New U.S. Business Tax Rates Loom Over Canada on TPP Trade Deal…

The economic strategy of President Trump is so consequential and encompassing, even the domestic effects are felt globally.

♦Removing the U.S. from the multinational TPP trade deal initially planted the seeds of doubt amid multinational trade forecasters because the shift positioned the U.S. with unique leverage. They saw Trump using access to the worlds largest market as a negotiating strategy.

♦A few months later, President Trump walked away from the ridiculous regulatory restrictions within the Paris Climate Treaty.  Instantaneously this put even more strategic manufacturing and economic advance on the U.S. ledger, and simultaneously made American energy independence a foregone conclusion.

♦And now that congress has codified President Trump’s lower domestic business taxes, in conjunction with opening up ANWR for energy development (a strategic economic goal for 20+ years), the size of the U.S. economic and manufacturing advantage has just increased U.S. trade leverage to almost unimaginable levels.

Economic Nationalism – President Trump’s strategy has created: •Lower and long-term predictable energy costs, not attached to OPEC or multinational influence; •Lower and long-term raw material costs due to slashed regulatory environment; •lower and long-term business manufacturing tax rates; and now Trump begins negotiating trade deals.

Add these advantages together within the largest economic market in the world and the U.S. is now the place where manufacturers will want to do business.  Additionally, the process of utilizing Canada and/or Mexico as a workaround into the U.S. market, via NAFTA, is on the cusp of removal.

This is the backdrop for Canadian Prime Minister to consider his trade options.

•Canada is now anchored to the multinational rules contained in the Paris Climate Treaty.  •Canada will no longer be able to utilize their own natural resources.  •Effective yesterday, Canada has lost their strategic corporate-tax-rate advantage; and •there is a very real possibility the U.S. will pull out of NAFTA effectively closing the loophole exploited by China and Asia using Canadian companies as assembly plants for Asian products shipped duty-free into the U.S. market.

This is Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s new economic landscape as he attempts to adhere to his former promises to remain in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal:

TOKYO — Japan’s former ambassador to Canada has added his voice to those concerned that confusion over Ottawa’s position on the Trans-Pacific Partnership could affect the relationship between the two countries.

At last month’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Vietnam, Trudeau’s decision not to attend a meeting of leaders of the 11 countries negotiating the trade deal — a meeting which the other countries expected would finalize an agreement in principle — “grated on Japanese sensitivities,” said Sadaaki Numata, formerly Japan’s top diplomat in Canada and an advisor to the Canadian Chamber of Commerce Japan. And he said it has put the relationship into a holding pattern, with the Japanese waiting for an indication that Canada is still interested in moving forward with the deal.

“I am concerned that what happened recently might lead to a stasis in our relationship and that’s not good, that would not be very encouraging,” Numata said. “Certainly (Trudeau) may have been able to avoid a situation where people would call Canada’s attitude as something ‘unpredictable.’  (read more)

Allow me put it bluntly.  Prime Minister Rainbow Socks is screwed.  POTUS Trump has unleashed the U.S. economic engine; meanwhile Trudeau has anchored Canada to the Paris Treaty rules and is now on the brink of giving Canadian trade sovereignty to Asia.

Prime Minister Trudeau and Foreign Minister Crystia Freeland demanded that TPP be renamed the “Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership”. However, no amount of linguistic lipstick is going to hide the foolish ‘fine-print’ attachments within the multinational trade deal that will eventually be taken over by China.

China is in the perfect position in relationship to TPP.  Chairman Xi Jinping sitting on the sideline waiting for everyone else to attach themselves to the rules, then China will strategically enter and all other nations become economically subservient.  It appears to be a transparent long-game.

At CTH we occasionally ask ourselves if POTUS told Xi Jinping China could have trade leverage over Canada and Mexico in return for help on North Korea… and other things?

Wait., that would mean China knew Trump was likely pulling out of NAFTA way back in February 2017.   …Nah, that would mean a much bigger and more comprehensive  strategy than any one assembly of people could possibly pull off…. Right? 

Right?

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, Canada, China, Dem Hypocrisy, Donald Trump, Economy, energy, European Union, Japan, media bias, N Korea, NAFTA, President Trump, Taxes, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

254 Responses to New U.S. Business Tax Rates Loom Over Canada on TPP Trade Deal…

  1. wheatietoo says:

    Wait…what’s that sound? Is that a giant sucking sound coming from the US now?

    Liked by 32 people

    • mopar2016 says:

      “They saw Trump using access to the world’s largest market as a negotiating strategy”.

      DUH! Isn’t that what a US president is supposed to do?

      Liked by 23 people

    • StanH says:

      Perot had it right.

      Liked by 10 people

    • fleporeblog says:

      Our President wants to get the entire process that goes into the making of automobiles 🚗 back into our country. He wants to see the State of Michigan humming again like it did in its hay day. That reason is why he will kill NAFTA by the end of January. Countries like Germany 🇩🇪, Japan 🇯🇵 will have to expand their companies here in the USA 🇺🇸 in order to have access to our market. We saw Japan 🇯🇵 announce during our President’s visit that happening. China 🇨🇳, Mexico 🇲🇽 and Canada 🇨🇦 are screwed! The days of getting rich at our expense will be coming to a screeching stop 🛑.

      America First From Now On!

      Liked by 15 people

      • wheatietoo says:

        Yes!
        And that’s why we have got to get our Immigration and Visa programs fixed, so that these countries don’t simply import their own people for these jobs…instead of hiring US citizens.

        Liked by 12 people

        • WSB says:

          We also need to make sure our industries are not taken over by foreign fifth columns.

          Liked by 7 people

          • Carrie2 says:

            WSB, et al, as a young university student and working part time for attorneys, I could never understand why so many foreign countries could purchase so much land here and have businesses here with their own employees. Well, now seeing that all being reversed set my much older mind and soul at peace thanks to Pres. Trump being a real businessman and knowing the art of the deal and the cupcakes in other countries are writhing in misery and “how could this happen”.

            Liked by 3 people

        • JmkNY says:

          We do need to fix the visa and immigration system-and not just for the job angle. Here in Howard County MD we have a flood of Chinese, Korean and Indian immigrants in the last few years. And many have positions in IT departments of companies and the federal government agencies. Stop and ponder the systems they have access to. And then remember with the Chinese (and they’re not from Taiwan) that China is a communist country- you get to leave and work in another country only with the government’s blessing. So who do they really work for? Hmmm.

          Liked by 5 people

      • fleporeblog says:

        http://money.cnn.com/2017/11/06/news/economy/trump-japan-autos-fact-check/index.html

        From the article linked above:

        President Trump delivered a rebuke to Japan Inc. on Monday.

        “Try building your cars in the United States instead of shipping them over. Is that possible to ask? That’s not rude. Is that rude? I don’t think so,” Trump told executives from local automakers during a trip to Japan.

        At the same time, Trump thanked Japanese automakers for “building new plants and doing expansions” of existing facilities in the United States. He praised Toyota (TM) and Mazda (MZDAF) for planning a new $1.6 billion manufacturing plant in the U.S.

        Liked by 5 people

        • Carrie2 says:

          fle, my Toyota was made in Kentucky with no union impositions and still the best car on the market and all #1. Love my 2001 Solara Rally that even 178K miles and all renovated and great gas mileage and quiet running and I can play CASSETTES to as can’t in new cars.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Dennis Leonard says:

        Please,Please,Please,go away

        Liked by 4 people

      • Bud Klatsch says:

        Yes exactly! I am retired, but I think jobs and opportunities are what our young people need most. Any American that travels thru Detroit and much of the industrial heartland has to be ashamed of what our POL’s have done to America. A disgrace!!

        Liked by 3 people

      • Bob says:

        If we think the Tax reform package is great ……just think of the FAIR TAX being a factor of 10 better for the USA and the rest of the world go completely crazy because of the competitive edge it would give the USA.

        Liked by 2 people

      • AMK says:

        Dude, do you see what he has done in less than 12 months?
        In 36 months from now, this country will be unrecognizable from the obama years!

        Please stop with the whining and worrying.

        Put a rubber band on your wrist.
        Every time you have these thoughts, I want you to snap the rubber band.
        That way, you can train yourself to keep your
        “doubt seeds” in your own head!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Big Jake says:

        No. Pence will be Bush 41 Part Two. The Rs will lose their way entirely (again). I doubt we will ever see another Trump to save us, either.

        Liked by 1 person

        • fleporeblog says:

          I disagree with you on Pence. He will have 7 more years to learn from our Lion 🦁. He is a good Christian with his heart in the right place.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Carrie2 says:

          Jake, stop being a downer and doubter. God brought Trump to us and if we continue to know and acknowledge God, this turnaround will continue for a good long time. Gloom and doom only makes one sicker both mentally and physically. Hope on the American Train and enjoy a tremendous ride and meanwhile we have to Drain the Congress Swamp, take away all the benefits/perks they gave themselves, and inform them we own them and they do not own us and I would like to see that anyone with more than 2 complete terms not be voted back again and again and again. Fresh blood is needed and that to represent us and not on becoming millionaires and ignoring us.

          Liked by 1 person

    • vfm#7634 says:

      I think the sucking sound just ended, and we’re hearing everything else now.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Running Fast says:

    Interesting… does that put the US at risk militarily? The border between the two countries is massive and unprotected? If Canada becomes a Chineses proxy how does Amrrica counter?

    Liked by 5 people

    • H.R. says:

      We simply declare Florida off limits to Canadians. They will grumble, of course, but they are too polite to make a fuss and will stay on their side of the border.
      .
      .
      Wait up… are you suggesting a Canadian Missile Crisis?!?

      Liked by 4 people

    • wolfmoon1776 says:

      Not a chance.

      IMO, it’s because Trump is several plays ahead of the two-move-ahead scenario that leads to Canada as a Chinese proxy.

      Prime Minister Rainbow Socks and his Girl Friday think they can tame the Dragon Master by casting some spell with commie words (“Progressive”? LOL! Spare me!), begging on bended knee that the ChiComs not be the world’s biggest hypocrites.

      It won’t work. At some point, drowning in China debt and ChiCom fentanyl, and up to its eyeballs in ChiCom spies, Canada will have its “Come to Trump” moment. Whether that involves Prime Minister Rainbow socks is uncertain, but I tend to think that the lightweight will be cast aside at some point, unless he plays “follow the Trump” for his own political survival, and his own country’s national survival.

      Bilateral deal with Japan? Oh, my. I don’t think that much backtracking is possible. Looks like those rainbow socks are going back to Quebec. Maybe not right away, but soon enough.

      Liked by 16 people

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      I think we’re gonna need another wall.

      Liked by 18 people

    • Cuppa Covfefe says:

      Don’t fire until you see the pink of their socks… 🙂

      Liked by 8 people

    • One border at a time. I’m an American who has been living in the middle of Montreal’s real estate boom, condo heaven, and it’s so incredible, Within in my window at least 30 new Condo buildings within the last 5years and guess who they are filled with. Chinese tour buses have sprung up. They on the way to be 30% of the city’s population. Willing to be Toronto and Vancouver worse, those cities have recently trying to control the surge with new real estate taxes, too late, horse out of the barn. Fortunately, they are not established in the countryside. But there will be a time, in the not so distant future, they will own Canadian cities and will become their political power. I think ending NAFTA may be a good thing for Canada in the long run, it may help easy the pressure from China and protect Canada’s sovereignty. Canada has 25 million people, how difficult would in be for the Chinese to control it. Take away NAFTA gives them less reason. Fortunately the Chinese are not terrorists, but on that problem Trudeau is a class-a- fool. And once that problem bleeds into the states you may hear talk of a Northern Wall. Canada has a long history of using and abusing the states.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Michael says:

    What raw materials do we absolutely must acquire elsewhere?
    I know we don’t have much of a supply of diamonds in this country but what else do we absolutely lack?

    Liked by 2 people

    • 4harrisonblog says:

      We can make diamonds.

      Liked by 9 people

    • treehouseron says:

      Nothing Michael. We’ve got it all right here. Our manufacturing industry is decimated…. so we don’t have much capacity, but all the raw materials we need we have right here.

      Just need to start building the factories….. and hiring the workers. We’ll eventually probably have to start importing visa holders again to take all the jobs after we reach full employment….

      Liked by 6 people

      • 4harrisonblog says:

        Yes we do and there is nothing we can’t do. We can even elect someone like obama and still be better than all the rest.

        Liked by 6 people

        • Bill Robbins says:

          Hi, 4harrisonblog: Golden comment, right there. Well done.

          Liked by 3 people

        • cats23 says:

          And chances are that without obama we would never have had Trump as our president.
          (Knew obama had to be good for SOMETHING!!)

          Liked by 3 people

        • Betty says:

          No ! No Obama, never again, teach your children about the bitter lesson we learned. Call it the Obama pass-over.

          They told us:
          we had to accept an anmesty – there was no alternative
          we had to accept open borders
          we had to accept the America was over
          we had to accept that our manufacturing base and jobs were gone and never coming back
          we had to accept the managed decline of our Republic
          we had to accept the loss of our Sovereignty
          we had to accept and pay for abortion on demand right up to full term
          we had to accept gay marriage
          we had to accept the government spying on us

          what else?

          Liked by 5 people

      • andrewalinxs says:

        Biggest reason for lack of raw resource extraction in the Untied States is regulation and cost to set up the equipment was greater then cost of import.

        Liked by 9 people

      • nuthinmuffin says:

        not cobalt, and very limited rare earth minerals

        Like

        • andrewalinxs says:

          U.S and China hold the majority of rare earth Minerals, but we suspended mining in 2015.

          USGS commodity report on Domestic production of Rare earth Minerals excerpt:
          The suspension of U.S. mining in 2015 resulted in a significant decline in exports of
          rare -earth compounds in 2016. U.S. imports of rare-earth compounds and metals increased by 6% compared with those in 2015. In 2016, excess global supply caused prices for many rare -earth compounds and metals to decline. (China is currently flooding the market so most other operations are suspended.)

          As for Cobalt, USGS Domestic report of 2017 excerpt:
          Identified cobalt resources of the United States are estimated to be about 1 million tons. Most of these resources are in Minnesota, but other important occurrences are in Alaska, California, Idaho, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Oregon, and Pennsylvania. With the exception of resources in Idaho and Missouri, any future cobalt production from these deposits would be as a byproduct of another metal. Identified world terrestrial cobalt
          resources are about 25 million tons.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Maquis says:

        Why, we just might have to start educating our children.
        🙃

        GBPDJT

        Liked by 7 people

        • 4harrisonblog says:

          My two grandsons are in a private schools with the help of Chick-fil-A restaurant chain founder, Truett Cathy. He gave the school the startup help it needed.

          Like

      • Donna in Oregon says:

        We have automation/robotics, we don’t need visa holders. That’s what Obama’s whole speech was about (for those who saw/heard it) Obama was out parroting what his handlers wanted to get out.

        We don’t need low skilled workers here anymore. That’s what is happening.

        Liked by 1 person

    • H.R. says:

      Michael: “What raw materials do we absolutely must acquire elsewhere?”

      We’re a little short on bauxite, for one. I don’t think US reserves are adequate for our needs, but perhaps there is more in the US that is not currently obtainable economically.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Gary says:

        Actually I think there is a bauxite glut, only really domestic product that uses it at the moment is cleaners.

        Liked by 1 person

      • andrewalinxs says:

        Here is the 2017 USGS mineral commodity report.
        https://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/mcs/2017/mcs2017.pdf

        Excerpt on bauxite alternatives:
        United States and most other major aluminum-producing countries have essentially inexhaustible subeconomic resources of aluminum in materials other than bauxite.

        Substitutes:
        Bauxite is the only raw material used in the production of alumina on a commercial scale in the United States. Although currently not economically competitive with bauxite,
        vast U.S. and global resources of clay are technically feasible sources of alumina. Other domestic raw materials, such as alunite, anorthosite, coal wastes, and oil shales, offer additional potential alumina sources. Some refineries in China recover alumina from coal ash, and processes for recovering alumina from clay were being tested in Australia and Canada to determine if they would be economically competitive. Synthetic mullite, produced from kaolin, bauxitic kaolin, kyanite, and sillimanite, substitutes for bauxite-based refractories. Although more costly, silicon carbide and alumina-zirconia can substitute for bauxite based abrasives.

        Liked by 2 people

        • andrewalinxs says:

          I should add the majority of our Bauxite use is in the production of Alumina.

          Liked by 2 people

          • H.R. says:

            Thanks, andrewalinxs. So we should be OK, but it will just cost more extracting it from other sources.

            Like

            • andrewalinxs says:

              Untied States can ether extract or replace the none domestic resources with alternatives we can make local. The reason we do not is cost. However if prices go up or we are in a situation we have to make more domestic goods the Untied States can stand on its own also interestingly costs go down as energy gets cheaper.

              The more cheap energy the U.S can produce the cheaper it is to make the alternatives.

              Like

        • 🍺Gunny says:

          Alumina is very important. It is used in making the crystal boulle / crystal ingots for the base material in the manufacturing of LED’s. ( like silicon for computer chips) LED lights are everywhere globally and a multi-trillion dollar industry.
          China is the number manufacturer of LED’s. I worked for a company based out of New Hampshire that made the furnaces that created the crystal boulle.
          South Korea and China were our largest customers.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Thecleaner says:

        Uranium and nickel come to mind off the top of my head.

        Liked by 1 person

        • rf121 says:

          Plenty of uranium in CO, WY, and NM. Issue is cost to mine it.

          Like

          • Thecleaner says:

            Here is a link to world Uranium reserves.

            https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/the-largest-uranium-reserves-in-the-world.html

            Contrary to popular belief, the goal of Putin in aquring Uranium assets was to drive the price down, and force western countries yo mothball mines…which has been working.

            The US currently imports about 90-95% of their Uranium. Its doubtful the US could ever be Uranium self sufficient.

            Like

          • Thecleaner says:

            I would put this out for discussion as well
            If a nation such as the US can import energy at reasonable costs as well as other base or strategic metals and materials, it is in their long term national security interests to do so.
            The goal would be to have your adversaries expend their national resource reserves, while you maintain strategic control of yours.
            At the end of the day, the last guy with energy reserves will win.

            Liked by 4 people

            • Michael says:

              Every time I have made this argument (elsewhere) I got smacked down.
              Thanks for your comment 🙂

              Like

              • Thecleaner says:

                There is inherent risk in expending your strategic reserves, and pissing off your allies and adversaries alike in the process.
                As for the TPP, if you look at the potential signatory nations, and then add in China entering and Russia being their ornary selves, you will quickly a rapidly approaching day of reckoning for the US when it comes to procurring metals, minerals and Uranium.
                I base this arguement in part on Sundsnce’ admission that he expects China to move in and monopolize the TPP.
                The US being a non signatory gets to the back of the line when it comes to supply unfortunately. Im sure China will squeeze supply, inducing shortages of strategic metal shipments into the US.

                Like

            • Maquis says:

              I’ve felt this way too, but if we regulate mining out of existence because “we don’t really need it” and thus a low-hanging victim of the EcoWarriors, and we have no active mines to exploit, then we are dorking ourselves big-time.

              Strategic Impotence seems to have been our dark guide star for some time.

              GBPDJT

              Like

              • Thecleaner says:

                I would never condone regulating production into shutdown. Its more about simply strategically leaving it in the ground, and using up everbody elses.
                Eco Warriors will be non existant in a couple of decades when wars begin for control of strategic resources. It will be far better to have the worlds largest producers as your allies at such a time, but time will tell where loyalties lie in 20 yrs, and which powers have secured trade agrerments for delivery of those resources.

                Like

            • KBR says:

              When is the “end of the day?”

              Might that be when your nation is being deliberately worn down, deliberately economically beaten down and culturally taken over by marxist globalists such that it might lose its sovereignity?

              You speak of the “long term national security interests.”

              Is NOW what we strategically saved up our resources for in the past? If there IS no nation, there will be no future security for it, after all.

              Also, keep in mind that:

              Once upon a time, the best source of slate was one of the strategic resources most sought. It made fine weapons, it chipped well and sharply, when stone spear tips and arrowheads were needed for war or food-hunting.

              Perhaps copper was next.

              Then copper was mixed with other earth elements like tin. Bronze was the new slate.

              When iron was smelted suddenly copper and tin were not as essential.

              Steel came next.

              The need for one mineral or element over another to manufacture strategic goods changes over time, as new inventions change the relative importance for any one of them.

              Perhaps soon uranium will be much less important?

              My point is, hoarding the important resources so stingily that you risk losing your nation altogether, especially those resources potentially soon to be outdated as “essential” is simply foolish.

              Strategic resources are likely to change over time. And if there is a strategic resource our nation does not have, but needs there is an option.

              Make what you have strategic: create the next strategy and the newest latest greatest strategic technology/weapon/commodity with that. USA was good at that sort of thing, that sort of thinking. Innovate!

              Like

          • Thecleaner says:

            Here is a link to the even bigger nickel probem the US has, with only one operating mine, and less than 160,000 metric tonne reserve.

            https://investingnews.com/daily/resource-investing/base-metals-investing/nickel-investing/nickel-reserves-by-country/

            Liked by 1 person

            • andrewalinxs says:

              Yep, about half of are nickle production comes from scrap.

              Like

              • andrewalinxs says:

                Addindum statistics are covered in the USGS raw commodities survey report I linked. 43% of nickle consumption in the U.S was from recycled Scrap.

                Like

                • Thecleaner says:

                  I am sure Canada and the US will sort it out amicably, at least this is my hope.
                  At the end of the day both Countries are better served having Canadian resources moving into the US market. It is a stable, plentiful supply chain from a reliable ally.
                  If Canada and Australia are forced to sign deals to maintain their exports with Countries not so friendly to the US they will do it, but Im not sure how the US can possibly benefit from becoming reliant and Khazakstan, Brazil and China for natural resource procurement.

                  Like

        • 4harrisonblog says:

          Thorium reactors are the future!
          Thorium. (Updated February 2017) Thorium is more abundant in nature than uranium. It is fertile rather than fissile, and can only be used as a fuel in conjunction with a fissile material such as recycled plutonium. Thorium fuels can breed fissile uranium-233 to be used in various kinds of nuclear reactors.
          http://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/current-and-future-generation/thorium.aspx
          http://www.world-nuclear.org/information-library/current-and-future-generation/thorium.aspx

          Like

          • 4harrisonblog says:

            Take away from all that is this nugget; present. Some of these problems are overcome in the LFTR or other molten salt reactor and fuel cycle designs, rather than solid fuel.Particularly in a molten salt reactor, the equilibrium fuel cycle is expected to have relatively low radiotoxicity, being fission products only plus short-lived Pa-233, without transuranics. These are continually removed in on-line reprocessing, though this is more complex than for the uranium-plutonium fuel cycle.Nevertheless, the thorium fuel cycle offers energy security benefits in the long-term – due to its potential for being a self-sustaining fuel without the need for fast neutron reactors. It is therefore an important and potentially viable technology that seems able to contribute to building credible, long-term nuclear energy scenarios.

            Also need a cookie cutter design to cut down on costs, red tape, and approval time. Something goes wrong then a fix for one becomes a fix for all of them. Also need to build out for smaller more diverse system to get away from large multistate interconnect grid power system. Like a county and cities within that county can have their own power systems with capacity for each system to be used as a backup system. Get costs down and designs right then states can also build out a backup system.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Michael says:

              Agreed. Theoretically you could build one enormous electric power plant to run the entire country. Of course failure of said plant for any of a multitude of reasons would be the devastation of our country.

              Multiple independent power plants and associated power grids (with interlinking ability as needed but not full time) brings different problems but absolute and total power failure is no longer an issue.

              Later in my career it was convenient and mondo-cool to be able to dial into a skyscraper and see what was being difficult in the BAS and possibly fix it from home, however that oh so convenient connection to the interweb left the build vulnerable to bad actors to do all manner of evil.

              Liked by 1 person

      • starfcker says:

        I believe Jamaica is just about solid bauxite. Jamaica’s our friends, right?

        Like

      • nuthinmuffin says:

        ROK! PROTECT!

        Like

      • wondering999 says:

        I didn’t understand that….”dilithium crystals”? Apparently “dilithium” was a thing on “Star Trek”, but it is also a real item in real engines currently being designed? I’m not mechanically gifted and need more explanation
        https://www.wired.com/2012/10/dilithium-crystals-warp-drive/
        “This engine…would by comparison be about twice as fast as the best current technology.

        “According to Txchnologist, General Electric’s online tech magazine, this fusion reactor would be fueled by “a few tonnes” of deuterium (a heavy isotope of hydrogen) and lithium-6 (a stable molecule of lithium) in a crystalline structure – hence the “dilithium crystal” claim.”

        Like

        • Maquis says:

          The “real” variation as presented here is mostly a wistful allusion to star Trek’s fictional element. It’s more a play on words than any sort of genuine equivalence.

          This “real” version is still a concept, a theory, a worthy pursuit, but in terms of viability it might not be much more useful than Gene Roddenberry’s creation.

          Not that dreaming of the Stars isn’t awesome and where we should be looking to go. I’m all for colonizing Mars too, though my ideas on genuine lasting Terra-Forming require radical methods and a generational committment. So living there other than in orbit as part of the Terra-Forming project is a ways off.

          But Warp Drive is an exciting idea. The one thing that actually can go faster than light is Space-Time. The Universe is expanding sufficiently fast that light from the farther reaches may never reavh us, Space continually lengthening the distance from thence to hence.

          Exciting stuff!

          GBPDJT

          Liked by 5 people

    • EV22 says:

      Rare earth elements. We import 100% with about 70% from China. Not good as lead time to open a new mine here in the US takes years. Molycorp had 1 mine here in the US but they closed in 2015, IIRC.

      Like

    • jakee308 says:

      there are some strategic minerals that are only found easy to mine in Canada. Few other things. Polar bears and snow?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thecleaner says:

        When Canada and Australia sign the TPP and begin diverting 80% of the worlds Uranium to Trumps new buddy Xi the Uranium 1 boondoggle will seem like an April fools joke in comparison.
        Im sure this contingency has been mapped out and Putin will fill the void.

        Liked by 1 person

    • doug says:

      Rare earth elements mostly.

      Like

    • EbonyRapror says:

      Rubber?

      Like

  4. 4harrisonblog says:

    Now when the big dog, President Trump barks, they will all listen. All those that don’t will find themselves, between a rock and a hard place.

    Liked by 6 people

  5. Gil says:

    A snow board instructor and a journalist shouldnt be running the country. Case in point see above. Unless their goal is sock boy’s daddy’s country, Cuba, or eventually Venezuela, like Ricky always said to Lucy, “You’ve got some ‘slpainin’ to do!”

    Liked by 16 people

    • mopar2016 says:

      Trudeau and Freeland can take a hike.
      Canada wants to add a gender committee to NAFTA, and a climate change chapter.
      I hope that president Trump dumps NAFTA.
      https://www.aier.org/blog/if-canada-wants-free-trade-she-should-practice-it

      “Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership”.
      I wonder what else these clowns have hidden in the fine print.

      Liked by 8 people

    • G. Combs says:

      NEVER EVER FORGET Trudeau Sr. was a Maurice Strong puppet and Strong wanted China to be the world’s greatest nation.

      Liked by 3 people

      • wondering999 says:

        Maurice Strong:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Strong
        “Maurice Strong (April 29, 1929 – November 27, 2015) was a Canadian oil and mineral businessman and a diplomat who served as Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations…

        “Strong had his start as an entrepreneur in the Alberta oil patch and was President of Power Corporation of Canada until 1966. In the early 1970s he was Secretary General of the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment and then became the first executive director of the United Nations Environment Programme. He returned to Canada to become Chief Executive Officer of Petro-Canada from 1976 to 1978. He headed Ontario Hydro, one of North America’s largest power utilities, was national president and chairman of the Extension Committee of the World Alliance of YMCAs, and headed American Water Development Incorporated.”

        Website using his name:
        http://www.mauricestrong.net/

        Like

  6. snarkybeach says:

    I just love the picture of the Wilburine about to pounce!!!

    Liked by 9 people

  7. What a great day to be an American!

    Liked by 9 people

    • 4harrisonblog says:

      I think all days are as I have been in a few of the others. I do get what you are saying. Some are much better than others. We are in the “some” time frame. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Some Old Guy says:

    Appreciate your bluntness Sundance! 😀

    Liked by 4 people

  9. bayrat65 says:

    More Winning!! President Trump has them all by the balls. All their bluster and hot air got them all sucking wind. Great. I just love it.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Charlie says:

      POTUS has also educated thousands of Americans teaching how government operates both internationally and here at home. Giving the next generations opportunities and a taste of what freedom looks/feels like. Look forward to the next wave of American innovation.

      Liked by 3 people

  10. emet says:

    Just need a few changes to title 19 USC
    1. Imported Merchandise fraudulently marked made in usa, or marked to convey the impression it is a product of the US=seizure of merchandise and a penalty equal to twice the domestic value
    2. False claim of USGR (US goods returned=penalty equal to twice the domestic value.
    3. Merchandise NLM (not legally marked). 100% marking duty, merchandise to be legally marked or reexportef
    4 . Merchandise fraudulenly enteref to evade antidumping or countervailing duty, in addition to criminal consequences under 18usc542, a penalty of three times the domestion balue plus seizure of merchandise.

    Liked by 12 people

  11. Craig W. Gordon says:

    I I say I say I think that boy Trump knows a thing or two about the economy and trade.

    (Fogg Horn Legg Horn voice)

    Liked by 8 people

  12. Founding Fathers Fan says:

    Lest we forget, Ted Cruz supported both TPA and TPP.
    Senator Ted Cruz’s statement that he “always opposed TPP” is incorrect. He and Representative Paul Ryan co-authored an April 21, 2015 op-ed in the Wall Street Journal (Putting Congress in Charge on Trade) in which they both supported fast-tracking TPP (the Trans Pacific Partnership). Cruz was also incorrect when he implied that TPA is separate from TPP. TPA (Trade Promotion Authority) was the “fast-track” bill that gave up Congress’s right to amend or filibuster TPP and which reduced the number of votes required to pass TPP from two thirds of the Senate to a simple majority in each chamber.
    http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2016/03/cruz_lied_in_thursdays_debate_about_his_previous_support_for_tpp.html

    Liked by 12 people

    • Orygun says:

      No amount of political smell good can take the stench off of Cruz.

      Liked by 7 people

    • M. Mueller says:

      Yep. That’s when I knew he is a snake!

      Liked by 2 people

    • 4harrisonblog says:

      Ted forgot he was born in Canada.

      Liked by 2 people

      • 4harrisonblog says:

        Anyone that looks at our United States constitution and reads all of what is required to be a congressperson “just a Citizen” and the President and Vice President needs to be a “Natural Born Citizen” in the full context of our United States constitution. Will see obama was not a natural born citizen. No matter what his Birth Record says. There were no BC back then and the person he states is his father was never a United States citizen. So he can at best only be a citizen by his mother being a citizen. Those of us that tried to get it before the SCOTUS were told we had no standing.

        Liked by 8 people

        • Maquis says:

          No one had, and HAS, more standing to challenge the qualifications of a seeker of the Presidency than the American People.

          When we crush Cruz like the roach he is Zero’s illegitimacy will be proven.S

          Shall we then reverse his American DeEvolution?

          😈

          Liked by 1 person

          • 4harrisonblog says:

            The States through our elected congress people are who represent, we the people in regards to our United States constitution. That contract is through the States and the Federal Government. They are the ones and those people seeking that office that have standing in a court of law or in a hearing. They choose not to do anything with their power to make obama prove he was a natural born citizen. Some people think that is why President Trump was angry with McCain.

            Like

      • Paul Revere says:

        Not only from canada, but he is not eligible to run for the presidents office even by his own admission! Of course then he took the odumbo route and hid all of his documents.

        Liked by 3 people

  13. nm says:

    TPP enforces so many regulatory restrictions that it is suicidal and would have been for the US.. Trudeau better update his resume in the next year….he ain’t getting reelected now….

    Liked by 2 people

    • rvsueandcrew says:

      Oh? Is there someone with prettier socks?

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thecleaner says:

      Unfortunately we dont have a stinkin conservative worth his salt to step in. Kevin O’Leary would have been a perfect fit with Trump, but had no french support…surprise surprise.

      Like

      • starfcker says:

        Greatest Kevin O’Leary soundbite of all time. It’s only 7 Seconds long. Enjoy. Godzilla vs Bambi. https://youtu.be/gIJ9UvG0Q-A

        Like

        • Thecleaner says:

          Thanks Starfcker, I hadnt seen that.
          I really like O Leary, killer business mind….him and Trump working together would have been a sight to behold….instead we have this friggen puke Trudeau running around the world demanding tranny rights be included in any trade deal….I think the Chinese sent some low level caffeteria worker to meet him, then threw him out of the Country…what an embarrasment.
          This clown is so outmatched right now its not even funny….the problem is he doesnt even have the spine to retaliate in trade if necessary, so I am not optimistic.

          Like

    • yucki says:

      Find who’s pulling the strings on puppet-Sock-Boy.
      Former drama teacher isn’t even a good actor: He’s a marionette.
      Got to shutdown the powerful forces that are sinking glorious Canada into a ChiCom Islamist hellhole.

      Like

  14. Economic Nationalism (kudos, Sundance):

    Nobody has seized on the tsunami-scale “ripple effects” of repatriating $4 TRILLION … FAST.

    • What happens to the “entities” that have been holding the $4 Trillion?
    • Do foreign-investment interest rates spike as it floods into America?
    • Who will want to risk investment abroad as growing American capacity idles foreign capacity?
    • Does America’s First-Year Expensing of capital investment make America the no-brainer place to expand?
    • Do Tax Cuts, Repatriation and First-Year Expensing give America a YUGE cost-of-capital advantage?

    Batter Up, Treepers: Please pile on!

    Liked by 8 people

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      Et tu, Apple???

      “…For all the scowling that Apple’s Tim Cook did during those Tech council meetings, he might not be able to feign outrage over the Republican president any longer. It has now become affordable for Apple to fulfill a longtime goal and repatriate $252B in cash that currently sits overseas. Via 9to5Mac:

      Apple would be able to take advantage of a one-time tax break, paying just 15.5% tax on the cash, rather than the 35% it would have had to pay previously.

      If Apple chose to bring all of the cash back to the US, it would pay $39.1B in tax. And this would be practical because the company has already set aside $36.3B – almost the entire amount – for exactly that eventuality. But there’s one catch …

      Reuters notes that Apple could be caught out by one provision in the bill. The bill introduces a minimum tax of around 13% on income from patents held overseas, and this could put an end to one method Apple has used to reduce its tax bill.

      The treatment of foreign patent profits is important to Apple because shifting those profits overseas was a cornerstone of its tax practices for decades.

      In effect, the company attributes a large portion of the value of its products to patents and other intellectual property such as trademarks. Apple then assigns some of that IP, proportional to overseas sales, to subsidiaries in countries with low tax rates and assesses substantial patent royalties on sales. Those royalties then flow back to those low-tax locations, like Ireland.

      This means that it no longer matters where the patents are held – Apple still has to pay US tax on the revenue assigned to them….”

      http://thegatewaypundit.com/2017/12/trump-effect-apple-looking-bring-252-billion-foreign-cash-back-usa-landmark-tax-bill/

      Liked by 8 people

    • Maquis says:

      The revenue consequences of Repatriation will be, I suspect, poured into PDJT’s Infrastructure Plan.

      Glorious it will be.

      GBPDJT

      Liked by 2 people

      • Make Infrastructure Plan Investments “SUSTAINABLY RENEWABLE”:

        • Set qualifications for Federal Funding:
        √ States with the SHORTEST Approval Cycle Times get their projects funded FIRST.
        √ States with the LONGEST SPLIT the LEFTOVER FUNDS.

        • Limit Federal Funding to matching State Funding:
        √ Creates State OWNERSHIP.

        • Minimize State Regulatory Requirements:
        √ Add Monthly Cost of Compliance to the State’s share.

        • Deliver Federal Funding on a last-in, first-out basis:
        √ States pony up their share FIRST.

        • Require first-in-line REPAYMENT of Federal Funding from Fees/Tolls:
        √ Make Federal Funds the GIFT that keeps on GIVING.

        • Control On-Time On-Budget Completion:
        √ States fund 100% of Delays and Cost Overruns

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rip Tide says:

      BKR, corporate rates change in 2019 right? But does the repatriated money get a discount if they bring it back into U.S. in 2018, or do they have to wait a year?

      Like

  15. The240report says:

    Love the President of the AMERICAN people! Pretty boy..go change your socks..put on galoshes..because your in deep crap!

    Liked by 5 people

  16. LannyD says:

    If this goes bad enough look for the Quebec independence movement in reverse.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. TwoLaine says:

    Personally I was elated to hear about the Anwr agreement. Almost 40 years of waiting for that to happen. SO RIDICULOUS, and really makes Congress look like the DO NOTHING fools that they are. I am sure Anwr made up for President TRUMP not making it to Alaska during the elections.

    Treaty with Russia for the Purchase of Alaska

    “On March 30, 1867, the United States reached an agreement to purchase Alaska from Russia for a price of $7.2 million. The Treaty with Russia was negotiated and signed by Secretary of State William Seward and Russian Minister to the United States Edouard de Stoeckl. Critics of the deal to purchase Alaska called it “Seward’s Folly” or “Seward’s Icebox.” Opposition to the purchase of Alaska subsided with the Klondike Gold Strike in 1896.”

    Read more:
    https://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/ourdocs/Alaska.html

    Alaska has repaid us over and over and over again. Seward must’ve been a Wolverine.

    Liked by 9 people

    • wondering999 says:

      Yes, a Wolverine. This link has multiple descriptions from different contemporaries of Seward. He was a powerhouse
      http://www.mrlincolnandnewyork.org/new-yorkers/william-h-seward-1801-1872/

      Liked by 2 people

      • TwoLaine says:

        “Seward was accustomed to being assailed verbally. On the night of April 14, 1865, he was physically assaulted by John Wilkes Booth’s accomplice, Lewis Payne. Seward had been seriously injured on April 5 in a runaway carriage accident and was confined to bed in his home on Lafayette Square near the White House. Payne overwhelmed Seward’s son Frederick and a male nurse and then repeated stabbed the Secretary of State. Both Frederick and his father took months to recover — during which Seward’s wife Frances attempted to care for them. But her delicate constitution could not handle the strain; she was the family member who lost the struggle with death. Their beloved and precocious daughter Fanny, who witnessed the attack, died a year later. Seward himself struggled back to health, work and another four years of controversy in the Cabinet.”

        This alone qualifies him. He was the 1865 version of the 2017 hit job on Steve Scalise & Team.

        Liked by 1 person

      • TwoLaine says:

        A New Yorker and a Powerhouse. Sounds familiar. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  18. jeans2nd says:

    Only China? Based on Japan’s former ambassador’s reaction, one might postulate that Abe (and Modi?) were in on a possibly even bigger picture. After all, Modi wants to Make India Great At Last 😉

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Jukin the Deplorable says:

    You mean to tell me that a tough business man from Brooklyn knows how to deal with business topics than a fairy from Chicag…er Hawaii?

    Liked by 4 people

  20. Bendix says:

    I want all this to eventually lead to better lives for the young Americans stuck in part time, retail work.
    I know too many who can’t even schedule time off to attend an evening Christmas party at a friend’s house.
    Part time, and you can’t get time off?
    What kind of life is that?
    I want the children growing up now to know what things called “weekends” and “holidays” are.

    Liked by 11 people

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      Absolutely. I can’t wait for the economic growth to start making opportunities for people just like you described. Young people who have never had a healthy economy and have been trying to keep it together by working several part time jobs. That’s nuts.

      Liked by 4 people

      • 4harrisonblog says:

        Yep, I was lucky and old enough to recall life in the late 1950 and early 60’s. Awesome times. Not can I find a job but where do I want to work, what do I want to do. I’ve told my children and grandkids if President Trump gets a good congress behind him and 8 years they will know what the United States can be. I wish my wife was here to see it. Breast cancer took her Jan 19, 2010.

        Liked by 6 people

        • Sylvia Avery says:

          I’m sorry for your loss. The holidays can be rough even though it has been a few years. And it is hard when you want to share good news with your loved one who has passed! I hope your kids and grandkids get to experience something amazing! I think all of us want this for the future generations, not the bleak globalist communist mess we were speeding toward. Merry Christmas!

          Liked by 5 people

      • Orygun says:

        Maybe we can bring back the single wage earner and have cohesive families with the parents bringing up their children instead of DayCare centers.
        My folks on both sides had huge families and they really were a great bunch. I miss them every one. The Trump family is a great example of what American families used to be like. Making both parents work to make a living has nearly destroyed the family dynamic.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Sylvia Avery says:

          I was lucky enough to grow up with a dad who worked at a job, and a mom who stayed home and took care of us. Mine was the last generation that had many of these type of families.

          It was a real struggle. Dad didn’t make a lot of money, but they were committed to do it this way.

          Orygun, I pray you are right. Having grown up with a stay at home parent, it was a huge blessing.

          Of course, by the time I was grown that was ancient history. We women needed to find ourselves and enjoy the kind of self actualization that ONLY employment brings.

          We were sold a bill of goods to the detriment of the following generations. Day care is no replacement for the values a parent inculcates.

          Honestly, I don’t know how we go back. Sure, part of it is economic, and if the economy booms and a couple makes the choice to have one parent stay home they may be able to do that.

          But it isn’t all an economic matter, now. It would involve changing societal values so that it was acceptable for one parent to stay home.

          I really believe that one change would have a massive impact on a lot of the things that are wrong with our culture.

          Liked by 1 person

          • 4harrisonblog says:

            I had number of family members that owned family farms. Then it got to a point, they were no longer able to farm for a living. I also grew up with mom not working. Dad got a job with Eastern Airlines in Atlanta, in 1957. He was there until he retired. Bought his first new car that year, a 1957 Bel-Air 2 door Chevy and a house. Great times!

            Liked by 1 person

    • Somebody says:

      I agree Bendix, this is about our young people. They have no point of reference, they were in grade school or pampers when NAFTA and other trade agreements were signed.

      I would add to your hopes young people in the tech field. Many of them work long hours which is expected because the H1B visa employees work like that for less $$. Wouldn’t it be nice if wages improved enough that families could get by on 1 income? How wonderful for our grandchildren!

      Liked by 2 people

  21. The leverage employed here is incredible.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. Curry Worsham says:

    Enrique say, “Is it hot in here or is it just global warming?”

    Liked by 3 people

  23. It’s magic, you know, never believe it’s not so ….
    Wand not included.

    Liked by 3 people

  24. covfefe999 says:

    Justin Trudeau’s college degrees:

    bachelor of arts degree in literature from McGill University (Montreal)
    bachelor of education degree from the University of British Columbia

    Like

  25. Sylvia Avery says:

    I’m almost sorry for Canada. While Justin was showing off his socks to Mutti Merkle and while the Canadians were organizing the bestest LLGTTQQPTAEIEIO gospel anywhere on the planet the world changed in an instant.

    Now Justin and his My Little Pony socks, Germany, and all the transgender related vocabulary in the world has become irrelevant. I doubt they have even recognized it yet. But I suspect by the time our NAFTA discussion ends they will have a fuller picture.

    I don’t like the thought of China essentially turning Canada into a client state, however. That’s just a little too close to home.

    Liked by 3 people

  26. free2313 says:

    It ‘seems’ that Canada will be receiving lumps of coal, in their Christmas stocking, from the Americans!

    Like

  27. G. Combs says:

    “Prime Minister Rainbow Socks is screwed.”

    It occurs to me that Rainbow Socks is more screwed than we initially think. I mentioned before that Maurice Strong was the power behind Trudeau Sr. Strong was also very closely associated with David Rockefeller.
    Strong Died: November 27, 2015
    David Rockefeller Died: March 20, 2017

    Looks like the Trudeau puppet got cut loose from his strings….

    Strong in China http://www.bjreview.com.cn/exclusive/txt/2008-03/13/content_104791.htm

    Who did Maurice Strong work for in Beijing? CH2M Hill.
    (note connection to Oregon)
    http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Talk/talk.religion.bahai/2008-11/msg00491.html

    Liked by 1 person

    • 4harrisonblog says:

      I know a little about CH2M Hill. I don’t have a good opinion of the ones I was in contact with. That would be a very small group of people. No comment or opinion on the overall company.

      Like

  28. Deborah @UnTamedInSD says:

    Oh Canada….. soon to be – Woe is Canada
    While I love to see liberals take a nose dive in the extremely deep end of an empty pool
    I feel for the Conservative brothers and sisters to the north.
    Pray for them to find their own PDJT soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. StanH says:

    Keep it up Mr. Trump the left is squirming, great fun.

    Liked by 3 people

  30. unconqueredone says:

    If Trump had this figured out this far, who is to say he doesn’t have a plan to help our neighbors right the ship as well? You don’t leave them to drown if they call for help, no?

    Liked by 3 people

  31. Betty says:

    I wish we had a way to put President Trump and all these men and women on Mount Rushmore. Maybe take a negative image of the topography and then have a huge 3D printer to make the bust on one side and the and the positive topography on the back side so all you would have to do is lift it into place and fit it like a puzzle piece with no danger to Mount Rushmore. What fun.

    Liked by 3 people

  32. Bob Thoms says:

    No wonder Canada and Mexico abstained in the U.N. vote.

    Liked by 3 people

  33. This is why we call him The God Emperor. This is why we elected him, and this is why he’s the greatest president in (at least) the last 50 years.

    Liked by 2 people

    • scott467 says:

      I understand that people mean that expression in a positive and supportive way, that it is meant in jest and not in earnest, but it bears pointing out that DJT himself would accept no such title, and for good reason, which no doubt DJT is well aware of:

      ………………………………
      “I am the LORD, and there is none else, there is no God beside me: I girded thee, though thou hast not known me:” (Isaiah 45:5, KJV)

      “Thou shalt have no other gods before me.” (Exodus 20:3)

      “And Jesus answered and said unto him, Get thee behind me, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve.” (Luke 4:8)
      ……………………………….

      I do agree that he is already easily the best president since Reagan, and if he continues at the current trajectory, will likely be among the greatest two or three presidents in the history of our Republic.

      It seems unbelievable, but there it is.

      Against all odds, look what he has accomplished already. And things are just now reaching final preparation for a global takedown of evil and corruption, the length and breadth of which most of the world’s population could not even imagine.

      And this will be in addition to all the other responsibilities DJT ably executes as POTUS.

      Big things are on the horizon. We have already seen great things, but greater things than these are coming.

      Liked by 4 people

      • wheatietoo says:

        From what I understand, Ron, the term “God Emperor” is from a popular video game…and is not meant to be blasphemous.

        In gamer world, it’s a reference to a fierce Warrior Leader who vanquishes the evils of the world and greater universe, and frees the oppressed.
        Or something like that. Heheh.

        Liked by 1 person

  34. scott467 says:

    “Chairman Xi Jinping sitting on the sideline waiting for everyone else to attach themselves to the rules, then China will strategically enter and all other nations become economically subservient. It appears to be a transparent long-game.”

    ______________

    A long-game that could only exist if the leaders of Western nations were COLLUDING to give up each of their own nation’s SOVEREIGNTY in a conspiracy to establish a ONE WORLD GOVERNMENT.

    And China, being the biggest and most ruthless COMMUNIST nation on the planet, is the globalist traitor-class’ object of ideological hero worship on the way to the New World Order. A world run by Satanists and those who are sympathetic to Satansim.

    These sick, twisted people, the political-class globalists of nearly every Western nation, deserve to be burned at the stake — for High Treason, for crimes against their own People, and for crimes against Humanity.

    This worldwide sickness in the world’s political-class goes hand-in-glove with the global Occult (i.e., Satanic) human-trafficking and pedophilia and sex-slavery and narcotics empire.

    And DJT is in the process of exposing ALL of it.

    Wait and see.

    Liked by 3 people

  35. chojun says:

    Regarding the potential “trade” deal with China (Mexico & Canada for North Korea), I think China ought to think of this carefully because once NK is dealt with China loses their leverage.

    Like

  36. Miles Rost says:

    Got a friend who does investing based out of Calgary. He’s saying there’s good money in that Trudeau could be forced out with a no confidence motion within a month. Many Liberals, Francophones, are reportedly up in arms at Trudeau’s connections with the Aga Khan, as well as his finance minister’s problems re: insider trading.

    Possible dissolution of Government or transfer of power to the opposition could be at hand.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thecleaner says:

      Unfortunately your buddy is ill informed. Trudeau has a majority government and therefore cannot be taken out in a non confidence vote unless his own party flips…and that is not in the liberal vernacular…they will continue to destroy Canada until forced out by the electorate, which is becoming more difficult due to the immigrant/refugee demographic transformation that is killing Canada.
      Toronto is already 60% non white.

      Like

  37. itswoot says:

    The one fly in the ointment I’m seeing is the likelihood of having a shortage of skilled hands-on workers to reinvigorate American industry. One example that has been in the news lately is the severe shortage of skilled pilots, both in the U.S. armed forces and in the domestic airline industry. I’m thinking that there will be a similar severe shortage in the various trades that industry depends on to function. Robotics will fill the need for a part of that, but it won’t be enough.

    The problem is in finding enough young workers who have the desire and will to invest their lives into learning a trade, and then sticking with it. A friend of mine is a manager in the HVAC industry. He often complains of there being a chronic shortage of semi-skilled HVAC installation workers despite raising the hourly rate for such work beyond what it normally would be.

    I hate to say it, but bringing in foreign workers with the required skill sets (tool and die, electricians, welders, etc.) to restart American manufacturing will likely have to be a partial solution to getting things done. That is, unless a way can be found to apply a kick in the a** (so to speak) to lagging American youth to get them motivated. Some already are, but as I see it, it isn’t enough.

    Like

    • wheatietoo says:

      How do we know those ‘reports’ aren’t skewered to justify importing more immigrants?
      It wouldn’t be the first time.

      We’ve got millions of citizens out of work or under-employed, on unemployment benefits or on welfare.
      How do we know they cannot fill these jobs?

      Pilot training does not take forever…neither does training for the trades.
      Our President has already put forth his training initiative for the trades.
      The Airlines can offer training programs and have new pilots in a matter of months.

      So I think as the jobs are offered, there may be a little lag time for getting people trained up…but those jobs can probably be filled.

      Like

      • Cliff Indiana says:

        Whatever happened to on the job training/apprenticeships? Granted flying planes is a bit more involved, but, come on, most of these jobs are not that complicated.

        Liked by 1 person

        • itswoot says:

          “Granted flying planes is a bit more involved, but, come on, most of these jobs are not that complicated.”

          That is true.

          What it comes down to, as I see it, is the increasing lack of desire and will among young people to get up and do what needs to be done. It coincides with there being increasingly more young people who are still living with their parents long after they should have left to be on their own.

          Too many have gotten used to living lives of idleness and ease. Having a strong work ethic isn’t what it used to be. The strength or weakness of having that work ethic varies from state to state, and rural areas vs. urban. Also in political persuasions, conservative vs. liberal, especially in the trades.

          The change of emphasis in what is being taught in education has been a big part of that.

          Liked by 1 person

  38. Sunshine says:

    Justin Trudeau is in bed with Islam and all other minority safe space groups. At this point, I’d rather be owned by China, and it’s the sad truth.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. HankM says:

    A Cogent Voice From the Past

    I was watching a recent Trump video on You Tube and after it finished a 1987 interview between Trump and CNN’s Larry King followed. Justin was 16 years old and Trump was already articulating similar and even identical economic policies that he promotes today. Japan was the Asian economic giant ripping off America then rather than China today of course but the similarities in Trump’s rhetoric and policies to today is incredible. He answers viewers questions about economics etc later including by some Canadians. President Trump has been preparing his agenda for decades and some are now surprised at how fast he is making changes. Only, Congress has slowed him down.

    Unlike 1987, the well informed and economically keen Trump now has a very talented and experienced cabinet and economic team behind him led by Wilbur of course. He picked the very best and most successful business people available while Trudeau chose ½ of his cabinet based on gender and then all the others were picked to accommodate all possible ethnic and identity groups.

    Nothing personal against Trudeau’s cabinet members but it’s not difficult to see which side has the upper hand on the crucial issues like trade and jobs. But Trudeau clearly has the upper hand on feel good identity politics. That skill is a significant gov’t job creator however as federal and provincial agencies are established to ensure Justin’s progressive identity group think and other similar policies are being correctly taught and followed by obedient Canadians.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. rsanchez1990 says:

    Sorry Canada, you’re gonna have to learn your lessons the hard way. I just hope you actually learn, Canada!

    Like

    • Thecleaner says:

      I hope you guys still have your old coal fired naval vessels in dry dock. Gonna be tough running the those fancy new nuclear powered ships on coal. Same with the hydro.
      Lots of jobs opening soon for coal shovellers.

      Like

  41. Donna in Oregon says:

    The Globalists made their push in 2016. Hillary would have made it complete, but they failed.

    This is why the butt-hurt anti-Trump movement is so angry.

    Like

  42. Carolina Kat says:

    FTA: “Allow me put it bluntly. Prime Minister Rainbow Socks is screwed.”

    I love ya, Sundance. Thank you for always making the click a rewarding experience. Merry Christmas to you and yours. ..

    and to Treepers everywhere.

    And please .. if I don’t stop reading and get off this blog I’ll never get Christmas dinner done. (Yes it takes me days to do it all. There’s a crowd.)

    God bless the Treehouse.

    Liked by 1 person

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