMI) came in at a much higher than expected 60.8 in February, beating the 58.6 consensus forecast. This is the fastest pace of expansion and strongest reading in 14 years, or since 2004.

    The overall strength of the PMI is shown in new orders, at 64.2, which are filling backlogs that are now at a 14-year reading of 59.8. In response, firms in the manufacturing index are reporting a need to hire new employees to fill demand and the Employment Index rose 5.5% to 59.7.

    Orders for exports are notable in the sample, up 3 points in the month to 62.8, a 7-year high. Orders for imports are also very elevated at an 11-year high reading of 60.5.

    Respondents’ Comments

    – Availability of electronic components, long lead times, allocations and constraints continue to wreak havoc in the purchasing cycle, with no end in sight at this time.” (Computer & Electronic Products)

    – Our business saw [an] increase in fourth quarter, and it continued in January 2018. CapEx purchase deliveries are moving out globally.” (Chemical Products)

    – Labor market continues to be tight for supply chain talent in the Southern California area. Overall economy is strong.” (Transportation Equipment)

    – Employment is one of our biggest challenges. No labor available.” (Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products)

    – Steel market is doing rather well. Everybody is out of what I need.” (Fabricated Metal Products)

    – It seems the tax break for business is making a difference. Customers are spending more for capital equipment.” (Machinery)

    – Hiring has picked up for direct-hire employees. Due to end-of-2017 performance and improvement in commodity price, there has been an increase in capital budget.” (Petroleum & Coal Products)

    – Business is very strong, and our lines are running at full capacity.” (Plastics & Rubber Products)

    -We expect to have a strong year in 2018. In expectation, we have added to our sales staff and plan on adding to our production staff.” (Miscellaneous Manufacturing)

    – The weakening U.S. dollar in relationship to the yuan is starting to impact importing cost. We are starting to see more supplier price increases.” (Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components)

    Even the Atlanta Federal Reserve had to change their forecast from February 27th of 2.6% GDP Rate for the 1st Quarter of 2018 to 3.5% GDP Rate!

    Liked by 20 people

  3. Atticus "The Deplorable" says:

    I’m on the tail end of my aerospace career, but I’m heartened to think that my Sons will benefit from what we see today.

    Liked by 9 people

    • fleporeblog says:

      This article and this poll tells me that a majority of Americans think exactly like you do! They want our damn country back even if it means a little more out of our pockets. For our kids and grand kids! AMERICA FIRST!

      From the article linked above:

      Nearly 60 percent of American voters say imposing tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminum is crucial to the United States’ economic relationship with China.

      In a Morning Consult poll, 59 percent of Americans say it is “important” that President Trump place tariffs on imported steel and aluminum, specifically from China, showing a wide range of support for the White House’s economic nationalist agenda.

      About 66 percent of voters said shrinking America’s more than $375 billion trade deficit with China was key, as well as 56 percent who said they wanted to see the Trump administration challenge China’s leaders on intellectual property protection, and 44 percent who said they want China labeled as a currency manipulator.

      Liked by 9 people

  4. sundance says:

    Liked by 33 people

  5. fleporeblog says:

    More incredible news!

    Our President is a man of his word! Our Energy Dominance is truly taking off.

    From the article linked above:

    From the article linked above:

    U.S. crude oil production shattered a 47-year output record in November and retreated slightly in December, the U.S. Energy Department said on Wednesday, as oil production from shale continued to upend global supply patterns.

    Oil output rose to 10.057 million barrels per day (bpd) in November, a revision from earlier estimates, the EIA said. December production fell 108,000 bpd to 9.949 million bpd, it said.

    November’s figure exceeded the 10.044 million barrels produced daily in November 1970. Output has surged in the last several years due to the shale boom, pushing the United States past Saudi Arabia among top producers. Only Russia now has greater daily oil output.

    The gains are primarily due to rising production in shale regions in Texas and North Dakota. Output there ramped up sharply at the beginning of the decade as new techniques involving hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, allowed drillers to extract vast quantities of crude from oil fields.

    The increase in crude output has cut U.S. oil imports by a fifth over a decade, and boosted energy exports.

    Liked by 18 people

  6. georgiafl says:

    Great comments here:

    Especially this one:

    Talking to you, Romney!

    Liked by 30 people

    • lastinillinois says:

      Wonderful!!!

      Like

    • Best part is that President Trump is about to HAMMER DOWN on the ACCELERATOR.

      He’s now “surprising” people with each move, and there are SO MANY unannounced options to multiply Maganomics.

      The Mainstreet Economy will rapidly grow to IRREVERSIBLE scale, scope and momentum!

      The Wall Street Economy will restructure itself to maximize income from accelerating the expansion of the Mainstreet Economy as the only game in town.

      In fairly short order, there will be ZERO political support for either UniParty Globalists or Never-Trumpers.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Zactly. Watching a very stable genius troll from the White House will never be boring… like watching amateur bath house bari phale at all moments was. Infuriating, but very monotone (blah, blah, blah) and monotonous.

        Liked by 2 people

  7. starfcker says:

    You got a perfect grip on this, Sundance. It’s the way they used to teach economics. The deal changed the day Clinton sign NAFTA. The deal will change again the day Trump exits NAFTA. I like that he’s starting at the base of the economy. Lumber, steel, aluminum. I’ve been waiting for this a long time. I think we’re going to go on an economic run like we’ve never seen the likes of. I’m in my mid-fifties period a 20-year run of good Economic Policy would suit me just fine. I produce things for a living now. It’s been tougher for the last 12 years. The biggest component that needs to be addressed is cutting the welfare so people are incentivized to work. The meeting where Preident Trump addressed Ron Johnson was the best. We’re paying people not to work, said Senator Johnson. And President Trump said employers are competing against government. They do better if they stay home. Change that, and we’ll have a workforce. MAGA on.

    Liked by 22 people

    • wheatietoo says:

      “…President Trump said employers are competing against government.”
      ___

      That’s exactly right.
      And it is an outrage.

      It is so great to finally have a President who speaks the truth about this.

      As jobs return, it will be time to cut back on welfare.
      We also need to cut back on the number of months that Unemployment is paid.
      There will be screaming and wailing…but it has to be done.

      Liked by 21 people

      • trialbytruth says:

        Keep in mind there will be a natural ascendancy. When starting incomes start at 20 and the state pays ten$ to (dollars and benefits) to stay home. Suddenly the guy stocking shelves at Walmart doesn’t look like such a tool.

        We wont be able to punish people into work we have to reward them to work. Unfortunately generations have passed since folks would work just so they could proudly say they are working.

        Liked by 5 people

      • Drop the Welfare Payment by 10% per month.
        Limit the Welfare Period to 10 months every 10 years.
        Problem solved.

        Liked by 4 people

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        And paying people to NOT work goes clear back to LBJ and his “Great Society”.

        Neither great, nor good for “society” as a whole, LBJ’s policies, coupled with his criminal compatriot [Chappaquiddick Ted’s] flipping of the immigration quotas set the USA onto the road to ruin.

        This has been going on a lot longer than most folks realize. Thank GOD for giving us President Trump and his Wolverines to set things straight.

        MAGA!!!

        Liked by 6 people

      • starfcker says:

        You totally get it, wheatie

        Liked by 1 person

    • magacombover says:

      Goin’ Old school

      Like

    • That’s the Post of the Day, Star, and there’s been plenty of competition!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      Was it last year that the so-called “experts” finally admitted that NAFTA was not all it was cracked up to be? It took them, what- 25 years to realize that? Or perhaps they realized it a couple of years in but it just took them this long to finally admit it.

      Ross Perot WAS right, NAFTA was a “giant sucking sound” taking our jobs away. Us ordinary folks saw it, too. so did our President and he was determined to fix it. Thank you, President Trump!

      Like

  8. NJ Transplant says:

    Fox Business is really going off the deep end. I had to turn off the TV. There wasn’t this much angst over a one day drop of the Dow when the markets crashed in 2008 due to the bad mortgages.

    The Business Roundtable and all the usual suspects are preaching doom due to PDJT’s policies. I am so glad Peter Navarro and Wilbur Ross are there to offset the naysayers.

    Sure, things will go down for a while. As they say, you have to spend money to make money. In the long run, our economy will even be much better.

    President Trump is saving the middle class which both parties tried to kill. The masters of the politicians only care about their personal greed. The country will be stronger and so will my IRA once the US starts manufacturing again.

    Now is when you see the real phonies come out. Orrin Hatch, who was supposedly such a friend to PDJT is talking about ruin of the economy and loss of jobs. President Trump is the only one who ever cared about jobs for Americans. PDJT is bringing back good paying jobs, not the crummy service jobs that Obama brought in the drive to destroy the middle class.

    Now, if only NJ’s unemployment rate would go down like the rest of the country.

    Liked by 13 people

  9. I think the logic behind the opposition to Trump’s changes to trade is less sinister than you suggest. My academic background is in International Business and Management, with a focus on econometrics and the international financial architecture. Mind you, I studied all of that as a student. The professors who teach such courses are, more or less by definition, academics. They are almost entirely highly educated (and smart) people who could not achieve success in the real world about which they were teaching.

    That last bit is critical – I’m not saying these people aren’t intelligent, just that they can’t translate what they (think they) know into success. Economics is largely scientific (though it thinks too much of itself as a science). The people who are really, really good at it become fabulously rich running hedge funds. Why would they teach? The people who understand international trade and international business have all kinds of opportunities to make lots of money – far, far more than they could ever make teaching. Anyone with any understanding of these concepts, with a relevant degree behind them, will end up in business, finance, academia, government, or writing about business/finance/etc.

    The people who understand these concepts the best will never be the ones writing the textbooks, writing about business, or regulating things. Nassim Taleb refers to these people as IYIs, or Intellectual Yet Idiots. This is an entirely accurate description.

    Nonetheless, I was always a die-hard free trader. I still am, really, except that, as I’ve gotten older and worked in the real world, I’ve recognize that theory differs greatly from the real world. As such, people game free trade. I don’t think Trump always articulates his opposition to the academic view of free trade as clearly as he could, but a lot of the resistance is just due to the fact that the lowest performing group who understands these subjects are the academics, bureaucrats, and the writers, and they are still stuck in the idea that reality should perform like it does in their theories of how reality works. The problem is, it doesn’t.

    The reason it doesn’t is actually tied back into what I just explained – the smartest people who study these subjects are in finance and business. They are looking for arbitrage opportunities – areas where they can exploit the loopholes (often ones they create) for advantage. They know what the theories are, and thus they can game those theories. They will always be a step ahead of the academics, writers, and bureaucrats, and they will often game the system to their advantage. You (mostly) can’t blame them – it’s a competitive world, and they are driven to succeed.

    The downside is that people get hurt in the process. There’s a great (and mostly true) justification, which is that globally inequality has rapidly decreased, and billions have been lifted out of poverty. I still think globalization has been good in that regard. However, the cost of this has been stagnation at home, and that’s created exacerbated serious domestic tensions. The balance has to be somewhere in the middle, because if the developed economies tear themselves apart, this will not be sustainable in the long run. Hence, I’ve moderated my view – balanced globalization is good, but it can’t be entirely at the expense of the working and middle classes of developed countries.

    Nonetheless, the opposition isn’t sinister, it’s mostly just ignorant (except for the people angry they’re going to see their loopholes closed).

    Liked by 8 people

    • coldwarrior says:

      very well said and true.

      Liked by 1 person

    • ‘Free trade’ is another clever bit of rhetorical misdirection emanating out of the Tavistock Institute.

      Liked by 2 people

    • sundance says:

      *ahem*

      Liked by 16 people

      • lastinillinois says:

        Looks like collusion to me!

        Liked by 3 people

        • Your Tour Guide says:

          The 25% decrease in grocery costs might bring back something
          that’s been gone for the last 3 decades. The small town, independent
          grocer. Lots of talk about Wal Mart and how they destroyed main street.
          Some of the major Grocery chains are in on the guilt. See any Krogers
          in midwest towns of less then 2500?

          I’d love to see the reduced cost of groceries make it viable for small
          towns to have an IGA store front and center. In the store front that’s
          been vacant or used for a store front church for the last 20 years.

          Liked by 4 people

          • lastinillinois says:

            No Krogers, only Dollar Generals around here.

            And lots of ’em.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Your Tour Guide says:

              That’s all I see when I go through rural Kentucky going from
              the Tennessee border up to Somerset on highway 27. A few
              groceries in population centers. Only in towns with interstate
              off ramps.

              Like

          • talkietina says:

            New Mexico has Smiths aka Kroger. I love them.

            Like

          • Cliff Indiana says:

            We have JayC here, very small town of Milan Indiana ( ever see Hoosiers? we’re That town) which is owned by Kroger. They bought the JC chain (founded in the 1800’s in Seymour) awhile back, while trying to compete
            with WM, and they seem to be holding their own. We also have 2 $ stores, not 2 lots apart. I avoid them as much as possible.

            Like

        • WSB says:

          Russian Collusion.

          Like

      • Firefly says:

        Oleg Deripaska is one of the guys Mark Warner was texting and paid in part the Christopher Steele dossier. Also Oleg Deripaska was involved with the Clinton foundation with a deal with General Motors-opel.

        Liked by 2 people

      • talkietina says:

        As agent 86 would say, Very interesting.

        Liked by 1 person

    • wheatietoo says:

      “Nonetheless, the opposition isn’t sinister, it’s mostly just ignorant…”
      ____

      I wouldn’t attribute to ‘ignorance’ what is actually Indifference.

      The opposition doesn’t care about our middle class or what their globalist policies have done to our country as a whole.
      They are profiting off of their patronage to the elitists…so they are content with the way things are.

      Liked by 4 people

    • zorrorides says:

      Globalization has been good in that regard (billions lifted out of poverty), as you say, rationalnational, but I’m sure you would tell everyone that liberty and fair trade would have lifted the billions up faster and better- except the ruling classes around the globe, of every type, would have less control over the masses. Including right here.

      I thank God for President Trump, and I thank President Trump for being himself!

      Liked by 3 people

      • map says:

        It lifted billions out of poverty by isolating poverty in the United States.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        I would say Billions lifted from the Wallets Of The Poor.

        Reverse RobinHood. Just like the Klintoons helping Haitians… yeah, right.

        “Globalism” is only good for the Oligarchs. No one else… just look at http://www.weforum.org
        or the UN sites for Agenda21 and Agenda2030.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Deplorable_Infidel says:

          I clicked on that link to check it out. I would bother wasting my time clicking on those links there. scary stuff. I have posted this here before on that topic:

          https://www.democratsagainstunagenda21.com

          It is pretty good, came across it a couple of years ago. All that “stuff” is going to have to be undone, too. Everything in due time. Have to get the economy moving first! MAGA

          Like

    • Madison Grant says:

      Another major problem with globalism comes from the reality of differences ingrained in cultural attitudes. Economic concepts that are universal can’t dislodge cultural world views. Both Sundance and John Derbyshire of Vdare have written about this effect in doing business with the Chinese. Because the Chinese have no concept of win-win, everything must be a win for the Chinese or it is a loss. Being in the moment is a major concept of Taoism. You either have good fortune or you have bad fortune, and when it is good, you hold on for dear life to keep bad fortune away. The Chinese would rather save a nickel today, and let the millions they’ll lose from making an inferior product take care of itself tomorrow.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Deplorable_Infidel says:

        Cultural differences are another big reason to stop the immigration nonsense AND stop trying to “impose democracy” around the world, but that is for another thread.

        Like

    • Questioning says:

      Where do you think the money came from to lift those billions from poverty? Yep, America’s middle class….

      Liked by 7 people

    • frank field says:

      Dear rationalnational: Enriching the communist Chinese oligarchy on the backs of peasants who don’t love America is not my idea of a great business partner nation…

      DRAIN IT

      Liked by 5 people

    • trialbytruth says:

      Rational national

      I must disagree with your suggestion.

      “The downside is that people get hurt in the process. There’s a great (and mostly true) justification, which is that globally inequality has rapidly decreased, and billions have been lifted out of poverty. I still think globalization has been good in that regard. However, the cost of this has been stagnation at home, and that’s created exacerbated serious domestic tensions.”

      It may be true that global inequality has rapidly decreased but it is not as you say a mere stagnation at home. It was a vast increase in inequality within our borders. By exporting our workers jobs for cheaper overseas labor. Workers lost jobs and income. Wages stagnated for the working class technical class and the Management class.

      Life has been good on Wall Street But your pedigreed slip is showing. You and your friends in the investment class would like to hide behind the grand world benefits of globalization. Like the court of kings holding your scented handkerchief to your nose as you fly over the wastelands of once productive factories and proud workers now relegated to the public dole. Wall Street flourished while our cities became crime infested slums where generations of kids grew up never having a family member who actually had a job

      President Trump Said :
      “We will no longer surrender this country or its people to the false song of globalism,” . … “And under my administration, we will never enter America into any agreement that reduces our ability to control our own affairs.”

      There is no lack of clarity there. We understand him well and I suspect all his betters do as well. We were a republic, a representative government and that was taken from us by people with no morality or soul. Their only interest was world dominance of markets and the control of governments to further that end.

      What I am hearing is the whimpering of the defeated and the faint whisper of a child “I didn’t mean too”

      Liked by 5 people

      • I think you make a great point, but I do think it was largely ignorance.

        I won’t deny that I came from a rather privileged background, and my exposure to what’s often called “flyover” country has been, literally, flying over it. I’ve flown from New York to San Francisco far more times than I can count. The closest I’ve come to “visiting” the rust belt was the time I drove a UHaul back to New York after I finished a work assignment in Chicago years ago.

        My point is, and this is totally earnest – I never really thought about the impact of globalization on factory workers in the Midwest AT ALL until maybe a year and a half ago. I knew we’d shed manufacturing jobs, but the standard economic pablum is that that’s all just “creative destruction” and that new, better-paying jobs should come along to replace those. Frankly, it’s hard to recognize or understand problems to which one is not even exposed, and I was never exposed to these problems. I’d imagine most here would have difficulty recognizing the challenges dealing with the urban homeless (it’s not that there aren’t beds, or food, it’s that they’re mostly severely mentally ill and refuse to go to shelters, and can survive via panhandling, so there’s no pressure to do so). Unless you’re around a specific problem, its just hard to grasp it or understand how it impacts people you’ve never met and who are never, ever, profiled on the evening news or in any mainstream publications (quick side – how many movies are based in NYC? I can tell you on which block they’re shooting and notice a disconnect when they jump from midtown to Chelsea, but I couldn’t recognize a landmark from Mississippi and they never film movies there anyway). That doesn’t make either of us bad, it’s just a problem that we should all face honestly.

        I’m coming to terms with something I’d never even considered. At least give me some credit for realizing my blind spot here – trust me, most people (around here, at least) don’t, at all. The overwhelming majority of people in New York City think all Trump voters are a bunch of racist morons who deserve whatever bad things happen to them. I know maybe 5 people who voted for Trump, and thousands who voted for Clinton, including many who frequently vote for Republicans.

        This is an unfortunate reality, and one we have to figure out. I try to point out that blind spot to people more and more these days, but it’s not easy. As an example, at Thanksgiving, my nephew asked his mother (my sister), “Is Mr. Trump really evil mommy?” He asked that because she had told him that, but some of his friends had parents who voted for him, and he was having difficulty squaring that circle. In my attempts to explain that no, Trump is not evil, to the 20 or so people at the table, and that most of the people who supported him are actually well-meaning people, I was basically looked at as a social pariah.

        My own mother got so angry with me later in the evening (largely over this) that she asked my wife and I to leave, instead of spending the night, with our two young children, and I had maintained my calm and not even raised my voice – I wasn’t screaming or shouting at them, but just calmly making a case that no, Trump isn’t evil, and the people who support him aren’t all terrible people. They still think he is, though, and that he’s a traitor that colluded with Russia.

        I know this other side of it is harder for you to see, but this country has been split in a terrible way in recent decades. It sickens me. But, I’m basically a convert, and even if it’s one at a time, Trump is gaining supporters. Maybe I’ll even convince my wife (she has moved from “sort of evil” to “perhaps no worse than Clinton”).

        Lots of people online (basically the only place I encounter Trump supporters) talk about being “red-pilled”, and I think that’s happening to some degree. I’m trying to organize a group at our church to get people of differing political views to talk with one another and build understanding. The social fabric of the nation has been torn, and it has to be rebuilt. That’s not an easy thing, but please recognize that I’m trying to do my part.

        Liked by 5 people

    • Blacksmith8 says:

      Yea no. They are sinister evil and they want you and I poor and working so they can promise free chickens to the idiots that vote for them.

      Like

    • Nonetheless, the opposition isn’t sinister, it’s mostly just ignorant (except for the people angry they’re going to see their loopholes closed).

      I respectfully disagree. Here’s why.
      Globalists are very intelligent and well networked people. They’ve been tackling this issue for decades.
      The original idea of shifting labor intensive industries to places with ample CHEAP labor was accepted by everyone as a benefit to both sides. USA EU would supply capital, China etc would supply cheap labor. USA EU companies would make profits and their citizens gain cheaper products, China et al would gain employment and a way out of poverty for millions.

      But the globalists who controlled all this (remember the endless WTO rounds?) also understood that as the cost of labor increased in the developing countries, BUT MUCH MORE IMPORTANTLY, AS THE INPUT COST OF LABOR DECREASED DUE TO TECHNOLOGY (think a production line for autos. Where once you needed hundreds of people on the line, now you need just a dozen or less) the importance of cheap labor would diminish.
      The pendulum would swing. Why would a company manufacture in Mexico or Venezuela where the sovereign risk is so much higher? They’d all be looking at coming back to the USA or EU with lower sovereign risk and the higher cost of labor inconsequential.

      They decided to artificially increase the cost of doing business in the US and EU with endless red and green tape. Environmental regulations, human rights regulations etc etc which China et al didn’t have to adhere to (that’s why China can still build 400 coal power generators but the US can’t even build one new one). And that’s why trade agreements run to 12,000 pages.

      I could go on and on but you get the point.
      Yes it is all sinister. The overarching idea is to redistribute wealth from the USA (especially) and from other developed countries. A form of GLOBAL SOCIALISM. VERY VERY SINISTER.

      Liked by 7 people

  10. FBN is crapping their pants. So the world’s money is all going to be gone by tomorrow at 9:30am.

    Give us a break, acting like they know how this will impact middle class middle America. Where was this push back when Clinton & Bush oversaw banks giving out home loans left and right to knuckle heads who were never going to pay their loan back. That is what crushed the economy.

    Let’s hope this and the tax policy more attractive for manufacturers and distributors to locate and headquarter here.

    Liked by 18 people

    • georgiafl says:

      This movie explained the housing and banking mess:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Big_Short_(film)

      Liked by 3 people

      • dbobway says:

        In the cycles of my mainstreet working history. Money started coming to the building business when the stock market went down. They shouldn’t be working against us here in mainstreet. Wallstreet and mainstreet need to have a working and winning relationship.

        Not one pitched against the other.
        Makes me think we aren’t on the same side!

        Liked by 2 people

    • KittyKat says:

      Miappropriation of blame: if the banks didn’t make those loans, the affordable housing people got them redlined. They didn’t change their underwriting rules because they wanted to.

      Liked by 5 people

      • mostlyogauge says:

        You got that right. The Community Reinvestment Act signed by the peanut farmer is what started the whole mess. Clinton used Janet Reno to really ramp up threats of civil rights and discrimination actions against banks and lending institutions. This is how the term “ninja” was coined; no income, no job, no assets. That resulted in the creation of the derivatives market; crap loans were packaged together and then given astronomically high ratings. Fannie and Freddie then added more fuel to the fire. The whole thing went bust in 2007-2008. The banks got bailed out but We The People got screwed and holding the bag. Another fine example of the Law of Unintended Consequences brought to you buy the idiot progressives. The derivatives market is still thriving. The value of the US derivatives market is in the TRILLIONS of $$$$$. Let’s put a 5% tax on all derivative sales. The national debt and the wall would both be paid for in 2 years or less.

        Liked by 6 people

        • mimbler says:

          And no one to my knowledge from the rating agencies went to jail. And this was fraud, not incompetence.

          Liked by 4 people

          • rashomon says:

            This “no one goes to jail” attitude is destroying the moral fabric of our society. How can parents raise children to respect the law when every adult running the country, if not involved in criminals acts themselves, looks the other way while the beat goes on and on and on.

            Liked by 2 people

        • CirclinTheDrain says:

          Please do NOT discount the fraud in mortgage lending by banks and mortgage companies and ratings agencies. Without that fraud, the 2008 crash would never have happened.

          Like

      • Deplorable_Infidel says:

        The small community banks were crushed by the regulations in Dodd-Frank, so the big banks bought them up. Only the small independent Credit Unions are left and the big bankers are trying to get laws passed to wipe them out, too.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Bruce Fauth says:

    Sundance highlights what I’ve been saying for so long about DC. If you listen to the average Senator or Congressman (or for that matter the Prez and his cabinet) they sound like their financial and economic literacy is below that of toddlers. Many of them really are that stupid. The others may or may not be but everything they say is spouting the nonsense that is their puppet masters’ bidding.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Mickturn says:

    “U.S. has lost jobs, wages have been depressed, and the middle-class has suffered through the implementation of economic trade policy that destroyed the U.S. manufacturing base. None of this is in question – the results stare us in the face – yet the Wall Street and multinational corporate club(s) [U.S. CoC chief among them] now demand a continuance of the same.”

    What we have to look at is:
    1. WHO benefited from bad Trade Policy and moving Jobs to other countries?
    2. WHO got kickbacks for selling out America, America’s Workers etc.?

    Answer those two questions and you see WHY they did it…to enrich themselves/friends at the expense of the rest of us.

    I would not just dismantle all of what they are doing but start investigations for TREASON on the rest of them!

    Liked by 7 people

  13. KittyKat says:

    U.S. stocks, centered around U.S. domestic companies, will go up. U.S. stocks, centered around multinational companies, will go down.”

    In what category are companies like Apple and Coca Cola?

    Liked by 3 people

    • Your Tour Guide says:

      I, for one happen to not think that
      “Things go better with Coca Cola”.

      Watch a little known Eric Roberts movie
      from the 80s: “The Coca Cola kid”. The
      premise wasn’t too far off. It also seemed
      to bring Robert’s career to a basic standstill.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. emet says:

    My recollection is that a lot if damage was done in the 70s and 80s by Korean steel dumping. Korea paid a small penalty in the WTC for getting caught. The US was not successful generally in collecting the AD duties owed. I was trying to find some information on this AD case against Korea, but all I could gind was alternative explanations for the demise of US steel production, viz:
    lack of technology
    unions
    saturated steel market

    Nothing about dumping steel.

    Liked by 4 people

    • coldwarrior says:

      if i may point you toward “And The Wolf Finally Came” by John Hoerr

      Liked by 2 people

    • USTerminator says:

      By the time that country can collect the AD duties. Their industries are already bankrupted. Damage done and very hard to recover. Even if WTO imposes penalty on US. There will be a lot of steel companies in China, Germany, South Korea will go under in the next few years. MAGA !!!

      Like

    • Pa Hermit says:

      You will prolly find that in the 60’s, the dumping was from Italy. I worked USS Irvin Works, and we were constantly undercut by Italy dumping cheaper steel in the U.S. You cfan really trace this start back to after WWII. We went over to Japan and showed them how to make steel as well as other things. Then they showed us how to sell it! I remember that Japan’s products were sub par in the early 60’s (think transistor radios and cars etc.) Amazing how their products started to become world class after the 70’s. Our good deed came back to bite us in the rear! There’s a lot of truth behind that old saying: No good deed goes unpunished!

      Liked by 2 people

    • beigun says:

      Wrong country….you meant Japan, no?

      Like

  15. “All opposition to President Trump is about the underlying financial and economic policy of America-First. There are trillions at stake.”

    This is the hardest thing to explain to the mesmerized. They have been whipped into an anti-Trump frenzy for reasons that extend beyond POTUS’ funny hair or his at-times indelicate phrasing. However people are not rationally parted from their pet madness, especially one that has been systematically inculcated to the tune of 91% negative media coverage (Media Research Center) for Trump.

    I take hope from this. Rasmussen has Trump at 49% popularity after a historically unprecedented media onslaught. Managed democracy is failing. The globalist message (of slitting your own throat) is no longer finding an easy audience.

    Liked by 10 people

    • sundance says:

      Cue the audio visual demonstration:

      Liked by 7 people

      • jmclever says:

        Mr. Deripaska keeps floating to the surface of things! Not a coincidence I’m sure.

        Liked by 2 people

      • I keep taking my hat off to you Sundance. Once again you’ve performed a neat bit of dot-connecting. My first thought? I’ve never seen The Goebbels Doctrine more starkly illustrated.

        ***Insufferability Alert. Long message to follow***

        Lamenting Germany’s WW1 defeat, Goebbels says the following at the 1934 Nuremberg Rally:

        “While the enemy states produced unprecedented atrocity propaganda aimed at Germany throughout the whole world, we did nothing and were completely defenseless against it…Just as we were militarily and economically unprepared for the war, so also with propaganda. We lost the war in this area more than in any other. THE CLEVEREST TRICK USED IN PROPAGANDA AGAINST GERMANY DURING THE WAR WAS TO ACCUSE GERMANY OF WHAT OUR ENEMIES THEMSELVES WERE DOING.” [My Caps]

        The Russian Collusion football put in play by John Podesta derives directly from this propaganda strategy. Identify your most egregious sin (Uranium One, Podesta Group), then ruthlessly attack the enemy with it. Podesta had the propaganda apparatus WW1 Germany so sorely lacked: WaPo, CNN, NYT etc. etc. More important, he had every reason to believe Clinton would win. So the tactic would vanish, unexamined, into the mists of time. Hubris. (Without getting too psychological, there’s some Jungian shadow-projection going on too.) Of course Trump is a TV-savvy President with an uncanny media instinct. He decides to circumvent biased mediation altogether, weather the simpleton accusations and type his policy initiatives in 280-character nuggets.

        Like Wile E. Coyote at the bottom of the U-shaped gorge, we find the boulder precariously balanced on the gorge peak, just about to careen back into the valley below. From her rarified vantage (and one can imagine after some commiserating discussions with the hub), Lady Rothschild can see the writing on the wall or in this case the boulder headed for Valley of the Dems.

        On February 21, 2017, she releases a twitter overshare, calling Podesta (in a rare departure from Lady-like reserve) “pathetic”. Even more revealingly (or am I being too fanciful?), she’s quite sure the “destruction of the Clinton family” is assured. Whoah hang on, Mi’Lady. Girlfriend just lost an election. Wholesale destruction?

        Maybe that’s what it looked like to many of us at that time. But Rothschild knew the retracement arc of the ravine and the inevitable Clinton catastrophe that loomed ahead. How could that dumb *ss Podesta have been so reckless?

        I bring up Mi’lady not to belabor hackneyed Rothschild conspiracy theories, but because she was a close friend and wealthy, well-connected confidante of Hillary. She possesses the social vantage to portend the imminent carnage.

        Of course post-election, we move into a far more perilous phase for the Dems as they opt to ply the bogus narrative on a sitting President. They’ve already got a dissident on board: the NSA’s Rogers. They make quick work of Flynn. Why such a risk? Sundance has sketched it out here. Because the stakes are astronomically high and could reach into the TRILLIONS with a NAFTA repeal and selected tariff imposition. Russia is economic peanuts. But you get a double bang (MIC/Pentagon) with a renewed Cold War. That’s the quid pro quo Trump throws the Generals for having the military in his corner. (Plus the military has strong nationalist affinities anyway.)

        The big fish is China who owns both establishment parties and has done since Clinton. If Congress doesn’t produce (by maintaining the sell-out of America and prolongation of NAFTA), the blackmail wheels turn in earnest. Might this explain the spate of Republican resignations? The easy money has been made with Uniparty complicity. Now there’s a muscular nationalist in the WH. The rubber’s going really hit the road. Not everyone has the stomach for it.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Still wondering where “Democrat Progressives” got their “PROJECTION TACTICS”?

          “THE CLEVEREST TRICK USED IN PROPAGANDA AGAINST GERMANY [Trump] DURING THE WAR WAS TO ACCUSE GERMANY [him] OF WHAT OUR ENEMIES [Democrats] THEMSELVES WERE DOING.”

          Liked by 2 people

        • Johnny Bravo says:

          Phew, what a ride that was. Thanks for sharing your detailed thoughts, great post FSD✅

          Liked by 3 people

        • Deplorable_Infidel says:

          Printing this out for the non-computer people I know. I have been telling them, the oligarchs own the red team and the blue team, so they always get what they want, no matter who is running the show.
          Jimmy Carter spouted off that we are run by an oligarchy in August 2015 (or 16) after his brain cancer diagnosis.
          The red team and the blue team keep the populace perpetually divided over issues, while they all laugh on their way to the bank.

          Liked by 1 person

        • 1. Try to quantify 30 years of American sub-optimized GDP performance, the compounded opportunity cost that our oligarchs sold out to the Chinese, the social misery index measured in job dislocations, vaporized pensions, shuttered towns, drug dependencies, etc. It’s incalculable. Bribery. Treason. Sedition.

          2. Russian collusion is the cudgel the Dems/Globalists beat Trump over the head with in order to keep the NAFTA back doors open for China.

          Russia is a comparative bit-player that helps furnish a narrative. Russia is about China.

          Liked by 1 person

  16. spren says:

    Sundance, you are a veritable genius (probably a stable one as well). I am so appreciative of your amazing work on putting these issues into a form that even us dweebs can understand. We really are in a war between the economic forces that drive action.

    As someone who worked in the steel industry (on a railroad) for 13 years a lot of this is deja vu to me. We had dumping by Japan that undercut our own steel market concurrently while the EPA was putting ever more stringent requirements on steel producers.

    I managed to do pretty well after moving to another industry and am now retired. My broker, who I don’t want to mention, just put out a policy statement today essentially saying they thought the bull market will now be extremely tempered if not reversed. They are hedging their investment strategy by favoring foreign investments. But what you are detailing indicates they are doing exactly opposite of what they should be doing. As a result of your work, I am going to seriously consider moving to another broker who is aligned with what is going to happen in America.

    Liked by 10 people

  17. wheatietoo says:

    “No former economic models have any way to measure or gauge this dynamic.”
    ___

    Yes. Thank you, Sundance.
    We are in uncharted territory here…and it is very exciting.

    The ‘economists’ who have been suckling on the teat of Globalism, are all spewing doom & gloom right now.
    It’s annoying.
    It’s also predictable.

    The CEO of Nucor, our main surviving steel producer, said that the average cost of an automobile will go up about $130 dollars.
    Which is less than one-half of one percent of the cost.

    The return of manufacturing Jobs in this country will create so many benefits…in so many ways…that it will far outweigh any small increases in the prices of goods.

    Liked by 9 people

  18. FL_GUY says:

    The Globullists call the economic mess they created for the USA a “service” economy but the truth is, it is a SERVANT economy.

    The main thing that the Globullists have hated about the USA is that unlike Europe, which has hundreds of years of a rigid class system with the upper crusts keeping a riding boot on top of the lower crusts people, the USA has traditionally rewarded hard work with status and wealth, e.g. President Trump.

    IMHO, they view President Trump like the Rodney Dangerfield character in Caddyshack. If they view a great man, a literal genius, a self-made Billionaire like that, how do you think they view We the People?

    I don’t resent people of wealth but I do resent them working to keep me from having any wealth. That is exactly what the CoC and Globullists are trying to do.

    Liked by 14 people

  19. Stringy theory says:

    I trust POTUS Trump and he’s getting the job done!

    Liked by 4 people

  20. Bitcoin & Stock Market Timing says:

    Based on 80% time decay, most likely market has peaked (if holds) and highly probable market bottom in March 2020.

    1 John 4:10

    Like

  21. Nigella says:

    OMG… It’s hysterical watching them all run around with their collective heads on fire!

    Liked by 3 people

  22. Ruckus Tom says:

    It will be cheaper for manufacturing jobs to come back to the US as long as the payroll, transportation and other costs (e.g. tariffs and taxes) are equal to or less than those same costs doing the same thing over seas. Unions beware. Fight for $15 beware.

    Liked by 1 person

    • wheatietoo says:

      The Right-To-Work States will be the most attractive locations for manufacturers to locate in.
      Unions will not be able to stop this.

      Pulling back on being ‘Policeman to the World’ will also help to bring manufacturing back to the US.
      We’ve been making the world safe for the globalists.
      This needs to stop.

      Liked by 3 people

      • NoJuan Importante says:

        Unions can get a piece of the action, too. Its all about being reasonable. Everybody gets some.

        Like

        • wheatietoo says:

          Union Bosses have not been known for being ‘reasonable’, though.

          Union Bosses embrace open borders, which creates competition for the jobs that their members need.
          It makes no sense.
          And it is certainly not reasonable.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Your Tour Guide says:

            Wheatietoo:
            It’s because the union bosses are “approachable”.

            Ask anyone that grew up in Cleveland or Dayton
            in the 60s through 70s. Use union labor on jobs or:

            1. Have sharpshooters trained on hills above your
            company, with rifles on the ready. My dad can tell
            you all about Teamster strikes, early mid 60s.
            Besides bullets flying over their parking lot, they
            had fifty thousand dollars worth of damage to their
            trucks. In 1964. Adjust for inflation.

            2. Have your restaurant or car wash site blown up.
            Blow up the vice president of the union’s Buick
            Deuce and a Quarter for good measure. Happened
            within 1/2 mile of each other, 1974, Northridge, Ohio.
            YTG wound up working at said restaurant once
            they put the walls back up. Bombs: courtesy
            Sheetmetal Workers, local 784.

            Liked by 2 people

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      Many places found that outsourcing was not all it was cracked up to be. Sure, labor was inexpensive, but quality control went down the drain. So much that many did not make out as good as they thought, because they had to scrap so much bad product. There is also a problem with worker productivity in many underdeveloped places were these factories were located.

      Like

  23. daughnworks247 says:

    Folks, we are right over the target now.

    Liked by 7 people

  24. Daniel says:

    If Ross Perot had the cajones of Trump, we wouldn’t have the problems we have today. I remember so well the things he said about the economy in his campaign.

    Trump knows he’s risking his life and even that of his children. Those are some big brass ones he’s got. God bless Trump for that.

    Liked by 8 people

  25. Olivertwist says:

    Our small company has new customers calling to give us business even big companies are inviting us to be on their vendor lists so they could secure their supplier chain. Never happened before and in the past could not even get a meeting with the buyer but now they are calling. Love the feeling of being wanted.
    Yes, material costs are going up and so far no one is complaining, we are passing the increased costs to our customers and they never complained like they did before.
    Just bought stainless steel food bowls for my dog and the polish is well done, even my dog loves it. Check out https://www.basispet.com
    Employees are happy and workplace environment is improved.
    Great time to be living the start of MAGA in history
    Thank you Mr.President

    Liked by 7 people

  26. daughnworks247 says:

    My understanding is that Trump dropped the bomb while Wilbur Ross and Mnuchin were IN A MEETING for trade negotiations with the Chinese Delegation.
    Bwwhwhhahahaaa.
    I love it

    Liked by 8 people

    • georgiafl says:

      You may be right. The WHPC were hounding Sarah about the timing and she demurred about answering….saying, ‘The President will give the details later.’

      Liked by 4 people

  27. fanbeav says:

    House Speaker Paul Ryan wants President Trump to reconsider his decision to place tariffs on steel and aluminum

    http://redstatewatcher.com/article.asp?id=119800

    Do we expect anything less from this globalist RINO?

    Liked by 3 people

  28. jmclever says:

    A theory: maybe the CoC Cabal tantrums are about more than just money. Since Our Lion has been implementing America First economics, the stock market has broken record after record. Pure investors after only cash would restructure their investments to maximize their profits in this booming market. My theory is that the CoC Cabal are mad because they cannot control a Main Street Market to their advantage the way that they have been controlling the Wall Street Market up till now. Yes its about money, but its also about the control of the system and the people. Your basic megalomania using economic tools.

    Liked by 6 people

  29. thedoc00 says:

    There is a major missing element to this whole discussion. Notice China just took the final step to establishing their current leader as autocratic president until China falters. Countries like China as well as Russia under Putin (and to some extent even the EU) have always viewed their economies as WEAPONS in their arsenals to remove the US as a world power, the welfare of their citizens is secondary or worse to that goal. Do not down play the “National Security” aspect of this move. The threat exists to our ability to design, develop and build military and domestic goods, which are capabilities necessary to reestablish our middle class and ensure future viability of the nation.

    The US politicians who were in the pockets of the Globalists, were essentially well paid Quislings or maybe worse a 5th Column working inside our government.

    Who actually fears the trade war? Of course the multinationals, with heavy overseas investments milking the existing US Trade Agreements most certainly fear the trade war as the markets showed today. The others are actually Russia, China and the EU because the US consumer represents over 40% of the purchasing power in the global economy and Trump intends to use that leverage if he is not eliminated first by the Quislings inside the US Government.

    Will there be pain, yes indeed as the US has the transitions back to the balanced economy situation described above.

    Liked by 6 people

    • FofBW says:

      Let the pain fall on all those sucking us dry for the past 30 years.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Deb says:

      People need to realize that it is better to fight this battle now while we still have leverage. The longer we wait, the weaker our position becomes. China was hoping to simply bleed us dry slowly until we collapsed. Then they would be left owning massive amounts of American real estate and controlling all of our markets, without having to actually fight us at all.

      The globalists just assumed that once we were all dependent on each other, the Chicoms would have to behave. And Americans wouldn’t mind being slaves as long as we could still get cheap cell phones and stream Netflix.

      PDJT put an end to that fantasy. So although it may shift to open hostility, don’t forget the hostility was already there, it just had a friendlier face.

      Liked by 12 people

      • zorrorides says:

        Deb !!!

        You’re a marvel of thinking/ writing! Wow. Sundance needs you on staff as explaner.

        Way back in the 1970s, did you suspect your Dad was in the CIA?

        Liked by 1 person

        • Deb says:

          I was born in the 1980’s, lol. I’ve just always had a keen interest in history, politics and current events. I was a history/English

          I’m not as bright or knowledgeable as most of the other posters here, but I’ve picked up a thing or two, lol. As a former teacher, I ended up being front and center in the culture wars, and didn’t like what I saw.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Deb says:

            I was a history/English major before switching to education.

            Sorry for the typo, my phone seems to act up on CTH.

            Liked by 3 people

            • beigun says:

              But the story about China reminds me of a Japanese troll. Just thinking context, like the trade deficits in the 1960, 70, 80, etc., when Chinese wore Mao suits and rode only bicycles.

              Like

      • Phil aka Felipe says:

        “China was hoping to simply bleed us dry slowly until we collapsed.”

        Good point. We need to realize that autocrats and tyrants like China, Putin, and the Mullahs, Shieks, and Kings in the Middle East take the LONG view.

        They’ll play their hand knowing Trump will be in power for a short time relative to them and their plans.

        Trump realizes that and knows he has a short time to put things and policies in place to preserve this country and our freedoms and liberty.

        WE TOO had better realize this and HELP him, for our own sakes, and for the posterity of this country and the world!

        And so we should, “with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence”, “mutually
        pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.”

        Liked by 4 people

      • Phil aka Felipe says:

        “PDJT put an end to that fantasy. So although it may shift to open hostility, don’t forget the hostility was already there, it just had a friendlier face.”

        Wouldn’t you rather die FOR something good than die OF something? I would.

        Liked by 2 people

      • suejeanne1 says:

        “the chains of a bad habit are at first so light that they are barely felt until they become so heavy they are nearly impossible to remove”

        I am not sure if I have that right and I do not know who said it, but I think it applies to our nation as well – we need to quit the bad habit of handing over our future to people who would subjugate us – we need to recapture the initiative

        Liked by 2 people

    • wheatietoo says:

      We have already been in a ‘Trade War’.

      We have been in a Trade War for decades…and we have been losing.

      You are absolutely right, Doc, about it being a matter of National Security.
      And yeah, China & Russia have been waging an Economic War against us…as well as all the other countries.

      Even the ‘undeveloped’ countries who lure our manufacturers away with their low wages, low taxes and lack of regulations, are waging their own economic warfare against us.

      We are the big target that all of the other countries have their sites on.

      Liked by 4 people

  30. Phil aka Felipe says:

    “Those who have read here will note the media are generally oblivious to America-First economic policies; this includes the financial media.”

    Heck, the media is merely obediently spouting the message of their OWNERS–those opposed to President Trump and his America First policies.

    Liked by 6 people

  31. lastinillinois says:

    Bring it on!!!

    Liked by 4 people

  32. “U.S. stocks, centered around U.S. domestic companies, will go up. U.S. stocks, centered around multinational companies, will go down.”

    US Steel was up 9% today

    Liked by 6 people

  33. Blade says:

    I think it’s rather simple and I’m surprised that no-one just grabs these globalist traitors and puts them on the spot using classic leftist talking point terms …

    Why would you avoid buying American Steel and instead import from China where it is made by slave labor in non-OSHA sweatshops and is inferior quality and possibly structurally dangerous, and then it is shipped 12,000 miles wasting fuel and damaging the environment?

    If Trump has one of his “live” White House events he could get them all on record spouting their CoC talking points and then level them with that truth bomb. Then he should literally call Ben Sasse and his cabal exactly what they are, traitors, right to their faces on camera. Let’s get the party started.

    Liked by 10 people

    • wheatietoo says:

      That’s an excellent idea, Blaze!
      I hope Pres Trump does exactly that.

      Liked by 1 person

    • suejeanne1 says:

      This needs to be repeated – continually – put it on billboards and t-shirts:

      “Why would you avoid buying American Steel and instead import from China where it is made by slave labor in non-OSHA sweatshops and is inferior quality and possibly structurally dangerous, and then it is shipped 12,000 miles wasting fuel and damaging the environment?”

      Liked by 4 people

    • lastinillinois says:

      The answer, of course:

      “Because, muh 401k.”

      Like

  34. Food supply-and-demand dynamics haven’t gotten nearly enough attention:

    “Exit NAFTA and U.S. food prices will drop 25% within a year”

    Eliminating government price supports and artificial demand for corn-fed ethanol will be YUGE.

    Unleashing arable land for farming will be YUGER, and that’s exactly what our EPA, Agriculture and Interior leaders have been setting up to do as they shred regulatory constraints.

    Can’t wait.

    Liked by 5 people

  35. NoJuan Importante says:

    “As Secretary Wilbur Ross, U.S.T.R. Robert Lighthizer and U.S. President Trump have previously affirmed, they are going to restore the U.S. manufacturing and production economy -OR- lose office trying”

    Inspiring words

    Liked by 3 people

  36. 4harrisonblog says:

    Lot of people will call President Trump a bastard and worse. I love that bastard, that is what I say.
    Let China and all others like them have these multinational globalist. I would love to see congress pass laws to protect the United States from these type of multinationals globalist in the future.

    Liked by 3 people

    • wheatietoo says:

      Here is a law I would like to see, even though I hate to advocate any new laws:

      When Govt Policies cause US Jobs to be eliminated…then govt jobs must be eliminated, reciprocally.

      Jobs are what funds the govt payroll.
      When the govt does things that kill jobs, then the govt payroll must be cut back, by the same amount of jobs that the govt killed.

      Congressional Staff should be on the chopping block too.
      See how the congress weasels like that!

      Liked by 2 people

  37. What’s not to like about President Trump’s “announced” Tariff Levels above those mentioned by Secretary Ross:
    • Sends the alpha signal that he’s “dead serious”.
    • Leaves room for a “staged-tariff” option with higher thresholds that can AUTOMATICALLY kick in if there’s a whiff of CHEATING or can be DISCRETIONARY if there’s a whiff of RETALIATION.
    • Enables President Trump to assign OWNERSHIP to the WTO, EU or whoever to force China and others to end cheating, dumping and currency manipulation, with deadlines and consequences if they fail.

    Liked by 3 people

  38. big bad mike says:

    You should see the melt-down of the dishonest Steel Brokers in the South Side Chicago area. Can’t bring in more steel from Turkey, Mexico, and Brazil. Did you know they have steel mills in these countries?. Hope the Steel Mills start selling direct to the small U.S. Manufacturers and cut out the dishonest middlemen who sold foreign steel like dope dealers – calling secondary and excess material Prime. They all love to lie. We put a domestic melt spec into our Purchase Orders to scare the hell out of them and they still lie and tell you that it is made in the USA when they know it isn’t.

    Liked by 3 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      Biggest problem I see is Bangladesh…….. which has no steel mills, just a lower tariff into the USA than directly from China.
      Watch the countries he goes after.
      Chinese have been sliding in the back door of NAFTA for years, we all know it.
      They move quickly and we have to react.

      Liked by 2 people

  39. Bastiat says:

    I’m still very wary of trade wars. I can’t help it. They are never good for either party. However, I fully understand that we NEED some sort of leverage to get to the ultimate goal of Free and Fair Trade.

    Also, I hate that I have to type “Fair” in there, because Free Trade is inherently fair. Problem is, crony capitalists and globalists (redundant, I know) have hijacked and ruined the term about as badly as the Progressives ruined “liberal”.

    Either way, I have a hard time trusting politicians, even Trump. I hope he knows what he is doing, because this could backfire spectacularly, and I think many people here aren’t really aware of the consequences of a global trade war.

    Also, note that the North used tariff policies to take advantage of the South pre-civil war, and, not to excuse the South, but tariffs were probably a significant reason they couldn’t move past the slave economy and industrialize like the North.

    Liked by 1 person

    • suejeanne1 says:

      liked this part:

      “Problem is, crony capitalists and globalists (redundant, I know) have hijacked and ruined the term about as badly as the Progressives ruined “liberal”.”

      I wonder if the globalists really would want to wage a global trade war – meanwhile, we are supposed to shiver in our boots and allow our sovereignty to be held hostage –
      the globalists ARE bullies, no better than the likes of Stalin, Hitler and Mussolini.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Wretched1 says:

      Bastiat writes, “Either way, I have a hard time trusting politicians, even Trump. I hope he knows what he is doing, because this could backfire spectacularly, and I think many people here aren’t really aware of the consequences of a global trade war.”

      PDJT was a successful businessman first. He took on this political gig because he’s also a Patriot. Unfortunately, some politicians don’t possess much of either attribute….

      As Sundance has written, PDJT will not necessarily get a perfect solution to any given challenge; but, he will attain an optimal solution, given all the moving parts…

      Trust the guy, it’s been a wild 1st year!

      Liked by 3 people

      • Bastiat says:

        I certainly trust him more than any politician, though Rand Paul is right up there in my book. Trump has done an excellent job, and that is why I’m waiting and seeing. He needs to turn these tariffs into concessions quickly, though. He MUST isolate China, because they are the slave labor of the globalists. If he can’t outmaneuver them it could hurt us. It is a risky play, but I do agree that it needs to be done.

        Liked by 1 person

    • wheatietoo says:

      What is a “crony capitalist”?

      Capitalism is merit-based…where the consumer gets to choose the best goods and services.

      Cronyism is favoritism which ignores what is the best product, and favors one company over others, based on some non-business related motive.

      Capitalism is the opposite of Cronyism.

      Capitalism is pro-consumer…and Cronyism is anti-consumer.

      I know people like to use the catchy little term, “crony capitalism”, but it was a term that was invented by the Left to demonize capitalism.
      It is not the fault of capitalism that cronyism exists.

      And, Bastiat…we’ve already been in a Trade War.
      It has been going on for decades and we have not been fighting back.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Bastiat says:

        A crony-capitalist is one who uses government force to gain competitive advantage. I get what you’re saying though, fascist is a better term, it is too bad it is over-used.

        Liked by 2 people

        • wheatietoo says:

          Yes, it’s an insidious little term that has invaded our vernacular, isn’t it.

          It’s like saying “dry water” or “cold heat”.

          And cronyism flourishes more in Socialist Countries and under Communism, than it does under Capitalism.

          Cronyism is just…cronyism.
          It is the same no matter where it exists.

          Liked by 2 people

    • ibobland08 says:

      The civil war tariff argument makes no sense. Tariffs would encourage the south to industrialize because it would make it cheaper to manufacture their own goods rather than importing them from Great Britain. Also the tariffs decreased the south’s cotton exports which made an agrarian economy even less desirable.

      Because of slavery, the way to make money in the south was through planting, no manufacturing. If they had to pay wages, planting would be a lot less attractive.

      Like

      • Bastiat says:

        No, you misunderstand what I was saying. Think of it the opposite way of what you wrote. My point is that if we make it the norm, our enemies can use it against us:

        “As early as the Revolutionary War, the South primarily produced cotton, rice, sugar, indigo and tobacco. The North purchased these raw materials and turned them into manufactured goods. By 1828, foreign manufactured goods faced high import taxes. Foreign raw materials, however, were free of tariffs.

        Thus the domestic manufacturing industries of the North benefited twice, once as the producers enjoying the protection of high manufacturing tariffs and once as consumers with a free raw materials market. The raw materials industries of the South were left to struggle against foreign competition.”

        Like

        • ibobland08 says:

          I agree with all of that, but the last point you made was:

          “tariffs were probably a significant reason they couldn’t move past the slave economy and industrialize like the North.”

          That is what I disagree with.

          Like

    • beigun says:

      60 years of consecutive trade deficits with Japan.
      30 years of consecutive trade deficits with Korea.
      20 years of consecutive trade deficits with China.

      What does the US receive in return? A minority middle class!

      We have been in at trade war for decades.

      Like

  40. zorrorides says:

    President Trump, have a Town Hall. Let Sundance help do the set-up. Invite some of these CoC politicos, and pick Deb and Blade and Wheatie and theDoc for asking the questions!

    As Q said, “These people are STUPID.” They want us to call them our benefactors.

    Trump’s gonna start a trade war?

    Where do I go to enlist!

    Liked by 3 people

  41. suejeanne1 says:

    “U.S. stocks, centered around U.S. domestic companies, will go up. U.S. stocks, centered around multinational companies, will go down.”

    Beautiful!

    When I was a child, the company my Dad started was on what was called the OTC (“Over The Counter”) exchange – as soon as we could read, we used to check that in the paper and tell Dad (in case he did not know) where the company was on the OTC (as he tied his tie and listened to our reports).

    It would be wonderful if the new generation of kids would grasp this concept of America-first and follow the “U. S. stocks, centered around U.S. domestic companies” and take part in those stocks going up.

    Liked by 3 people

  42. Matt Transit says:

    But, but Mark Levin just said on the radio, that tariffs are taxes on the American people.

    Like

    • lastinillinois says:

      People still listen to Mark Levin?

      Liked by 5 people

    • Bastiat says:

      That is not an inaccurate statement. You will pay the cost difference.

      I wish that the reasons necessary for this type of stuff were more widely understood past “America First”. Yes, I agree with that, but it is not that simple. America First is truly Free Trade with other countries, America last is the one sided trade we’ve had. Tariffs are a means to an end, not something that is great in and of itself. It’s like saying shooting someone in self defense is great. It is not, taking a life is never fun, even if it is necessary. Same thing with tariffs, they are NOT a good thing, but they are necessary in this case.

      Like

      • wheatietoo says:

        We’ve already been paying the price, though.

        Hello…$20 Trillion in Debt.
        People don’t realize how much the National Debt affects their everyday life.
        But it does.

        There would be long soup lines, illustrating the trouble we are in, if it weren’t for all the ‘entitlement’ programs that pay people who are out of work.
        We’ve been masking the problem.
        But it is still there.

        And our National Debt has grown to be able to pay for all the govt programs and the bloated govt payroll to administer those programs.

        The buying power of our Dollar is where we see the damage done by our National Debt.
        We see it at the grocery store and at the gas pumps.
        Most people don’t realize that’s what they are seeing, though.

        Liked by 1 person

      • map says:

        Tariffs do not raise prices for Americans for the simple reason that the price of every good that you buy is already fully priced. You are not getting discounts at Walmart. Walmart charges you the highest price they possibly can at any given moment because they are a profit-maximizing firm.

        If prices were able to go about by, say, the amount of the tariff, don;t you think Walmart would be charging that already? Or, do you think Walmart was running a 25% discount on all of its prices to pass the savings onto you?

        Like

        • Bastiat says:

          Walmart charges you the maximum amount they can, yes. However, Walmart has competitors like, say Amazon. This is what you are missing. If the product cost 10 bucks before tariffs to produce and ship, Amazon and Walmart may charge somewhere around 11 bucks. If it costs 12.50 after tarriffs to produce and ship, they’re going to be competing around the 13.50 range. That cost is passed on to you. Walmart and Amazon are going to make their profits regardless of the underlying price because they have to to stay in business.

          Like

    • TheWanderingStar says:

      Blow a raspberry in Mark Levin’s general direction.

      Get him off the radio the jerk!

      Liked by 2 people

  43. trapper says:

    Myself, I’m reserving judgment until I hear what Jimmy Kimmel and Meryl Streep have to say about it all. Can’t make a move without my celebrity input.

    Seriously, any talk about increased prices resulting from the tariffs entirely misses the point. America is a now a nation of junkies, individually as consumers and collectively as an economy. We are addicted to abnormally LOW prices. As a result, the cheap goods high is what we accept as the norm, the baseline. We gorge ourselves on $3 sneakers and $10 pants and $200 flat screen TVs and fill our closets and living spaces with the cheap Chinese junk we can’t get enough of. But the high is not the norm. It’s the high.

    It’s cold turkey time, and that isn’t fun. It hurts. Prices will go back up to where they belong, the true normal, in an economy in which the prices I pay support my neighbors who made the stuff, who in turn buy the stuff I make in my job. It had always been that way, but hardly anyone other than we oldsters understands how it works because no one under 40 had the experience of entering a job market where manufacturing jobs were just there for the taking everywhere in America, and all of them could support you and your family for life.

    America, getting clean and sober.

    Liked by 7 people

    • lastinillinois says:

      Nice analogy.

      I likey.

      Like

    • Matt Transit says:

      trapper, you make great points. I’ve tried to tell those that listen, I would rather pay more for goods of higher quality, ( knowing they were made in the US) and my neighbor was making them and earning a living wage from such employment.

      Like

    • Deb says:

      I will gladly pay more money for American Made products that I know will last. I’m tired of cheap imports that must be replaced constantly.

      Liked by 3 people

    • wheatietoo says:

      “We are addicted to abnormally LOW prices.”
      ____

      Yes.
      It’s like we’ve been lured into the black van with candy.
      Cheap Import prices are the candy.

      It’s not sustainable.
      We cannot survive on a diet of candy…this is why our economy has been so sick and ailing.

      Liked by 1 person

    • NJF says:

      When candidate Trump spoke about factories closing and natl security my first thought was we’ve left ourselves in a very weakened state. how would we BUILD what we needed if necessary?

      Liked by 2 people

  44. snarkybeach says:

    Swamp Guardian in Training Bret Baier is letting RINO Ben Sasse whine on air tonight about the tariffs. The CoC must be yanking his chain…

    Liked by 1 person

  45. sundance says:

    2017 – BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Commission has imposed anti-dumping duties on steel products from China to stop them flooding Europe’s struggling steel market.

    The Commission said Thursday that an investigation has confirmed that Chinese hot-rolled flat steel has been sold in Europe at dumping prices.

    The Chinese exports will now be taxed with duties ranging from 18.1 percent to 35.9 percent.

    https://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2017-04-06/eu-imposes-anti-dumping-duties-on-chinese-steel

    Liked by 6 people

    • trapper says:

      Great catch! First opium, now cheap junk goods and dumped steel. The West just doesn’t learn when it comes to trade with China. Poison merchants, and the COC is the pusher.

      Like

      • beigun says:

        Or Japan and Korea…birds of a feather. Import once, export a lot. You American, You have inspection…blah, blah. Finally some leadership in Washington!

        For the Americans who have been unregistered foreign agents who lobby for trade surplus countries that have held decades of surplus against the US: Guess what’s for dinner?

        Would you believe US Ambassadors have jumped into foreign business only weeks after leaving the taxpayer’s dole?!

        Like

    • daughnworks247 says:

      Great spot Sundance – those whiny hypocrites in Brussels need to be spanked.

      Liked by 1 person

    • trialbytruth says:

      Growth for 1 and 2 who’s interest is it in in this current global economy to crash us? We are the market crash us and it all falls down. I am not saying i am not nervous about it I just cant go all doom and gloom.

      If Wall street were to explode peoples retirement savings would be lost and big banks would crash. Sundance theorized a separation of rules between large investment banks and CUs was on the horizon that would help moderate access to money on mainstreet. I too would like Sundance’s take.

      Like

  46. talkietina says:

    I love when Sundances uses that, “Shiftt like this is why I won”. Meme.

    Liked by 2 people

  47. Eric says:

    Reading this post Sundance reminds me of reading Fernand Braudel’s 3 book set “Civilization and Capitalism” Final stage of a great power before the collapse is finance after losing it’s industry and trade. The Donald is trying to pull us back from the edge.

    Liked by 2 people

  48. theresanne says:

    A few years ago a Chinese company came to our small island in the Pacific and offered a few pennies a pound for metal of any kind. They loaded it all on containers and shipped it back to China. When the WWII relics and abandoned vehicles ran out, people started stripping the utility poles, digging up guy-wires, and even burned down several buildings to get to the metal wiring to sell to the Chinese. My guess is some of that metal was refined and sold back to America (the Americans were the ones who built the buildings in the first place.)
    Maybe an import tax will help the US recover some of that wasted money.

    Liked by 2 people

  49. NJF says:

    Lordy, Mark Levin’s Head has officially exploded.

    There are a few sane ones in the wilderness ie Dobbs, Payne et al.

    Liked by 4 people

  50. ForGodandCountry says:

    No one is mentioning the 800lb gorilla in the room…

    The global credit bubble + $20 Trillion US debt

    How can you shift from a “service economy” to a “production economy”….in which wage inflation creates the necessity of increasing interest rates (ie. normalizing interest rates)….when interest rates have been held artificially low for a decade+ and created a MASSIVE global credit bubble??

    Sundance says, broadly speaking….yes, there will be pain. And the people replied, “No pain, no gain!”

    But in all fairness, I don’t think you good people (and I mean that sincerely…damn fine people) realize how much pain there really could be to get from here to there. I don’t want to rain on a parade, but the pain Sundance is speaking of can…and most likely will be…considerable.

    And yes, that’s how bad the globalists have F’d us all.

    Like

    • wheatietoo says:

      ” I don’t want to rain on a parade…”

      And yet, that is what you are doing.

      Why don’t you put on your thinking cap and offer a solution, instead of wringing your hands and pointing to this ‘impending doom’.

      Liked by 1 person

    • NoJuan Importante says:

      And…why not keep rates low? WITH wage inflation. Innovation keeps most inflation low, so why increase rates? Cut govt spending. Hopefully Powell is on board with thinking out of the box. Not just kneejerk starve inflation mantra.

      Liked by 1 person

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