Kraft and Conagra Shut Down Restaurant Supply Manufacturing Plants – Simultaneously Expand Retail Manufacturing Due to Excessive Demand…

Hopefully the advanced information CTH provided on the food supply-chain has helped to understand the issues, challenges and demands many are seeing.  Inside the food manufacturing industry the impacts of COVID-19 are stunning; crazy increases in business; and there are going to be interim shortages on popular products.

To understand the ongoing issues with empty shelves, and also prepare for future shortages on specific products (hint: buy extra pet food now), here’s some interesting background:

Champaign, Illinois – […] “We can’t make enough mac and cheese right now,” said Dilton “Dee” Gibbs, plant manager at the facility that makes half of the Kraft Macaroni & Cheese sold in the U.S., as well as A-1 steak sauce, mayonnaise and salad dressings.

The packaged food giant, along with many of its peers, has had to ramp up production amid an abrupt reversal in consumer trends. Shoppers who in recent years shunned processed foods in favor of fresher, healthier and more premium products are now loading up on shelf-stable standbys as shelter-in-place orders force vast swaths of the nation’s population to prepare for a long stretch of cooking at home.

[…] Kraft Heinz, co-headquartered in Chicago and Pittsburgh, said demand for numerous products, from ketchup to Kool-Aid, has been up sharply since pandemic fears sent consumers into a stockpiling frenzy.

Macaroni and cheese sales, which grew just 1.6% in 2019, were up 27% during the 13 weeks that ended March 21 compared with the same period last year, the company said. Sales of Heinz vinegar have been robust, perhaps because people are using it not only to cook but also to make cleaning solutions.

To be sure, all sorts of food has been flying off the shelves. Year-over-year sales of rice, beans and pasta more than tripled during the week that ended March 21, according to Nielsen. Fresh meat sales doubled and oranges, dense with immunity-boosting vitamin C, grew 57%.

But products that had fallen out of favor in recent years are making a fierce comeback. Packaged soup sales shot up 237%, according to Nielsen. Canned meat surged 282%.

[…] Credit Suisse has projected that retail sales of packaged food companies will grow, on average, by as much as 15% to 30% during March through May. Some of the largest companies have announced production increases by as much as 40% to keep up with demand, it said.

[…] “The priority right now is producing the maximum amount of food that we can possibly produce,” [Conagra CEO Scott] Connolly told investors on a conference call Tuesday.

The company has shifted employees from its food service production lines, where demand has dropped drastically because of mandated temporary restaurant closures, to the lines making products sold in grocery stores.. Its planned rollouts of new products are being put on hold at some retailers that want to focus on core staples.

As a result, consumers might see less variety on shelves as companies focus on churning out the most in-demand products, said Geoff Freeman, CEO of the Consumer Brands Association, an industry trade group.

Unilever has said some variations of its products may be unavailable as it focuses on its most popular sizes of Hellman’s mayonnaise and flavors of Knorr meal mixes.

“There will be no shortage of product,” Freeman said. “Product will be there, but perhaps not some of our choice.”

[…] And the lean, efficient supply chains companies have adopted to save money also are being reconsidered as manufacturers weigh the benefits of redundancies in the event of an emergency, Fereday said.

There will likely be a move toward de-globalizing the supply chain in favor of local suppliers, he said. (read more)

Read that again, considering the influence of Big AG:  “There will likely be a move toward de-globalizing the supply chain”…  That is good news.

BACKGROUND – By now the majority of protein manufacturing has caught up. Beef and pork should be solid at your local market; however, chicken, while available, will lag to full replenishment capacity in the protein sector. The reason is: “chicken” is an ingredient component in many shelf stable items (soup etc.), that are still short as the manufacturing sector runs at capacity.

We enter a phase where grain commodities are now arriving at manufacturing.

♦ Between the Appalachian mountain range and the Colorado mountain range there is a massive amount of grain, meal, and derivative (farming) product generated. Thin component inventories, now exhausted at processing, are the cause of the current manufacturing supply chain stress… This lag will take a little longer.

There are train-loads of grain products heading both East and West daily; but there is a process of background prioritization taking place within the grain (total), flour, meal, rice and dried beans sector. The downstream ingredient system has a long-term and short-term priority schedule.

Example: total flour is prioritized to industrial bakeries for the production of bread. Nationally retail or consumer flour shortages are caused by prioritization in this part of the supply-chain.

Dry pasta will eventually catch up as manufacturers receive millions of metric tonnes of raw material. However, the canned pasta derivatives (think Chef Boyardee etc.) will come after. The same applies to macaroni (mac-n-cheese) manufacturing.

The grain and row crop farmers are loving the emptying of regional, industrial, dry storage silos; there will be a long-term benefit in the next harvest season.

Remember, chicken is a base ingredient for many shelf-stable items such as soup noodles (Ramen), as well as wet and dry soups. The temporary shortage of chicken will extend for an unknown time-frame as the retail chicken and manufacturing sector are both pulling from Chicken farmers. Because both segments are pulling inventory, the ability of soup manufacturers to catch up is a little limited. You are probably noticing that on retail shelves.

Chicken is also a big part of frozen processed food production. In addition to chicken nuggets, patties etc; it is also the primary ingredient for many blends of frozen dinner foods.

Rice is similar in that it is a base ingredient for a variety of sectors: plain rice, shelf stable blends, stuffings and many frozen prepared meals pull from rice harvests.

The manufacturing sector will catch up, but the raw material is diversely spread into multiple manufacturing segments; so it takes a bit longer.

A note of caution, the dry pet foods category could also see a slight shortage in manufacturing as they draw from rice and grain supplies.  You might see some empty shelves of dry dog and cat foods as a consequence. [Just an fyi]

Fruit juices are abundant as the seasonality of berries has left very little disruption in that sector. Water and enhanced water products that use fruit juices were only constrained by distribution issues (phases two and three), and those should be back to normal. Frozen fruit products and desserts also unaffected (except for distribution).

Dehydrated potato products will also catch up soon as the retail demand is never too extreme on an ordinary basis. They don’t need to manufacture too many dried potato varieties to catch up. Frozen potato products are only a distribution capacity issue. Good ol’ taters are solid.

Dried beans again are a multi-segment derivative. Used in dry and wet soups, shelf stable products, rice blends, pet foods etc. It might take a little longer to see raw dried beans back in stock as the manufacturing sector for the derivatives soaks up the beans. Wet beans (baked beans) should be back in business very soon; if not already.

Canned vegetable production is almost unimaginable in scale amid the big manufacturers. One can assume they are buying up the bulk row crops, wet beans and corn silos from all sources. However, on the positive side they can crank out canned vegetables at an astonishing rate and the restaurant bulk business doesn’t need it.

Overall, the majority of products should be back on our store shelves, sans some specific brands, very soon (depending on region). It’s the manufactured shelf-stable items that are now playing catch-up.

Meat cases should have ample products as the distribution was running 24/7 for almost the past month; again, with the single exception of chicken as noted above.

Retail eggs may take longer as eggs are also needed as a raw material.

On the paper and chemical side there is still a big void. However, that void is almost certainly an issue with “cube space” prioritization from phase two and three; and a demand shift from commercial to consumer.  First, ‘cube space’ is literally the amount of space it takes to ship products.  Paper goods take up a lot of shipping space and with demands on food – paper good distribution is not as critical or urgent.  Food comes first.

Second, toilet paper is two sides of a slightly different product, commercial and consumer.  Commercial TP demand is down 40% while consumer TP demand is up 40%.  The TP you use at home is not the same as the stuff you use at the office, school, restaurant, public restroom etc.  Both products manufactured differently; both packaged differently; both manufactured to fit different dispensing equipment.

Consumer, home use TP, now in +40% demand.  The industrial scratchy, big roll, individually wrapped, less appealing commercial TP not-so-much.   That is likely why the lack of toilet tissue has remained for so long… Sheesh, who knew.

Big manufacturing soap and chemical users also have been challenged with the extreme demand for sanitary products. Hand soap, hand sanitizing, personal hygiene and also surface sanitizing products are beyond extreme demand. Here I would place a note of caution… Again, prioritization has to happen.

When given a choice between laundry/dish detergent and personal hygiene products we can expect the manufacturers will prioritize production of the latter first.

This *could* lead to a shortage in laundry and dish soaps. Just keep that in mind if you are seeing some of your favorite brands in those sectors missing.

Think of a massive segment within our economy that was already working near capacity…. now demand has increased 40% overall within that industry….  It’s incredible we have not seen more widespread shortages considering the scale of this increase.

Keep on truckin’…

This entry was posted in Big Government, Coronavirus, Economy, Patriotism, Prepper, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

230 Responses to Kraft and Conagra Shut Down Restaurant Supply Manufacturing Plants – Simultaneously Expand Retail Manufacturing Due to Excessive Demand…

  1. JohnCasper says:

    In a perhaps cause related development, Nike and Rebook Shut Down sneaker Manufacturing Plants – Simultaneously Expand Leg Iron Manufacturing Due to Excessive Demand…

    Liked by 7 people

  2. Well done, as always, Sundance.

    Liked by 30 people

    • ezpz2 says:

      Yes. I’m grateful for the pet food hint. Thank you, Sundance.

      Liked by 28 people

      • The Devilbat says:

        Me too. As to the dish detergent, one can wash dishes using unscented bar soap. My old mother in law used it for most of her life. This of course will not work for dishwashers so one will have to wash the dishes the old fashioned way in the sink.

        Liked by 8 people

        • ezpz2 says:

          Thanks! So many things we’ve taken for granted seem to have now become precious and increasingly rare commodities.

          Lord willing, this will soon pass, but I think it’s a learning experience for many of us – one that will make us better and more grateful.

          Liked by 11 people

      • Mr. Morris says:

        Thank you too Sundance, pooches are family. They are our comforters and exercise partners.

        Liked by 12 people

        • woodstuff says:

          The feed store was always my source of dog food. Sadly, all my dogs have since gone to heaven.

          Liked by 7 people

        • Dutchman says:

          Carrots. Cooked carrots, if you can’t get dog food, but can get carrots.
          Dogs love em, and its good for them, too.
          As they last quite awhile, dog owners might want to stock up on some, in case dog food becomes unavailable?

          Just a suggestion. My pooch in heaven as well (cause you know, ALL dogs go to heaven) but she DID love her carrots!

          Damn, stupid phone screen is getting all,….swimmy!

          Liked by 15 people

          • woodstuff says:

            One of my favorite pooches would grab a cucumber off the fence of my garden and have at it. He would also grab up one of the pears that fell form a tree and go crazy. I never tried carrots. In those days table scraps were given to them (we didn’t know any better).

            Liked by 4 people

            • Dutchman says:

              Dads dog would ‘beg’ for ANYTHING a human was eating.
              My brother was visititing, and eating a grapefruit. Dog begged, so he tossed a section.
              Funniest dog expressions you ever saw, but he ate it!

              Liked by 6 people

          • Country_Kat says:

            Ours eat them raw. Even the cat, he would run the dogs off when we were ‘peeling’ carrots for a roast of something (sadly we had to have him put to sleep 2 weeks ago due to spontaneous complete kidney failure 😥). Raw cabbage too, him and the dogs would ‘fight’ over any pieces that hit the floor when I would cut cabbage up.

            Glad Sundance posted the *hint* on extra dog food, hubby is at the store now because he wants a pork roast tonight so I called and told him to grab another bag if they have one. We have one un-opened bag but an extra can’t hurt. If it ends up that there’s no issue with getting more later on, we can always donate a bag to our local shelter.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Dutchman says:

              Frankly, prior to 9/11, followed by Catrina, followed by 2008 meltdown, I could understand people being derisive of “survivalist nutjobs”.

              But after that 1,2,..3 punch, I find it hard to understand how people aren’t stocked up, and haven’t got their financial house in order, so they are at least SOMEWHAT prepared to weather the unexpected storm.

              Sorry about your cat, we lost one years ago, and then I had to personally send my beloved blond heeler to heaven, maybe 3 years ago.

              Thinking maybe we need to open our hearts and homes to another dog,….but its hard!

              Liked by 4 people

              • Country_Kat says:

                It’s hard but it’s so worth it. We’ve had a handful of critters since we got married almost 21 years ago and while it hurts like heck to lose one of the fur-babies, I couldn’t stand being without one.

                We lost our ‘boys’ within 7 months of each other and that was hard. After about 6 months I couldn’t stand the quiet any longer and came across a pit that was at a local shelter and fell absolutely in love with her picture. Never dreamed I’d get a pit that I hadn’t raised because you never know how someone else has raised them, but we ended up with her. 2 months after getting her, found out we were pregnant and that made me a little nervous. She bonded well with our other kids and when the baby came, let’s just say he ended up with not only a 2 legged mommy but also a 4 legged mommy.

                She’s highly protective of me and the baby (now almost 3). We had someone attempt to break in at the beginning of winter and well, they got the door open but she stopped them from actually coming in. 95 lbs of ticked off fur and teeth is a great deterrent!

                We used to be better prepared, before we took over my mother’s home after she passed. Had enough TP and paper towels to last a year, same with shelf stable foods. After moving in to this place though (big mistake), every penny has gone into upkeep and major issues being fixed. It truly is a money pit. It will be paid off here in a month or two once we are paid for the eminent domain from the state and we are going to have a contractor come in and give us a price for fixing this place. If it isn’t worth it, we’re going to attempt to sell as is and start over but that’s a scary thought in its own right.

                Like

          • jazzbogie says:

            Forgive me for being gross but make sure they are cooked carrots because if not they will end up passing big chunks in their poop. That’s how my black labs learned to eat their poop. They saw the big chunks and went after them. A VERY difficult habit to break!

            Liked by 2 people

        • botchedcasuality says:

          If you have a crockpot homemade dog food is a breeze, and it’s something to experiment with if you need some diversion.
          Inexpensive organ meats are great for your dogs especially for their heart. Recall they evolved like wolves and didn’t naturally feed on grain.
          I use carrots, sweet potato, brown rice, meat trimmings (plus) lentils, frozen organic veggies from the dollar store.
          I avoid chicken snd beef stock because they all contain onion. NO ONION☠️. The meat is more wholesome nutrient wise if raw, but that’s hard to do when we think our dogs are people. I just toss the meat in with the cooked food at the end so it cooks a little while it cools down.
          This is inexpensive and you can trust that it is not made in China and then branded product if Canada. No lead and arsenic for my boy!

          Oh sorry I thought I was on Pinterest.

          Liked by 9 people

          • botchedcasuality says:

            I should have said that I was describing my crock pot dog food method because the ingredients are from my bulk storage. There are fantastic freeze dried dog foods not inexpensive but make great shelf emergency rations for I dunno; earthquakes, floods, shortages.
            God bless all you four legged caretakers!
            Thank you Sundance!

            Liked by 5 people

        • Michael Jones says:

          Mine eats better than I do, he gets dog food AND my food.

          Liked by 7 people

        • psalm1391216 says:

          So are our kitties. 😺😺

          Liked by 3 people

      • Pa Hermit says:

        Personally, I cook for my avatar and myself. I was turned off totally when China f’ed the dog food up big time. Realized I could do much better in getting needed nutrients into his system as well as mine.

        Liked by 5 people

        • ezpz2 says:

          That’s great. You’re both better for it.

          I’m just not that ambitious. Loyal Companion (formerly Barks) assures me they only carry the best, and so far, so good. They’e great in there.

          But I do remember that China dog food scare. The dog we had then is waiting at the Rainbow Bridge. 😦 She was a sweetheart! Still miss her. 😦 Thankfully, she wasn’t affected by that major recall.

          I do admire those who do it all from scratch. Kudos to you.

          Liked by 2 people

        • CC says:

          Also…rice,pumpkin, and green beans (raw or cooked) can be added to dog food…

          No onion, something in onions bind with the RBC’s in the blood, preventing oxygen molecules from binding to the RBC in the blood stream…hence death by suffocation while they breathe. Kind of like carbon monoxide poisoning.

          My vet lost a patient that way. Someone’s dog got an onion…

          Liked by 5 people

      • Rick554 says:

        Absolutely. Can’t have Rebel the Dog miss his meals! But, I may have to find more skinless, boneless chicken breasts! No pancreatitis here, for sure!

        Liked by 2 people

        • ezpz2 says:

          Thank you, Rick554. You, ‘Pa Hermit’ above, and others have inspired me!

          I used to cook up a big vat, lol, of chicken/turkey/vegetable soup for my last best friend.

          I would take a whole chicken (cut up), giblets and all, a turkey leg or wing – or both, soup bones – the round ones with the marrow inside, carrots, and other vegies that I had researched were safe and GOOD for dogs and cook it all up. I didn’t add the vegetables until there was only about an hour left to cook, or they would have gotten too much.

          When it was done, I let it cool, separated everything, and then put it in the fridge overnight so that I could remove the hardened fat that had risen to the top and solidified. I would then cut up everything, and combine the meat, vegies, and broth, and place them in containers and then froze them. I didn’t feed it to her exclusively – she still had her dry food, but a few times a week, she would get that special ‘chicken soup’ and she could barely contain her excitement as I was getting it ready for her!

          I think my shopping list just got revised. My boy deserves it.

          Thank you all for the inspiration! NOW, I AM motivated.

          Blessings to all!

          Liked by 2 people

    • sturmudgeon says:

      Yes, I agree… thanks, Sundance for laying all this out in this manner… very easy to understand, and to ‘deal’ with. There is no question that this is the best school of learning on the web. Kudos!

      Liked by 6 people

      • sturmudgeon says:

        I have attempted to avoid Heinz products for years, because of a certain politician’s connection.

        Liked by 10 people

        • auntiefran413 says:

          GREEN Giant is another one to avoid. 90+% of their veggies are grown in China. Yech!

          Liked by 7 people

          • lotbusyexec says:

            Good to know — thank you!

            Liked by 3 people

          • jingosam says:

            We’ve been looking at labels for years now and refuse to purchase any food item made in China. The last Green Giant peas we purchased had Grown and Packaged in Canada right on the front of the label. Must have been part of the other 10% I guess.

            Liked by 1 person

          • botchedcasuality says:

            I have a related backstory. I’m from an agricultural community in Oregon. The local cannery was founded by a group of Farmers during the Depression. I spent my summers picking strawberries, raspberries, green beans and when the local kids turned 16 we went to the cannery. I can say Birdseye packaged corn, green beans, carrots and squash right there. During my childhood we were “The Green Bean Capital of the World” . There were numerous labels packaged there but two food processors impressed me: when Campbell’s soup veggies were running they sent their own line inspectors on top of the cannery inspectors and they added more line people to sort out poor color, rot, leaves etc. Birdseye was not as finicky but they only wanted the highest graded product which was sorted to their line while the remainder was packaged for institutional use or lesser known labels.

            Like

  3. Sue says:

    Lots of moms and dad’s out there trying to take care of their kids full time. Mac and cheese is an easy meal that kids like. Also, chicken nuggets in short supply too. Many folks don’t cook from scratch anymore so I’m not surprised foods like this are in short supply.

    Liked by 16 people

    • Sharon says:

      “Lots of moms and dad’s out there trying to take care of their kids full time.”

      Used to be that’s what moms and dads did all the time.

      However, in Portland, Or they still don’t have to. Even though all the schools are closed for the year, they are still serving three meals a day for the offspring of dads and moms to pick up…..dads and moms who have no intention of “taking care of their kids” – either part time or full time.

      Liked by 13 people

      • sturmudgeon says:

        Yeah… I don’t (and never have) agreed with this nonsense of schools serving meals… another good reason to get rid of the PSS, and have more home-schooling, and non-taxpayer-funded entities that actually might be “learning” centers.

        Liked by 5 people

      • churchladyiowa says:

        In addition to the daily pickup school meals, our town is expanding the once-a-month “box o’ groceries.” Now there will be two giveaways per month.

        Yesterday while walking the dog, Hubby said the lineup at the new distribution center (school) stretched 5 blocks down to the Highway with another 4 blocks of cars in the turn lane. Our schools are 75% “other cultures,” and the name for the giveaway program is “Hunger Fighters.” Trust me, almost every child I see walking past our house is chunky or an actual butterball!

        Liked by 6 people

      • tappin52 says:

        Isn’t a parent who does not feed their children guilty of abuse and neglect? I simply can not buy the argument that a school meal is the only food some children get.

        If they are poor, I am sure that they are getting SNAP benefits.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Sharon says:

          …and they’re also getting free book bags every fall from the guilt-ridden public who participate in great book bag drives…..and then they get free winter jackets, hats, scarves, and glove from the battered, guilt-ridden public……as nearly as I can tell, parents no longer provide ANYTHING for their children……and then the school system provides them with free computers……

          Liked by 1 person

        • tempejeff says:

          Of course, the children receive SNAP ( Food Stamps). BUT, if the parents are illegals; the parents can’t receive benefits. So, the benefits feed Mom and Dad and, the school feeds the kids. Here in AZ, Phoenix buses kids to school during the summer for free lunch to keep that sweet, sweet Uncle Sugar money coming. Our local Elementary school has food carts piled high with free breakfast and lunch, every school day in the School Driveway.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Risa says:

      In other news, women who aborted their unborn children aren’t having to care for them.
      Planned Parenthood claims credit.

      Liked by 2 people

    • RedBallExpress says:

      I am a dairy farmer. Today our very large dairy cooperative send out a notice to all dairy farms pleading that everyone reduce production 10% or retire if you are thinking of it. They have had huge order cancellations and written contracts ripped up. In addition the price we are paid will drop from $20 per hundred pounds of milk to $12 per hundred pounds of milk. There has been no money in dairy at all for the past 5 years and just as prices were inching up this happens.

      There is going to be a fire sale of the dairy industry. All farms are entering a crisis mode and contrary to popular folk lore among the most vulnerable will be the highly leveraged California style mega dairies that illegally employ illegal immigrants. They have been existing on monthly loans as it is.

      It is also interesting to note that all commodities such as corn or soybeans are down sharply.

      Liked by 16 people

      • Harvey Lipschitz says:

        Dairy supplied school lunch and breakfast milk which was tossed in the trash.

        Last I checked, moms don’t buy milk to throw away.

        My wife was a school principal and stopped to be a stay at home mom. Our kids never tasted kraft mac&cheese. We both cook with the mother sauces and the only mac and cheese comes close to wife;s is at Chick-Fil-A.

        I milked 3 cows every day till I left the farm for college.

        Liked by 8 people

      • barnabusduke says:

        I hate to hear that Red. I would have never thought that the salt of the earth farmers would have such happen to them. Major staples in all fridges and freezers! Stay strong and we will pray for our farmers!

        Liked by 10 people

      • upstate909 says:

        I suspect China has a hand in that….just like they did to steel and aluminum and pharmaceuticals…..etc. They probably have a stake in the mega “happy cow” dairy farms in CA.

        Liked by 5 people

      • Newhere says:

        Thank you for this information. Praying for your farm, and for this incomprehensible nightmare to end. I’m surprised, I am buying more milk than usual.

        Liked by 8 people

        • MelH says:

          I thought the new contract with Mexico and Canada was going to be a win for dairy farmers. What happened to that, Red Ball Express?

          Liked by 2 people

          • J says:

            Consumption of Milk has been dropping for decades.

            Like

            • JTR says:

              That’s because of the crap they put in milk now! It’s also illegal to buy raw milk from a local farmer’s cow. I grew up drinking it warm from my Auntie’s cow, and the stuff they sell in the stores just isn’t very good.

              Like

      • RedBallExpress says:

        Thank you!

        Liked by 1 person

      • auntiefran413 says:

        I’

        Like

      • auntiefran413 says:

        I’m so sorry to hear that Red…will be praying for you and your fellow dairymen. I’m told that this is the result of people who think they’re being “green” moving to soy milk, almond milk, et al. I think that stuff tastes nasty. Just give me a big, ice cold glass of the real thing — the thing that comes from cows!

        Liked by 7 people

      • That is incredibly sad to hear. Is there any future for raw milk and it’s products? It seems very hard to find.
        Actually, so is milk and cream and even sometimes butter here in Florida. Grass fed milk is $6.15 per half gallon.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Not a farmer so forgive my ignorance. Who stopped ordering milk and tore up the contracts? I was in the store (Aldo) today and had to reach to the rack in back to get a gallon. It seems to be flying off the shelves.
        Can you provide more background please?

        Liked by 2 people

      • JustTheFactsPlease says:

        RedBallExpress, regarding demand for dairy products: Have you looked at selling your milk as dry powdered milk? There has been a shortage of milk powder for a long time where I live. The last two times I went to a store (a few weeks ago), the store was sold out of powdered milk.

        I just checked online, and Safeway and Walmart didn’t have powdered milk for sale on their websites. Target had a “Market Pantry” brand of milk powder for sale, but they said, “Due to high demand, item may be unavailable or delayed”. ( https://www.target.com/s?searchTerm=powdered+milk&Nao=0 )

        Would it be possible to change from selling milk and yogurt, to milk powder? That’s a shelf-stable product that people (including me) want these days.

        I stay home these days. I shop online and have my food delivered, so I haven’t been to a store in almost 3 weeks. So I don’t know what is available in the stores these days. But I would guess that a lack of powdered milk on websites indicates a lack of it in the stores.

        Liked by 1 person

      • The past 5 years? More like 25. My grandfather made good money dairy farming in the 50s through the 80s. When my dad and uncle took over, they did not. But it wasn’t through their incompetence…milk prices have not kept up with rising costs since about that time period.

        My dad just retired…not sure how my uncle is going to survive this.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Sharon says:

          Yes. My brother-in-law had a large dairy operation in Minnesota that was a “100 year farm” – and finally tossed in the towel about 12 years ago. The math just did not work any more and there was no sign of it improving.

          Like

        • bill johnston says:

          Aren’t milk prices set by government “marketing orders”? I seem to remember that when farmers were dumping milk down the gutter due to low prices.

          Like

      • Randy Blain says:

        I had to stop drinking milk at the age of 22 when I moved to NYC from southern Ontario. I always drank at least a quart a day but all of sudden got ad heartburn. Now at 63 I have found A2 milk. It does not have the A1 protein which undigestible. Tastes just like the milk I grew up with. IIRC it comes from Jersey cows and I remember the milk jugs saying Jersey cows when i was a kid. If the dairy industry would return to just jersey cows they would be back in business as the gastro issues would drop by the wayside. I drink a gallon every two days now.

        Like

      • Mhf says:

        Amen brother live cattle prices are down to $85 hwt., Hogs are down to $55, corn is down to $3.30 soybeans down to $8.60. Rice is only bright spot I can see $14 hwt but. If you don’t have it. On hand you can’t sell it. And all those silos Sundance is talking about are still full of corn getting cheaper every day

        Like

    • The Devilbat says:

      I just made chicken nuggets last night and they are simple to make and taste much better than store bought nuggets. Simply cut some chicken breast into bite size pieces. Dip them in a small bowl of plain flour, then dip them into a bowl of whisked up egg, followed by rolling them in a bowl of bread crumbs to coat them. Fry on a medium burner until golden brown and eat. My wife and I loved them and we both overate.

      Hint: breadcrumbs work better than panko.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Heck, I just wait for 49 cents-a-pound chicken to come my way, usually in 10-lb “chicken quarters” bags, cut it up into 2- or 3-serving bags, and into the freezer. When needed, I thaw a bag out, nuke the skin (separately) in the microwave to a crispy treat, then trap the chicken piece(s) between two plastic bowls (the kind single-serving commercial “bowl” meals come in) and cook them in the microwave for a few minutes. Always perfect, always delicious. And I grew up on Mom’s pan-fried “southern-fried” chicken (like all of you; I know). So don’t tell me you have to go through all that dredging and coating, not to mention cutting into bite sizes, just to enjoy chicken. You’re one o’ them furriners, ain’tcha? City folk (ptui)!

        Yes, I know — who am I to talk, with a microwave…but that’s all I got, man. (And I haven’t lived in the country for, oh, forever now I guess.)

        Liked by 2 people

    • TonyE says:

      We are both working from home… kids are grown up and moved away.

      No commutes, so we got lots of time to cook. We are cooking lots of great meals and if you know how, you can repurpose the left over.

      Example, tonight we topped some two day old brown rice with a cup of two week old chili with onions and cheese. Took a week old egg noodle and chicken dish and topped it with marinara and mascarpone cheese, baked a small salmon fillet with oranges and furikake and then a green salad with romaine and cucumbers. And a bottle of french rose.

      So, we eat very well, and try to cut back on the time… but, I’m going nuts. We need a day off from the kitchen.

      When this is done, I’m taking my wife to the nearest Ritz Carlton’s main dining room.

      Liked by 4 people

  4. Jlwary says:

    This is a fascinating read… Thank you, SD!

    Liked by 19 people

  5. Newhere says:

    I’ve been worried about pet food since this started. Informed projections appreciated.

    Liked by 18 people

    • wondering999 says:

      Just saw a notice from our local animal shelter… you DON’T have to give up your pet if you can’t buy food. They will help.. but, there has to be supply for the animal shelter to help with. Hope that they continue to get supplies to meet the need!

      Liked by 6 people

    • vikingmom says:

      Good question – we are very careful to only buy food wholly made in the USA. There hasn’t been any shortage yet but your comment makes me think!!

      Liked by 5 people

      • Newhere says:

        I kept the dog in mind when getting other items — powdered goat milk (dogs digest it better), peanut butter without salt or other ingredients, powdered egg (probably wouldn’t have bothered but my dog eats eggs), organ meat in my freezer (cheap and nutritious), powdered bone broth (no ONION!).

        I am assuming any commercial pet food — even made in USA — is a prime candidate at some point both for hoarding and for either manufacturing or distribution/supply line disruptions. I started buying extra in early February and now am trying to refrain so OTHERS can stock up!

        I’m starting to think about how some of us amateurs could scratch up a recipe and scale it up to help community neighbors or shelters, if we face a shortage on commercial sources (e.g., rice/potato, egg, organ meat, bone broth, meat scraps if possible, etc.) …. obviously not “complete canine nutrition” but facing a shortage, probably better than what we’d otherwise have available to scrape together!

        Liked by 1 person

      • auntiefran413 says:

        Are you sure? So much of our food is labeled “Distributed by …”

        Like

        • churchladyiowa says:

          I’ve been seeing that “distributed by” too, auntie fran. At least five years ago, I read that all of the Green Giant vegies are shipped to China, canned/frozen there, and sent back to the US.

          Like

        • WVPatriot says:

          auntiefran413, if the food package says, “Distributed by…” then I will wager that it WAS NOT produced in the U.S.A. FACT! I put it back on the shelf.

          Like

        • vikingmom says:

          Oh I realize that so I specifically found a brand that is 100% made in the USA and verified it on their website. Many labels are quite deceptive and I have learned to read them very carefully!

          Liked by 2 people

    • mandy says:

      Dry pet food can go stale, so when I buy a large bag, I vacuum seal it. I divvy it into smaller amounts (into brown lunch bags, actually). Then I put those bags into a vac seal bag and take the air out. Seems to hold the vacuum better with the ‘brown bag liner.’

      Liked by 10 people

  6. littleflower481 says:

    The big shortage here remains toilet paper and hand sanitizer/ wipes. Ingles grocery store is just not catching up at all. Walmart slightly better. Just don’t get it with Ingles. On the other hand, we have a two store independent company that buys stuff from going out of business stores, etc and they had a huge shipment of toilet paper last week…employee said they had multiple supplies. i just depends where you get it from Finally scored some hand sanitizer from Trader Joes.

    Liked by 5 people

    • jimrockfish says:

      “De-globalizing the supply chain”. Good news if they follow through. It’s a shame our farmers and ranchers “need” foreign buyers. It would be great if enough American companies purchased from them that foreign buyers would be a bonus, not a necessity.

      This whole situation sure has made me notice so many people/jobs that I took for granted because they were always just there.

      Thanks Sundance as always.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Risa says:

        Beef ranchers are seeing low prices, while retail prices are not depressed.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Newhere says:

          😦

          Like

        • sturmudgeon says:

          Well.. beef ranchers experienced really good prices for several years prior to this mess… so, hopefully they have “put aside” from the good years.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Dutchman says:

            According to Master Sundance, in his MAGAnomics articles he says that as multinationals are phased out, the consumer price for foodstuffs will drop dramatically.

            This is due, I believe, to eliminating the manipulation of supply and demand (to maximise profits) and the “exfiltration of wealth” perpetrated by the Multinational corporations.

            The price farmers and ranchers recieve for their product shouldn’t be affected by this, however unless its that they see a slight increase?

            Anyway, this is all a result of the building up of the Main Street economy.
            The question is, HOW will this CHI-NA virus shutdown, and resulting supply chain disruptions effect the MAGAnomic shift from the Wall street engine, to the MAIN Street engine?

            I think its a safe bet that to whatever degree PDJT can, he will influence things to further his agenda.

            He has used tariff $ to support the farmers. And, he has deliberately structured this SBA loan/grant program so it goes thru the “alternative” banking sector he had already been working to strengthen, by exempting them from Dodd/Frank rules intended for too bigger to fail banks.

            Is it possible that as a result of this surge in demand, many food producers will decide it no longer makes sense to ship food 1/2 around the world, just to have it processed and shipped back?

            I realise people are hurting, and worried about their financial health, as well as physical health.

            But I keep seeing silver linings,…

            Liked by 5 people

            • Newhere says:

              I HOPE you’re right, and the dynamics of the situation would seem to be screaming for changes that are LOCAL LOCAL LOCAL and main street economics.

              It’s funny on all things “deep state” Dutchman you’ve nailed the “heads they win, tails we lose” dynamic, so very heartening to hear notes of optimism from you on this gathering storm of dystopian medical tyranny.

              I wish PDJT would stop dragging his Doctors of Death up to the podium for hours every day, and would re-focus on something like a “let’s beat the virus” which would mobilize ALL OF US to get up and start moving in concert …. things all of us can do, locally. We can do it ourselves. But there’s something really depressing and frankly frightening to have our government essentially pat us on the head and ask us to stay home. I GET IT medically (even if I don’t totally agree) …. but it’s NOT HOW AMERICANS ARE BUILT. We needs calls to action.

              We could start a thread here at CTH and have lots of ideas that would pull people off their couches.

              –helping to deliver food
              –help restaurants re-tool themselves as grocery stores
              –build temp shelters/fences in people’s yards to quickly take in dogs on emergency basis
              –make big batches of home-made dog food in case of shortage
              –make big batches of PEOPLE food for all the situations people may need ready meals (hospitals, food kitchens, neighbors, etc)
              –create online neighborhood resource boards for barter and quick-response help
              –scale up local food resources (kind like CSAs on steroids)
              –sewing masks and gowns and making sterilizer

              And I’m not good of thinking of things … but point is, we could USE this time to start digging out the paths and constructing the mechanisms for SMALLER living, i.e., not dependent on big box retail + online which is the pipeline to the globalized supply chains we need to END. Over years we have unlearned and dismantled how to do life within our means and resources (geographically and practically) and we can re-learn.

              We’re Americans. We’ll rally if called to action — even in pandemic. Right now we’re essentially being told our duty is to cower inside and try to “relax.” No one’s going to save us but ourselves. We can be safe without being passive … and frankly our way of life depends on it.

              The alternative to a life where a weekly alert tells us the times we can leave the house and a drone delivers our rations is to re-wire our brains, bodies and actions NOW that it’s up to us and our local community.

              Didn’t intend to go off on all that … but it’s what I started thinking in re to your point about using this time to get back to the REAL economy and off the paper/Wall Street/financial economy …….

              Liked by 1 person

              • Dutchman says:

                Good ideas all! Heres a couple more; start small and medium sized “victory gardens” both for individual households, and ‘vacant lot’ community gardens.
                You can weed, etc while maintaining 6′ distance, in fact its almost MADE for it.
                And, it would get people outside in fresh air, sunshine and excercise.
                Local musicians could play “music to garden to”, again maintaining distances.

                A thought occurred to me, as I was making coffee, this a.m.

                Coffee filters look an awful lot like the material on face masks.
                Pipe cleaners or similar around the edge, with the filter folded over, like a casing but glued.
                Couple rubber bands, and a message on the front with felt pen.
                “Screw China”, “Screw Virus”, “China sucks”,…well, you get the idea,…

                One thing did occur to me; No mass, lone shooters lately!

                Hard to pull off a lone shooting, without a large gathering of victims, in a gun free, shooting gallery!
                Actually, PDJT HAS shared some stories of optimism, of people pulling together.

                Perhaps email Whitehouse, telling him we want to hear MORE?

                Liked by 1 person

    • fred5678 says:

      As most hand sanitizer is 60% alcohol, vodka and gin work just as well. Also, you get to lick the excess off, to boot!

      Liked by 5 people

      • Steele81 says:

        Our family has been making our own hand sanitizer. There are lots of recipes out there and if you look around you probably have all the ingredients or you can find them. I had several bottles of 70% isopropyl alcohol at the barn and husband had some white lightening.

        Liked by 1 person

      • teabag14 says:

        OH, NO F IN WAY! I need every spare drop of vodka for my world famous Black and/or White Russian Kahluasions. Oh dear. Is that raciss? 😂

        Liked by 5 people

      • The Devilbat says:

        60% alcohol is 120 proof. Only Everclear or similar at 180 proof is useful for hand sanitizer and I do NOT recommend your drinking it without first watering it down. Remember that the proof number is twice the alcohol number.

        Liked by 1 person

        • I was lucky. I had made hand sanitizer in years past for myself and I had a bottle of Everclear in my pantry. Everclear, vegetable glycerin and aloe Vera. Add a few drops of your favorite essential oil. Clove oil is supposed to be antiviral and oregano oil (very potent) is supposed to kill MERSA so I just filled up a few bottles and refill the small one in my handbag. I also spray everything with peroxide instead of Lysol. Much more affordable and no smell unless you add essential oil.

          Liked by 2 people

      • sturmudgeon says:

        fred… How and why did it get on your boot?

        Liked by 2 people

    • WSB says:

      Call your local pizza delivery place and ask them if they can sell you TP.

      One of my clients who has an Italian Restaurant was asked by a customer…and he sold him the rolls when he picked up his takeout.

      Pending your state and local laws, any restaurant that is capable should put on line and on the street a list of prepackaged items they can sell.

      It makes so much sense.

      Liked by 5 people

  7. wondering999 says:

    Many of the local churches have “Bounty Gardens” for fresh vegetables in season.
    It’s a good time for planting, here’s hoping that some out-of-school students, especially strong teens, can make a difference for their family and also the rest of the community.

    The work does not have to be done in groups. Many churches have garden property — also there are farmers who could probably use help. If other pinches to the supply chain come up, this could be essential. Haven’t the British been warned to expect power outages? Read that someplace.
    https://thebountygarden.wordpress.com/

    Liked by 4 people

  8. elarson says:

    That Kraft macaroni & cheese smell was so pervasive in Champaign.
    I didn’t eat it very often, so it was “What the heck is that smell?”
    Finally one of my roommates was making it one night and I actually stuck my head out our front door and realized “That’s it!!!”

    Liked by 3 people

  9. fred5678 says:

    This CCP virus is exposing those who don’t know how to boil water and must buy prepared foods.

    2 for 1 specials on fresh or frozen meat allowed me to buy two turkey breasts at $1.25 lb. net cost.

    Cloistered menu this month — hot turkey sandwiches.

    Liked by 8 people

  10. teabag14 says:

    Thank you for this info. Forewarned is forearmed. ❤

    Liked by 4 people

  11. Magabear says:

    This could lead the left to finally revolt. I mean, having to eat the same food as deplorables?! 😳😮

    Went to my local Redner’s market tonight. Well stocked on everything but (you guessed it) paper products and anti-bacterial soaps. Frankly, even I didn’t think people were this full of 💩.

    Liked by 2 people

    • muckeyduck says:

      Fight Coronavirus germ: Drop by you local ABC Liquors, and get a bottle of Everclear 151, 189 or 190 proof. Mix in proper proportions with Aloe Vera gel and you have effective homemade hand sanitizer.

      Alternate Receipt: Drink the Everclear. (Disclaimer: Will not prevent Coronavirus, but you probably want care.)

      Liked by 4 people

      • Deplorable_Infidel says:

        Devil’s Spring(s) is another brand name that is 160 proof (80% alcohol/volume)

        Liked by 1 person

      • leavemygunsalone says:

        We can’t find aloe gel anywhere, that is scarce as everything else.

        Like

      • Dutchman says:

        Submerge unopened can of sweetened, condensed evaporated milk in water, in a crock pot on low for 8 hours; don’t ‘overcook’ and make sure top of can is totally covered with water, like by 1/2 inch.
        After 8 hours, remove and cool, then open and put resulting carmel in mixing bowl and beat for 2 minutes, and add in 1/4 cup cream.

        Soak 1/2 cup coffee grounds in 1/2 cup everclear, until liquid is dark brown and add to mix, and beat until thoroughly mixed…..

        Oh HAND sanitiser,…sorry I thought this was “things you can make with everclear,…sorry! …NEVERMIND!

        Liked by 2 people

        • Dutchman says:

          (Add the strained LIQUID, NOT the coffee grounds, lol)

          Like

        • muckeyduck says:

          I kind of liked where that receipt was going, what is the end result.

          Like

          • Dutchman says:

            Its what I think of as a mental recipe. I haven’t actually tried it yet.
            Idea is to end up with something lile a home made Baileys caramel liqueur.
            I HAVE made my own caramel, with the sweetened condensed milk, and it works GREAT.
            Every time I make a batch, I THINK about this recipe,….
            Could use whiskey, or vodka instead of everclear, or even make a “virgin” version with water, I suppose?

            Like

            • muckeyduck says:

              I was thinking about the can of milk unopened swelling up and bursting, and started to laugh at a memory form my youth.

              When I first move out on my own, I hated washing dishes, so i would take a can of corn and green beans, and just tear the paper label off, and stick the can on the electric burner.

              One night after “teeing it up” as my dad called drinking, I came home, put a steak in the oven on broil, and put a can of corn and a can of green beans on the stove top. Problem is, I forgot to open them.

              At some point later, work up. The steak had turned to charcoal, and the two can had exploded, flew across the counter, and shattered my coffee pot, and I had green bean hanging off my walls like leaches. The corn looked like my walk had chicken pocks.

              Like

              • Dutchman says:

                Funny, and I can just see it. Yeah, with the milk, you need to make sure it stays totally immersed, and the cans don’t touch each other.

                And, ONLY 8 hrs. I let one batch go longer, and it gets real dark brown.

                Like

    • MD says:

      When you think about it, this shut down is hurting the elite liberals a lot more than the average Trump supporter.

      Most of the businesses shut down are restaurants, entertainment, beauty salons, malls etc. The average employee is probably going to do fine with the stimulus checks and additional unemployment available to them during the shut down.

      Liberal elites frequent these places daily as a lifestyle. Not to mention Hollywood who is also having to sit alone without crowds surrounding them at cocktail parties kissing their butts.

      Deplorables probably don’t care about the next garbage movie they put out, don’t shop at the mall (too expensive), normally eat at home, have never been to a cocktail party etc.

      Liked by 6 people

      • The Devilbat says:

        Not to mention that the movie theaters are all closed and the Manhattan elite can’t go to see a Broadway show. Life for the demented left must be unbearable.

        Liked by 4 people

      • Newhere says:

        In terms of lifestyle and geography, there’s likely truth to this; libs are crammed in cities and highly dependent on services, practically and psychologically. That said, many many Americans everywhere are prone to job and financial insecurity, and the immediate effects of this are real.

        Like

      • Dutchman says:

        In so many ways, this is a positive for deplorables vs elites;
        Who’s important a JANITOR, until recently considered the lowest, most demeaning of occupations, or a movie star, until recently considered one of the highest?

        A “Sports star”, or a Truck driver?

        A Hollywierd loudmoth tweeted, 2 months,ago “Deplorables like living in sparsely populated rural areas, cause they don’t like PEOPLE”, and no doubt got lots of kudos in twitterville.

        Yeah, hows that living in densely populated cities working for you NOW, sweetheart?

        And how about those bans on disposable straws and grocery bags?

        Open borders, with CBP and ICE Eliminated, yeah what a GREAT IDEA/S!

        And, the Dems just can’t help themselves, as they show their true colors with Dem govenors responding with rediculous edicts,…
        Banning Rx’s of malaria drug, then begging PDJT for some, less than a,week later.
        Declaring gun stores and shooting ranges non essential, and having Trump admin overrule.

        I wonder, with all these food producers and PPE producers working 24/7, if the economy won’t take as big a hit as,some think?

        IF we can get out of this within a month, and with the pump priming of the stimulas, I could see the economy going ballistic.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Newhere says:

          Re gun stores — yeah it’s been dem governors and mayors trying to shut them down (who no doubt themselves live behind gates and security) …. but let’s not forget it’s their liberal residents desperately running out to buy guns they have no idea how to use, at the slightest whiff of danger! I wonder when they’ll be back to lecturing the deplorables that guns are a public health threat….

          Typical — slightest hint of fear and ALL the gun piety dissolves to fairy dust

          Like

          • Dutchman says:

            Hah! My libertard, TDS possesed sister’s husband ‘inherited’ a 1911 Colt .45, one of the first batches made.

            She wanted to get rid of it. In fact, about 3 1/2 years ago, she clic-baited in to an anti-gun website, and wrote letters to every local, state and National politician, urging them to ban semi-automatic weopons,….even though she couldn’t tell me exactly WHAT made a gun a semi-auto.

            Anyway, so they wanted to sell this gun. Then all the fake news stories of Maga hatted Trump supporters committing violence, turned her 180 degrees on 2A; she WANTED a gun, to defend herself and family, from us crazy Trumpers!

            Nothing like fear, to change ones perspective.
            I read,similar story of guy in New Orleans; pre-Catrina, he was all for gun-confiscation.
            Post Catrina, he is,”cold, dead hands!”

            Like

        • givethankswithoutceasing says:

          Brilliant assessment! Love the new status of the janitor! Just for fun, bought a shotgun yesterday!

          Like

  12. Kerry Gimbel says:

    Yes Sundance is right about dish and dishwasher soap. Bought the last container of dishwasher soap yesterday from our IGA. Susanville CA

    Liked by 4 people

  13. BigTalkers says:

    Paper products should catch up quickly, too. We have enough fast-growth Southern pine down here to paper the world.

    Liked by 5 people

  14. ltravisjr says:

    Very informative and reassuring article – thanks! I would temper the focus on Mac n cheese demand as a telling example of these dynamics at play. Remember – this is lent and there is higher demand for meatless foods during lent.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. treehouseron says:

    So the Food Lion i’ve been going to, because it’s the only one open at night, is still in about the same situation as it was two weeks ago. No toilet paper, no meat at all, very little frozen food, very little canned goods.

    I went two days ago, and the cashier told me that business was actually way down, likely because they’re sold out of alot of things was his joke. It was so dead, that when I went there at 9:30 I checked online to see what they had changed their hours to, because there were only 3 cars in the whole parking lot and I thought they were closed. They weren’t. They just didn’t have any customers!

    So even with much less customers (last week, at the same time, they had 15 or so customers, but you know it’s all anecdotal)…. they still can’t get the shelves stocked.

    They did have enough ketchup though so Heinz is getting the stuff to them somehow 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Magabear says:

      Giant food stores actually has Stouffers frozen foods on sale. 5 for $10.00! 😊

      Loves me some Stouffers meat lasagna. 🍜

      Like

  16. chzheadproud67 says:

    I have about 70 laying hens, I was previously known as “the crazy chicken lady”. Now, I’m all my neighbors new best friend! 🙂

    Liked by 19 people

    • The Devilbat says:

      Lets hope that there is no feed shortage.

      Liked by 1 person

      • chzheadproud67 says:

        This time of year their pelleted feed intake goes way down as they free range in our pastures for most of their food! Plus I’ve got a fairly good stock of pellets, just in case!

        Liked by 4 people

        • JTR says:

          I used to be known as that crazy chicken lady in my neighbourhood. I had to quit having chickens because of my disability, but I sure do miss my little flock! The lady across the road came to me one day moaning about my birds being in her driveway. I just laughed and told her to just get the water hose out and shoo them off. They will soon stop going over there, lol. One of her cats had kittens in one of my nests!

          Liked by 3 people

    • MelH says:

      Eggs are rationed in California. If you and mate eat 2 eggs for breakfast, your one dozen is gone in 3 days. Milk is VERY scarce too. Orders for pick up or delivery have to be placed a week in advance. And starting this week, EVERYONE is covering their face,most with Painter’s masks, and wearing gloves. Grocers have marked the floors near the check-out counters with colored tape strips 6 ft. apart. In this County of 2 million people, in 19 cities, there are 212 Confirmed Cases and 3 deaths. But last Wednesdays’ newspaper headlines, in huge bold black letters, said ” OFFICIAL: 14,000 COULD DIE IN CONTRA COSTA.” Land O’ Liberals!

      Like

      • Ootenvault says:

        Hi Mel, I live in COCO County also, think we only have 1 million. Get your point tho, CoCo Health website today has 300 infected with 32 hospitalized. 4000 tested. Got a long way to go to get to 14,000. Or Gov’s claim 56% in CA will get virus. – 20 million.

        Like

    • leavemygunsalone says:

      Most people don’t know you can freeze eggs using an ice cube tray, when frozen, pop them into freezer bags. But these days how many people have freezer space?

      Liked by 3 people

  17. Miya says:

    Colgate Palmolive has encountered supply chain issues getting raw materials for their soaps and sanitizers. They’re working constantly (my cousin is getting a ton of overtime), but they’re not sure how much longer they’ll be running, weeks, if they can’t resupply. They plan on working until they run out of ingredients and have sold products six months out.

    Just a ground report.

    Liked by 6 people

  18. Vince says:

    People don’t need macaroni out of a box to have good mac and cheese. If you have pasta (good luck if you are starting now), you can fix a nice sauce out of melted butter or olive oil and garlc, and grate parmesian or romano cheese over it. It tastes much better than the boxed stuff.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Randy Blain says:

      2 tablespoons butter go into a pan and melted.. Add a handful of flour and keep stirring and scraping until all the flour is browned and mixed with the butter. Then begin adding in two cups of milk or half and half a quarter cup at a time and stir till even consistency. Add salt and pepper and paprika to taste. Turn off heat and add a pound or two of cheddar. Stir lightly to leave chunks of cheddar intact. Throw the cooked pasta in a casserole dish and douse it with the cheese sauce. Add cracker/bread/corn flake crumbs in top and bake at 375 for 25 minutes. Yummy.

      Like

  19. Felipe Garza says:

    Regularly I read in the Official Russian export news how the poor in the US are suffering under capitalism and denied aid of any kind by the US Gov’t.
    I realize now the magnitude of that suffering and am appalled.
    Somewhere, even as I write there is a poor person standing outside a tattoo parlor, EBT card in hand with a fresh refill of cash, but the tattoo parlor is closed so he or she must go away denied and unable to buy the instant food of their choice on the way home, will be forced to cook something (The Inhumanity!).
    As that’s not enough, after they’ve suffered through their meal, they probably have to demean themselves by using generic toilet paper.
    Well, my heart hangs heavy tonight for the impoverished but I feel better knowing that the taxpayers have given them a $900. iphone for comfort as they face these indignities.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Henry J says:

      States are currently raising the EBT limits per month. I seen some as high as $700 per month for family with 2 kids. It’s no wonder the stores are out of food. The EBT folks are buying it all before any working person can. Locally Hamburger Meat has doubled in price in the last week and eggs are 3x what I paid last month. It must be nice to spend $700 untaxed and unearned on food every month. I usually budget ~$150 of earned and taxed income (HAHAHAHA) for one person which leaves me around $137 before the Hahahaha other tax (sales taxes) on the food which are almost 10% locally LOL. What kind of world are we living in? America has gone crazy.

      Like

  20. hawkins6 says:

    Re–“Canned vegetable production is almost unimaginable in scale.” I never bought canned veggies before this outbreak–only frozen raw veggies–but I do now to diversify storage.
    ———————————————-
    It’s time for a new “Battle Slogan” in President Trump’s “War.”
    I’m sure someone can write a better one but it should declare something like–“Save lives and Save the Nation.” The 2 are obviously not separate concerns. They are interwoven and while many precious lives are on life support, so are many important sections of the nation’s economy. Neither should be left to die.

    I agree with Mark Levin’s concerns and suggestions about the economy. I’m sure many of us have been worried about the economies of their nation for sometime. I think it’s time to begin an Official Back to Work Process for all businesses small and large. Business owners that hope or expect to reopen should be planning now how to best adapt their workplaces for April 30th like the grocery stores, My Pillow etc have done by implementing reasonable precautions for their employees. Reliable ways must be found to protect Care home residents from preventable infections. The aged and most vulnerable must continue to self isolate if necessary, Not excluding walks in safe areas etc. Meanwhile, the nation must be safely taken off life support before it’s too late. It already is for some.

    April 30th should be COVID-19 D Day. This should be the latest date to go back to work and deal wisely with the C-19 enemy like all of the “essential” workers have been doing for weeks. ie Hand washing, distancing etc. Whether Birx–Fauci’s unreliable model curve is flattened to their satisfaction or not it will be time to save the nation.

    Some brilliant minds have been on standby rather than preparing for a safe resurgence of their businesses.

    Liked by 4 people

    • I have been thinking the same thing hawkins6.

      We need to be mindful of the dangers of this virus and careful but we need to start thinking about moving from our hunkering down mode to our breakout attitude.

      I hope, like you, that we have some very brilliant minds working on a successful resurgence of our countries economy while so many of us must focus on foraging for our needs or caring for our sick family members.

      We know we can not depend on the Dems all they are going to do is blame Pres Trump and whine about everything he has tried to do to fix things not being perfect.

      Liked by 3 people

    • sturmudgeon says:

      I hope it is sooner that the end of April!

      Liked by 3 people

  21. Jlwary says:

    This doesn’t make sense to me. Thoughts, SD?

    “”We need you to start dumping your milk,” said his contact from Dairy Farmers of America (DFA), the largest U.S. dairy cooperative.”

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-dairy-insight-idUSKBN21L1DW

    Like

  22. George Hicks says:

    Last year my Dr. told me to cut out the carbs and he was pretty impressed with my due diligence – no bread, pasta and just about anything else I could think of. My last visit (early in Jan) he was impressed AND I was losing weight.
    Since the ‘working from home’ (for me since 3/13) I’ve been unable to be so picky about my diet. In addition, I certainly don’t get as much activity as I did in the office, as my stay-at-home-work consists of sitting at my laptop for most of the day…oh, and eating more than usual probably out of boredom and worry.
    My wife is gone from 8AM to 7PM daily babysitting my SIL kids so every day I’m trapped in the house alone. My only escape is when I get to visit them on FRI & SAT evenings.
    I also work in the airline industry, which has been hit very hard, so I have my job security to worry about as well.
    As I re-read this, I feel ashamed: A friend of ours’ mother passed away tonight in the hospital. She had many underlying problems BUT her family was unable to visit her in her dying hours due to the CV scare. Her family is so upset that they couldn’t be there for her.
    I’m very lucky!

    Liked by 9 people

    • Mari in SC says:

      I worked at home by myself (except for the cats) for 3.5 years before retiring in January. I did not always do it, but when I made my lunch the night before or in the morning before starting work, I ate a lot healthier, usually a dinner plate size salad with some protein (hard boiled egg, cheese, and/or toasted almond slivers). The last part I eat is the plain goat cheese, toasted almonds, and strawberries with Ken’s Steakhouse Vidalia Onion dressing. Cutting up all the veggies at once and storing them in glass canning jars makes a salad easy to assemble.

      My co-worker, who was also WFH, and I both tried to walk 250 steps per hour, even if it was just standing and stepping while on mute on conference calls, (no video, thankfully).

      Good luck with WFH and your job.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Rudolph says:

      I think it is awful that a person can’t be with a loved one in the hospital, especially if they are passing. Anyone who is in a hospital or long term care facility needs someone who will advocate for them! People who get the most visitors get the best care! You are at their mercy.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Dutchman says:

        While I recognise each situation is unique, and so its sometimes necesary, I am appalled at how much the accepted way is for people dieing to do so in a hospital.

        When I go, if I have the option, I intend to die at home.

        I even heard a house was harder to sell, because,a person had died in it? There was a sensible time when most people died in there homes; people dieing from terminal illnesses or “old age”.

        And, HOSPICE care IS available. WHY would I want to die in a HOSPITAL, full of mostly strangers, who can even control who visits me?

        Far better to go out surrounded by friends and family, in my own bed.

        But maybe thats just me,…?

        Liked by 3 people

        • destashjan says:

          It’s not just you. My mom, terminal lung cancer, WAS in a nursing home.
          She wanted to come home, to die at home. She lived with us for 18 years.
          I took her home, and with hospice, I cared for her…she lived another 2 months.
          She died at home, Aug. 28, with me sitting on her bed, holding her hand, talking to her.
          Just the two of us. Family. I’m so thankful that I made that decision to take her home.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Dutchman says:

            I saw my Mom die in a nursing home of Cancer. One of the reasons I am committed to not going that way.
            Not to in any way denigrate the workers in such facilities, some are very compassionate, etc.
            But yeah, thats the,way I want to go, I am sure SHE is as grateful for your decision.

            Like

        • Rudolph says:

          My mother wanted to die at home too. Unfortunately, the series of events during her cancer treatment left her with a long hospital stay in which she never returned home.

          Like

  23. Mari in SC says:

    Aldi’s had plenty of regular chicken Thursday morning but no organic chicken, either whole or boneless, skinless breasts. I had to go to two stores to get 2 gallons of organic milk because the limit was 2 gallons per shopper. I was going to stop at Trader Joe’s until I saw the line of customers waiting to get in, each standing on their own 6 feet apart X.

    Last summer, Chewy was out of the prescription cat food that one of my 3 cats eats. He likes only one brand and one flavor of that brand. You would THINK an 18 pound cat would eat as anything, but you would he wrong. Petflow.com had it about a week later and I bought 6 bags to last 24 weeks. Call me a hoarder, but this is how I always shop. I bought another 6 bags in February. The thing that has been out is the flavor of canned food the other 2 like, but Chewy finally has it and I bought 3 units of 24 cans each tonight. It should get here in 7-10 days because they are backed up with so many orders. All of this will take us into the fall with what I already have.

    Cat litter was also problematic. Their brand was out everywhere online but I got a couple 19 pound boxes from the Petsmart 12 miles away (local one was out). Chewy finally got 14 pound boxes in and I ordered 7 of them so we are set on that for 5 months now.

    Publix has been out of their brand of dishwasher detergent for 8 weeks or so and I may have to switch to the more expensive stuff eventually but I have a couple months right now.

    A bunch of people in Aldi’s were wearing gloves and masks. No, just no…

    Liked by 2 people

    • Perot Conservative says:

      You don’t believe we can spread the virus by droplets? One sneeze, one cough? We could be a carrier?

      Like

    • MfM says:

      Many people don’t know how to wear gloves. I wear them now grocery shopping. It’s taking me much longer because selection is down. I know I touch my face, the main reason I wear gloves is to be aware of that and stop.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. cherokeepeople says:

    my mom used to make the best (grandma’s recipe)homemade mac and cheese,with stewed tomatoes.

    Liked by 2 people

  25. cherokeepeople says:

    one thing that i hope this farce does is get people to prepare.this is one thing i inherited from my parents,they both went thru the depression and growing up our cupboards were always full.my wife and i are the same way,we take the shopper and get the deals,sometimes we don’t need what we buy but when things are cheap,stock up. we bought tp right before it disappeared,we didn’t need it butt our list that day was small so grabbed some,we still have over half of it and could probably still go another month.

    Liked by 4 people

    • barnabusduke says:

      A $400 investment in a freezer goes a LONG way these days Cherokee! 😉

      Liked by 3 people

    • auntiefran413 says:

      You sound like me! I usually say I’m still shopping for a family of seven. If it’s on sale, you buy three or four (even though I’m the only one I’m feeding these days). Old habits are hard to break, but I have to say my freezer is full and so is the pantry; I could probably survive six months without going to the grocery store except for my all-time favorite cheese.

      Liked by 4 people

    • destashjan says:

      My friends used to laugh at my prepping. “What are you prepping for…Armageddon?”
      Umm, yes. Yes I am.
      And here it is…and here they are, calling or messaging with “could you spare some “….” (fill in the blank).
      We’re all set for at least a year with everything except fresh fruits, veggies.
      And there’s enough canned and frozen that we can make do until the garden is in.
      I’m hoping this will have others join the ranks of We Who Are Prepared.

      Like

  26. T2020 says:

    Great analysis, SD!!! Thank you so much!!! Regarding dog food…My dog gets plain boiled chicken with a Dr Harvey’s Veg-to-bowl mixture added. Dry food was too hard on his stomach…kept puking it up…even the expensive brands.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Newhere says:

      My dog has GI issues to, part of why I worried about it. Limited diet. I stocked up on some frozen chicken. Dr. Harvey’s (or maybe Honest Kitchen) sells powdered bone broth — maybe a good one to keep for a pinch!

      Liked by 2 people

  27. Monadnock says:

    My wife was in Kroger earlier today – the deli had chicken fingers for 99 cents/pound. Pre COVID-19, that price was 6.99 per pound.

    Needless to say we’re eating chicken fingers all weekend.

    Like

  28. Perot Conservative says:

    Costco related note:

    1. First time I have ever seen 2-3 isles where ALL the product from eye level – upwards – is GONE! For a month now?

    2. Large interior clothing section – virtually spotless 3 trips in a row. All clothes folded perfectly, everything in place. I.e. people aren’t buying clothes.

    Aside: UPS driver said it is almost as busy as Christmas. He was asked to work Saturday overtime. Online ordering.

    Liked by 2 people

  29. law4lifeblog says:

    I have 7 cats, and I just placed a big order with Chewy.com, where stocks were already low. Thanks, Sundance!!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Bret says:

    From south Florida to Wisconsin , dairy farmers are dumping whole milk because processors and retailers are claiming there isn’t demand. Likewise, cattle producers are selling animals at the lowest price in years, but packers are making a pile of money.

    Meanwhile, stores are having to ration milk and are very limited on meat. There is a severe disconnect.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. A2 says:

    Well, this morning Hong Kong) biked into the ‘town’ where there are two supermarkets. Not the gaisee where most folks buy their fruit, veg, eggs, frozen meat and swimming fish and seafood.

    You have to understand that HK supermarkets probably equate with a large convenience store, not those grand cultural experiences of the the world market that are in the US. Whenever I went home, first stop was I want to see the grocery stores. Palaces of products, from the mundane to the exotic and everything in between.🤣

    Today, with reference to this article, I found that flour has flown off the shelves. Very weird as most HK people don’t have ovens. So I surmise a lag in exports as it is mostly from the US, UK, some from Japan or Korea.

    Interestingly, rice supply is fine (a government priority) and big bags of US produced rice, besides from Thailand, Japan and Vietnam, not much from China. Anyway people don’t want to buy Chinese rice. They think it’s contaminated.

    Meat and chicken supplies are fine, mostly sourced from US, Brazil, Thailand and Australia. However US sources have dried up. Lamb is very expensive, and Chinese generally in the south don’t like it. That is sourced from NZ, Australia and UK. Pork is from China, Denmark and some from the US, again, that has dried up.

    Pasta is plentiful, from Italy, UK and US producers.

    As for cheese, not many Chinese people eat it, but mostly products from EU, UK and also US processed cheese. Putting cheese on macaroni is like a scare food.🤣

    Canned goods are still on the shelves, because most Hong Kong people won’t eat stuff out of cans.

    Also, though spices in jars is ok, most people do not use these ‘exotic’ things. Ketchup comes from UK, US and Asia, and mayo is there, but most folks don’t eat it.

    Having said that, locally, the veg and fruits are fine. I should also note that Hong Kong has the highest per capita consumption of orange, all from the US.

    Cheers,
    A2

    Liked by 5 people

  32. MfM says:

    Eggs will likely still be a problem. Part of it is restaurant verse home use. Liquid vs whole eggs. People often see eggs as a cheap, quick food, so home demand is up. In my area (near Philly) there are limits and prices are up. The cheap ones sell out, leaving more expensive ones, which then sell out. Easter often has sales, who knows this year.

    Another issue is eggs are cyclical. From chick to egg layer takes time, and given heat and light variance egg production varies. Industry wide I’m sure they juggle that by producing more dehydrated and frozen eggs when there is a glut.

    Ramping up production isn’t quick, from chick to egg layer is 18-20 weeks. Egg size varies with age of the birds. There is one vegetable market near me that specializes and only sells extra large eggs. Great for many things except for baking , were the standard size large can make a difference. If that is all I have, I scramble and measure and save the balance .

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Angus D says:

    How long until we see the next plandemic?

    Liked by 1 person

  34. MfM says:

    I don’t know if this will happen but some enterprising person should repackage the more generic cases of TP.

    I just went to my local restaurant warehouse stores web site. Their paper products including TP are sold out. These are 50 & 100 rolls per case and even the ones with the oversized cores or coreless that need special dispensers are awaiting shipment.

    This is a walk in location and when I went there mid January to restock several spices and basics they were fully stocked. Interesting to see that all their rice in 25 pound bags are gone and many of the 50 pound bags. Obviously when grocery stores were seeing panic shopping others knew these alternatives.

    Like

  35. iwasthere says:

    Oh the humanity! A shortage of Kraft Mac & Cheese? Somebody might have to rediscover the secret formula for Mac & Cheese from scratch. FYI, my wife has been making her own dog food, and believe me the dogs are looking much better on the home made stuff.

    Like

    • Henry J says:

      There is a shortage of Mac and Cheese and Cereal in general because they have raise the EBT Limits. Also WIC is being given without in person verification right now until May and June in many states. So look for food to be in shortage for atleast 2-3 months because people on the Govt’ benefits will be utilizing every cent of that free Money which also buys more food since they are not paying the sales taxes that us self paying folks do.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. J says:

    As far as I have seen chicken is nearly back to normal with mostly variety of cut issues.

    Its hamburger that is short here west of Detroit. I havent seen more than one or two small packs of hamburger at a time in the Kroger, Meijer and Walmart I check out 2 or 3 times per week, for nearly a month.

    And the price is astronomical. All I see are the small 1lb packs and they are more expensive than the three pound packs I used to buy. At Meijers they had the 70/30 hamburger in the one pound plastic tubes priced at $8 dollars a pound. I used to be able to get 3lbs of 90/10 at the same price.

    Like

  37. MorningWings says:

    We’ve practiced preparedness for some time, but this situation has shown us the vulnerabilities in our preps and plans. These posts on the food supply-chain have been very interesting & extraordinarily helpful, so thank you, thank you.
    Toilet paper is still MIA, as is hand sanitizer (though I now have supplies to make my own) and disinfectants. No zinc and echinacea, alcohol or hydrogen peroxide. No hand soap, but body wash and shampoo are good substitutes. Spaghetti sauce and soups are scant. Paper napkins and paper towels are hit & miss, but we found big rolls of wonderful shop towels at Tractor Supply.
    The local grocery outlet has become my go-to store for weekly needs and for some stocking of freezer-safe dairy. As long as you’re not set on a certain brand, they’re stocked with many staple items. They have plenty of eggs but lately the the shells are paper-thin. I think the poultry houses are running the lights 24/7 on those poor chickens! Dollar General has also been pretty good. Today’s household task is cleaning, inventory, and organization of the freezer.

    Like

  38. thedoc00 says:

    This happened weeks ago but good to see SD’s the article to get out the word.

    Two of my neighbors are food company chemical engineers. They told me 2 weeks ago that their employers had already instructed their sales representatives and plant managers to reorient on selling as well as delivering to retail outlets.

    Like

  39. So, on a war footing, and a Deep TP State working against us…got it. This is all the Big Malls’ fault, with all those bathrooms (hee-hee).

    Like

  40. Tom says:

    About the time that Kraft, etc, really get their swagger on, some competitor is going to blast them out of the water. Unfortunately, it will probably be a foreign company. Hubris has probably killed as many American companies as regulation.

    Like

  41. Sundance, fabulous inputs as always. Learning something from you always. The enemy in this case, Communist China must be observing every move of POTUS Trump and his team in gearing up to defeat Chinese Virus INCLUDING this food supply chain/logistics approach, oil reserve/conservation, Water supply, power supply etc. Can you please provide some insights as how our country is gearing up for further sabotage by them in the next manufactured pandemic. ? To begin with (a) our Custom and border patrol should stop all sorts of plants/ seeds in the name of ethnic grocery consumption item should be stopped. (b) USMCA countries must have high vigil. MX, not worried as they will listen to POTUS but SOYBOY Canada is always a problem. (c) Our AG research labs/ university labs/companies where agri bio science is done, should curtail foreign students/employees.

    Like

  42. ed bernay says:

    NYC is considered to be a hotspot of Covid 19. Look at the number of deaths in NYC, the age range and the amount of people who died that had pre existing conditions. The majority of deaths are for people with pre existing conditions, over 45 and a huge part of that is people over 75 years old. Its was absurd to close down business in the country yet the Governors continue to keep them closed. Why? This data is available.

    I live in Pennsylvania. Gov Wolf has put a lot of people out of work He is destroying peoples’ lives yet there are quite a few progressive democrats on his Facebook page that continue to support him. It boggles the mind. Its amazing how much negative influence the mainstream media has on people. You can check out NYC’s stats at the following.

    https://www1.nyc.gov/assets/doh/downloads/pdf/imm/covid-19-daily-data-summary-deaths-04032020-2.pdf?fbclid=IwAR14uY-_XKdvF2wcMb2ed-VwycRNHiNo9ymi-guutase1Pb-YJsLd9XcDAM

    Like

  43. solomonpal says:

    The blue cities and states don’t get it. Red States and people keep them fed. Blue cities only provide services to each other… of of the efforts and production of the red population. If it was up to blue states to feed or keep the nation stable it would be a disaster. That’s why we have an electoral college.

    Like

  44. lgstarr says:

    My two remaining pets (a cat and a dog) are now both on prescription food, different brands. Neither of these prescriptions are available in pet stores and only one can actually be ordered through my vet (although both need a prescription). So I’ve been ordering through Chewy.com and spacing out the orders through auto-ship (for the discount) and also because it’s so expensive! If anyone reading this can convince me to double (or triple?) my order I will try soon. But I don’t want to just go ahead and do that unless the prescription food is also going to disappear–I’m retired and it’s VERY pricey stuff. HELP ANYONE??

    Like

    • ruralnc6 says:

      Hello lgstarr, I called Chewy last year and the representative was excellent and very patient and kind. I believe making the call might help you with your decision to see if the company foresees a shortage of your sweetheart’s prescription food in the near future. IMHO, I feel that the prescription pet food will still be available because it’s not massed produced on the same level as store-bought food. Good luck and blessings to you and your two sweethearts.

      Liked by 1 person

      • lgstarr says:

        Thanks! The few times I’ve called them, it’s been a great experience, really first class. Plus, they shipped today!! (They were supposed to ship for the cat on Monday and then I got an email saying they might be delivering in 7-10 days–a very close call to my backup supplies and, unlike my dog, she will start vomiting immediately without her special food and her daily Prednisolone). Thank you for commenting 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • ruralnc6 says:

          I hope your Kitty Cat will be OK until he/she gets the Chewy food. I love my two remaining dogs from the same litter, 13 yrs. old, one with Cushings Disease, not doing too well, their sister died last year from diabetes. They are everything to me, and I know your dog and cat are the same to you. Good Luck and Many Blessings.

          Like

  45. rd says:

    Interesting post by Kate at Small Dead Animals

    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/index.php/2020/04/04/wuhan-flu-20/

    Livestock prices are down, slaughterhouses are not running at normal capacity.

    Liked by 1 person

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