Deregulation in Focus – Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke Discusses Massive U.S. Energy Objectives…

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke discusses one of the epicenter issues surrounding U.S. economic growth and the importance of energy independence.  Secretary Zinke discusses the objective within reaching a production output of 14 million barrels per day of U.S. Oil and natural gas by 2020.

Energy independence is one of the specific examples of creating another economic pie, as opposed to trying to carve up and distribute existing ones.  Energy is one of our biggest and underappreciated assets.  Think about how GDP growth expands when the economy adds an entire export sector that was previously non-existent.

Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke is joined by Southern Ute Indian Tribe Councilman Adam Red to discuss boosting U.S. oil production, drilling on the Ute Indian Tribe’s land, deregulation and reforming regulations such as the Endangered Species Act.

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, Election 2018, energy, Environmentalism, EPA, media bias, President Trump, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

54 Responses to Deregulation in Focus – Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke Discusses Massive U.S. Energy Objectives…

  1. Phil aka Felipe says:

    Zinke should have aspirations for higher office. Put him on potential future POTUS list.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Auntie Lib says:

      Trust me he does. And it’s on his list :-).

      Like

    • Auntie Lib says:

      But we want him back in Montana as governor first – we’re desperate.

      Liked by 4 people

    • GB Bari says:

      Does anyone else see the actor John Lithgow when they look at Ryan Zinke? Even some mannerisms when he speaks.

      Anyway, them man speaks assertively, directly and is compelling. Excellent choice for Interior Secretary. To say that post was outrageously mishandled during Obozo’s Reign of Terror would be an epic understatement.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Everywhereguy says:

    The goal is that the US will not need energy imports any more, and will therefore be at the mercy of no outside factors — and in fact will be a net exporter…

    Liked by 4 people

    • Judith says:

      I think the globalists goal was to buy up our land and steal all of our natural resources. They must be very disappointed.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Judith says:

        Patagonia won’t be too thrilled either. They think our land should belong to federal government should. That worked out great for Hellary’s uranium deal (but not for the poor souls that stood in her way.)

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jack Hawkins says:

        What do you mean “was” their goal. It still is. What do you think Agenda 21 now Agenda 30 is? Globalists and the Chinese all lust after our resources.

        Like

  3. Kent says:

    I personally believe the U.S, should not export oil at all but only refined products…..keep those good paying jobs right here at home..

    I’ve worked in chemical plants or oil refineries for 30 years.

    Liked by 7 people

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      I think we would have to expand refinery capacity first. Crude oil coming out of Alaska is just as easily shipped to Japan as to our west coast, where they are not interested in allowing plastic straws, much less a bunch of catalytic crackers.

      Liked by 5 people

      • PS says:

        Then let’s get a couple more Keystone-scale pipelines going, and get the crude to a state that will crack it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Calamity May says:

          Got a cracking plant coming on line soon here in Western Pennsylvania, just outside of Pittsburgh.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Jack Hawkins says:

          Need to get the EPA regs under control. The Trans-alaska pipeline is flowing at less than 25% due to over regulation. Drill, Build more Hydro Plants, Dig Coal and Shale, find real coast effective workable wind and solar with components made in USA. We can be dominant in the world with an all of the above approach and wisely find cleaner alternatives.

          Liked by 1 person

          • NavyBuckeye says:

            And get out of the way of nuclear. The NRC has made it so costly that the new plant, first in 20+ years to be built, keeps having its costs increased and schedules delayed because the NRC keeps jumping in, despite already issuing a combined license….which was supposed to stop this from happening like in the late 80’s and early 90’s. Where numerous plants reached 80-90% complete but the companies stopped because of cost burdens created by the NRC.

            Like

          • Geoff Goedde says:

            Cleaner than who/what? The USA is already the cleanest nation on earth. I know Norway/Sweden/Denmark may be more pristine, with 1/10th to 1/40th the population; but they don’t have any military to defend themselves and are being over run by Muslim immigrants, so they won’t stay pristine.

            Like

    • swampratterrier says:

      Great idea!!!!

      Send it to President Trump please!!!!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Cat Lady says:

      It’s not that simple – there’s a mismatch between the characteristics of the crude being produced and the feedstocks needed by US refineries.. plus, I think we’re going to have plenty of everything anyway!!! Texas is the new Saudi Arabia, the US is the new OPEC, etc.. this, even aside from our VSGPDJT’s trade agreements, is remaking geopolitics!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Newton Love says:

        Can I triple-like this “Cat Lady” post?
        Maybe 1,000 likes?

        Like

      • Pyrran says:

        I was out in West Texas and New Mexico a month ago and, even as a native Texan who is used to seeing oil production, I’ve never seen anything like it. Rigs and wells stretching to the horizon for miles on end. It was nothing short of amazing. My wife is a petroleum geologist, so we knew about the boom, but we were both completely flabbergasted at the sheer number of wells. Texas produced staggering amounts of oil and gas during World War 2, but not since then. Now it looks like we’re doing it again.

        Liked by 2 people

        • soozword says:

          I just flew in to Lubbock and Odessa recently going back and forth on my Ozark Mtn vacation. Very geographically unattractive areas to my eyes, so did not mind seeing all the oil jacks pumping away, especially since I don’t live there and depend on the income derived from that industry. BTW, had a GREAT pro-PTrump conversation on my last flight with a AL lady who was moving there to be with her pump jack mechanic husband.

          But if this comes to the more scenic areas of southern UT (my home state), including gorgeous Monument Valley which is sovereign tribal land, expect me to be out noisily protesting with the libs. I know it’s a case of hypocritical “not in my backyard” reasoning but I don’t care a whit — I find pump jacks and big gas transfer stations pretty darn ugly when out hiking. And my support of Native American income is secondary to preservation of particularly scenic areas which may be endangered by deregulation. Now if they can only put those ugly jacks completely underground and minimize the roads then I could be persuaded. And I realize beauty is indeed in the “eye of the beholder”.

          OK, let the barrage of insults begin because I’m sure I’m a minority on this here…..

          Like

  4. ristvan says:

    Zinke is likely correct.
    The problem is it will not last long. Fracked shale decline curves are very steep. There is only so much shale to frack. And even if TRR recovery doubles from 2014 (my below referenced ebook publication year), as well it probably will, the global peak in oil production (conventional, which peaked in ~2007) and unconventional (includes shale, Athabascan bitumen sands, and Orinoco tar sands) is ~2023-2025. Many details, examples, nd calculations in my (cheap) ebook Blowing Smoke.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Everywhereguy says:

      Maybe, by the time oil extraction is past peak, the challenge of making fusion plants viable and financially worthwhile will have been solved… They’ve been working on it for several decades now…

      Liked by 1 person

      • David A says:

        Coal to liquid is also a very viable source of oil to bridge us a century or two until we have nuclear energy wired.

        Like

      • ZooNTexas says:

        Or maybe even a Tesla Tower, the quotes below from http://www.jmccanneyscience.com/TeslaTowerPhotoandProject.HTM

        Tesla had already started getting power from the ionosphere and was ready to replace the “burn high energy content fuel for electricity” with literally FREE power!”

        “we know the military quickly built such a tower in july 2003 (only a few short weeks after the release of my ATLANTIS TO TESLA book on the july 7, 2003 Coast to Coast program … listen to the C2C archive for that release) near Kanata Canada and when they tapped into the ionosphere (the idiots did not put any control electronics on their tower) the surge blew out the north east electric power grid corridor – the recent Dept of Energy report was another cover up of this mess (sighting the “official cause” as due to a squirrel’s tail tripping over a power line in rural Ohio)”

        Here is a picture of what I believe to be one at CERN. https://booktwo.org/notebook/cern/ Yes that CERN

        Liked by 1 person

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      “Zinke is likely correct.”

      On his evaluation of the “Endangered Species Act”, where success stories should be de-listed and resources directly towards other species just as deserving (although perhaps not as iconic – such as the bald eagle).

      Like

    • Well, my husband who has multiple projects with energy cos says we have at least 200 years of natural gas, and probably 50+ from oil.

      Even more interesting is the cost advantage for feedstocks and chemical byproducts of same. These can overcome huge differentials in labor costs because the raw material cost is so significant in a number of products. He can’t find enough people to staff the growth in his business, which has grown by 4-5X in three years, and has legs.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. So where is Rick Perry on energy? Just curious, as I think Zinke is quite effective.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. fleporeblog says:

    The effect that this sector will have on the Economy hits so many different areas. The fact that Energy will work in our favor unlike in the past allows companies to stay right here in the USA. The need to go elsewhere in the world will no longer be necessary because of our Energy Dominance.

    The cost for shipping and everything else involved becomes a detriment to overall profit. The fact that you have to pay a fair salary to American workers no longer is a burden to costs. The Tax Bracket being at 21 percent becomes the cherry on the sundae.

    Our President and his Killers have no intention to ever finalize a trade deal with China. The ultimate plan is to have all our companies come back to our country. Energy Dominance will be a major factor on those future decisions.

    Liked by 6 people

    • America’s STRATEGIC ENERGY DOMINANCE:

      √ Transport Cost Advantage
      √ Feedstock Cost & Supply Advantage for Plastics, Petrochemicals, etc.
      √ Corporate Net after-Tax Income Advantage, notwithstanding American Payscale
      √ Reindustrialization that consumes what the Energy Boom produces
      √ Multiplier for GDP Growth and consequently Federal Deficit Reduction
      √ MASSIVE LEVERAGE with European Allies during any Russian Gas Disruption
      √ MASSIVE LEVERAGE with Allies & vs. China during any Mideast Oil Disruption
      √ MASSIVE LEVERAGE vs China dependent on American Coal Exports
      … which can be Government-Stockpiled should China continue IP Theft & Spying

      Liked by 3 people

  7. Sharon says:

    Kim Clement prophecied this years ago when he prophecied Trump would become President and America and Israel would be energy independent and a new energy will emerge which will only come from God! Something from a stone and to remember the word stone! And America will prosper like never before!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. MontanaMel says:

    Remember ANWR and it’s soon (3-5 yr) “new” North Slope production – which will once again fill the TAPS pipeline with 2 mil ++ BOPD… AND, remember all those TRILLIONS of cu ft of nat gas still at Prudhoe Bay field…soon to move to market in the lower-48….Such standard production will provide the “backbone” for our future needs. Ryan knows this- – he has come a long way from when he was first appointed, he is a fast learner!.. Check-six

    Liked by 1 person

    • piper567 says:

      One of the things I love ab listening to our Cabinet members is no matter what foolishness or challenge is presented to them, they have an answer.
      and a good one at that.
      such a pleasure.

      Like

  9. donnyvee says:

    Given our huge coal and natural gas reserves we should also be looking at turning both of those into gasoline and diesel fuel using the Fischer–Tropsch process. There is a pilot plant in Hayward CA turning natural gas into gasoline as we speak.

    Like

  10. Anonymous says:

    Love the frackers. Only thing that kep us out of Great Depression during Obummer.

    Some observational data:

    US production of crude and condensate:

    https://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgw_nus_mmcfdm.htm

    We were in the 5 millions per day as recent as 2011. Last year we broke past 10 million and are probably doing over 11 now (data lags two months). In any case, doubled production in less than a decade.

    US production of wet gas (total withdrawals):

    https://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgw_nus_mmcfdm.htm

    We have gone from production in the 60s BCF/d last decade to just breaking through 100 BCF/d. In fact, we added over 10 BCF/d just in the last year.

    Within that, marketed dry gas has gone up from 1.5 TCF/month to 2.5 TCF/month in the last ten years. (And PRICE has gone from flirting with $10 plus, to hanging out at $3 or below. That’s right…60% increase in volume while price dropped…that’s not demand driving the bus…that’s a supply glut). We are also now a net exporter of natural gas.

    Also within wet gas, natural gas liquids:

    https://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler.ashx?n=pet&s=m_epl2_fpf_nus_mbbld&f=m

    More than doubled. From below 2 million bpd to over 4 million bpd. Not only are now a net exporter of LPG (propane and butanes), but we dominate the market now, having become the number one exporter of propane and nearly 50% of the world export/import market.

    The “App” Marcellus/Utica is producing at record levels, close to 30 BCF/d. The Bakken has resurged and is hitting new records again. Haynesville has made a very strong turnaround and will likely repeak in less than a year. And the Permian…really has become a world class production region, more than Kuwait.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Summer says:

    Why do the tribes “usually protest”? I looked it up.

    From a 2016 article on the subject:

    “As the shale boom spread across the American West over the past decade, oil and gas drilling have increasingly found their way onto Native American reservations, long impoverished and eager for the royalty checks and jobs that oil brings. But with that development has come an uneasy tension for Native Americans whose traditions are based around a deep spiritual connection to the land upon which they live.”

    “Last year [2015], Dine Citizens Against Ruining our Environment, an activist group within the Navajo tribe, joined with national environmental groups in a federal lawsuit to block a drilling project in New Mexico that they said threatened the tribe’s limited water supplies and encroached upon historic ruins.

    “We know the minerals in the ground are part of earth mother. It’s what we’re taught as little kids,” Cummings said. “As more tribes opened up their land to drilling, we’ve seen the consequences of that.”

    Also, on top of spiritual issues, there is an issue of old, not properly sealed wells that allegedly contaminate water and create ground pollution. I wish Zinke addressed this concern, frankly.

    MEANWHILE,
    the real facts from another article:

    “Per capita income for American Indians living on reservations is about half that of other United States citizens. Thirty-nine percent of Indians live in poverty, compared with 9 percent of white Americans, and Indian unemployment rates are almost four times higher than the U.S. average.”

    “Indian poverty persists despite the fact that many Native American reservations contain considerable energy wealth. The Department of the Interior recently estimated that Indian lands have the potential to produce 5.35 billion barrels of oil, 37.7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 53 billion tons of coal. According to another estimate, Indian energy resources amount to 30 percent of the nation’s coal reserves west of the Mississippi, 50 percent of potential uranium reserves, and 20 percent of known oil and gas reserves.”

    BUT

    “Nearly every aspect of Indian energy development is controlled at some level by the federal government…
    Underlying the federal trust responsibility is the notion that tribes are incapable of managing their own lands…
    On Indian lands, companies must go through at least four federal agencies and 49 steps to acquire a permit for energy development, compared to as few as four steps off reservations. The effect of this complicated bureaucracy is to raise the cost of entering into resource development agreements with tribes or individual Indians.”

    https://www.perc.org/2018/07/23/tribal-energy-resources-reducing-barriers-to-opportunity/

    It would be truly a historic achievement if President Trump and his administration manage to Make Indian Reservations Great, don’t you think?

    Liked by 1 person

    • GB Bari says:

      PDJT would likely be very glad to take it on, if he could find an ultra-competent and very topic-knowledgeable individual to champion and lead the project.

      You offering? 🙂

      Like

    • Pyrran says:

      “Also, on top of spiritual issues, there is an issue of old, not properly sealed wells that allegedly contaminate water and create ground pollution. I wish Zinke addressed this concern, frankly.”

      All Zinke has to do is ask Texas. Drillers here pay into a fund which allows the state to seal wells in which the company has gone bankrupt, as well as forgotten wells which have been improperly sealed. This protects the groundwater from contamination.

      Liked by 2 people

  12. Turranos says:

    Never forget that true energy independence strengthens our Republic. Energy from our own shores is fabulous, plus it creates lots of jobs. Steel and Aluminum production give us National Security once again. Did any other president make this happen? NO! President Trump continues to save our Republic, day in and day out. Thank God for him.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Doug Amos says:

    For what not to do with energy and uranium resources, see Canada. Cannabis became legal in Canada today; building pipelines is not.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Newton Love says:

    My cousin, Larry Love, used to work for the Bureau of Indian Affairs as an advocate for the Tribe that he was assigned to (the Southern Utes).

    The US Government eliminated his job. (Grrrr!)

    Cousin Larry went to work for the Southern Ute Tribe, where he helped them develop a strategy to use their mineral resources to achieve non-dependency on the US Government.

    In the sundance provided video, a Councilman for the Utes, Adam Red, tells how they have been careful stewards of their land and resources, and have used that to guarantee Healthcare and College Educations for all Ute members. All Ute members share in royalties for their resources.

    They have over 9 $B in reserve for the Utes from their efforts. My cousin Larry, was a part of their success!

    For all y’all, the Utes are what you know as “Blackfeet Sioux.”
    They are part of the Nakota Nation, which were derived from the Lakota Nation, which originated from the Dakota, who lived in settled villages with gravel paved roads, elected city councils, and a paid police force to keep the peace and interdict invading foreigners, before the “Plymouth Rock” event in MA.

    Liked by 3 people

    • That is a terrific story, Newton. Kudos to your cousin!

      Liked by 1 person

    • soozword says:

      Would you happen to know what percentage of the mineral extraction workforce on tribal lands is by Native American workers (both skilled and unskilled)? It’s great that such extraction helps them build wealth and their community services, but would strongly prefer it’s also largely from the sweat of their brows and not just passive income. The abuse of alcohol and drugs is legendary on tribal lands, especially if they are idle — applies to any community, not just Native American.

      Like

  15. Timothy says:

    I would love to see Thorium reactors discussed by President Trump

    Liked by 4 people

    • Newton Love says:

      Thorium reactors could power a big hospital with a suitcase sized reactor that will never have a “China Syndrome.” The Big hospital would have power through a CAT-5+ Hurricane that kills the power everywhere, but the Hospital keeps operating at full capacity.

      Also, the Hospital would pay no utility bills for 50 years after the Thorium reactor is installed. Every 50 years, they would need a “recharge” or “refresh” of their thorium reactor, but that is all.

      Liked by 2 people

      • GB Bari says:

        Wow. So why aren’t they in common use? What’s the downside?

        Like

        • GB Bari says:

          Answered my own question.

          Here seems to be a good site to learn about thorium:
          https://whatisnuclear.com/thorium.html

          And a page of thorium myth-busting:
          https://whatisnuclear.com/thorium-myths.html

          Liked by 1 person

        • Pyrran says:

          The biggest downside is that the companies who currently build conventional reactors make more money refueling the reactors than they made building them. They don’t want a thorium or molten salt reactor. It would cost them billions in profit. Think GE.

          Liked by 1 person

          • GB Bari says:

            Actually your description makes me think of HP inkjet printers. Where the printer costs are relative peanuts but the real money (and profit) is in the replacement ink cartridges…

            But I do get the point.

            Seems to me that if they can build these things small enough and safe enough then they would not run out of customers for many decades. It would revolutionize both the energy and power generation industries. It would make us less dependent on the “grid” and less susceptible to EMP, sabotage, or other causes of general grid failure .

            Like

  16. Doc Moore says:

    I am 100% in agreement. The US should be able to supply itself first, and the rest of the world as needed to ensure that global oil cartels (OPEC) have no stranglehold on the market. The more we can sell offshore the better. That brings money INTO the US, and is therefore VERY much opposed by Democrats. But we need to do another thing, too.

    We need to build many dozen new Nuclear Power plants so that we have virtually zero dependence on fossil fuels. The more nukes we have online, the more oil we can sell abroad. If done so that the oil companies of the US still book tens of billions in PROFIT each quarter, it should be an agreable win-win.

    Like

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