Trucker Shortage: Largest U.S. Trucking Company Projects 20% Wage Increase for Big Rig Drivers….

You might remember when CTH shared the following wage growth estimate:

[…] I’m not going to dismiss the possibility we could see double digit increases in year-over-year wage growth in multiple economic sectors in several regions of the U.S. –link

Trucking Company President Nicholas Hobbs is now saying he projects a twenty percent increase in wages for truck drivers due to extreme demand.  That’s MAGAwinnamins!

Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao discusses efforts to address the truck driver shortage in America.

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This entry was posted in Donald Trump, Economy, Election 2018, media bias, President Trump, Trade Deal, Transportation, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

134 Responses to Trucker Shortage: Largest U.S. Trucking Company Projects 20% Wage Increase for Big Rig Drivers….

  1. Mike S says:

    Sir Sundance, your analysis on the Trump economy has been phenomenal from your first posting and predicting the shift from Wall Street to Main Street was MAGA-nificent!

    Liked by 13 people

  2. daizeez says:

    Truckers used to get paid a very good wage once upon a time. That was when trucks used to drive in the right lane only so it’s been a while. It’s not an easy job, especially for over the road drivers.

    Liked by 10 people

    • trumpismine says:

      The ol’ breed truckers were knights of the road. They helped many travelers in need and passed along their traits to the next generation. Wishing I was 20 years younger to work in Trump’s America.

      Liked by 15 people

    • CriticalThought says:

      Many truckers used to be union, and there used to be a Federal Bureau that set rates fro trucking. The cost of moving freight by truck has dropped dramatically since then.

      Like

      • OSP says:

        “there used to be a Federal Bureau that set rates fro trucking”

        CT, you’re referring to the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC). That was nothing but legalized price-fixing. Since enactment of the Motor Carrier Act of 1980 (Deregulation) freight rates have been market driven, which IMO is the way most everything should be.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. 4sure says:

    More good paying jobs. Gotta make sure the illegals don’t get them.

    Liked by 10 people

  4. fleporeblog says:

    This is HUGE! There will be many more companies both big and small that will be making similar announcements. It is the reality of where our country is currently at. There are 7.1 million jobs available at this point in time. That number will continue to grow as corporations from other countries start coming back home. In order to find workers, employers have to offer larger salaries, better medical plans and better retirement plans in order to retain their employees.

    4 million people have already come off of public assistance. I anticipate that number reaching 10 million by the time our President’s first term is over.

    Americans are going back to work because opportunities are everywhere.

    Liked by 24 people

    • Orville R. Bacher says:

      Trump is an American Patriot President, not a Globalist Myopic Traitor. Truck driving takes a lot of patience that few people possess. Good for them to pay them what they are worth.
      Thank you Donald Trump for understanding the engine that makes America strong is not in Washington, New York or Hollywood.

      Liked by 18 people

    • Doug Weiss says:

      Exactly right! And we don’t need to increase immigration either! We actually need to decrease immigration and only take merit base skilled immigrants and eliminate welfare for able bodied people within working age. We have to be careful amnesty lobby will be pointing to worker shortage as reason for increased immigration and amnesty. We take in over 1M legal immigrants a year! Where are they all going? Why aren’t they taking the jobs? We merit based immigration. Period.

      Liked by 6 people

      • It’s time for POTUS to FREEZE ALL IMMIGRATION
        … until Congress funds the Wall and passes Immigration Reform.

        Employers faced with paying and training and babying the indolent to come back into the workforce will drive the above overnight to get merit-based immigration, etc.

        Liked by 5 people

    • Suzanne says:

      7.1 million jobs available… sounds to me like it’s time for work-fare

      Liked by 5 people

    • Newton Love says:

      Flepo, this is classic economics, going back to Adam Smith and his An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (1776). He codified the Economic Law of Supply and Demand.

      When unemployment was high, and workers exceeded jobs, it drove wages down.

      In the MAGA Economy, where jobs greatly exceed the number of available workers, if you really want your jobs filled, you will offer more to bid the unemployed to take your jobs, but even more important, the higher wages will induce workers to leave their current employers.

      You just gotta love how classic Economic reinforces Capitalism as the most efficient method of Economic distribution ever invented. (The polar opposite of Socialism.)

      Liked by 11 people

    • Kate says:

      Flep, you are correct this is huge because not only will the trucking industry grow but the driver training schools will be popping up all over, more fueling stations coming on line, highways will have to be increased or kept in better repair.
      One of the things I have noticed the past several years is the increase of cardboard boxes due to the increase of shipping packages and now I imagine this industry will grow faster, Fed X, UPS plus all newer shippers will be affected, so yes I know we are lucky that Donald Trump became president and we the people are reaping the rewards.
      MAGA

      Liked by 6 people

    • wodiej says:

      Yes, these companies make me sick with their wage offerings. Are you kidding me? I work in marketing and you would not believe how much they spend and waste on advertising. They can afford to pay more-alot more.

      Liked by 1 person

      • OSP says:

        wodiej, are you referring to trucking companies?

        I occasionally see a TV ad for an LTL company aimed toward customers (usually on a financial cable channel), but don’t think I’ve ever seen/heard a TL company ad – TV or radio.

        I have, however, for years regularly heard radio ads and see highway billboards aimed at recruiting drivers.

        Like

  5. Palafox says:

    What does a trucker make in a year? How predictable is that income year to year? I’d think about a new career in trucking if you could replace the driver’s easy chair with an Exercycle.

    Liked by 5 people

    • trumpismine says:

      Real good money. If you want some exercise try hauling a flat bed trailer moving steel, over length/width, or machinery loads. work intensive with many rewards.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      Too many variables in your question(s). My father is a retired Teamsters truck driver and I have a younger brother that has been driving since graduating from high school (1979)

      Union or non-union?
      Paid by the mile or by the hour or by the trip?
      Owner-operator or driving for a company?
      Experience
      What are you hauling? Liquid hydrogen or a flatbed of empty wooden pallets?
      Size and configuration (single or double trailer/tanker) of truck.

      Etc.

      Liked by 3 people

    • SouthCentralPA says:

      Surviving the first year or two is the hard part. Not everyone can get used to being patient on the road. As with much in life, it depends. If you live in a place where driving local (going out and back the same day every day) is a thing, something like 40-50k is not unreasonable within 2 yrs or so, increasing the longer you drive consistently safely. OTR (over-the-road) depends on how much you can stand being on the road (it helps if you live near a “traffic lane” (frequently driven interstate). 50-60k is not uncommon among experienced OTR drivers, and if you can find someone you can be in the truck with day-in and day-out without killing them you can make a LOT. Team drivers never run out of hours, stable teams can run a lot of miles and are in high demand. Unless you are already extremely proficient at driving a stick and have a lot of experience pulling a trailer, going to a community college with a CDL program (especially if they have a “driving range” so you can get used to the speed and size before going out on the road) is well worth the money.

      You can’t really do it while you’re driving, but some drivers will get an “under desk exercise bike” and sit on the edge of their bunk and pedal while they read or whatnot. YMMV

      Barring some sort of amnesty or prolonged Donk domination of the country (BIRM), the amount of miles is fairly steady year-on-year.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Newton Love says:

      > “What does a trucker make in a year? How predictable is that income year to year? …”

      It’s all about loads and miles. The more loads the trucker team (a requirement nowadays) turn around in a year, the more delivered, the more they make. the longer the trip, the more they make.

      So, an efficient trucker team, that hustles hard can make 3 or 4 times more than a low yield trucker, who can make $65k / year.

      Liked by 2 people

    • GB Bari says:

      Right now I can tell you that if you are relatively healthy, can pass the drug test, have a clean driving record, and can get a CDL, you have a very high earnings potential – easily into 6 figures. Companies are offering overtime in heavy amounts because of the driver shortage.

      I have a cousin who is 62 and sees no end in sight for unlimited overtime where he works – hauling shipping containers at the Port of Baltimore. They cannot find enough qualified drivers (meet the requirements I listed above). All of the old guys are getting tons of OT and making $$$$ hand over fist.

      Liked by 2 people

    • shirley49 says:

      My Grandson is a Truck driver. He gets a lot of exercise 6 days a week. Many of the driver jobs include loading and unloading the truck. It is a hard job but he loves it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • OSP says:

      Been in the business since 1975 here… owner-operator, small fleet operator, company driver – worked in most related jobs at one time or the other in both TL and LTL…driving, operations, sales. Dry van, flatbed, tankers, dumps, auto transport. I’ve seen my share of “stuff”.

      Coming straight out of “driver school”, with no road experience, I’d estimate a new OTR driver with a TL company could expect $40-45K, maybe more in the current environment, especially with HME (hazardous materials) and/or Tanker endorsements. A rookie is not likely to get on with an LTL carrier, tank line, or auto transporter, and generally speaking, these jobs pay quite a bit more.

      With more experience and a good safety record, a driver could obviously expect more money. With 5+ years of safe driving experience an OTR TL Dry Van driver could expect to earn $60-70K these days with an HME. Tankers, LTL (City P&D or line haul), and car haulers could could expect 10-20% more.

      I haven’t factored in union vs. non-union, nor the driver’s work ethic. In trucking (as in any business), hustlers not afraid of working long hours, breaking a sweat, or staying on the road a few more days than the average person are going to earn substantially more.

      Like

  6. GSR says:

    Chao will want to bring Mexicans, Muslins and Filipinos to our country to take trucker jobs.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. alliwantissometruth says:

    In other news, under democrat policies, illegal aliens built 20% more corn with mayonnaise street carts

    Like

  8. treehouseron says:

    There is another huge issue going on with the truckers, where they have to electronically log their drive time (and down time) now… so basically they’re not allowed to cheat and fudge a little bit on their logs. This is causing huge problems for drivers and none of them like it…. since it all has to be by the computer, it doesn’t give them any flexibility.

    Talk to a driver the next time you bump into one and ask him or her about the electronic logs, you’ll be surprised.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      “it doesn’t give them any flexibility.”

      Yep, your 10 miles and 15 minutes from your destination down the Interstate and your 10 hours driving time are up – so you have to pull over for a mandated 8 hour break.

      Liked by 6 people

      • LafnH20 says:

        It’s actually 11 hrs driving within a 14 hour window.. now, DI.
        That’s not to mention a 30 minute break before reaching 8 hours on duty and another if on duty more than 12 hours (All within the “14” hour Clock)..
        There are 5 clocks running at the same time…

        At least for Over the Road Drivers (OTR) and many “more local” jobs as well… Not all..ie Agriculture, Oil/Gas field, and other such speciality positions.

        And a 10 hour MANDATORY break before driving again after “Stopping for the day.”
        70 hours on duty in 8 days maximum (OTR) or sooner than the 70 if the position does not require 70 hours/week; and then a minimum of 34 consecutive hours off before starting a new “70 hours.”

        1) 8 hr rule
        2) 10 hr rule
        3) 11 hr rule
        4) 14 hr rule
        5) 70 hr rule

        Back to the “Stopping for the day” for a minute…
        That’s the rub… imho

        There is a serious lack of places TO STOP!
        And since the BIG Trucking companies have contracted with the BIG Truck Stop owners (fuel) – and since with limited hours to make money drivers frown on stopping multiple times at different places …
        Stop 1) Decent food.
        Stop 2) Shower
        Stop 3) Fuel
        Stop 4) Parking
        Stop 5)…Forgetaboutit) –
        and by eliminating choices the BIG GUYS have run the “Mom & Pop Truck Stops into bancruptcy – the # of spaces to PARK a Big Rig will NOT keep pace with the # of New Trucks being driven by the New Truck Drivers.
        🤔
        Not to mention Roads…
        You think there is TRAFFIC Congestion now…

        Quality of life is the biggest issue, imho…
        For the most part…
        IT SUCKS!!!
        Subway or Pizza
        Shower or not
        Sleep well or Take what you can get.
        Park safely or Take the risk…..
        Clean clothes… not so clean.

        Try living in a 8×10 bouncing, noisy, highly regulated, most detested cause your in the way “closet” for a month….

        You get the picture.

        The quality of life for OTR Drivers..
        Sucks
        No matter what the power point presentation and fancy pictures show…

        The Ritz it is not….

        🎩🎩🎩🎩
        To them….
        They’ve earned the 20% raise…
        And then some…

        Don’t get me wrong…
        Excellent news!!

        But the established “System” is just going to keep taking advantage of them… At every turn…

        It’s what they do!!

        Liked by 8 people

        • WSB says:

          So, I should look into designing new Luxury Truck Stops. 3 hour hotel rooms and the like!

          Like

          • LafnH20 says:

            I don’t know about too much luxury, WSB.
            LOL

            We gotta get em back behind the wheel or we’ll starve!! 😁

            A 10 hour “stay rate” would be most interesting.
            An older truck (idling) burns “about” a gallon an hour; or so Ive heard tell.
            Diesel @$3.00/ gallon x 10 hours = well $30.00.
            If you DO not fuel 50 gallons+ at a Truck Stop (TS) a shower will set ya back $11-12 bucks. Toss in $5.00 to wash/dry (if they work) at the TS = $17
            …and consider the often limited seating and no real choice in the entertainment in the “TS Lounge”…
            🤔 AND you have to sleep in the truck.
            $17 + $30 (idling) =$47
            Or…
            $30 room
            Add in the value of Entertainment Choice (TV such as it is) + Peace&QUIET, nice COMFY bed, small microwave/fridge..
            That comes to bout $30 + $5 (In motel laundry) = $35 + tax (of course).. say $40
            Maybe, 🤔 Buy an in room movie… $50

            I’d do it as often as I could.
            You build the motel/Hotel near (very) the TS
            You turn the room twice a day…

            Might just work.

            Prolly more of an answer than you were looking for… 😊

            Liked by 1 person

      • LafnH20 says:

        BTW…

        Though not as many as some and more than others…

        2,000,000 Accident free miles here..
        And counting..😉

        I’ve been everywhere, Man..
        I’ve been everywhere, Man…
        Crossed the deserts bare, Man..
        Breathed the mountain air, Man..
        Of Travel I’ve had my share, Man..

        I’ve been Everywhere! 😎

        Liked by 11 people

        • LafnH2o, what a great post. Felt like I kinda got a taste of what it would be like. Takes a certain type Of person, that’s for sure. I always try and give the truckers the road. Help them by staying out of their way. I try and smile and let them know that they matter.

          With out truckers our beloved way of life would come to a standstill. No groceries, animal feed, everything we use and need is transported by someone driving a truck to bring it to market.

          Thank you LafnH2o for your excellent driving record. That’s something to be very proud of.

          Liked by 4 people

          • LafnH20 says:

            TY, Mz Molly Anna!

            ‘ Preciate it!!

            Even with that many miles, I am junior to many. And everyone has started “Somewhere” with 0 miles.
            It does take a certain type of person to make it work.
            There is something special about it… And like most things… a price is paid.
            The “Truck Stop” has (no offense) become a Travel Center; Pit stop; a “Touristy type” attraction.
            With prices to match.
            It breaks my heart when I see some drivers eating “Microwaved Noodles” or asking if anyone has a “Shower Credit” they’re not using.
            In some cases it is of their own doing. In many more, I suspect, it is not.

            Thank You, for giving us a little room and an appreciated Smile 😁!
            It goes a Looong Way!

            As you said, Everything you see, touch, eat or see…
            Was at some point on a Truck or other “Large Car” lol

            Even the Trucks.

            Best

            Liked by 3 people

            • Nice posts.
              Great record.
              White-House qualified for a visit!

              Liked by 3 people

              • LafnH20 says:

                Most kind, BKR!
                TY!!

                Full disclosure: There might have been a speeding ticket in there somewhere. 🤔
                Or two..
                And a couple “scratches”.
                All in all.. I have been quite fortunate.
                Thank You, Lord!
                Things can happen fast out here… luckily, I’ve been able to stay “Outa the ditch”.. If you will.

                A White-House….visit??

                Man oh Man… Whatever the occasion..
                That Would Be The Berries!!!

                ‘ Preciate Ya!!

                Keep your nose to the wind..
                Your eyes on the skyline…
                And Your Powder dry!!

                You be safe goin thata way, BKR!!
                This is the LafnH20…

                Take Care!
                God Bless!!
                🚛🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

                Liked by 3 people

              • LafnH20 says:

                Chirp!!

                Liked by 3 people

          • TheLastDemocrat says:

            I always let the truckers have the way. I just did, on my ride home this evening.

            Three lane freeway, lots of cars. Some drizzle. He came on my entrance ramp. Anyone paying attention would know he would want the middle lane.

            I hung back, steady, and let him decide when to come over.

            Liked by 2 people

            • LafnH20 says:

              TY, TheLastDemocat.
              If he/she is “Gettin on the (BIG) Road” a middle lane is prefered, imho. The right most lane (The Slow Lane), as you indicated, has lots of getting on and getting off… Slowing and merging..🤔
              Merging…remember that.. Lol
              Big Trucks can take a while to get up to speed and conversely.. drop speed (The Law of Gross Tonnage).
              The left lane (Affectionetly known as “The Money Lane”) cuz ya might get a “Special Driving Award” $$ from the local Peace Officer 😉 or the “Hammer Lane” where permitted) takes a bit of doing when just getting up to speed.
              The middle lanes (Just right.. Not too slow..Not too fast) allow you to get in the mix and settled down a bit before “Puttin it in the “BIG Whole” aka “Top Gear” and Mashin on it!!
              ..you know.. The skinny pedal on the right😉.

              Liked by 4 people

        • trialbytruth says:

          Hitchhiked my way around the country many times when i was in my teens and twenties. In my 60s now. Had my bladder tested in the jump seat many times. Heard a lot of stories some BS some soulful mostly about women wives and kids. Kept a lot of sleepy drivers going down the road running empty trying to get to a load.

          I never met a trucker I didn’t like on the road. I had more then a few meals bought for me. A couple times with home bound trucker I was invited to go home with them to meet the family get a real meal and a good nights sleep. I never took anyone up on that offer I always had somewhere to go. The road was where I wanted to be.

          The world has changed But LafnH2O you are right. Truckers got the respect they deserved then and enough income to raise a family …or two LOL.. (yeah i heard those stories too) If I could turn back time, I would have lived on the road more. The warmth and kindness of strangers to someone asking for nothing but a ride and offering a willing ear in return was amazing.

          Thanks for keeping America moving.

          Liked by 3 people

          • LafnH20 says:

            YW, trialbytruth.
            I all honesty, I have gotten more than I’ve given.
            You mentioned “The warmth and kindness of strangers.”
            I have lost count of the times others have come to my rescue! From a simple “fuse” to staying with my “Stuck in a snowbank in the middle of nowhere” truck, until help arrived.
            Or, the bill, from the diner, being “Taken care of” by some kind SOUL when I was unshaven, unwashed, unimpressed and still had 1200 miles to go!
            I must of been a sight!
            Then, there were, and still are, the countless hours sitting at the counter and just listening; Coffee cup in hand.
            Women, wives and kids. How that rings true!!
            Thoughts of home! Thoughts of kin! And, some thoughts that won’t be mentioned here. 😉
            Unique expressions… like..
            “Throw some groceries down my neck.” = Eat
            And some truelly gut wrenching recollections…
            Friends lost.
            Times gone by.
            Woulda, coulda, shoulda’s.

            And the Laughter!!
            The sheer joy of being among kindred spirits.
            So far from home.
            Home…
            When the laughter subsided and the lol pause set in…
            You just knew… they were not at the counter for a few seconds.. not really…
            They, and I, were somewhere else. Somewhere special.
            And We all knew it.
            You can FEEL it.
            It was visceral!
            And then… Another story.
            Life goes on…
            And the waitress tops off whatever you were drinkin and smiles a little smile.


            Joy at the start
            Fear in the journey
            Joy in the coming home
            A part of the heart
            Gets lost in the learning
            Somewhere along the road
            Along the road
            Your path may wander
            A pilgrim’s faith may fail
            Absence makes the heart grow stronger
            Darkness obscures the trail
            Cursing the quest
            Courting disaster
            Measureless nights forebode
            Moments of rest
            Glimpses of laughter
            Are treasured along the road
            Along the road
            Your steps may tumble
            Your thoughts may start to stray
            But through it all a heart held humble
            Levels and lights your way
            Joy at the start
            Fear in the journey
            Joy in the coming home
            A part of the heart
            Gets lost in the learning
            Somewhere along the road

            Dan Fogelberg

            Good night, my friend.

            Tomorrow the Sun
            will rise..
            Who knows..
            What the tide
            might bring!

            Liked by 2 people

        • MIKE says:

          “…but he was so young
          On a ten city run
          In love
          With a truck stop girl…”

          You guys ALWAYS get a little extra space,
          A lot more decel room,
          And much courtesy from me.
          Take care, there is a lot of psychos on the roads
          Where I live.
          Thank you for what you do, H2O.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Dixie says:

          2 million accident free miles…..Wow…..just wow. H/T to you, Laughing Waters.

          Like

          • LafnH20 says:

            TY, Dixie!

            A “Friend” once told me I should write a book. HA!!😆

            Even I wouldn’t believe half the stuff that happened, if I hadn’t been there.

            Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all.

            -Helen Keller
            The Open Door

            The Best, to you and yours, Dixie!!

            Liked by 1 person

        • Dixie says:

          I’m reminded of yesterday when I was approaching an intersection while a big rig was waiting to make a turn in my direction. Realizing he didn’t have enough room to make the turn unless I provided it by hanging back, I stopped way short of the intersection in order to allow him room to enter.

          He waved and smiled bigly. 🙂

          And for the second time today, I’m inclined to post that “my empathy meter is stuck on max”. Seems to stay that way lately.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Menagerie says:

          Your posts are very descriptive. My son has been a trucker for years. He’s an owner operator now, doing very well for himself. But only because of years of hard earned experience.

          I ride with him sometimes, and the juggling, the planning, the good head for business, and the mental calculations always impress me. He knows which loads really pay the best in the big picture, not just the rate listed. In other words, can he get a load out of he goes to Florida, etc., where to buy fuel for his best deal, what loads to avoid because he will likely get held up all day, and as you address and few people know, where to park.

          I rode with him on a long trip up in New England several years ago and the shortage of truck stops was critical then. I can’t imagine how bad it is now. An unspoken clock apart from the mandatory breaks listed above is knowing that you will find no spot in a truck stop late in the evening. And in many states, it is illegal to park in most places outside a truck stop or a rest stop.

          My son fares well because he knows the less known places to park, the best runs to make, all kinds of things that we who know nothing about trucking take for granted. Not to mention the sheer skill. The last time I rode with him we were in an ice storm, and trying to get to Memphis while we could, not too much further but tricky. We drove past a lot of rigs that were wrecked or stuck, many that had previously passed us. He took a steady pace and drove very safely, and we parked for the night, got out again well after daylight, but some of the roads still weren’t sanded. And he knew which areas would have the worst conditions and the slowest road crew responses.

          Anyhow, truckers have my admiration, gratitude, and are always, always in this mother’s heart and prayers.

          Liked by 1 person

          • OSP says:

            Menagerie, sounds like he has his act together. Some here have really bashed the Owner/Operator aspect of the business, but there are thousands of O/O’s across the country who have been making a good living for years and now – with the upward pressure on freight rates – have a chance to really make bank.

            Liked by 1 person

    • bearsgrrr says:

      I talked to someone who said their drivers were electronically monitored. They knew exactly where they were, how fast they were going, if they were idling, engine specifics, etc. Very invasive/controlling for the driver. Yikes

      Liked by 2 people

      • OSP says:

        Considering the driver is responsible for a $100K rig…plus cargo value. The truck company owner has every right to be “invasive/controlling”.

        Liked by 1 person

      • LafnH20 says:

        They know (Depending on the Rig) when the seat belt is buckled, bearsgrrr!!
        With Giggle Earth and Onboard GPS systems there is nowhere to hide..
        🤔
        Well.. Almost nowhere!! 😊
        With front and in-cab facing cameras… not much privacy.
        You should hear some of the stories…

        Lane change indicators/alarms. “Real time” data for the speed and distance (in feet) of the vehicle in front of you; to include Automatic deceleration and if “Deemed necessary” Hard Braking.
        GPS and topography feeds to enhance engine performance and maximise MPG.

        All that said…
        Imho, there is a valid argument to be made for what, OSP, stated ☝👇…
        Cell phone usage, sleepy, distracted, seat belts, etc.
        The liability of Owning “A Big Rig” is no small thing!
        Nor, the consequences, when “If things go wrong”!

        Liked by 2 people

  9. starfcker says:

    A lot of this is a load of crap. Most trucking companies have been consolidated and now only operate under the owner/operator scam. If a man is willing to sign on for a brand new extravagant rig, he can start working as an independent trucker. I look at the deliveries I get, never do I see a day rig again. All I see now is monsterous sleeper rigs for guys doing 40 mile deliveries. And they have to pay the taxes, and they have to pay the fuel, and they have to pay the insurance. It’ll get better when it goes back to being employment

    Liked by 2 people

    • Craig Sjodin says:

      Just so you know if you are an owner operator you can not join a Union. So it is not a scam. You really have to be specific as to what type of transportation you are referring to. I drove for United van Lines for 17 years. You are partially correct the industry has change a lot. But if you have certain skills you can do pretty good.

      Liked by 3 people

    • piper567 says:

      star, I had a roommate for many years who was an owner/operator.
      You are absolutely right.
      Bob did a three-day from WA to CA each week. The paperwork, taxes, upkeep on his tractor (tires were ab $500 ea), tractor payments/insurance, and the differences in Law (he hated Oregon!), ate up nearly 50% of his income.
      I, too, will be happy IF these jobs are “employment”.
      The huge salaries are not worth the grief for an owner/operator…discouragement…its not JUST driving the big rigs.

      Like

      • starfcker says:

        Yeah, it’s not really a job when you have to buy the truck. More of a scam like Uber, but you have to borrow a lot more money. No wonder there’s a shortage

        Like

        • trialbytruth says:

          Kids were getting scammed into overbuying trucks with guaranteed loads back in the 70s its not a new game Once the rig is paid for the loads end and then you have to hustle. We quickly ended up with to many owner operators on the road and not enough loads. It took a while to get there though. There are no guarantees in life.

          An experience trucking team that knows how to get loads will make a lot more money in the next 20 years than a hourly guy. Some people are risk averse and that’s okay. If you are don’t work for yourself. Trucker, Barber, Builder, the scale is different but its all the same You have two roads and they both offer different risk/rewards.

          Like

          • starfcker says:

            Yes but now we’re seeing owner operators that in a former life would have been picking strawberries. Owner operator is something for people who have their act together to aspire to. Certainly not for low IQ types being preyed upon by big business. Which is what the game is now. Going to take some antitrust to fix this. Is that the way it’s being sold now, you will need to drive in a team? Another flavor of, if you’re not making it is because you’re not smart enough or working hard enough? Screw that. Enough of this Darwinian economy. That’s not how you make America great again

            Like

            • OSP says:

              “Enough of this Darwinian economy”…
              This economy – hell, every economy – is Darwinian. If it weren’t we’d all be billionaires.
              If the trucking companies gave IQ tests to prospective lease/purchase drivers, that would be discrimination…and we certainly can’t have that. /sarc

              Like

    • melski says:

      Time to go up north and become an Ice road Trucker I guess.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. sunnydaze says:

    Exactly how it’s supposed to work.

    Get rid of illegal workers and pay rises for legal citizens.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Allowing young veterans (who are experienced at driving big rigs anyway) to drive semis makes tons of sense. Demonstrated expertise and help for vets–a win/win.

    Seems like Ms. Chao is all-in for Pres. Trump which can’t hurt in relationship with Sen. McConnell 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Eric says:

    Ok now we need Keebler to post in this thread about the CIA using mind control on truckers through CB radio waves and using them for false flag terror attacks.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. George Hicks says:

    FTA
    Trump’s low-immigration/high-wage “Hire American” policy is forcing reluctant CEOs to compete for willing American workers because Trump has rejected corporate pleas for more immigrant blue-collar and white-collar workers. For example, Trump has drastically lowered the inflow of refugees, which previously had provided trucking companies with many new workers willing to work at low wages.

    In response, CEOs and investors have helped block Trump’s more ambitious immigration reforms, and are now backing a proposal by Kansas GOP Rep. Kevin Yoder which expands several blue-collar and white-collar visa-worker programs. The proposal is hidden in the 2019 budget for the Department of Homeland Security and will be voted up-or-down in the lame-duck Congress during December.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. CNN_sucks says:

    Re train all gender women study graduates or others with useless degrees to become truck driver. MAGA.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Mncpo(ret) says:

    Just sent this to a dear friend, who got his CDL in 2011, couldn’t find a job. Now works in the vegetable section of a Publix. Really hope he reads and takes the article to heart. He always wanted to drive.

    Liked by 1 person

    • OSP says:

      There have been many job openings for truck drivers for the last 2-3 years. It’s just now getting to the point where the freight volume is such that companies are willing to pay a premium for drivers.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Bubby says:

    I just drove home to Texas from Pennsylvania where I visited family. I know this is anecdotal but I have never seen so many trunks on the roads. At times I felt like I was driving in a truck convoy they were everywhere. All the rest and truck stops were full of trucks. The three times I took that exact same trip during obama’s rule there were trucks but nothing even close to what I just saw! It was unbelievable! President Trump’s economy in action it was a beautiful site! Although driving was more challenging. Godspeed President Trump!

    Liked by 4 people

  17. Darius473 says:

    Is it any wonder? All I hear on the news is that truck drivers will be eliminated by automation within 5 years. It must be difficult to recruit when under those circumstances.

    Like

    • Hebo Sabe says:

      ” All I hear on the news is that truck drivers will be eliminated by automation within 5 years.”

      Yes, the left are good at lying outright and the right are good at believing anything they’re told.

      That’s got to change.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Nom de Blog says:

    10-4 Rubber Duck!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. David says:

    I’m an owner operator and there’s no way in Hades I’d ever drive for hourly wage or mileage again ! Freight rates are getting up to where they need to be and the flexibility of being an owner operator is great. I buy and run older trucks that make me a lot of money. If you’re a fool and go buy a brand new tractor you will need to maximize your hours and be a slave to the tractor. The electronic logs have definitely tightened the market and that’s a good thing. I’d like a little more flexibility but it hasn’t been a big issue for me.

    Liked by 6 people

  20. RJ says:

    The CEO of Mack Trucks recently said its production of new trucks is smoking hot. MAGA!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. hoghead says:

    Oh gosh, I guess the ray-roads are gonna have to take up some slack. [And they can take up serious slack…]

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Redfish says:

    Yea ok Mr. Trucking Company Prez. This is a yearly year round thing, “driver shortage” that is. Good economy or bad, matters not.
    Long haul driver w/12 yrs OTR company and owner operator experienced here. Some of the Real Reasons for the so called driver shortage – very high turnover rate due to many factors. Low pay, high hours, high stress, The high turnover rate is a known factor and part of the company hiring structure. Recruit – School – Train – Drive – Repeat – New Driver.
    I could go on about the harsh lifestyle on the road and the dealings with the shippers and receivers. And of course the friendly DOT officers and staff members at all the super coupes.
    Driver Shortage is code word for Average trucking company hiring / pay policy. Low pay and high turnover = steady diet for new drivers. All built into trucking company budget.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. HB says:

    A huge reason there’s a shortage of drivers is the price and hoops one has to go through to get a CDL these days. It’s not affordable. So the road is full of Russians and Hajis that get government grants to get CDLs. They drive like mad men and leave the scenes of their own accidents half the time.

    Like

  24. Anonymous says:

    Convoy!

    Like

  25. MontanaMel says:

    Along this same line is the growing SHORTAGE of PILOTS – Both airlines and private (business). An 18-wheel driver can be trained and licensed in about 90 days – as long as the trainee has the basic driving skills down pat. A commercial pilot takes about 2 years MINIMUM – and, that only works if it is a structured, full-time, schooling. Whereas the “measure” of a truck driver is “miles or years” of experience, along with special endorsements for “special loads”; the pilot is measured by total hours, time in “type”, and “advanced ratings” as they gain depth of experience over “time”. The “entry level” person for each position is similar – yet, a higher level of medical perfection is demanded for the pilots. And, “life style or criminal” events affect the pilot much worse than the drivers’ choices – to the point of invalidating any ratings, etc.

    I have seen figures of 80,000 to 150,000 new pilots needed over the next 10 to 20 years.

    The average earnings per year for both skills can range from $50k to $250k per year.

    Do you really need that 4-year college degree?

    Check-6

    Like

  26. Great MAGAnomics call, Sundance!

    Liked by 1 person

  27. TarsTarkas says:

    Wage increases is what happens when you get a seller’s market of labor vs jobs. Too bad too many Democrats (and some Republicans, unfortunately) consider that method of increasing people’s pay a bad thing, because it’s not tax dollars that they can hand out to favored constituencies, or wage increases by fiat to increase labor union dues and thus contributions to their campaigns.

    Like

  28. White Apple says:

    Huge opportunity for truckers who decide to be owner/operators. With Trump’s Investment Tax Credit (ITC) revision, an owner/operator can buy his own Truck and deduct 100% the purchase price of the Truck from his IRS bill. In other words the purchase price of the Truck ends-up being a free truck for the owner/operator.

    Truck owner/operators earn in excess of $150,000 per annum.

    Like

  29. Vince says:

    I am glad she is not trying to dictate the pace of innovation. There are companies that go halfway to autonomous driving by having truck trains, where a line of trucks can move together and save energy, with only the leader truck having an active driver. Those may be ready for certain routes.

    I also think reeder route US flagged container ships can take a load off the trucks and trains. Probably 70% of our population is within 100 miles of the ocean, a navigable river, or Great Lake.

    Like

    • olderthanuthink says:

      I’ve lived near the Mississippi my whole life. Right now, river traffic is backed up because of flooding. There’s not enough clearance under many bridges for barge traffic. A local RR bridge was hit by a barge about a week ago; that stopped not only the river traffic, but also the rail traffic across that bridge.
      Granted, we don’t see this level of flooding every year (we’re currently about 8 ft over technical flood stage), but it happens at least every few years. Trucks/highways are much less unpredictable.

      Like

  30. Boris DaBot says:

    These big trucking companies created this problem. Reaping what they sowed.

    Like

  31. Herbert Kroll says:

    Yeah, but think of all those poor affluent Democrats who will no longer be able to find obedient household personnel who’ll accept their sh1tty dictatorial behaviour…

    Like

  32. olderthanuthink says:

    26 years ago this month, my husband left his manufacturing job to become a truck driver. At first, he pulled flat beds throughout the lower 48, and was gone 12-16 days at a time. (I hated that.) For the last 10 years, he’s been an owner/operator. It was unfortunate that this switch came at the same time as the banking crisis & Obama. It hasn’t been that glamorous nor profitable, believe me!
    For the last 3 years, we have had no health insurance AT ALL, because we’re priced out of it. On paper, our gross income looks impressive…but subtract truck expenses, maintenance/repairs, fuel, insurance, and TAXES – and there is little left over, especially for $1200-$2000/mo insurance premiums (on top of the actual medical expenses that aren’t covered by the insurance, because almost nothing IS covered). Hoping this situation will change in the near future!
    I’m more than a little bummed today about the subject…hubby is sitting 2 states away with a busted transmission. The repairs (parts & labor), plus the lost revenue (missing his most profitable loads of the week) are going to cost $7000+. ZING! I’d have some more cash on hand if I hadn’t just paid quarterly income and fuel taxes! Timing.
    He works very, very hard and has to put up with a lot: Bad weather, bad roads, bad drivers…customers that don’t care about his schedule, only theirs…and a public that thinks truckers are to blame for every accident that happens. But he’s very good at what he does and he loves it.
    Being a trucker ain’t for sissies – but neither is being married to one! He was in North Carolina during Florence…and caught the tail end of Michael last week in Virginia. And now we’re coming up on my “‘favorite” time of year – winter. If there’s bad weather anywhere, chances are that he’s right in the middle of it. I pray almost without ceasing…and the Lord is always faithful to take care of us. Because He is good – all the time! I have to trust Him to take care of hubby, because I can’t. I’m still a work in progress on this worrying thing…

    Liked by 5 people

    • trialbytruth says:

      Heres to better times my friend. When your a small business person you end up on the edge a lot but when all is said in done it is yours “you built that”

      Liked by 2 people

    • White Apple says:

      You may think about buying a newer, better truck and take the ITC. It will eliminate having to pay withholding income tax. You will now have a more reliable truck with the ITC IRS tax dollars paying for it.

      Like

      • olderthanuthink says:

        In 10 years, the truck has had 2 motor overhauls, and now this – as far as major repairs go. Not bad for an “old” truck! Plus, it’s grandfathered-out of the E-LOG requirement. It’s reliable enough to run 3200 miles a week. Today was a rarity.

        Like

        • OSP says:

          Learn something new every day, older.

          Until reading your comment, I was not aware that trucks manufactured before 2000 were exempt from the elog requirement.

          Like

    • Dixie says:

      Older, there goes my empathy meter again and this time, you have my sympathy as well. Best wishes to you and your husband and getting his truck repaired and back home again.

      Liked by 1 person

      • olderthanuthink says:

        Thanks, Dixie! We’ll be okay. Just not one of my better days! (Or hubby’s, come to think of it. lol) I certainly will be glad to see him come through the kitchen door on Friday.
        And compared to worrying about him getting flooded on an interstate in NC, or blown off the road in VA – this was pretty mild!
        I really do hate winter, though. About 6 years ago, the week before Christmas…I was taking a nap…phone rang. He said, “First of all – I’m fine. And second of all – the truck is fine. The trailer, however, is toast.” Blizzard conditions – gust of wind blew the trailer into a bridge railing. No one got hurt, thank God! But those are the kinds of phone calls that I dread. At least I don’t get them very often!

        Liked by 3 people

  33. andyocoregon says:

    I wonder if some of the long haul loads could be transferred to the rails. It would make our highways safer and create less pollution. Trains run in inclement weather much better than 18 wheelers and with fewer operators. I realize trucks are a necessity for getting goods distributed locally, but it seems to me if you’re transporting large, heavy loads from ocean ports to major U.S. cities, trains carrying containers would be much more efficient.
    I have nothing against truck drivers, mind you. I think they are some of the least appreciated American workers. But if there’s an acute shortage of qualified long haul drivers, why not put as much as possible on the rails when it’s logical to do so?

    Like

  34. Frank says:

    In the northeast – particularly in NY, NJ, DE, CT, MA, and probably others – there are laws on the books that make life hard for truckers. No parking here, no idling there (not even to keep warm in a blizzard). Those people despise truckers like nowhere else in America. So I hope this improvement in the industry keeps those back-biting communist turds up at night.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Semi-truck sales doubling means economy is growing and Trump’s tax cuts are working.

    Harrie Schippers, President and Chief Financial Officer of PACCAR, said the Trump tax cuts are responsible for his industry’s and his company’s record profits and sales.

    The tax cuts generated “positive cash flow for PACCAR as well as benefit the transportation industry in the United States,” said Schippers.

    His company builds Kenworth, Peterbilt, and DAF semi-trucks. These are heavy-duty trucks used to pull trailers in long-haul routes.

    https://brassballs.blog/home/semi-truck-sales-doubling-means-economy-is-growing-and-trumps-tax-cuts-are-working

    Like

  36. G. Combs says:

    I noticed the trucker shortage….

    A newly certified driver generally runs IN-STATE for two years esp if he buys his own truck.

    So far we have had 3 gravel trucks and one logging truck tip over on the curves of a local road near me this summer. This is NOT typical. The last time I saw a truck tip over several years ago on that stretch of road it was a logging truck. I talked to the driver and he had just gotten his CDL.

    The Truck Driver Training School – Johnston Community College NC, has a good program that I went to. It is several weeks longer than the quick courses and even that course really can substitute for the experience you need. (And yes I took it.)

    Like

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