President Trump and Prime Minister Abe Announce U.S-Japan Trade Agreement…

U.S. President Donald Trump and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan announced the terms of a new U.S-Japan trade agreement have been reached.  This part of the trade agreement was visible for some time; confirmed today. U.S Ambassador Lighthizer and Japanese Minister Motegi have worked this for a while. [Video and Transcript]

.

[Transcript] – PRESIDENT TRUMP: So, thank you very much. We’ve been working on a deal with Japan for a long time. It involves agricultural and it involves e-commerce and many other things. It’s a very big transaction, and we’ve agreed in principle. It’s billions and billions of dollars. Tremendous for the farmers.

And one of the things that Prime Minister Abe has also agreed to is we have excess corn in various parts of our country, with our farmers, because China did not do what they said they were going to do. And Prime Minister Abe, on behalf of Japan, they’re going to be buying all of that corn. And that’s a very big transaction. They’re going to be buying it from our farmers.

So the deal is done in principle. We probably will be signing it around UNGA. It will be around the date of UNGA, which we all look forward to. And we’re very far down the line. We’ve agreed to every point, and now we’re papering it and we’ll be signing it at a formal ceremony.

And I just want to thank Prime Minister Abe and the Japanese people. You’ve been a fantastic friend, and we very much appreciate it. This is a tremendous deal for the United States. It’s a, really, tremendous deal for our farmers and agricultural ranchers, and also involves other things, including, as I said, e-commerce.

So, it’s very big and we look forward to it. And thank you very much.

PRIME MINISTER ABE: (As interpreted.) With regard to the Japan-U.S. trade agreement, a series of intensive negotiations have been conducted between Minister Motegi and Ambassador Lighthizer in line with the Japan-U.S. joint statements on September 26 of last year.

And by now, how we successfully reached consensus with regard to the core elements of both the agricultural and industrial products of our bilateral consultations on August the 23rd. And I certainly welcome this development.

And now, as Mr. President pointed out, next month, at the end of September, both of us are going to attend the U.N. General Assembly. And, on that occasion, I do think that we’ll have the bilateral summit meeting. So we certainly have — we would like to set the goal of signing this Japan-U.S. trade agreement, seizing that opportunity.

We still have some remaining work that has to be done at the working level, namely finalizing the wording of the trade agreement and also finalizing the content of the agreement itself. But we would like to make sure that our teams would accelerate the remaining work for us to achieve this goal of realizing the signing of the agreement on the margins of the U.N. General Assembly at the end of September.

And I’m very happy that both of our teams have been working on the specific issue in a win-win manner, bringing both the benefits to Japan and the United States. And if we are to see the entry into force of this trade agreement, I’m quite sure that there will be the immense positive impact on both the Japanese as well as American economies.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Perhaps you may want to discuss the additional purchase of all of that corn, because we have a tremendous amount right now. And we’ve been working with the farmers and making very, very large payments for the unfair way they were treated by China.

And the farmers are very happy. They like — they like their President. They’re very happy. But I think it’s even better, and I think they’re even happier, when they hear you’re actually buying their products.

So perhaps you could say a couple of words just about the hundreds of millions of dollars of corn — existing corn — that’s there, that you’ll be buying.

PRIME MINISTER ABE: (As interpreted.) So with regard to the potential purchase of American corn, in Japan we are now experiencing inspect pest on some of the agricultural products. And there is a need for us to buy certain amount of agricultural products. And this will be done by the Japanese private sector. That means that Japanese corporations will need to buy additional agricultural products.

And we believe that there is a need for us to implement emergency support measures for the Japanese private sector to have the early purchase of the American corn.

Of course, there is something that is already a shared understanding between — by the Japanese public, Japanese private sector, as well. So that’s why, against such backdrop, I do think that there is a possibility for us to cooperate to address this issue.

And with regard to further details, I would like to continue discussing with you, Mr. President.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: And the Japanese private sector listens to the Japanese public sector very strongly. I’m not sure. It’s a little different than it is in our country perhaps. But they are — they have great respect for the public sector. So when I hear the private sector has agreed to this, we’re very happy about that.

And I’d just like to ask, perhaps, Bob, and your counterpart, if you’d like to say a few words.

AMBASSADOR LIGHTHIZER: Great. Thank you, Mr. President and Prime Minister, and Minister Motegi.

Well, first of all, what we have is an agreement on core principles. It has three parts: agriculture, industrial tariffs, and digital trade. And from our point of view, it is extremely important to our farmers and ranchers and those people who work in the digital space.

We’ll get into the details at another time, but generally, Japanese is our third-largest agricultural market. They import about $14 billion worth of U.S. agricultural products. And this will open up markets to over $7 billion of those products.

In the agriculture area, it will be a major benefit for beef, pork, wheat, dairy products, wine, ethanol, and a variety of other products.

It will lead to substantial reductions in tariffs and non-tariff barriers across the board. And I’ll just give you one example: Japan is, by far, our biggest beef market. We sell over $2 billion worth of beef to Japan. And this allow us to do with lower tariffs and to compete more effectively with people across the board, particularly the TPP countries and Europe.

So it’s very good news for our farmers and ranchers, but it’s also good news for those who work in the digital e-commerce space where it is the gold standard of an international agreement. This is an area that not only has been important to the President but been of particular importance to the Prime Minister.

So we’re very excited about this agreement. We look forward to finishing the additional work and having it be implemented as soon as possible in Japan and the United States.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Would you like to say something?

MINISTER MOTEGI: Thank you very much —

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Thank you.

MINISTER MOTEGI: — Mr. President and Prime Minister Abe.

(As interpreted.) As the Prime Minister mentioned, based on the Japan-U.S. joint statement released by the two leaders on the 26th of September last year, myself and Ambassador Lighthizer had a series of ministerial negotiation on the Japan-U.S. trade agreement.

As we all know, the United States is the largest economy in the world, whereas Japan is also ranked third in terms of the total GDP. And also, among the (inaudible) economies, we are the very first and the second largest economies. And with this milestone of achievements we now have the full concurrence on various issues covering the agricultural, as well as industrial products, and also the digital and e-commerce. And the significance of this achievement cannot be over-emphasized. And I’m very happy to share this important achievement with you.

And on this occasion, myself and Ambassador Lighthizer had a chance to present what we have agreed at the ministerial level, and we successfully both obtained endorsement from President Trump and also Prime Minister Abe.

So the key mission for both myself and Ambassador Lighthizer is to complete the remaining work as soon as possible. Of course, I have my own team, which will focus on completing the remaining work. And I certainly hope that by working hand-in-hand between myself and Ambassador Lighthizer, and also between the Japanese and American teams, we will like to complete the remaining work as soon as possible.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Thank you very much. I appreciate it.

Q Mr. President?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Yes. Go ahead.

Q Will the auto tariffs remain in place? The U.S. tariffs on autos.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Are you talking about with regard to China?

Q Yeah. With regard to Japan.

AMBASSADOR LIGHTHIZER: Well, there are a series — pardon me. There are a series of industrial tariffs that are being reduced. Auto tariffs are not in that group.

Q So they remain?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: It depends. Are you talking about Japan or are you talking China? China is a very different situation.

Q Well, I’d love to hear your answer to both.

PRESIDENT TRUMP: Well, I can tell you — I mean, on China, they remain. On Japan, they stay the same. They’re staying the same.

This is a massive purchase of wheat also, in addition to everything else. This is a very large purchase of wheat, and the very, very large order of corn will go quickly. But importantly, it’s something that wasn’t in the agreement that we may not even — we may do that as a supplementary agreement. But we appreciate that very much. We just agreed to that on the other idea of the door.

So I just appreciate that very much. And we’ll do a great job. And the farmers are very thankful. Thank you very much.

Q Mr. President, on a separate issue, there are reports that the Iranian Foreign Minister is coming to Biarritz. Can you confirm that? Or do you plan to meet with him?

PRESIDENT TRUMP: No comment.

Okay? Thank you very much, everybody.

TRANSCRIPT END

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Big Government, Donald Trump, Economy, G7, Japan, President Trump, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

102 Responses to President Trump and Prime Minister Abe Announce U.S-Japan Trade Agreement…

  1. Nigella says:

    So china loses again… LOL

    Liked by 16 people

    • bertdilbert says:

      Farmers win. Who is China?

      Liked by 5 people

    • Sofa King says:

      Maybe I should change my name to Debbie Downer:

      There was a lot of hesitation on Abe’s part. Not to mention Abe dragging his feet this whole time.
      Trump may have strong armed him, to give the markets some positive news going into Monday’s trading…

      Like

      • I don’t believe it was foot dragging. It was timing for maximum effect.

        Like

      • I don’t believe it was foot dragging. It was timing for maximum effect.

        Like

      • I don’t believe it was foot dragging. It was timing for maximum effect.

        Like

      • Arrest Soros says:

        @Sofa King
        International trade isn’t like going to a supermarket. You can’t just decide to buy your stuff from a different supermarket.
        Japan has long term contracts with places like my Australia and other places for the purchase of Ag products (among other things).
        Abe can’t just stop buying from those places. Contracts have to run their course or need adjusting if possible.

        Also, Abe can’t just buy 10,000 tonnes of corn or any other food stuff. They are already buying what they need (they’re not starving right?). What do you do with the extra corn?

        These things take time and you can’t step on allies, places like Australia and Brazil.
        A deal worth $20B might be just a tiny fraction of the US economy, but it’s big enough to cause chaos in smaller economies like Brazil and Australia.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Beigun says:

          Abe said Japan’s corporations (trading companies like Mitsubishi or Marubeni) will buy the corn. This means Japanese consumers will not receive the American “comparative advantage” of a cheaper agricultural product as the Trading Companies will continue the monopoly of business in Japan.

          And there is the long standing issue of “implementation” in any agreement with Japan Inc. So, let’s see if Japan opens the Ag Market.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Sofa King says:

          Excellent rebuttal.

          Like

    • John-Y128 says:

      Maybe the American people can win again, when we stop ‘ethanol’ corn subsidies.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. They’re signing the bilateral trade agreement at the next UN general assembly meeting. That’s a thumb in the eye to the UN.

    Liked by 18 people

  3. oldschool says:

    Now, sell the latest military hardware to Taiwan, invite the Taiwan President and Dalai Lama to the USA on State Visits and watch the fun…

    Liked by 10 people

  4. CaptDMO says:

    Oh great, NOW there needs to be armed guards around the Wheat and Corn until it ships,
    because organized radical Social Justice Warrior wing of the entire “Strictly”NeverTrump consortium….
    I suspect Great Britain is going to want to set up “actual food”, and mechanical, agricultural “relations” with the USMCA…if/when THAT finally clears the hairballs and rancid grease desperately clinging to clogging THAT Trump repair.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. StanH says:

    This what matters, not the latest swamp gas du jour.

    Liked by 6 people

  6. betseyross says:

    Winning!

    Liked by 5 people

  7. jimboct says:

    Does the the House or senate have to pass any of this? Not sure if nasty Nancy or up chuckie would love to throw in a wrench or three.
    Keep being you VSGPDJT.

    Liked by 2 people

    • They should be legitimately called Treaties and put only in the Senate’s hands. Polosi has no say in that.

      Liked by 4 people

      • ristvan says:

        An A2§2.2 Treaty is, per Thomas Jefferson, ‘forever immutable save by mutual consent’.
        Trade deals have unilateral opt outs so they arent constitutional Treaties. Since trade deals need enabling legislation changing previous trade legislation, they are legally ‘Congressional Pacts’ expressly under A1§8.3 clause 1, requiring simple majorities of House and Senate—plus Presidential signature.

        Liked by 3 people

    • ristvan says:

      Yes. As a Bilateral trade pact, House and Senate have to approve by simple majority.
      Same deal as USMCA

      Liked by 6 people

      • swimeasy says:

        Thanks ristvan. The optics for Pelosi just might add an obstruction to your list of why we will win the House back. Both countries clearly are pleased with this development and there is no Trudeau involved to gum it up. Clearly some key deliverables for key 2020 states.

        Liked by 2 people

  8. Jason Ross says:

    *swish*

    Liked by 3 people

  9. dd_sc says:

    …on behalf of Japan, they’re going to be buying all of that corn.

    Wasn’t all that unsold corn Senator Grassley’s (and other RINOs) main sticking point about not supporting USMCA? No more excuses now.

    Liked by 14 people

    • Ray Runge says:

      Specifically, the implications of all that Grassley corn being purchased simply means that Joe Biden, and Son and John Kerry and Step Son are good as dog meat.

      Grassley will now have further incentive to pursue the investigation of the Bidens and Kery involved in a sham U.S. government approval of the transfer of defense technology to the ChiComms. A classic Grift of U.S. technology and Grassley has already sent a letter to Mnuchin and Treasury department to expose the LLC scam of Biden and Kerry.

      Liked by 10 people

    • litlbit2 says:

      Grassley just another swamp creature along with McConnell and many others time for them to go or be neutered. I like “ur fired” MAGA/KAG2020

      Like

  10. oldersoul says:

    This is an economic variation of the old Kennan doctrine of containment.

    PDJT is slowly, brilliantly, forming an economic ring of containment around the Chinese threat.
    But America will remain the hub, because he has done it through bilateralism, and not a multilateral arrangement, which is equally brilliant.

    And equally important, Japan desperately needs our alliance against their historic enemy, China. We could not ask for a better economic ally than Japan.

    Liked by 20 people

  11. Howard Philipson says:

    This deal is not possible, because, according to MOST media outlets, Trump has made enemies all over the WORLD. Darn, something is fishy someplace. Next, Trump will be announcing a major trade agreement with the U.K., just as soon as they get their own ( C U, E U ) situation ironed out.
    Just wonder if we are being misled by our own talking head journalists. Viet Nam, Brazil, So. Korea, India, the Philipines, and other Nations can make up the losses from our imbalance of trade with China. I think China ought to be thinking very hard about their hard-line on trade with the U.S., before there isn’t any left. ‘Made in China, doesn’t mean it can’t be JUST ‘ made in China.

    Liked by 1 person

    • kddomingue says:

      I have a lot of vintage stuff stamped ‘Made in Japan’ and things stamped ‘Made in Taiwan’. Absolutely no reason we need stuff made in China. We can make any of that stuff here. Might cost a little more but it would be American made with companies here paying American workers. We can import some things from Japan and other countries that participate in fair trade practices with us. It is not incumbent upon us to support the economies of countries that will not participate in fair trade agreements with us and steal our intellectual properties.

      Liked by 8 people

      • Dutchman says:

        And, very importantly, those countries you mention, that support FRE and FAIR trade?
        THEY will br allowing American products into THEIR markets, which means JOBS here in America, and not just stopping the exfiltration of wealth, but REVERSING it.

        China and EU are the MOST eggregious, but ALL countries have been screwing us on trade.
        India, for example has outrageous tariffs on American products.

        By taking on the biggest malefactors, and dealing with them firmly, the others,will quickly fall in line.

        Liked by 5 people

        • Grandma Covfefe says:

          Re: India…and they refuse to budge on the tariffs.

          Maybe after seeing what’s happening with USAJA trade deal today and how China will be hurt badly, India might panic and rethink.

          I’ve been losing my ‘liking’ on Modi these last few months since we found out about the ‘outrageous tariffs on American products’, too.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Dutchman says:

            Recently someone posted a list of countries, and there economies. India was WAY down, considering their size.
            They COULD benefit greatly, but as you say they need to lift tariffs, AND address IP theft and patent.

            Thing is, the goal is to get manufacturing back HERE, not simply out if China. Yes, China is the enemy, but ALL these countries have been feasting at the trough.

            The main thing that got us in China in the first place, was to overcome the,USSR. Lets not make the same mistake, again.
            Of coarse ALL these leaders, who go along with what,PDJT is doing, are going to encounter STIFF resistance within their own countries. Their countries companies have enjoyed tariff free access to our market, while getting protection in their own. They aren’t going to like losing that advantage.

            India got an awful lot of service call center business, thats for sure.

            Like

            • Percy Rajani says:

              Dutchman, very slight difference on history here. The late 70s and early 80s were rocked by high inflation, high interest rates, and high unemployment. Reagan inherited the worst economy (Obama had it relatively pretty!) and turned it around along with Volcker. One of the key issues was taming inflation – the unions had gotten too strong. The powers that be wanted to have competition for labor, and hence set about creating that competition around the world – first Japan for autos, then Mexico for autos; then came Thailand/Malaysia/Indonesia/Taiwan for electronics manufacturing; then India for IT, and finally China for manufacturing – electronics, furniture, clothing, blah blah.
              So now the unions have been busted. The working class has not had a decent wage increase until Trump came along – and he’s working on the solution. It will take a while. And hopefully the cycle won’t repeat itself.
              BTW, my high school teacher used to joke that in the WWII the Japanese would make rifles and bikes that would only last a month. The reason: the average soldier lasted 2-3 weeks.

              Like

              • Dutchman says:

                Well, complicated business, folks. For sure. I remember that time, remember Reagan firing the traffic controllers, but don’t recall a concerted effort to bust unions, in fact union MEMBERS,were a part of the Reagan Democrats, IIRC.

                And, long term whatever PDJT does, to break up the elites,….
                they’ll be back.

                Like

                • OlderAndWiser says:

                  Agreed, biz unions backed Reagan. But definitely the urge to create competition arose from there. Bush senior is the one who championed it and got the ball rolling, Clinton took it to the next level, Bush Jr. totally embraced it, and Obama rode on it. The Dem party had become a party of the haves. The R’s had their chance with Reagan, but the country club R’s under Bush blew it.

                  Like

                • Dutchman says:

                  The Country Club Republicans are the same geneology as the Rockefeller Republicans of Goldwater era. I THING maybe they are the Whigs. Certainly been around, and a curse on the RepubliCAN party, for a long time.
                  The Republican party needs a laxative, enema for a purge.

                  Those damn stealthy RepubliCONS are elitists, absolutely. They have nothing but contempt for Reagan,,PDJT and the deplorable rank and file RepubliCAN voter.

                  Liked by 1 person

        • kddomingue says:

          We need to bring manufacturing home. Unlike many other nations/countries, there is very little that we can’t make, grow, manufacture or produce ourselves. Putting the screws to China is absolutely necessary to send the message out that we won’t allow ourselves to be taken advantage of anymore in the world market. Start with the big dog and the rest of the pack will fall in line.

          Now, here’s another thought that I’d love to have the community chew over. If an American company goes to another country to produce goods or services that will be sold in the American market but the country that they moved part or all of their business to received more benefit from the arrangement than our country does…should those businesses be taxed more somehow? I’m not explaining my thoughts very well. 😦

          Like

          • Dutchman says:

            Yeah, I get what your saying.
            Its like the companies that offshored their profits, having a small office in Ireland, that they CALLED their “headquarters”, so they could get the lowest corporate tax rate.
            But, I THINK PDJT is de-incentivising companies from having ANY reason to do what your describing.
            The tariff in effect works that way. Make it here, no tariff. Make it THERE, tariff.
            EU, and CHINA can, SHORT TERM offset the (otherwise) increased retail cost of the product, but they can’t keep eating the tariff indefinetly.

            There are some long term ‘costs’ they will pay, for devaluing their currency, and China can’t keep subsidising their companies, just to keep people working, forever.

            They are proving the fallacy of the snowflakes, who thing no one pays for free stuff.

            Liked by 1 person

            • skipper1961 says:

              Dutchman,
              If I may? I refer to the mcconnells and ryans of the uniparty as republiCAN’Ts (or republiWON’TS), and the Jim Jordans, and Mark Meadows’, and Devin Nunes as RepubliCANS!

              Like

  12. Gary Lacey says:

    Well it shuts down the whining Democrat farmers for a while.
    It makes one wonder what will they whine about next, we’ll see what Monday brings, LOL.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. trapper says:

    China? What’s a “China”? What is this “China” thing you refer to? I have no need for a “China.” No one needs a “China.”

    Liked by 3 people

  14. But, But only yesterday his reelection was totally doomed by those crafty Chinese chess players and their ingenious farm targeted tariffs, at least according to the “Media Experts”- looks like they got totally flipped on that one . New doomsday talking point needed ASAP – Racism? Impeachment? Recession?

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dutchman says:

      Was anticipating another market drop, due to ‘escalation of Trade War with China, but how does that square with confirmation of trade deal with Japan, and GB in the works?

      Will Wall street shrug it off (China) or hype it up?

      Liked by 2 people

  15. tonye says:

    It’s great we make a deal with Japan.

    Given my wife’s ethnicity, we buy quite a few things made in the Land of Yamato.

    And, you know what? They make some of the best boutique High End Audio components in the World. Indeed, the US and Japan are tops on this.. with the UK coming in third. From an audiophile, free trade between the US, Japan, the UK and Canada is a dream come true! No tariffs. Get those vacuum tubes warmed up before I cue the record.

    Liked by 7 people

    • oldersoul says:

      The very best audio gear on the planet still comes from America.
      Now, and going back deep into the last century.
      I will salute you as I warm up my preamp to spin some vinyl later today.

      Liked by 7 people

    • Pa Hermit says:

      Tubes have become pretty much a dinosaur. I have doubts they make any anymore. They were great for over driving and continue to perform. Ya can’t do that too successfully with solid state.

      Like

      • oldersoul says:

        Vacuum tubes are still mass produced in Russia and China today. The Russian tubes in particular have evolved to reasonable quality, but not quite to the standards of the golden era of western production (up to @1970).

        There is still a very healthy demand for vacuum tubes among musicians, particularly in guitar amp applications. This use is now driving the current production tube market.

        In audio reproduction, not so much anymore. But there is still a fair demand for them among audiophiles and vintage audio enthusiasts, including for NOS and vintage-era used tubes, who favor their warm second order harmonics and excellent musical qualities.

        Among hard-core tube users, the manufacturing date and factory codes are as important as the vineyard and year of a wine is to a sommelier. Experienced tube ‘rollers’ will seek out a specific sequence of tubing to custom-tune their equipment for optimal sonics and timbre, using them as a chef would use seasoning.

        Liked by 2 people

        • ann says:

          👆🏼
          This is a tiny piece of a larger picture. To reinvigorate our highly skilled private sector workforce. The export of manufacturing marginalized American men, disrupting a generational transfer of knowledge and pride in craftmenship

          Im stumbling to express this, as a female raised by a traditional father, this sphere is unfamiliar
          . My point is that decades of politically sponsored economic policy was an act of disrespect, a top down betrayal of tens of millions of men, relegating many of the strongest to unemployment.
          American voters were stymied, deprived of candidates who were authentic leaders and responsible stewards. Both parties engineered policies that weakened cohesion.

          Politics became an infuriating platform for enriched career hypocrites, who condescendingly opine. The governing caste normalised abusive rhetoric as rationales for power grabs.
          confidence and optimism were blighted. .

          No longer,
          We finally have a team that understands how to restore economic liberty, independence & nat security:
          A critical part (which I do not profess to comprehend in detail) is recapturing skill sets & production competency exported during the era of WTO puppet rule.

          Ex manufacture of tubes with almost complete vacuum. huge industrial machines, turbines, mining equipment. How to dredge harbours, or build hydroelectric power plants, etc
          I worry we don’t know how to do these things anymore.

          Liked by 6 people

          • zorrorides says:

            Hi Ann, it’s interesting how this economic/ builder saga you write is also the life cycle of the older male of the Boomer species.

            We expected and wanted to live this life of positive contribution but in many ways, the longer we lived, the more we saw it exfiltrated away our of our lives, our kids, our grandchildren.

            Oh!! If Trump can cut regulations in half again. Let the little Main Streets and out-of-towns do stuff and make things and sell food again in America!

            Liked by 2 people

            • ann says:

              Glad you could read past my ignorance on manufacturing stuff. Lol

              On Election Day I cried at the sight of millions of good men quietly turning out, early, waiting in line to vote.
              I feel a deep protective instinct for American men.
              The chattering classes better not push.

              The rage of females whose loved ones and home are threatened is ferocious when ignited.
              My threats probably sound ridiculous, but the resolve is hearfelt. 🙂

              Liked by 5 people

          • skipper1961 says:

            Ann,
            So very well said! (And I too, am concerned about the future “non-tire changers” coming up) But I hope that the “Prosperity Zones”, will be an impetus of a possible new generation of “educators”. Let’s face it. Profit motive is an integral part of capitalism. I do hope that an infusion of private sector cash, will truly rehabilitate some of our blighted (yet previously prosperous) communities. (Vocational Schools?) I wish Mike “Dirty Jobs” Rowe had an office in the White House, or at least an advisory position (if he doesn’t already)

            Liked by 1 person

            • ann says:

              Agree.skippy.
              Younger Americans raised in the era of Progressive collapse have fresh eyes .

              The walk away videos are pretty accurate, reflections . Democrat Media schills propagates a lie.
              Other than protected classes in public sector and college kids, the American people still retain our practical pragmatic nature and hard work ethic.
              It’s a matter of removing the roadblocks and placeholders that weigh us down.

              Liked by 2 people

          • kddomingue says:

            I think you explained it very well. Jobs for men and women who don’t want to sit in front of a computer are becoming increasingly scarce. We used to be a nation of makers. Not so much anymore. We used to have apprentices, journeymen and masters of various crafts. People learned under a master by doing. Now they sit in a college classroom and learn from books. They graduate with book knowledge but have had no tutelage in practical application. We need to bring back alternative forms of education and somehow remove the stigma that seems to be pervasive in our current society of working with your hands.

            Liked by 2 people

            • ann says:

              Yes, producing tangible things, as it were. Useful real sturdy meaningful work.
              Building ships, replacing power lines,
              There’s a entire realm of hidden things that make our country go!
              Let’s stop neglecting them. Many of those kinds of jobs & proud optimistic breadwinners.
              It may be obvious my grasp of particulars is deficient, but this is critical- to strengthen the familial & social infrastructure is nat sec
              In my opinion. 🇺🇸

              Liked by 1 person

      • George Hicks says:

        Tube components have been relegated to the super audiophile realm…manufacturers such as Conrad Johnson, Rogue, Ovation and of course McIntosh. The argument over the superiority of tubes vs semiconductors rages on. My main speakers, Dahlquist DQ-10’s (made in the USA) need at least 200W each to really sing. I’m currently powering them with a pair of 1000W mono-blocks, something unavailable in a tube amp.

        Liked by 2 people

        • oldersoul says:

          I understand your plight. I run current hungry speakers. About 25-30 years ago, I migrated from all tubes to a tubed preamp only. Quality tube amplification is extremely expensive (particularly high current models). All the vintage output stocks have about dried up. Current production are ok, but it becomes expensive for the 1-2000 hours you get from them (especially at eight or more at a time, with matching and culling charges).

          The good news is that you can get about 70% of the traditional thermionic sonics using just a tubed pre. Even the best NOS small signal types are still available, and you can expect at least 5,000 hours (and often 7-8,000 hours) out of them in good-running equipment. That’s a lot of listening.

          Liked by 1 person

        • OlderAndWiser says:

          Dahlquist DQ10s!!! I had those for a LONG time. Till my divorce when I had to downsize…
          Fantastic speakers. But you are right – I had a 800W power amp to drive those puppies.
          Wow – a bunch of serious audiophiles on this site. Love it!!!!

          Liked by 3 people

    • OlderAndWiser says:

      Agreed! Had bought some great Japanese audiophile gear in the late 70s/early 80s that lasted several decades and still sounded good! US/UK/Japan and now South Korea (own Astell&Kern digital music player) are the best.

      Liked by 1 person

      • oldersoul says:

        I have mixed feelings about the ‘Japanese invasion’ into consumer electronics beginning in the late 1960s.

        On the one hand, they made very well-constructed, durable, affordable electronics for the masses during that time. No doubt about that. The old jokes about “made in Japan” ended sometime around 1970.

        But on the other hand, they purchased and/or displaced a number of the great American companies of the vintage audio era, whose equipment was completely designed, manufactured and sold in the USA. Pioneering audio companies such as Marantz, HH Scott and Fisher, and many excellent second-tier makers such as Dyna, Sherwood, Magnavox and HK.

        They eventually got to the big TV makers as well, with Sony leading the way in pushing the US giants such as RCA and Zenith into oblivion.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Musicphile says:

          Yes, US is over all by ar #1 in audiophile category. There is some good Japanese and British gear too. I have Wilson X2 series 2 speakers (made in Provo Utah), Dan D’Agustino’s Momentum mono amps and preamps (made in Arizona) and all Transparent Audio power cords and cabling (made in Maine); however, my 4 stack disk player stack (Vivaldi 2.0 Transport, DAC, Upsampler and Master Clock are by DCS of UK, replacing Esoteric from Japan many years back).
          However, in the videophile department, Japan does come into play and has become indispensable; my 4k Projector is by Sony, though the video processor isa Lumagen Pro and the Audio Processor is DataSat RS20i, both from US. My tapedeck (yes, cassettes, I have hundreds of them) is from Japan though, good old TEAC120 Mark III. Top 4 are US, Japan, Canada and U.K. in audiophile and videophile world. While there is some good gear from Germany, Swiss, etc., China is NEVER considered in any ultra high end systems. (I know some Chinese investors have gobbled up some US companies, like Krell, etc., I immediately start to get out from those gears) :-). Enjoy. P.S. yes, all good tubes originate in Russia (originally made for their military), e.g., all Audio Research, Doshi, etc,. US audiophile equipment use Russian tubes.

          Liked by 1 person

        • OlderAndWiser says:

          Agreed. My casette deck was a Nakamichi, my open reel was a Revox. Great for their time. No more tapes for me though- but still have vinyl that I play on my Pro-Ject turntable.

          Like

          • zorrorides says:

            I always said the Sixties got rolling so strong, they kept going until about 1976.

            Do you remember the kit tube amplifiers we could make? Popular, but I can’t recall the name. 60 watts per channel. A friend’s band used four of them for PA amps- singers and drums. When mine quit, the power tube cost more than the whole kit – but the kit wasn’t for sale. I lugged those paperweights around thru several apartments.

            Kids today have no idea how much fun it was to grow up a Baby Boomer. There’s a lot of things I wouldn’t do over – but I’d do that again.

            Like

    • Dutchman says:

      tonje;
      The compare/contrast between Japan and China couldn’t be more stark.
      When I was 5-10 y.o, first thing we looked at on a new toy, was where made.
      “If its Jap, its crap’, was what we said.
      Early days, Japan was largely making cheap stuff, and copying (mostly british) designs.
      But, by time I was in my late teens, Japan was, as you say making some of the best; electronics, cars, etc.

      Meanwhile, China started down same road, breaking in by producing cheap crap,….but its been 20-30 YEARS, and still producing cheap crap.

      Difference between a capitalist free market and a central controlled Conmunist system. Its NOT Racial, or ethnic or cultural, its economic system.

      Historically, Chinese have produced things of great quality and ingenuity.
      Under Conmunism, ANY peoples ingenuity, creativity and quality of products produced will suffer.

      Its INHERENT in the system. THIS is why CCP controlled China MUST cheat;
      AND why their never could be a deal.
      They CAN NOT COMPETE on ‘level playing field’.

      Stereo systems was one of the,…markets I used to,…dabble in in my youth. Sony and Panasonic were right up their with HarmonKardon as most desirable brands, for sure. Excellant quality and durability, which was a special concern for me and my crew.

      Just try running across the desert, at night, carrying a big ole reel to reel!
      Fortunately, eventually I learned an 8-5 is, amongst other things a much easier way to make a living!

      Liked by 2 people

    • George Hicks says:

      Great to hear CTH has its own group of audiophiles. I’ve been collecting/trading/upgrading components for 50 years.
      Over the last decade or so, I’ve shifted my focus to home theater, almost exclusively live concerts on BluRay/DVD.
      But I do have a turntable and plenty of vinyl to play on it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Musicphile says:

        We are esoteric and curious beings for sure :-). While it may come as a surprise initially that CTH has a bunch, most of us audiophiles spending copious amounts of our hard earned $s on our true passion, would by definition be conservatives, right! 🙂 Enjoy, happy listening and viewing.

        Liked by 2 people

  16. God's Poster says:

    Soooooo, was the person asking the question about auto tariffs trying to derail the agreement by embarrassing PM Abe? “Saving face” is very important culturally in Japan. And, this astute (but very annoying) question punched a big hole in the celebratory mood by pointing out that, for all he had gotten, PM Abe hadn’t been able to negotiate and win on the very important auto tariffs issue. President Trump tried to get the focus back on the positives, but I have no doubt PM Abe was stung by the question, and is now determined to get some kind of concession on auto tariffs to save face with his people.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. jmarshs says:

    This is exactly what an American President SHOULD do -be an advocate for US trade and businesses around the world.

    The US was, essentially, founded by businessmen – those who were, for largely religious beliefs, excluded from full participation in British civil government and excluded from appointments to positions of hereditary nobility.

    So they went into Trade – -something the ruling nobility regarded as ignoble (our Founding Fathers were the “Deplorables” of the 17th and 18th Centuries in the eyes of the ruling class.

    How similar does that sound to today’s view of the coastal elite and swamp creatures?

    Liked by 10 people

  18. MVW says:

    Trump made sure to let China know that their agriculture tariffs for political purposes have been countered and at this point will only hurt Chinese.

    Iranians may be smelling their goose being cooked. I wonder who alerted them?

    Liked by 3 people

  19. US says:

    This is huge. Now Nancy and young Trudeau have to pass USMCA and we are set for decades to come. We never had a trade agreement with Japan before because WTO rules favored them so much. With President Trump we expect reciprocity and the early bird gets the worm. God sent US a genius.

    Liked by 3 people

  20. Blind no Longer says:

    Trade negotiation score:

    Eagle- 1
    Red Dragon- 0

    That giant sucking sound you heard, was the wind being taken out of the sails of Nancy, Chuck, the never Trumpers and Rhinos!! I’d like to see some Dems and Rhinos refuse to support this deal..
    Hello it’s election time in flyover country!

    Very stable genius indeed!

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Kleen says:

    I hope we can get rid of the communist Unions

    They are a major problem for the US.

    Bringing jobs back, excellent!

    But having Unions inflate pay and benefits to suck the employer dry won’t work.

    Liked by 1 person

    • skipper1961 says:

      Kleen,
      Beg pardon? May I kindly ask you to please recognize the difference between “private sector” (predominately voluntary) union members, and “public sector” (predominately compulsory) union members? (On “public sector” unions, we probably agree, at the nub, being that WE the “employers” have NO seat at the bargaining table, between the “bosses” and Washington D.C.)
      As a free-lance (self-employed) contractor, I am unaware of any of my employers being “sucked dry”. Quite the contrary, the crews I roll with flourish with expertise, and pride in our work. Be sure, there will be a union crew installing gear at many events and functions that Our President, and Our First Lady might attend. As an occasional lapel pin “recipient”, let me assure you, they will enjoy the extra layer of centuries of experience, along with an abiding admiration for what they have done, and sacrificed for OUR nation. My rank and file brothers and sisters are finding it harder and harder to argue the American economy, with anyone who has even a rudimentary knowledge of CTH. (Thank you, Sundance)
      Sorry, Kleen, rant/over
      Skipper1961

      Liked by 2 people

      • Kleen says:

        My experience, working for a private company under Union was hell.
        They don’t allow you to work effectively. You have to stick to your assignment even if you have nothing to do and others need help.

        But the most disgusting part is how they would threaten with violence those who didn’t obey all ridiculous orders including protecting possible criminal activities from other members

        You talk, they come after you and destroy your life. Just like Democrats.
        Same mentality, same tactics.

        Not for me.

        Liked by 1 person

  22. dufrst says:

    Trump’s wingman Abe! They are not necessarily announcing a comprehensive deal yet, but was must important was the announcement of the end date for a deal. From my understanding and reading of this, they have agreed in principle in three areas, Agriculture, Digital Economy/Trade, and Industrial tariffs. However, there are many other sectors that were not mentioned. Trump said that they will sign an agreement on the “date of UNGA.” This is the UN General Assembly day, which is September 24th this year. So, basically another month of negotiation to iron everything else out and then the agreement will be signed. Recall, last UNGA Trump began these negotiations with Japan, while also signing KORUS.

    So we see Trump moving along with his time table. To understand what Trump is doing, you have to understand the major trading partners of the US. In order they are

    1. EU
    2. China
    3. Mexico
    4. Canada
    5. Japan
    6. South Korea
    7. United Kingdom
    8. India
    9. Brazil

    Combined USMCA is the largest trade deal. EU-US is the largest bilateral deal and US-China is the largest trade between two nations.

    Trump is working methodically on that list because I daresay 90% of the US trade deficit is with those 9 countries. Simply improving the trade balance by 20%, 30%, or 50% overall would reap major dividends for the US economy. Having an overall trade balance would be amazing. I will say the US would never see an unemployment rate above 5% in that world.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. ezduzit63 says:

    Excellent Analysis and Reporting of the G7 Events…keep up the Great work Sundance!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Trump admin have negotiated new NAFTA (USMCA), South Korea trade deal and now Japan trade deal. Fighting China on trade, and maybe a new trade deal with UK in the future

    Like

  25. Jan Pauliny-Toth says:

    Some see Pelosi and her crew of mendaciously malignant morons as a problem.
    I would suggest that, far from needing her approval for a trade deal, the deal can be bittified (was that a word before now?) Into individual tariffs and regulations, over which our President Trump reigns sovereign. The package is essentially the same, bar the title.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s