U.S. Wins Softwood Lumber Tariff Dispute -vs- Canada at WTO…

There’s a term called “zeroing” at the heart of this World Trade Organization decision that supports President Trump, Secretary Ross and USTR Lighthizer.

When an industry product like Canadian softwood lumber is shipped into the U.S. for sale at a lower price than exists in Canada, the U.S. Commerce department calls thatdumping“.  If the Canadian product is the same or higher in the U.S. as it is in Canada there is no dumping.  No dumping is a “zero” or normal price differential; hence “zeroing”.

The Canadian government is subsidizing their lumber industry by allowing tree removal from federal land at discounted rates so long as the lumber is exported.  This made softwood lumber cheaper in the U.S. than in Canada and set up the dumping issue.

[NOTE: This is the same issue with Steel and Aluminum from China]

U.S. lumber mills were going out of business because Canada was dumping subsidized product into the U.S. market at a discounted rate.  As a consequence, in 2017 Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross instituted a 20% tariff on Canadian lumber to protect the U.S. lumber industry.  The tariff is a countervailing duty to offset the Canadian subsidy. ie. “zeroing”.

With the 20% tariff, Canadian lumber sold into the U.S. was the same price as Canadian lumber sold in Canada.  This allows U.S. lumber mills to compete for U.S. market business on an equal basis.

Instead of removing their federal lumber subsidy (which would have removed the tariff) the Canadian government, via Justin Trudeau, went bananas and sued the U.S. at the World Trade Organization (WTO).  Trudeau was counting on prior disputes where the WTO did not side with the U.S. position on the calculations for industry “zeroing”.

However, in a departure from prior WTO opinion; and conceding to the obvious validity of the math while faced with a U.S. president who would not relent; the WTO agreed with President Trump, Secretary Ross and Ambassador Lighthizer and affirmed the 20% tariff as a valid countervailing duty.

The softwood lumber tariff was upheld by the WTO and Canada has lost its case.

This is a major victory for the U.S. with considerable ramifications for all further “anti-dumping” tariffs and/or countervailing duties.

(Reuters) […] U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer welcomed the ruling by a WTO dispute panel, which he said showed the “erroneous”, “unpersuasive” and “flawed reasoning” of Appellate Body rulings in the past.

“The United States commends this panel for doing its own interpretive analysis, and for having the courage to stand up to the undue pressure that the Appellate Body has been putting on panels for many years,” Lighthizer said in a statement.

He said the WTO rules did not prohibit zeroing, and the United States would never have signed up to WTO rules that did prohibit the practice.

“WTO Appellate Body reports to the contrary are wrong, and reflect over-reaching by that body,” he said.

Canada launched the WTO dispute in November 2017, saying it would forcefully defend its lumber industry against “unfair, unwarranted and deeply troubling” U.S. tariffs.

The U.S. Commerce Department had accused Canada of unfairly subsidizing and dumping softwood lumber, which is commonly used in the construction of homes. Its duties affected about $5.66 billion worth of imports.

There was no immediate reaction from Canada’s international trade ministry, which could appeal against the ruling. (more)

This ruling is especially important as USTR Lighthizer engages with China on the current trade discussion. Prior WTO rulings essentially allowed China to subsidize their state-run industries/companies and undermine free-market prices.  Globally this put China at a manufacturing advantage; however, moving forward, the U.S. can apply the “zeroing” analysis and offset the Chinese state subsidy with countervailing duties.

In essence this WTO ruling forces the financial principles underlying a free and fair market into the global economy.  If China wants to sell industry products into the U.S. they can no long manipulate their price to export at a lower cost than exists in China.

President Trump has a simple economic platform: “Buy American and Hire American“; toward that goal all economic and fiscal policies are now directed to assist U.S. manufacturing companies and retain U.S. workers.  This includes free, fair and reciprocal trade agreements. Period.

Once upon a time, there was an old man who used to go to the ocean to do his writing. He had a habit of walking on the beach every morning before he began his work. Early one morning, he was walking along the shore after a big storm had passed and found the vast beach littered with starfish as far as the eye could see, stretching in both directions.

Off in the distance, the old man noticed a small boy approaching.  As the boy walked, he paused every so often and as he grew closer, the man could see that he was occasionally bending down to pick up an object and throw it into the sea.  The boy came closer still and the man called out, “Good morning!  May I ask what it is that you are doing?”

The young boy paused, looked up, and replied “Throwing starfish into the ocean. The tide has washed them up onto the beach and they can’t return to the sea by themselves,” the youth replied. “When the sun gets high, they will die, unless I throw them back into the water.”

The old man replied, “But there must be tens of thousands of starfish on this beach. I’m afraid you won’t really be able to make much of a difference.”

The boy bent down, picked up yet another starfish and threw it as far as he could into the ocean. Then he turned, smiled and said, “It made a difference to that one!

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, Canada, Donald Trump, Economy, media bias, NAFTA, President Trump, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US Treasury, USA, USMCA. Bookmark the permalink.

123 Responses to U.S. Wins Softwood Lumber Tariff Dispute -vs- Canada at WTO…

  1. PLEASE, Mr. President.
    Too much WINNING.
    We can’t TAKE it anymore.

    Liked by 34 people

  2. Dam, kickass, let do it some more! MAGA!

    Liked by 12 people

  3. FofBW says:

    Oh Canada, say hello to the LION!

    Liked by 16 people

  4. Angel Martin says:

    One slight correction, mostl of the softwood here in Canada has been harvested from Provincial Government owned land, rather than Federal land.

    Other than that, the rest is absolutely correct.

    This has been an issue here in British Columbia for almost 40 years. They have known they were vulnerable to US action on this issue. The BC gov’t, regardless of party, has been in denial that this day could come.

    Some of us have been trying for 35+ years to get them to privatize at least some of the Crown lands, so that they could have some realistic private sector pricing on stumpage fees.

    But they wouldn’t do it. I guess they assumed that every administration would be like Bush or Obama to the indefinite future. Bad bet !

    Liked by 30 people

    • bertdilbert says:

      New Zealanders used to complain that milk is more expensive at home than countries they export to. Probably still do.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Kevin says:

        We do -to no avail. Plus butter at about $5 $6 for 500 grams

        Like

        • bertdilbert says:

          I think I pay about $3.50 a lb or 453 grams for butter here in the US. Back when I lived in NZ, we left the money in the milk bottles at the front door and the milk would be delivered in the morning. One thing I miss from NZ is you cannot buy hogget anywhere in the US.

          Like

          • Worked for BC and Canada on the Softwood Lumber cases back in early 90s as an economic consultant out of DC. Generally, the coverage on this is on the money. It does revolve around the stumpage fees in Canada/provinces. However, back in the 90s, the USITC looked at wholesale channel pricing, and Canada won those cases, because we were persuasive that southern yellow pine (grown in US southeast) was driving down the market price, not Canadian imports. That was because SYP was not viewed favorably by the housing sector as a construction material; it was better suited for pulp. Canadian SPF was more workable, and actually commanded a market premium even though it made inroads as (a subsidized) imported product.

            The only aspect of dumping not touched on here … NZ dairy perhaps relevant … is that lower export prices (compared to home market pricing) COULD also be the result of exporting to a large competitive market like the US. Whereas (and I don’t KNOW this to be the case) butter in NZ perhaps is high priced because the market is subject to collusive pricing by a small number of wholesalers with limited competition from imported butter. A lot of ‘dumping’ in the US market simply APPEARS to be dumping, because its the most price sensitive market in the world. It takes low prices to sell anything and hold market share. Whereas, higher prices in the exporting country can still find domestic buyers because the market is well controlled. So antidumping measures essentially say US producers merit protection when exporting countries can’t sell all of what they produce at home, because those exporters overcharge their home country consumers, and have leftovers to export.

            Liked by 1 person

            • bertdilbert says:

              Sometimes I wonder if the high domestic price is to curb consumption to allow more product for export. Like the outrageous price of gas in Norway, an oil producing country.

              Like

              • WES says:

                Bert: No it is what you get with Socialism! Milk, butter, egg, chicken marketing boards! You need a license to produce any of these commodities! There is no free market permitted!

                I often used to joke that the worst crime you could commit as a Canadian citizen coming back into Canada was to try and import milk, butter, eggs, and chicken! The border police would jump all over you if you dared to do this!

                Now if you were merely towing a trailer with a big round object with fins labelled atomic bomb, Canadian customs would would politely reassure you that there was no duty owing and oh by the way have a nice visit!

                When I was working in the Congo we could buy butter imported from Europe cheap! However other than subsidized butter, we couldn’t buy anything else at any price!

                Like

            • Ozzytrumpster says:

              In Australia we sell LPG to japan for 3c/litre. It is transported from source in huge tanker ships. To buy LPG at the bowser cost the aust public way more but it’s not dumping. It’s economy of sale and the cost of the infrastructure and delivery and all the middlemen between production and all the service stations in aust.

              Like

            • Ozzytrumpster says:

              In Australia we sell LPG to japan for 3c/litre. It is transported from source in huge tanker ships. To buy LPG at the bowser cost the aust public way more but it’s not dumping. It’s economy of sale and the cost of the infrastructure and delivery and all the middlemen between production and all the service stations in aust.

              Like

            • Ozzytrumpster says:

              In Australia we sell LPG to japan for 3c/litre. It is transported from source in huge tanker ships. To buy LPG at the bowser cost the aust public way more but it’s not dumping. It’s economy of sale and the cost of the infrastructure and delivery and all the middlemen between production and all the service stations in aust.

              Like

        • fred5678 says:

          Florida USA, at Walmart — I now buy Kerry Gold IRISH butter at $2.56 for 8 oz, 227 grams.
          Not much more than domestic butter.
          Almost all other food I buy is domestic, but KG is golden!

          Liked by 3 people

          • SteveT says:

            Because I’m the shopper, I always find it interesting to see prices of everyday items from round the globe.
            I was very surprised to see the butter prices. Here in SW France 227 gms (8oz) of butter can be had for as little as 1.29 euros – to over 2 euros for premium brands. I’m assuming this has something to do with the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and protecting French farmers. 1 euro = $1.15 approx

            SteveT

            Like

  5. bertdilbert says:

    Twinkle socks is too busy surrounded in his own scandal to deal with this small potato stuff….

    Liked by 4 people

    • “twinkle socks is too busy….” I believe ‘Twinkle Socks’, in the world of international trade and economics, is very dizzy and confused. Meanwhile President Trump’s astute negotiating “killers” have won another well deserved victory.

      Liked by 9 people

    • Our “not ready for prime time” PM is way in over his socks. Now he tried to sneak in the recent budget a stricter control on “irregulars” I.e., illegal immigrants, crossing into Canada from the US. Someone found this new legislation buried in the budget and cue the immigration lawyers and usual suspects citing human rights etc. Should be interesting days for our eyebrow raising PM.

      Like

  6. farinc says:

    Great story.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. farinc says:

    Great story.

    Like

  8. LBB says:

    Since this was a departure from WTO opinion on previous zeroing from US, did wolverines present a better case? or was it the product that was easily determined?

    Liked by 2 people

    • grlangworth says:

      Good question.

      Like

      • LBB says:

        I went to WTO site and found “key summary of findings” on this case . I am going to think it was both.

        One paragraph

        “With respect to the USDOC’s use of zeroing under the W-T methodology, Canada considered such type of zeroing to be inconsistent with the second sentence of Article 2.4.2, as interpreted in past cases. The United States considered such type of zeroing to be permissible under the second sentence. The Panel agreed with the United States that such type of zeroing is permissible under the second sentence of Article 2.4.2, and thus rejected Canada’s claim. In making its finding, the Panel noted that the second sentence of Article 2.4.2 would become inutile if zeroing was prohibited under the W-T methodology, as this methodology, which is designed to unmask targeted dumping, would not be able to do so. Taking into account this finding, the Panel also rejected Canada’s claim under Article 2.4 of the Anti-Dumping Agreement challenging the use of zeroing under the W-T methodology.”

        Liked by 2 people

    • Ray says:

      US. is the trough and Canada is far from the only country taking advantage. The one sided tarriffs are crony capitalism central and legion.

      Liked by 2 people

      • WES says:

        Ray: It was simply the fact that the US CoC wasn’t doing the negotiating!

        Trudope was still playing by the globalists playbook! They nicely topped up his family trust!

        Same for China too! More top ups for his family trust!

        Trudope is from Quebec. Corruption is Quebec’s favorite indoor sport!

        Need I say more!

        Like

    • I’d hazard to guess that the presentation was better; after all, we have people fighting for the US and not globalism.

      Liked by 2 people

    • BigTalkers says:

      Wilbur Ross didn’t become a billionaire in finance because he guessed at numbers.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dutchman says:

      Probably its because previous admins wanted to lose, otherwise they would have done what PDJT is doing on trade, 30 years ago!

      Like

  9. MAGAbear says:

    This is great news. Free trade zealots will cry “but it will make lumber more expensive!”, not realizing that as soon as all the lumber mills here shut down, the price will shoot upwards due to Canada now owning the market. Dumb, short term thinking leads to long time misery.

    Next, I hope the Trump administration gets rid of the Lacey act. Some of the best woods available to build guitars with are unavailable now because of the stupid law.

    Liked by 11 people

    • CountryDoc says:

      Maybe Gibson Guitars in Nashville can recover.

      Liked by 6 people

    • riverelf says:

      Softwood lumber has more than quadrupled in price (heavily wooded upstate central/western NY) in the last decade, making Walmart’s compressed sawdust furniture cheaper to buy than even the lowest grade white pine boards to DIY. That is wrong on multiple levels. Including, for the greenies, environmental reasons, since white pine grows pretty fast to harvest size, and sucks up plenty of their dreaded carbon d in the meantime.
      And yes please President Trump ditch the Lacey Act it’s a perfect example of leftard enviro-luncacy. Luthiers will thank you!

      Liked by 4 people

      • Your Tour Guide says:

        Maybe others here can bring in the dates better.

        ALSO : If anyone happens to be reading from the Trump
        administration, this might be of interest. It’s about local
        corruption, but I’ve seen similar in different jurisdictions.

        The year I’ve heard cited for timber sales skyrocketing
        is 1997. One of the reasons I heard cited was that Canada
        was killing some of the U.S. timber industry with cost
        undercutting.

        The reason I found out about all of this what occurred nearby
        around 15 + years ago. A new school was prepared to be built
        adjacent to my subdivision. The school board had re-assured
        us that we would have a 200 foot deep tree buffer between it
        and our neighborhood.

        Then, things started happening. Weird things. A large fire stared
        in the woods behind the subdivision. When I saw smoke blowing
        across an adjacent 4 lane, I turned around to go back and warn
        some neighbors nearby. There was already a fire truck parked
        in the area. I asked if the fire was under control. They replied that
        it had been extinguished. Then I asked if the fire was suspicious
        in origin. “Very much so” they replied. “There’s 7 fires that we put
        out back there. THERE’S ALSO A LOT OF TREES MARKED FOR
        CUTTING”.

        That’s when I found out that timber was at an all time high price.
        The area that the fires had been on covered 30 plus acres. Some of
        the trees on it were 5 foot across, and over 90 feet high. I also found
        out that when timber is cut in Georgia, that the price of it is declared
        to what city, village, or county that it sits in. This is so taxes can be
        collected on it. How they determine the price of lumber is called
        “cruising” timber. Some one comes out and figures out how much
        board footage is available from the trees, and gives a price on it for
        softwood vs hardwood.

        After the fire, the timber cutting began . They used a device called
        a “timberjack” which cut the trees off at the base, stripped the limbs,
        and loaded them on a logging truck. On a Saturday afternoon, some
        bulldozers and chain saws showed up, and cut down trees right up
        to people’s fence lines. Completely making a falsehood out of the 200
        foot tree buffer. Nothing could be done about it, because the county
        offices that over saw job sites was closed.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Your Tour Guide says:

          Part 2:

          Besides researching about timber prices and cruising timber
          I did some other digging. As mentioned before, cut timber in a
          given jurisdiction has to have a price affixed to it, so it can be
          taxed. The land that all the cut trees adjacent to my area had
          been on was purchased through public funds. So, any $$$
          gained through profits of timber sales should appear in the
          budget. None had appeared.

          A good friend of the family had grown up in our area. He moved
          away to Missouri, and got a good paying job. In logging. I told
          him about the disappearing trees. I told him what I thought had
          occurred: selling of timber, probable lining of pockets.

          He told me that by the amount of trees that had been cut, that
          they had at least 300 thousand dollars worth of trees that had
          been cut.

          The moral of the tale: When trees start being cut en mass on
          taxpayer bought land, do some digging on whether money from
          them is going into the general fund. In our area’s case, I believe
          something entirely different occurred.

          Liked by 2 people

          • LafnH20 says:

            TY, YTG.

            Prolly won’t have to dig very deep!

            Dug in – Like ticks on a hound… they are!

            Good Post!!

            Like

            • Your Tour Guide says:

              LafnH20 :

              Thanks. Was posting it as a heads up, ( as stated)
              that someone in the Trump administration would see it.

              I see this phenomenon all over the place in metro Atlanta.
              In many jurisdictions, there’s very restrictive tree ordinances.
              These ordinances are completely overlooked when the right
              developer or county official is involved. Graft.

              Anyone doing any digging on this, find a way to not expose
              yourself while doing so. I’ve heard too many stories about what
              the old line Georgia bunch can do. Don’t care to be part of that.

              Like

  10. walker4411 says:

    God Bless President Trump for all he is doing for our wonderful country!. Please keep him and his family in your prayers.

    Liked by 10 people

  11. sucesfuloser says:

    Electricity is higher in Montreal than NY. Will Canada lower the prices to its own?

    Like

    • WES says:

      Loser: No but if you live in Montreal you are a successful loser due to Quebec’s socialism!

      Can throw in milk, butter, eggs, chicken, etc!

      P.S. Ex Quebecer! Not any better in Ontario though! Probably worst!

      Like

  12. 335blues says:

    BUY AMERICAN AND HIRE AMERICAN.
    It may cost a little more for a “Made in America” product, but it supports OUR economy,
    and generally is of higher quality.

    Liked by 9 people

    • The more we Buy American and Hire American, the faster we cut Trade Deficits that export Currency, cut the fully-loaded Cost of Illegals, cut the Welfare and Unemployment Rolls and Costs, etc.

      … Allowing us to CUT GOVERNMENT and CUT the need for TAXES

      … Making up for any up-front “cost a little more”!

      Liked by 6 people

    • forjava1 says:

      Finishing a top-to-bottom home remodel.
      NOTHING from China.
      Zero illegals.

      If you or your spouse are diligent big-time , you’ll get more excellence for the same overall cost.

      Like

    • forjava1 says:

      Finishing a top-to-bottom home remodel.
      NOTHING from China.
      Zero illegals.

      If you or your spouse are diligent big-time , you’ll get more excellence for the same overall cost.

      Like

    • forjava1 says:

      Finishing a top-to-bottom home remodel.
      NOTHING from China.
      Zero illegals.

      If you or your spouse are diligent big-time , you’ll get more excellence for the same overall cost.

      Like

  13. China … and ALL other nations … must now RAISE EXPORT PRICES to the HIGHEST level they charge domestically.

    “If China wants to sell industry products into the U.S. they can no long manipulate their price to export at a lower cost than exists in China.”

    Liked by 7 people

  14. CNY3 says:

    A boost for our economy. Our prez is a ⚾️ Buster. 😎👍🏻

    Liked by 2 people

  15. boogywstew says:

    What about Central Americans dumping lowlifes, bums and criminals here where they bring in more money than Americans can receive in Central America???

    Like

  16. Trudeau’s about to get an epiphany:
    • First he SUBSIDIZED YUGE discounts to export to America … a YUGE FEDERAL EXPENSE.
    • This actually REDUCED PROFITS … which CUT FEDERAL TAX RECEIPTS.
    • Now, he’s having to FUND SANCTIONS that effectively DOUBLE the COST of the SUBSIDIES.
    • The resulting FEDERAL DEFICITS drive the need to RAISE TAXES.
    … or CUT FUNDING for NATIONAL HEALTHCARE.

    Liked by 7 people

  17. Ray says:

    The fact is in any case China paid for their accelerated rise to super power status able to build military islands to take control of international waters and oppose US interests with their trade surplus with the US. Greed of the few is paying for our own downfall.
    Trade always should have been limited with them.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. nagothm says:

    Is there no end to the humiliation and defeat of Just-in from Canada? I love our president!

    Like

  19. covfefe999 says:

    Very interesting. Based on some search results it looks like Wilbur Ross declared way back in Apr 2017 that Canada was dumping lumber in the US, and finally on Nov 2 2017 it was reported that the US would be applying the tarrifs to Canadian lumber. Trump hadn’t even been in office for a year and he was dealing with the Mueller investigation and other crap. How long did Barry allow the dumping to occur??? Did Barry’s team even notice that it was happening? One article I read said a Dem Senator from Oregon (Wyden) and 23 other Senators wrote a letter to Obama in 2016 complaining about dumping. And apparently Barry did NOTHING. When Trump applied the tariffs in Nov 2017 Sen Wyden applauded the action. We’re lucky we survived 8 years of Barry.

    Liked by 6 people

    • covfefe999 says:

      Per a 2006 agreement which expired in 2015, the U.S. agreed to lift antidumping duties so long as lumber prices remained above a certain level. Apparently that was a crap deal for us though, thanks Barry (and Dubya). Not sure what came after it. Thank God Trump won.

      Liked by 6 people

  20. Chip Doctor says:

    Well…..PDJT just took Justine to the woodshed. Again.

    Liked by 6 people

    • WES says:

      Chip: My only complaint as a Canadian is that President Trump left Trudope still standing!

      Next time please President Trump don’t spare the lumber!

      Liked by 3 people

  21. jmclever says:

    beginning to feel as if lil’ ol’ me in SW Missouri actually matters. Just when I think I can’t love, respect and admire My President any more, more winning!

    Liked by 9 people

  22. fractionalexponent says:

    Remember
    Chinese defective steel in the Oakland Bay Bridge rebuild,
    Chinese dogfood killing pets,
    Chinese flooring boards sickening occupants, Chinese Huawei phones with spy chips
    China campaign donations to Clinton

    Liked by 9 people

  23. decisiontime16 says:

    CANADA
    April 9, 2019 4:42 pm
    Freeland says Canada keen to boost impact of retaliatory tariffs against U.S.

    Canada is looking at ways to boost the effectiveness of its retaliatory tariffs against the United States, Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said on Tuesday, but did not address remarks by a senior official who revealed what Ottawa might do.

    We are certainly constantly looking at ways to refresh the retaliation list … to have an even greater impact,” Freeland told reporters.

    https://globalnews.ca/news/5147928/canada-retaliatory-tariffs-impact-chrystia-freeland/

    Liked by 1 person

  24. CountryDoc says:

    Does zero sum apply to importing doctors? Or any labor for that matter. 🙂 Can we charge a tariff for doctors who are willing to sign their name without applying the intellectual work and assurance of quality that the license is supposed to represent?

    Like

  25. Harlan says:

    I’ll wager that there’s a thousand more of these hidden victories waiting for DJT’s reelection.

    How many Americans will continue to vote against America, as they did in the midterms.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Sue Fowler says:

    Dare we hope that those are spine buds growing?
    Now about repulsing and DEPORTING INVADERS
    AND MOSLEMS…

    Like

  27. fred5678 says:

    USA economy DOMINATES the world — IF we have fair trade under VSGDJT, we will dominate even more!!

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/81/20_Largest_economies_pie_chart.pdf/page1-1200px-20_Largest_economies_pie_chart.pdf.jpg.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Rex says:

    For all the bitchers and belly-achers present…
    Ya gotta admit..
    The Wilburine and Lighthizer have been even better than advertised.

    Liked by 6 people

  29. ThePoeticJusticeWarrior says:

    Canada dumps their Number 2 lumber into the USA. Canada then builds their structures, with Number 1 lumber. American homeowners are the ones, that are getting screwed.

    One way around the tariffs, used by the Canadian lumber mills, is they drill a hole in each stud, say at 12 inches. The lumber, then became a different grade, and bypassed the tariff. Hopefully, that will be considered, in the new negotiations, EH?

    Liked by 1 person

  30. John Good says:

    As much as I hate to say anything against my own Country, this is just more reason for Canada to try to find our own Donald J. Trump, who can try to Make Canada Great Again! Canada had a “White O’Bama” forced on us, so maybe…
    But, this is a double-whammy for Justin Trudeau, because he’s been trying to kiss China’s ass to replace the lost American market, and this is not going to look good for him in China’s eyes!
    Justin Trudeau & the Liberals are self-destructing in front of our eyes. I love it!

    Liked by 7 people

  31. Bendix says:

    I love President Trump so much.

    Liked by 6 people

  32. USA First! says:

    Political winds are a changing. The global cabal is buckling to a President that knows how to hit them where it hurt me the most. I say “ President Trump, rip their jugular out! “

    Liked by 3 people

  33. Father Thyme says:

    This news is disturbing…not because the US won a great victory at the WTO, but rather because it means there have been decades of abuse of American workers and businesses under the old WTO paradigm.

    Liked by 2 people

  34. TwoLaine says:

    #Winning

    Like

  35. ATheoK says:

    Sundance: FYI

    “The Canadian government is subsiding

    Slight typo alert. Especially, since you use the word accurately many times.

    Like

  36. I recently told my kids a version of the starfish tale. We used to get help from an organization called Starfish Family Services. They had a portion of that starfish story on a plaque at a respite center where we would take our special needs son to get a break on a rare occasion. They couldn’t help everyone (who can but God!) but they did help make a bit of a difference for us & for other challenged families needing reprieve or in crisis…Trump (& his team) is helping to rescue America one industry & even one life at a time! Thanks for sharing more good news…

    Liked by 1 person

  37. GSparrow says:

    “Brief” Softwood History: (Canada has been importing Softwood Lumber to the USA since the 1800’s)
    1.1982-1983 (Lumber I)—“U.S. Lumber Coalition, accused Canada of subsidizing its lumber industry via low stumpage fees—the U.S. Dep’t of Commerce found that Canadian lumber was not unfairly subsidized and no tariffs were implemented.”

    2.1986-1991 (Lumber II) “U.S. Lumber Coalition petitioned for a 27-per-cent duty on Can. lumber imports–the Dep’t of Commerce concluded that the Can. gov’t was subsidizing its lumber industry by 15 %. To avoid duties being imposed, Canada and the U.S. reached a memorandum of understanding and Canada agreed to collect a 15-% tax on lumber exports.

    3…2006–A new Softwood Lumber Agreement was signed– “the agreement promoted a stable and predictable trade environment for the softwood-lumber industry and maximized benefits to Canadian industry, its workers and their communities.” (Global Affairs Canada). the agreement called for a return of more than $4-billion (U.S.) in duties collected by the U.S. since 2002, half of it to B.C. companies. But contrary to the SLA, a further $1-billion collected stayed in the U.S. and half of it was distributed to the companies that prompted the dispute in the first place.

    4. SLA Expired Oct 2016

    5. Trump was elected in the USA and Justin became PM of Canada in 2015. Trump had the Wolverine and Justin “I will not be pushed around’ Trudeau was unable to see that Canada should voluntarily level the playing field similar to 2006 to avoid larger tariffs being imposed.

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  38. wee2low says:

    I live right next to Sierra Pacific Logging Company land and I noticed what seemed to be an uptick in logging truck activity last summer and fall. Their route is the same route I take to work each morning and we get stuck behind the trucks hauling loads of Cedar, Fir and Pine (softwood). I think people get annoyed but I look at it as guys working so I just leave 10 minutes earlier.

    I don’t know if there’s any correlation, but I for one will smile behind every logging truck this summer knowing that Justin from Canada took a beatdown from PTRUMP. Some years ago our town got decimated economically and this policy in Canada probably had something to do with it. There was a huge softwood lumber mill which supported thousands of people. Closed down and with it the towns economy.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. Gassy says:

    Canada should work on perfecting their bagged milk and fake bacon. GFY Canada.

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  40. The softwood industry in Canada does one other thing that is short sighted and unwise.
    The log roads cross streams willy nilly and log pickups are down low ( less expensive) but the traffic ruins the salmon spawning areas with silt. The then BC govt of ?Clark accused Alaskan fisheries of
    stealing Canadian salmon , as the runs in the 90s were catastrophic.
    Which is silly because Canadian salmon do not return to Alaskan streams, they dont return because they were never born. . driving through Washington and Idaho one notices log roads very high on the slope and away from streams.

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