Sunday Talks: NEC Chairman Larry Kudlow -vs- Chris Wallace

National Economic Council Chairman Larry Kudlow appears on Fox News for an interview with Chris Wallace discussing Trump administration trade positions.  Kudlow and Wallace were previously on the same team, and held the same positions, perspectives and outlooks.

In the face of four decades of results which cannot be refuted, Chairman Kudlow is modifying his position to align with President Trump and Main Street.  At the same time Kudlow is trying to convince Wall Street and GOPe Wallace-types to follow his lead.

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[*side note* notice how no-one ever mentions MfN status?]

In some ways POTUS Trump’s selection of Kudlow is an interesting test to see if the functionally obsolescent Wall Street-minded economists have the capacity to retool decades of flawed thinking.

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, China, Decepticons, Deep State, Economy, media bias, Notorious Liars, President Trump, Professional Idiots, propaganda, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

92 Responses to Sunday Talks: NEC Chairman Larry Kudlow -vs- Chris Wallace

  1. Craig W. Gordon says:

    Most Favored Nation status. Why was China granted MfN? Who allowed this? Why is there even a MfN? Every country should stand on its own without preferential treatment.

    Liked by 10 people

    • usayes says:

      Glad SD brought this up — China did all sorts of backflips to get into the WTO. One main reason? MFN bennies! If you become a member of the WTO, WTO partners have to treat each other the same – i.e., China gets MFN status (access to the lower duty or no duty in the columns of the Tariff of the USA) just like all our other WTO partner do. A HUGE bennie. 160+ members of the WTO. That’s a lot of bennies (cue suspicious cat :))

      Liked by 5 people

      • usayes says:

        Reminds me… am old enough to remember that kids at the Thanksgiving table often had to sit on telephone books to reach the table. Since phone books are as rare today as an open-minded liberal, a good substitute for the phone book is a copy of the U.S. Tariff code – 10,000 pages and excellent sub for the Manhattan yellow pages. Available from the GPO – but not cheap.

        And you thought us treepers were only good for savvy political commentary 🙂

        Liked by 9 people

        • billrla says:

          usayes: I remember sitting on phone books as a little kid! We even had a little phone book just for our residents of our home town. Ah, the 1960s and 70s. Rotary phone that lasted forever. One call to the AT&T operator, who picked-up right away and spoke English. Stuff got done right-away. You need someone’s phone number? Here it is! And, when you left home, miraculously, no one ever called you because your phone was stuck on the wall at home.

          Liked by 10 people

          • Turranos says:

            Those were the days my friend…we thought they’d never end!

            Liked by 4 people

          • rashomon says:

            I still have just one phone stuck on the wall, which is sheer heaven when I see friends and family glued to their “minders” 24/7/365. Who in the heck it sooooooo important that their services are constantly demanded? In the own minds, perhaps, which is a mental illness.

            Like

        • Thanks for that-I’d not heard the term before or the back-story associated with it. I’m not sure how deeply thankful I should be to you as you’ve put me into another maze of reading and research that will consume many of my ever dwindling available hours.
          Regards….

          Like

  2. Genie says:

    It was a little creepy when Wallace asked who was in the coalition of the willing. Kudlow looked like nervous cat for a second at 5:11.

    Yet still he was a breath of fresh air compared to “Pelosi’s successor” who was interviewed next.

    Liked by 2 people

    • fleporeblog says:

      Larry is realizing rather quickly that if you want to get out of the kitchen and from making sandwiches 🥪, you have to be able to come across to our President’s agenda. Japan 🇯🇵 and South Korea 🇰🇷 will back us in anything we would want to do against China 🇨🇳. If that includes imposing tariffs against the Chinese, that will happen. They realize that our President is on the cusp of ending the Korean War will will allow peace and prosperity in at part of the world.

      Once North Korea 🇰🇵 is resolved, all the attention of the ASEAN nations will have to focus on China 🇨🇳. Between the One Belt, One Road initiative and the South China Sea 🌊, China needs to be reigned in BIGLY! Our President has been waiting for thirty years to slap the Chinese around.

      Liked by 3 people

  3. billrla says:

    The word “coalition” should have died with the Bush Administrations. Either it’s good for the U.S. and we act accordingly, or, it isn’t good, and we don’t act.

    Liked by 9 people

    • dayallaxeded says:

      Coalitions are good and even essential at times. The key is to keep focus on short and long term national interests, not posturing for the appearance of “leadership” or capitulation for appearance of “respect” or “cooperation” (the policies of the last 2 admins, respectively). VSGPDJT is remaking the definition of coalition – – watch and revel in the changing paradigm. Even Kudlow is beginning to feel it.

      Liked by 5 people

  4. Chris Wallence couldn’t sell me a toilet seat.

    Liked by 10 people

  5. Perot Conservative says:

    President Trump is correct. Can you be a country without a steel industry?

    Stealing our IP, and currency manipulation, are huge.

    I spoke last week with a German engineer who formerly worked here, and relayed in detail how Chinese companies were stealing our engineering designs. She relocates to Germany for a different company, same industry. Several years later said Chinese company attempts to sell her company that same design, but she was sharp enough to see the defects in the design that the Chinese engineers didn’t catch.

    Why not reciprocal tariffs?

    Liked by 8 people

    • trump2016ourlastchance says:

      Exactly right; reciprocity is the key. If the chicoms won’t defang the KimKluxKlan, then we should help Taiwan get its own nukes.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Mk10108 says:

      Shows you how stupid the Chinese are. They cannot engineer worth a crap, use sub standard materials and zero after sale support.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Matthew LeBlanc says:

        Having been in manufacturing my whole career you’d be surprised how many “smart” companies and those running them only see “cheap”. The horror storied I’ve heard over lack of support after a sale would scare me away but somehow “cheap” is more powerful incentive. Probably a statement on our society as a whole.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Perot Conservative says:

          A balcony collapsed in Berkeley, California, killing several people a few years back.

          My Dad is a semi retired carpenter. I promise you that never happened to his work / projects. Improperly built, poor water diversion, leading to dry rot and collapse? But “cheaper”.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Cuppa Covfefe says:

            I have that same fear about the replacement span of the SF-Oakland Bay Bridge, aka the WilliBrown™ span. There are problems on that from foundation(s) on up.

            I doubt it would withstand a Loma-Prieta scale or larger quake at all (as opposed to the original span, which although it lost a segment which fell onto the span below it DID NOT COLLAPSE)…

            Buy it cheap, buy it twice (at least), or buy the farm… No CCC (Cheap Chinese Crud) for me…

            Liked by 2 people

            • Perot Conservative says:

              Cuppa. Read about the new spillway at Oroville Dam?

              Roughly $1 Billion to remove concrete, restore some river banks, and pour a new concrete and rebar spillway.

              $1 Billion?

              Like

              • Cuppa Covfefe says:

                Wonder where the rebar came from ? 😦 (and the concrete/cement).

                The spillway and the reconstruction of the drain planes (or whatever they’re called) had to have been an enormous amount of work, and they did some replacements multiple times… (run that play over until you get it right).

                Amazed that there was any money left over from the Moonbeam Express™ to pay for it in the first place…

                Like

              • dayallaxeded says:

                Funny money–all debt “backed” by the full faith and weirdness of the Gr8 St8 o’ Californic8. Stuff gets extra ‘spensive when priced in vapor $.

                Like

        • Kate says:

          Yes Matt you are correct, I have done it myself knowing that whatever is won’t last long but serves it’s purpose at the time, and I think that is the type of thinking many people have.
          The bad and worse part is this kind of thinking happens in the construction business for example and is the reason why new homes start falling apart shortly after
          being built, new bridges won’t won’t last long, road building is shoddy due to bad material.
          We have to change our own way of thinking and change our buying habits.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Perot Conservative says:

        The brand new $9 Billion San Francisco Bay Bridge leaks and is rusting (microfractures). China, or American engineers?

        Liked by 5 people

        • MAJA says:

          This is a travesty. A huge chorus of alarm when up when it was found that Chinese materials would be used to build the bridge. The usual suspects assured everyone that there weren’t any quality issues. I wonder how many gov inspectors reports were falsified so they could approve of China as the vendor.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Cuppa Covfefe says:

            Not only materials: the huge crane(s) and workers were also brought in from China. Seems that nothing is left of the great shipyards that once were in the Bay Area…

            Liked by 2 people

    • Mid ’80s through the ’90s: we manufactured intercoms and headsets for the general aviation market and held the #1 brand. US based “import/export” pop-up retailers contract with Chinese fab’s to supply a look-alike knock-off of one of our most popular and esteemed products. The first version had a slight design flaw that reduced battery life by about 10% of what it should be by a .25 cent Zener diode. Any educated electronic tech. would have spotted it. Yet the bastards actually copied the flaw! Just a little historical context….

      Liked by 1 person

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        Look up the “Badcaps” disaster/scandal. A Chinese IP spy stole the formula to the electrolyte used in electrolytic capacitors made by a Japanese firm, but missed part of the formula.

        Because of that, the electrolyte caused failures in a lot of electronic equipment (especially PC motherboards [of which I had two]), and usually presented itself by puffed-up capacitors [Ballpark caps, they puff up when you charge them?] and/or brown goo oozing out of the caps. There were also “silent failures” where the electrical properties were incorrect, but no obvious physical manifestation thereof.

        I think Abit (a motherboard manufacturer) went out of business because of that, as they were major users of the badcaps (not knowingly, of course).

        Like

  6. We’ve been working on an enhanced rescission package with Mick Mulvaney
    There will be some explodey heads from that comment.

    Liked by 17 people

    • TwoLaine says:

      I CANNOT WAIT! I am so excited about this. From the minute I heard it, I tho’t FINALLY!!!!!!

      Liked by 5 people

    • Perot Conservative says:

      Leverage to get wall funding? I hope so.

      But we still have to deal with snakes Ryan and McConnell.

      Like

      • gregbuls says:

        Which is why there will be no recissions. I wish that were not the case, but the GOP “leadership” is feckless. It’s simply incredible that they allowed the language that prohibits us from using cement in any of the border ‘fencing’. It’s clear whose side they are on.
        Trump should start tweeting about McConnel’s enrichment as a politician (see Schweitzer’s new book). Until senate leadership changes we will never see the Trump agenda fully realized.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Perot Conservative says:

          Build it as a National Emergency!

          I think President Trump and his spokespeople could do a better job highlighting the highly negative consequences of illegal immigration.

          – 5,000 homicides a year (GAO report)
          – 60,000 opiod / drug deaths a year
          – 700,000 crimes in Texas
          – 5,000 DUI deaths? (Need source)
          – gang activity
          – African Americans driven out of South Central LA
          – Mexican nationals 90% of the DEAs Most Wanted in western regions

          Am I wrong?

          Like

  7. Scott J. Brooks says:

    Was shrewd and bit cute of Kudlow to shake hands with Wallace and to highly praise him as a good guy. Took a lot of the gas out of Wallace’s attempts to be confrontational.

    Liked by 4 people

  8. TwoLaine says:

    I want to slap Wallace and ask why he’s never cared about tariff’s placed on our products. Nor does he mention the fact that what we get from China is made with slave labor.

    Liked by 7 people

    • Bud Klatsch says:

      Amen, 1000 times over. I too bought into the WSJ/World Trade betterment BS for decades until I kept seeing us closing shops, factories and production along with the loss of wealth of our middle class. BS to them and I even canceled my WSJ subscription some years ago after 30 years. BS!

      Liked by 11 people

      • Publius2016 says:

        If you invested in these startups, you’d be super wealthy! Amazon Alphabet and Oracle

        Like

      • GB Bari says:

        You have a lot of good company. I was a naysayer from the outset about NAFTA (my first real awareness of “trade deals”); went against the tide of popular opinion but I never really had anything but gut instinct to back my opinions up. Internet was relatively thin on content back then (mid ’90s) and I was too busy with jobs and family to spend time researching in libraries.

        So I really could not debate anyone since I was only using my own gut logic and they were using fancy forward predictions and flowery descriptions from the WSJ, Forbes, and other financial newspapers newsletters, and magazines of how expanding global free trade was going to lift everyone up. It was the republican mantra and I was a Republican. Heck, even talk radio king Rush Limbaugh was an ardent supporter of NAFTA from the outset, disagreeing with and trying to school many of his callers who were apparently working class folks fearing for their jobs. It was his greatest error in judgment and worst prediction.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Sylvia Avery says:

          Face it, we were all sold a real bill of goods, sold down the river, however you want to phrase it. We were lied to. I have believed in the free market ardently and repeated endlessly, “let the markets decide!” and yet, here we are.

          We went VERY wrong with trade. NAFTA and the WTO were bad, bad, bad choices that made someone very rich, it just wasn’t middle class Americans.

          I can remember in the 90s being in Seattle when the WTO riots broke out and the anarchists were all over down town creating a mess and while I remember feeling instinctively (like you) that NAFTA had been wrong and the WTO was wrong I didn’t know how to really back that up, besides all the knowledgeable folks kept saying “it’s gonna be great!”

          Anyway, it gives me a really odd feeling to think that twenty years ago, my lefty friends were out breaking windows and screaming about the WTO and I thought they were criminally insane. Now, that could be me, and my lefty friends would be calling ME criminally insane (because WTO and NAFTA good, America bad…) The irony is so thick you could cut it with a knife.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Perot Conservative says:

            Even Hillary Clinton had to admit Perot was right.

            We had Reagan Democrats. Then Perot, folliwed by Tea Party, and now Trump.

            Bill Clinton got less than 50% of the vote!

            As Perot said, it is not fair, free trade if they get paid 50 cents an hour, no medical, live on dirt floors, and dump chemicals into rivers.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Steve says:

            You’re caught in the absurd vortex like everyone else. You are not alone. The great pendulum swings from one extreme to the other….but on a period much longer than our short, little lifespans can decipher to which direction it is swinging. We will always remain, as a species, perplexed and confused.

            Liked by 1 person

    • And with inferior material and quality control (if even present).
      Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Lenin) ” We shall sell them the rope they’ll hang themselves with…”

      Like

  9. graphiclucidity says:

    “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.”

    – Upton Sinclair

    Liked by 17 people

  10. quintrillion says:

    If you do a search on “when did china gain most favored nation status” many articles come up and it’s very interesting to research. Here is one:
    http://congressionalresearch.com/RL30225/document.php

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Publius2016 says:

    The value of imagination, creativity and the dollar must be preserved against the Globalists! Free People pursuing their dreams is why we are here…President Trump is working everyday to save our Republic!

    Liked by 4 people

  12. Disgusted says:

    I loved the way Larry waved Wallace off to correct him a few times. That’s the way to handle him!

    Liked by 3 people

    • GB Bari says:

      Yes. Kudlow is far more reserved and professional than I. I would’ve wanted to reach out and slap Wallace several times and tell him to shut the frack up with the “But, but, but” crap always trying to throw fear and consequences of trade war into the dialogue. That appeared to be Wallace’s sole objective today – keep the phrase “Trade War” in the dialogue as often as possible. Soooo obvious but still disgusting.

      Liked by 3 people

  13. Michelle says:

    My overall impression is that the media should step aside and not keep freaking out and interfering with this negotiation process with China. The media does not understand economics properly and they cannot keep insisting that they are correct.

    Liked by 4 people

  14. Roger Duroid says:

    They only care be because it came from PDJT. If this was ohole, it would be crickets.

    Liked by 3 people

    • GB Bari says:

      Maybe crickets. I tend to believe that the eneMedia would be gushing with praise lavished all over Obozo describing how brilliant a strategist he is…

      Liked by 2 people

  15. Does Kudlow need a job? Why would he take this on? He doesn’t BELIEVE it.

    Like

    • billrla says:

      Full Spectrum: What is the “it” that Kudlow does not believe? Once I know the “it,” I can tell you whether or not I agree with you.

      Like

    • GB Bari says:

      Disagree. Kudlow finally has talked at length with a brilliant man who truly understands the negative effects of the globalist strategy. I believe Trump has pulled Kudlow somewhat towards Trump’s POV, maybe not all the way but enough. I believe Larry lately when he emphatically supports Trumps approach in these interviews. I honestly don’t think Kudlow can fake it that well when he gets animated in these interviews. He’s not reading from a script – this is straight out from his heart and mind. he freely admits he still doesn’t like tariffs – ok – but IMHO he now better understands that they are a tool to be used among other tools to persuade a bad player to straighten out their bad practices.

      Liked by 4 people

  16. deplorabledaveinsocal says:

    “In some ways POTUS Trump’s selection of Kudlow is an interesting test to see if the functionally obsolescent Wall Street-minded economists have the capacity to retool decades of flawed thinking.”

    retool, or reboot / rethink / re-examine / repair / re-evaluate / repudiate / rebuke / refute / renege…

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Ditch Mitch says:

    Chrissy is useless. He constantly wants to talk trade wars and Kudlow’s position on tariffs causing trade wars. At 7:05 Chrissy plays a soundbite by PDJT and only points out the first part where PDJT states “we may take a hit”; however, Chrissy never mentions the second part of the soundbite where PDJT states “we may come back stronger for it”. I was suprised he played the whole soundbite.

    Crissy refuses to acknowledge China’s illegal trade tactics and stealing of intellectual property which is a big reason why we are where we are now.

    At least Chrissy acknowledges that he listens and learns from Larry. Probably only patronizing as Chrissy has to tow the “party” line even in its most detrimental forms.

    Like

  18. Perot Conservative says:

    Ross Perot was hugely against it, a ‘giant sucking sound’ of jobs moving south.

    He even explained it would create some jobs for 3-4 years while we produced machinery for the new factories (maquiladoras) in Mexico.

    In 2015 the Tijuana minimum wage was 55 cents per hour; $2.00 per hour in the maquiladoras.8

    In 2015 there were an estimated 2,000 maquiladoras along the border. I believe DUTY FREE!!

    Like

  19. pochas94 says:

    Perhaps SD could elaborate on the “flawed thinking” of past decades that Kudlow has had to abandon, and how he has now “seen the light.” Personally, I doubt his thinking has changed much.

    Like

  20. Mickey Wasp says:

    I don’t think I’m the only one that notices this – am I.?
    99 times out of a 100 interviews the democrats always get the rebuttal stage.
    No matter what Sunday broadcast the democrat always get to come on ‘next’.

    Like

  21. Greg Buls says:

    Wallace etc. have the same prescription: Tariffs may be disruptive, so keep allowing Chinese abuse. The Chinese are well aware that the talking heads on this side are effectively on their side. They can count on heavy internal pressure to maintain the status quo. Again, it’s essentially Trump vs the world. I’ll be on Trump. As with N. Korea, all he has to do is start applying the pressure and convince both sides that it will never stop until the other side breaks.

    Like

    • thedoc00 says:

      Actually Wallace and company have their eyes on the cost of items on the Wall Mart shelves as well as Amazon screens and not on the quality of jobs needed to actually regrow a middle class. They have absolutely no concept of the control the makers of stuff, with a monopoly in an economy, have on naming costs of good-services as well as defining how much of a “service economy they will allow to exist in the USA.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. thedoc00 says:

    My only disagreement is that the Chinese stole anything. IP and commercial advantages were willingly given by businesses via trade deals and via the state department authorizing the technology transfer inherent in overseas commercial contracts. IP was willingly given away via all the poorly executed foreign scientific exchange programs authorized by state department as well as congress. It is a brutal truth that needs to be stated and that is the crux of the “admiration and credit” gives to the Chinese as financial competitors.

    Trump is being smart not reminding everybody so overtly of the stupidity. If I were the Chinese there would be a temptation to write a few OP-EDS on the topic.

    Like

    • thedoc00 says:

      Of note is the technology Northrop and Boeing were allowed to transfer to China under Bill Clinton which is the heart of the massive leap in computing power, avionics and weapons accuracy over the past 20 years (this is how they caught up with the West).

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Joe says:

    I think, overall, the election of PDJT has been a great learning experience for Chris Wallace in addition to the schooling that Larry Kudlow has given hi over the years.

    Like

  24. Knowledge, fun, and lovable what’s not to like?

    Like

  25. VeritasVincit says:

    One of the things that keeps bothering me is the constant mantra that Trump is starting a trade war. He can’t start a war that China started decades ago. Trump just started to defend against China’s offense.

    Like

  26. Payday says:

    Well, Larry thinks Wallace is great. That’s one.

    Like

  27. Donna in Oregon says:

    Wallace nags and gossips…..old biddy.

    Like

  28. Beverly says:

    Wallace was ACTIVELY trying to sabotage America’s efforts in these talks with the Chinese Communists. What a scumbag.

    Like

  29. Mike diamond says:

    Chris the Wallace same o Chris !

    Like

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