U.S. Begins Providing Weapons To Syrian Kurds…

(Via Reuters) The United States has started distributing arms to Syrian Kurdish fighters battling to help retake the city of Raqqa from Islamic State, a U.S. official told Reuters on Tuesday, as the United States moved ahead with a plan despite concerns by ally Turkey.

The official said distribution of the arms had started in the past 24 hours, based on authority given by President Donald Trump earlier this month. (read more)

This is a very strategic move.  The primary goal of the Trump Administration is the destruction of ISIS.  The Kurds are currently the only fighting force, and a very good fighting force, with no ulterior motive other than the elimination of ISIS and the opportunity for peace, safety and security.  Hopefully leading to a future creation of an independent nation of Kurdistan.

Recep Erdogan (Turkey) views the Kurds as a threat to his ability to recreate the Ottoman Empire.  Turkey is a NATO member and view the Kurds as Erdogan’s political opposition. Erdogan wants Assad gone, but wants the space for himself.  Erdogan will not be happy.

Bashar Assad (Syria) also views the Kurds as his political opposition.  Assad benefits from keeping ISIS terrorists around as his enemy while he kills his political opposition.  Kill off ISIS and Assad will have regional political governorship to contend with.  He will not be happy.

Vladimir Putin (Russia) supports Assad, is generally ambivalent to the Kurds and holds a view of Erdogan as a useful part of NATO that he can manipulate.  Putin cannot appear upset about this because he has optically presented himself as willing to aid in the elimination of ISIS; albeit aligned with Assad.  He will be looking to navigate geopolitical leverage with this development.

All of the angst from those with vested adverse interests can be defrayed by Defense Secretary Mattis, Secretary of State Tillerson and President Trump, because the elimination of ISIS is job one and all regional participants have agreed in principle with this objective.

 

 

This entry was posted in Death Threats, Decepticons, European Union, ISIS, Islam, Jihad, media bias, Muslim Grievance Industry - MGI, NATO, President Trump, Refugees, Russia, Secretary of State, Secretary Tillerson, Syria, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

162 Responses to U.S. Begins Providing Weapons To Syrian Kurds…

  1. Donna in Oregon says:

    Finally. Thank God. ISIS will finally be destroyed.

    Liked by 29 people

    • The Boss says:

      Yeah. All of McCain’s buddies. Dead.

      Liked by 43 people

    • auscitizenmom says:

      FINALLY! That was also my first thought. 🙂

      Liked by 9 people

    • Betty says:

      I can’t “like” any more so I am here to say – Amen, to your comment Donna.

      Like

    • Oncefired says:

      The Kurds will retreat after finishing their job to NW Iraq, where Turkey, Iraq & Iran all border each other. Trump should tell them this your Kurdistan, they will defend it…They may need prodding from Trump to tell the 3 countries to leave them alone, with an occasional threat or airstrike! The fact has to be faced they will be an extremely important part in taking out ISIS in Iraq & Syria and deserve our recognition of a Free Kurdistan! They are an extremely well trained group of people from all the scuffles with Turkey and from Iraq when Saddam was in charge, for the most part Iran usually ignores them because of the rough terrain of that part of the Country. Iran make take a new interest in them to get back at us, but a proper deterrence and they won’t want to play with an Unpredictable POTUS!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. MakeAmericaGreat says:

    The enemy of my enemy is my friend

    Liked by 13 people

    • nontroll says:

      Trump! You magnificent bastard!

      Liked by 3 people

    • dayallaxeded says:

      In the case of the Kurds, our friends, the Kurds, are fortunately also the enemies of our enemies. Indeed, I suggest that history is pretty solid in showing that whomever the Kurds are enemies with, those are the scumbags who will one day become our enemies as well.

      Back when Iraq was a really HOT war for us, before and during the “surges,” when our troops needed quick R&R, they could go to the Kurdish towns and enjoy peace, safety, and real hospitality. The Kurdish people, though ostensibly Muslim, are not pisslamists–they’re overall good, decent, hardworking family and community oriented people, descended from ancient middle eastern stock. Similar to Yazidis (some of whom “identify” as Kurdish, iirc), they had identities before Mo-ham-head was a twinkle in the eye of the degenerate who raped the evolutionary dead end pseudo-hominid who was his mother.

      The Kurds have been repeatedly promised a homeland, protection, and support to build it (they’ve always built and done all they could on their own, never becoming needy/cheaty leaches, like most of Africa) by various invading powers, including the Brits and more recently us. Of course, PDJT would be the one to finally fulfill that decades old promise, left in shame by so many lesser men who have gone before (including, I’ve heard, Winston Churchill–because of his abandonment of promises to the Kurds, I understand Kurdish slang for “latrine” is “Churchill.”). In short, Hallelujah! Let the daesh-ass-kicking begin!

      Liked by 4 people

  3. MrE says:

    Pres. Trump is providing arms to rebels fighting for their freedom? Cue the liberal media outrage in 3…2…

    Liked by 23 people

    • Benson II says:

      Not saying your wrong but do any of the people we see on TV reporting the news even know who the Kurds are. They could of course just read their cue cards of universal agreement and spout the usual, Trump is evil for doing this without a clue about what they’re talking about. Personally I think it will fall by the wayside while they talk about Trump’s unintended spelling mistake on twitter and voice their agreement with Griffith’s Trump head photo.

      Like

  4. helmhood says:

    1. Destroy ISIS
    2. Stabilize Syria
    3. Drive out Assad

    This goes back to, and reinforces the strategic measures Tillerson outlined in April, right before the missile strikes.

    Liked by 34 people

    • sundance says:

      100% Exactly this.

      Assad survives in Chaos.
      Return stability and Assad is gone.

      Liked by 36 people

      • redlegleader68 says:

        Yea, but what about McCain and Miss Lindsay, Sundance? 😉

        Liked by 8 people

      • Texas Fossil says:

        Thank you for the post.

        Syrian Kurds are terriffic fighters and great people. I’m very proud to call a number of them friends since Kobani, 3 years ago. Reuter’s like US media cannot possible portray the reality of this battle. It can only be done from someone on the ground with knowledge of the area.

        Some foreign new sources do a pretty good job, but I find myself always relying on Kurds that I know for explanation of reality.

        Encirclement of Raqqa is almost completed. The final assault will begin soon. Current SDF movement is to the south west of Raqqa encircling the Baath Dam and from the East moving West very close to the city itself. They just captured the last town before reaching Raqqa.

        Raqqa was city of 240,000 people before ISIS. Here is a picture of the city: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DBBiFr5XgAEmmVj.jpg

        It has been fortified by ISIS with a earthen berm around the city too. And it is riddled with tunnels.

        Our Special Ops have done a great job of locating and targeting ISIS leaders and command centers. Surgical strikes by USAF and precision guided Howitzer rounds were used.

        All reports say they have greatly reduced ISIS effectiveness.

        Civilians continue to stream out of the city. In spite of ISIS killing some for fleeing. ISIS is using civilians as human shields.

        Most recent surge of refugees: “Another 25,000 IDPs arrive to SDF-held Tabqa fleeing ISIS and Syrian government” http://aranews.net/2017/05/another-25000-idps-arrive-to-sdf-held-tabqa-fleeing-isis-and-syrian-government/

        Kurds and the SDF are great allies, our military has nothing but praise for their ability and the coordination between US and SDF is very good. Great team.

        Liked by 7 people

        • Garrison Hall says:

          ” . . .Syrian Kurds are terriffic fighters and great people. . .” And not only that, they also like Americans. Using only light infantry weapons and always short of ammunition, they’ve proved to be far more effective fighters than the much larger and better equipped Iraqi military. I think the difference is that the Kurds are modern people where the Arabs are essentially tribal. The cultural differences are significant and explain why the Kurds, while not exactly a 1st world military, are pretty close in many ways and why ISIS and the various Arab national armies are 3rd world militaries regardless of how well equipped they may be.

          Liked by 1 person

        • yucki says:

          I wept buckets over Kobani.
          All those brave men and women fighting, dying. No supplies, no nothing but raw determination. Their Kurdish kin just over the border held back by that wretched Turk.

          There was a video of a Kurdish woman soldier dying. She was singing something toward the end. Maybe a tradition, I don’t know, but it just broke my heart.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Texas Fossil says:

        Here is a very large map of the city of Raqqa. With district details.

        It is a large file and take a while to download.

        Source is safe, I know the source.

        Like

    • M33 says:

      If any fools suggest this is “regime change”, they obviously haven’t been paying attention (or they are simply creating lies).

      Liked by 4 people

    • Sentient says:

      Who do you think will govern Syria when Isis is theoretically destroyed and Assad is out of power? I’m not being sarcastic. I’m seriously asking. Will they have a vote like in Iraq with the purple fingers? Seems to me most likely that the Sunnis will win and commit genocidal revenge against the Alawi, Shia, Druze and Christians. And eventually the Sunni Arabs would take their revenge against the Kurds. In other words, the outcome of a democratic vote would be roughly the same as if Al Nusra won. Democracy: two wolves and a sheep voting on what’s for dinner.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Wendy says:

        I agree with you. Obama and his friends wanted to get rid of Assad desperately. But why? Looking at Libya and Iraq getting rid of a dictator doesn’t seem to be an answer for peace in the Middle East.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Landwell says:

          The goal of the Arab Spring was to replace secular dictators like Mubarak, Gaddafi, and Asad with Muslim Brotherhod dictators – the MB was the only organized group to fill the power vacuum. Essentially create a new caliphate. Israel and ME Christians would be the big losers.

          Liked by 2 people

        • old deplorable owl says:

          The fact that Gaddafi had a few tons of gold and silver (which mysteriously vanished with no questions asked) stashed in preparation for converting his country to hard money couldn’t possibly have anything to do with ‘one of his friends’ (AKA Hillary) could it?

          Like

      • skifflegirl says:

        According to T-Rex, they are working with the regional partners, looking for the right person to come to power. That doesn’t sound like an election, sounds like an interim position until there can be a vote somewhere way down the line. It’s pretty obvious that President Trump and Tillerson will not expect democracy in the violent and lawless land that Syria has become. Probably just looking for someone who can provide stability, not necessarily our type of free republic. That’s my take on the policy speeches I’ve heard.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dayallaxeded says:

        If it’s not done like post WWII Japan, it’s going to be another dismal, tragic failure and a huge problem for us and the entire civilized world for decades, if not centuries to come. No sharia-based constitution. No mixing of pisslam and government. Representative democracy, not pure mob-rule democracy, with states drawn up to split the nation at issue into rational-sized and self-interested regional units. It’s not too tough to figure this stuff out, but it takes serious will and especially the will to tell the ever-so-devout and pious progzis, PC-nazis, and pisslamists, “NO!”

        Liked by 1 person

    • RC says:

      Hey, helmhood —

      Radical jihadi extremists in Syria are funded, to the tune of hundreds of millions, by the Gulf States, Turkey, Iran, Great Britain and the US among others. Long since, US forces discovered that these largely illiterate foot-soldiers have minimal understanding of Islam, joined-up for the pay, are actually paid very little and really want to be home with their kids. So “destroying ISIS,” along with DAESH, WHITE HELMETS et al is a matter of cutting the funding.

      But of course, the instability in Syria has more to do with who will control and sell Syrian and Iraq oil than theological issues. As with Libya and Iraq before, globalist have hired proxies to secure that Syrian oil and, wouldn’t you know, these brave Kurdish women, along with our betrayed soldiers, can be counted as disposable proxies.

      Regarding Syrian President Assad, he was elected three years ago and is the single greatest obstacle to globalist raids on his country’s oil.

      Like

  5. Ursula says:

    So happy to see this and the girls look so cute.

    Liked by 12 people

    • Gary says:

      From what I have read, many of these Kurdish fighters are women. In an area and religious region where women are held in low esteem, it will be interesting to see how these women will accomplish. They cannot be ignored after the contribution which they are making.

      Liked by 11 people

    • Sayit2016 says:

      The look so young ! They are brave and willing to fight for their country—not a snowflake in the bunch….

      Liked by 13 people

      • Minnie says:

        God be with them 🙏

        They put feminazis to shame, although the pussy-hat brigade needs little help in that area.

        Liked by 9 people

      • Ah, yes, their country, Sayit. Or as SD wrote: ” Hopefully leading to a future creation of an independent nation of Kurdistan.” I guess this isn’t an *ulterior* motive, but it is a motive.

        Kurds are not Arabs. This may be why we are arming them. Kurds have a long, complex history, but seem to be most closely connected with … Persians! Now known as Iranians. They also have some connections to people from the Caucasian Mountains.

        Remember that video from a few posts back about why Arabs Lose Wars? There were about a dozen reasons explaining why the basic mindset of the people in the Arab world precludes Western-style Army organization. Arabs are basically tribe/clan-based, and find it difficult to fight strategically in larger units.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Garrison Hall says:

          I first became aware of the Kurds many years ago when a CBS crew filmed some Kurdish fighters. They had an old British “25 pounder” artillery piece on top of a mountain. How they got it up there I have no idea. The video showed a column of Iraqi tanks down in the valley. The Kurds were sitting around a small campfire brewing tea and watching the Iraqi tanks. Then, a couple of guys casually got up, loaded a round into the 25 pounder’s breach, adjusted for range, and fired. Everybody casually turned to watch the fall of the explosive round. It hit near the tanks which broke formation and headed for cover and the Kurds returned to their tea. The whole thing was done in such a casual fashion that it was clear that they had no fear of the Iraqis and, also, that firing their artillery piece at tanks was something they were very experienced at doing. When I saw that, I thought “these guys are seriously tough . . .”. I still think that. GO KURDS!

          Liked by 3 people

      • Suzanne says:

        unlike the millions of military-aged male “refugees” who have invaded Europe

        Liked by 2 people

    • El Torito says:

      The Kurdish ground troops, which those cute girls are warriors with, are the only ground troops to successfully battle ISIS on the ground. That’s why Obama conducted the charade of sending weapons to Turkey to be distributed, knowing Turkey would see to it that the Kurds did not get them. Glorious day!

      Liked by 5 people

  6. scottmc37 says:

    YES, amazing, these folks are the most moderate people in Syria and Iraq by far. They are reasonable and just want peace. I have met a few and found them easy to deal with compared to people in Tunisia, Egypt, Jordan, Oman.

    Liked by 18 people

    • scottmc37 says:

      I have never been to Libya, so cant speak for them, and in Turkey, its mostly Kurdish Turks Ive met as far as I can determine(I dont often ask, and Im not knowledable enough to tell by talking to someone)so hard for me to compare.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. NM says:

    The Kurds hate ISIS and Erdogan, sounds okay to me.

    Liked by 19 people

    • Lunatic Fringe says:

      Upvote
      I’m not the best informed but I’ve never not thought the Kurds were an ally.

      Like

      • Turkish Kurds allied themselves with the USSR. Thus, the US feared them for a long time. That seems to have changed.

        Like

        • JohnP says:

          During the siege of Kobane, Assad and the Russians did squat, while the US supplied 143 pallets of supplies/weapons, military advisors, and air support. It wasn’t much but gave the Kurds the edge to save the city.

          Liked by 1 person

          • JohnP says:

            A B1-B Lancer going Winchester in Kobane.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Texas Fossil says:

            The supplies dropped to Kobani were not from the US. They were from Iraq Kurds, delivered on US planes. There were no military advisors at the time of the supply drop, but USAF killed the ISIS armor and heavy weapons. The Kurds did the rest. Most of the defenders of Kobani at the crutial moment were women. I’ve heard figures of between 7 & 13 thousand women, depending on how you define a woman (age thing). Not sure how many men. But many came from all over after they held with the US air strike as help. Some PUK Special Ops helped. Kurds are great people. Brett McGurk was there early with the State Department. He helped their cause. They were NOT given US weapons until Obama was out of office.

            Liked by 2 people

        • Garrison Hall says:

          They were betrayed by Nixon and Kissinger.

          Liked by 1 person

  8. M33 says:

    I wonder what Tulsi Gabbard is going to be like after this announcement…

    Liked by 3 people

  9. piper567 says:

    This gives me great joy.
    Since our presence in Iraq, I have had such a love for the Kurds. People groups continue to emerge which understand reality. Time to assist actual allies in this fight. To hell with those who have no identity or desire to help themselves.
    Just listen to Poland’s PM, what is happening in Hungary.
    Pray that this evil that has infected WEurope will result in realignments based on an understanding and desire for National Sovereignty.
    Defense against evil has worked in the past. Let us hope it may work in the near future.
    We have many ideological allies. I believe this should be recognized and acted upon.

    Liked by 11 people

  10. Tom says:

    I disagree that they don’t have a motive: they do. They want a Kurdish state. However, they are among the “good guys” in the region, so they are a good asset to help defeat ISIS. My guess is they feel they have a chance at carving out a Kurdish state if the chaos in the region ever subsides.

    Liked by 13 people

  11. Pam says:

    This is a major step in helping the Syrian people take their nation back without nation building. Yes, those girls do look very happy. I couldn’t be happier for them.

    Liked by 8 people

  12. Daniel says:

    I don’t want to see female fighters. I just don’t. This is how a culture is destroyed. No one to create new members of an important culture and society? The role of women is motherhood. There are no other options. How many women in a shrinking culture are expendable?! I would say none. No women are expendable.

    I was initially coming here to make jokes like “Kurds know the whey!” or “Trump is doing this strictly as a Kurd-esy” and there they are of that helps anyone smile.

    I just hate that women are reduced to warfare or that they even WANT to. The culture and mindset which still continues in former Soviet controlled areas still suffer from the social destruction of strength of family and value of human life. Those psychological mindsets are handed down and it’s truly hard to recover from generations of people who have lost this capacity. It’s roughly the same as the US’s loss of parenting skills due to generations of self-absorbed consumers having children and handing them off to daycare and public schools. The losses are very evident.

    I’m just old enough to remember a time before this became the norm and my sons have benefited (I hope) from my understanding of what’s missing from most of these families. Not wanting to see women in combat isn’t “oppression.” It’s recognition of something much larger than the individual in the culture. (Isn’t it ironic that the goal of socialism is to remove the individual and yet the way to socialism is to destroy the family in the name of individualism?! Just goes to show what a huge lie it is)

    Liked by 3 people

    • Angry Dumbo says:

      These women choose to fight rather than wait for help. Either fight or be sold into slavery. Given the facts on the ground, these fighters are doing what they have to in order to survive.

      Liked by 26 people

    • waltherppk says:

      Would you think it is better for your mother or sister or wife or daughter to be able to choose to fight and have a chance to survive fighting in self defense against the lowest scum of the earth, or instead to have no choice except to surrender and be gang raped, tortured, mutilated and crucified? Would you want for the women to have a choice in such a perplexity and what choice do you think would be theirs?

      Liked by 15 people

    • chojun says:

      In this case, it’s how a culture is saved.

      For these women to take up arms against an enemy that would imprison and rape them is delicious justice and, dare I say, a little bit of ‘Merica.

      Liked by 10 people

      • Daniel says:

        Saved by destroying it. Damned if you do and damned if you don’t.

        Liked by 2 people

      • piper567 says:

        Read a little story recently re ISIS invading a small village…story from a Missionary. They gave the villagers an hour to vacate or their daughters would be given to ISIS to breed more fighters and their sons would fight for them or die.
        Nice choice.
        I am female. I would run.
        If given the choice to kill these vermin, I most certainly would hone my skills.
        I believe these women have an idea that their families need to survive. But so do they.
        First things first.
        (I agree, it would be nice if the women did not need to fight. But when they decide they need to, I’m inclined to think they understand the situation a bit better than I do.)

        Liked by 5 people

    • Donna in Oregon says:

      I understand your position. However, the men they are fighting are evil. Smith and Wesson is a great equalizer. Better they fight then be crucified beheaded, or forced into sex slavery.

      Liked by 9 people

    • Texas Fossil says:

      If you knew how Arabs in particular and Muslims in general treat women you would understand why they fight. I saw a video of a middle age Arab woman who had survived 3 years of ISIS in Raqqa right after she and her children escaped. She was begging the YPJ (Kurd Female military) to arm her and let her fight to free Raqqa. She wanted to kill ISIS herself. (with no training) She said if ISIS is being a Muslim, then I’m not a Muslim. She had the fire in the belly to do the job, probably not the skills.

      I have close Syrian Kurd friends.

      Here is the leader of the YPJ (commander Rojda Felat)
      Welcome to Raqqa
      https://joeyl.com/blog/all/post/welcome-to-raqqa

      Liked by 1 person

    • dilonsfo says:

      It appears that some women value freedom more than subjugation. There fighting will ensure that their children, other Kurdish children and generations afterwards won’t have to fight. That called courage and conviction.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jenny R. says:

      For the Kurds (and many of the tribes in Iraq at the beginning of the IS catastrophe) it was merely an acknowledgement “even if you do not hold a sword, you are still very capable of dying on one”.
      Sometimes women are left with that non-choice. They should at least be prepared for it. There are pictures of the Kurdish women soldiers saying goodbye to their children — in a more perfect world they would not have to, but if a woman has to fight, then what better reason than to protect her children?
      This isn’t feminism run amuck; this is battling for one’s family and for survival. That is the very essence of choosing life over death.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Benson II says:

      You are correct in your assessment of the role of women but this is not a regular war where the men go and fight and the women stay home this is a fight for the very existence of women and men and children who are Kurds. Israel was in the same position and women had to fight alongside men in order to not be wiped of the face of the earth. When your very existence is at stake every able bodied person must do what they can.

      It’s the U.S. who has tried to pervert the role of women by pretending women cannot be equal unless they take on the role of men. What we have here in the U.S. is a concerted effort to undermine the family I see no comparison between what’s happening here and what the Kurds are doing.

      Liked by 1 person

    • old deplorable owl says:

      So you’re saying that our early settlers’ women shouldn’t have helped their menfolk fend off marauders? How long do you think they’d have lasted? Cold, hard reality has a way of changing noble ideals rather quickly!
      (FWIW, I agree with you on women in combat roles generally, but we’re talking about basic survival here for these people.)

      Like

  13. wodiej says:

    It’s a great day when we can help a country who is filling to fight for their freedom.

    Liked by 8 people

  14. Screwtape says:

    The US should unilaterally recognize the Kurds as a a nation and help them set up a border. Then build Air Force and Army bases in the new country. Then dare anyone to attack them.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Now THAT is thinking outside of the box.
      Erdogan wants them erased from the earth and will do so if given the chance.
      He is not happy with our military presence in Turkey….this idea would neutrilize that…he is using the US right now with his ties to NATO to accumulate more power. His aim is to create a caliphate and eliminate any Christians, especially any Kurdish ones.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Sentient says:

      We’ll just carve off a piece of Turkey, Iraq, Iran and Syria to create Kurdistan. And then we’ll station Americans there in perpetuity to defend it. Great. Does anyone care that that’s the exact opposite of what Trump campaigned on?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Screwtape says:

        I don’t recall Trump saying he would not support the Kurds. And having troops stationed in a friendly Kurdistan would be the opposite of having them stationed in Afghanistan or Iraq.

        And in any case it’s just a dream, unfortunately.

        Like

      • dayallaxeded says:

        If you’re being sarcastic, b/c you think this is “nation building” then my “like” was misplaced. I liked the word play of “carve off a piece of Turkey.” If the USA did this in support of the Kurdish people, it would not be the BS form of “nation building” Shrub and <0bunghole (and Demonrats before them) so disastrously dabbled in. The Kurdish people will, as they were doing in the area of Iraq they controlled before Daesh metastasized, build their own nation. A USA presence and commitment to support and defend would merely be making a partnership with a like-minded people (barring too much influence from the Turkish/Syrian Kurds who tend toward communism/socialism) for mutual strategic advantages. Ultimately, Turkey could be happy with it, since it will profit from having a prosperous, peaceful, economic and security partner, instead of a failed Iraqi state on its border. Ask soldiers who served pre-, during, and post-surges in Iraq what they think about helping the Kurds establish a nation and using that relationship strategically. Then get back to us. I'm confident you'll be singing a different tune. Hopefully, still with the clever word play.

        Liked by 1 person

      • old deplorable owl says:

        All we would have to do is set them up and arm them. They’ve proven they can take it from there! An air base there would probably be a necessity, until they could take that over, too. Erdogan would try and wipe them out if he thought he could. I think the reason he hates them is that he’s afraid of them. They could become his Israel standing in the way of his Caliphate.

        Like

        • old deplorable owl says:

          Can anyone tell me why my replies are winding up 3 or 4 posts down from the one I’m replying to? Kinda maddening!

          Like

    • dayallaxeded says:

      That is absolutely what should have happened in Iraq immediately after Saddam was taken down. Would’ve changed the entire dynamic in the region for the much, much better, imho. Had a discussion with some folks who were very knowledgeable about Iraq, Turkey, and the Kurds, way back in the early 2000s, and the consensus was, as I recall, that the US should set up a very substantial Kurdish state in Iraq, encourage Kurds from Turkey to immigrate to that state, solving the friction between Turkey and its Kurdish population and potentially annex the adjacent part of Syria as additional Kurdish territory. But then, I thought the incursion into Iraq was a strategic move to set up bases and intel-gathering infrastructure in a strategic location in the GME. I never would have thought a POTUS would be so stupid and petty (at least after the experience of VN) as to spill USA blood on soil and not fully control it. I believe PDJT is far better than those who have gone before. PRAY WITHOUT CEASING for him to be guarded and guided according to God’s gracious will in these matters–truly matters of life and death, not just of individuals, but of whole peoples, cultures, and our very future.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Orygun says:

    About time there was some official support for the Kurds. They have been trying to regain control over their historical homelands since their lands were arbitrarily chopped up and given away by politicians. Good job President Trump!

    Liked by 8 people

  16. duchess01 says:

    Erdogan has been fighting the Kurdish Turks for years – just like Saddam – he used an ‘alleged’ coup to set up a dictatorship in his own country – and suppressed any opposition to his dream of restoring the Ottoman Empire – he has no business in Syria – or any other country for that matter – especially, as an enabler to ISIS – as a member of NATO – he is entitled to assistance against an aggressor or attack on his country – he is not entitled to dictate to our President what he should or should not do – that was quite evident when he visited the WH – a wimp outside of his own domain – so poop on him –

    Liked by 7 people

  17. maiingankwe says:

    I may not have the intel needed like our President, but I have always backed the Kurds. Ever since Saddam Huissien (sp wrong) tried to kill them off by chemicals in northern Iraq.

    I give them the utmost respect for allowing and training their women to join in the fight. isis knows if they are killed by a female all bets are off when it comes to their glory after death, and I’ve always liked knowing these women are set to do just that for them as well as protect their people. It takes a great deal of courage to pick up a gun and fight your enemies. These women have that courage, and I wish them the best, especially when they return home from the battlefield. Many will have personal battles due to their emotional scars on the field. It’s what we know to be PTSD. They won’t have the medical treatment in which we will soon have here.

    The Kurds have been asking our government for aide in arms for many years and have always been rebuked until now. I really do hope they will get their own land so they can live in peace after all of this war. I hope they will live to see the defeat of isis. I hope for stabilization in the area too, which may take some time, but I do hope for all of the people there who just want to live their lives and raise their children without fear. It’s what most of us want around the world isn’t it? To live without the fear of death and destruction around you and your innocent children.

    My prayers will always go to the Kurds and others who just want to their lives. May they find peace one day, they deserve it.

    Liked by 21 people

  18. fleporeblog says:

    I absolutely love it! Unlike the POS Barry from Hawaii and what he did with the actual arming of ISIS in Libya and Syria and never coming out and stating it, our President is telling the entire world his plans and why he is doing it. I will pray for the Kurds that are fighting ISIS in Raqqa.

    If this means less Americans have to die and the job gets done, so be it! I hate for our President to feel what he did yesterday listening to Jimmy’s mom and the mother of the Navy SEAL. That tears away at you and rightfully so!

    If you haven’t seen this, be prepared to cry!

    Liked by 5 people

  19. Chuck Finley says:

    I get the geo-political play…. but we seem to have an extraordinarily high percentage of having our own weapons used against us down the road. Arming anyone but our own military has not been a strong play in our short history as a country….

    And yet, we keep doing it over and over again…..

    Color me skeptical.

    Liked by 1 person

    • missmarple2 says:

      What exactly do you think the Kirds are going to use against us, how, and why?

      Be specific in your comments, because to me, this is a no-brainer. The Kirds have been good allies for us from the beginning.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Chuck Finley says:

        Kind of misses my point. How can you account for unintended consequences? No one knows what they are at this point. Just like arming other groups in our past has, of course, seemed like a good idea at the time. Then 20 years later we find out the full ramifications.

        Here’s to hoping it does work and the weapons stay in the hands of allies.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Chuck
          It’s good to be skeptical and it’s healthy to question the motives, but I think it would help to make a simple comparison and then you might see things a little differently.

          When you said:” Just like arming other groups in our past has, of course, seemed like a good idea at the time. Then 20 years later we find out the full ramifications.”; just remember that those GROUPS were exactly THAT, a group. Rebels, para-militia, bandits, etc, whatever you want to call them, they were just that, GROUPS. Their leaders changed, there was/is infighting among them, and splinter cells all striving for the same thing – total power and control.

          The Kurds go WAY BACK and their ideology, morals, and ethics are VERY well known. They are a people who have wanted nothing more than to be left alone and live peacefully. They don’t have a reputation of attempting to overthrow governments, or financially sponsoring terrorism. They simply want to preserve their culture and be recognized as human beings, not animals.

          I for one am glad our President decided to arm them, not just for the reasons of helping to stabilize Syria, but it puts a major thorn in the side of Recep Erdogan and helps place another barrier against his dream of fulfilling an Ottoman empire. Just my thoughts.

          Liked by 4 people

  20. napoleon32 says:

    This puts Assad in quite the predicament. The Kurds control much of northern Syria right now. If they take Raqqa and swing a column south through the ISIS controlled areas of eastern Syria and take most of them, they will control about half of the country’s territory and a sizable number of oil fields. Interesting possibilities…

    Liked by 8 people

    • And see, per my post above, it appears the Kurds can do just that, napoleon32. With a bit of training, they would be good to go. But: warning… Kurdish fighters have heretofore been fighting defensive wars.

      That requires an entirely different mindset. Why do you think football teams have to have an offensive team and a defensive team? Why did our Founding Fathers beat the British back in the day?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Great points! But remember also, that the offense demonstrated by ISIS has for the most part been repelled by the Kurds, thus demonstrating a weak offensive strategy. All they have to do is produce an offensive system a few bars above what ISIS can muster and they’ll have it made. And perhaps, even creating a feign offense in order to turn it into a defensive position would benefit the Kurds tremendously.

        Like

  21. TimeIsNow says:

    Some people are suggesting this will go well beyond Syria, as Turkey’s Idiot leader insulted the USA and Trump at least twice this last week. The Kurd’s are also the biggest threat to Turkey. .Kurdistan could take over huge stripes of Syria, Iraq, and Turkey (with USA backing of course), and could represent a new balance of power in the middle east, much friendlier to the Trump USA.

    Liked by 4 people

  22. 4beagles says:

    This is Good News!
    I’ve felt for these folks since shortly after the Gulf War. Seems like everyone in their neighborhood dislikes or detests them, so they’re probably decent people.

    Liked by 6 people

  23. quintrillion says:

    The Iranians and Hezbollah are surrounding a US base on the boarder of Syria/Iraq. We have fired on a convoy of them too. This was set-up as a no conflict zone.
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/may/30/iranian-backed-forces-amassing-near-us-training-ba/

    Liked by 1 person

    • Minnie says:

      What’s that saying and by whom?

      When the enemy surrounds you, you know they can’t escape.

      Please pardon the rough quote.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Janie M. says:

        From my favorite Marine:

        Liked by 1 person

        • Janie M. says:

          Lewis Burwell “Chesty” Puller (June 26, 1898 – October 11, 1971) was a United States Marine Corps lieutenant general who fought guerrillas in Haiti and Nicaragua, and fought in World War II and the Korean War.

          Puller is the most decorated Marine in American history. He is one of two U.S. servicemen to be awarded five Navy Crosses and, with the Distinguished Service Cross awarded to him by the U.S. Army, his total of six stands only behind Eddie Rickenbacker’s eight times receiving the nation’s second-highest military award for valor.[1]

          Puller retired from the Marine Corps with 37 years service in 1955 and lived in Virginia.

          Liked by 2 people

  24. KBR says:

    Kurdish history shows them being brutal to Christians sometimes and helping them in others.
    I do not trust them. And therefore cannot join in the “love the Kurds” party. (Or any Muslims)

    But I trust our President.

    Like

    • Chuck Finley says:

      Good points.

      Like

    • KBR says:

      Armenian Christian Genocide by the Turks: before the Jewish Holocaust.

      Why do we remember the second Holocaust, and have little memory of the first?

      Liked by 3 people

      • MVW says:

        Turks. This genocide will forever cast a pall over them.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Chuck Finley says:

        Probably a few reasons…. but the easy answer for today’s age is that if you point this out, or Stalin’s massacres, you are belittling the Jewish plight in Nazi Germany. In other words, you are an anti-Semitic bigot.

        Liked by 1 person

        • KBR says:

          I am afraid the reason is likely a worse one. The Armenians were not really the “West” you see, so their anihilation was not as “important” as one which took place in the “elite” countries of Europe.

          God will judge.

          Liked by 4 people

        • Bert Darrell says:

          Chuck, if I ever had any respect for your comments, you just lost it with the most ridiculous and grotesque non-sequitur. One holocaust does not erase, condone, forget or belittle another. Please, don’t bother to answer me. I no longer care what you say.

          Like

          • Chuck Finley says:

            Good grief. Thanks for reading my comment out of context…. and then virtue signal about how offended you are.

            It’s like you were just waiting to rip a comment from me… no matter what I said.

            Like

      • KBR says:

        Sorry, forgot my link for my comment and photo above:

        http://bibleprobe.com/christianmartyrs-armenia.htm

        Like

      • Phil aka Felipe says:

        In 2010 Congressman Mike Pence gave the following statement during a House Foreign Affairs Committee markup of H.Res. 252, a resolution affirming the Armenian Genocide. Pence voted against it.

        Did not want to rock the boat with Erdogan. Now, Trump ain’t scared!!!

        Like

    • Jenny R. says:

      It’s a matter of who among the Kurds one works with — and this could be problematic — Barzani has close under the table ties to Erdogan, others do not.
      The Kurds were used as jackboots by the Ottomans, this is true and could be true in the future. Then again, they have had the jackboot applied to them as well by the Turks, Syrians, Iraqis, and Iranians, so they aren’t completely sold on doing those groups’ bidding all the time. It is a gamble, but there is nothing to lose at this point (and this goes for the Christians as well as America: Turkey, Iran, Iraq, and yes Syria are hardly governments that the Christians can really trust…no matter what propaganda some of them put out:

      http://augustafreepress.com/iran-assad-hezbollah-using-christian-persecution-isis-hijack-minorities/

      Since we can’t exactly be without some regional support, however tenuous, in the area, it would be better to cultivate an alliance rather than slap them away. It also shows that Trump will follow through with American commitments where other presidents have not — and that’s worth quite a bit geopolitically.

      Liked by 2 people

  25. Keln says:

    About damned time really.

    One of the few groups between Iraq and Syria that we can trust.

    Yes, there is such a thing as Kurdish terrorists, and they operate in southern Turkey (the PKK…a leftist organization, of course). No, we should not arm them or help them out. Terrorism is terrorism.

    But they are not the same as the majority Kurds in northern Iraq and Syria (heck, even most Kurds in Turkey don’t support the PKK). Most Kurds have been fighting for independence (generally in defense) against dictators and Islamists for many years. ISIS is their latest enemy.

    If you want a group to arm who aren’t going to go crazy Islamist on you, the Kurds are the ones to arm. Even if many of them are Muslim, they just don’t take it as seriously as Arabs do, as you can see by the way they treat their own women.

    Liked by 8 people

  26. C. Lowell says:

    Obama just pooped a kitten…

    Liked by 1 person

  27. thluckyone says:

    I love the way our Lion has reduced the chances for an Errordogman led ‘caliphate’. There appears to be a strengthening Arab “NATO” [Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, others] in which Turkey is not participating. And now, a US alliance with the Kurds [could they also be included in the Arab “NATO” ?]. For the Turks to remain in the European NATO, they have to adhere to at least some standards for “good” behavior. Perhaps Turkey will remain the only playground available for the Errordog. He made his bed – now let him enjoy it alone, with only his own fleas for company. Our Lion also knows how to handle a leash.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. A2 says:

    If you read these 4 articles you will get a fairly good idea about the position of the Assad regime backed by Russia and supported by Iran. The last article indicates what they are really worried about: the political reconstruction, not so much the fighting of ISIS, as clearly that will be reaching closure with the new Arab coalition the President was able to achieve in Riyadh.

    US warns Iran-backed, pro-Syrian regime forces to move away from base in Syria
    https://www.stripes.com/us-warns-iran-backed-pro-syrian-regime-forces-to-move-away-from-base-in-syria-1.471181#.WS38N4XKhaV

    27 May، 2017
    Damascus, SANA – The Foreign and Expatriates Ministry on Saturday called for once again for the cessation of the US-led international coalition’s illegal actions, after the coalition’s warplanes targeted al-Mayadeen city in Deir Ezzor countryside which claimed the lives of 35 civilians.

    ‘The Ministry said that the new assault is part of a series of attacks carried out by the illegal international coalition against Syria’s sovereignty and territorial integrity under the pretext of combating terrorism, while the actions of this alliance only contribute to spreading chaos and destruction which benefits the extremist terrorist organizations, particularly ISIS and Jabhat al-Nusra terror organizations.’
    http://sana.sy/en/?p=107033

    30 May، 2017
    Moscow, SANA – Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov affirmed on Tuesday that the threats launched by the US-led coalition over Syrian army’s advance on al-Tanf area in the Syrian Badia (desert) directly affect the sovereignty of the Syrian Arab Republic, stressing that these issues need to be resolved.

    “As you know, there were not only threats, but also the fact of the specific use of force in that area. I think that this situation is very alarming, as it directly affects the sovereignty of the Syrian Arab Republic.”
    http://sana.sy/en/?p=107246

    ‘Putin: Syria De-Escalation Zones Shouldn’t Become Territorial Division Prototype;
    “I would like to note the constructive approach of Turkey and Iran, and, of course, the Syrian government, which, together with Russia, have managed to achieve a ceasefire. The ceasefire would not have been possible without the so-called Syrian armed opposition. It was the first and very important step towards peace,” Putin also said.
    https://sputniknews.com/middleeast/201705301054139399-syria-deescalation-territorial-division/

    Like

  29. Who exactly sells these weapons anyway? The government picks independent contractors or brokers? Or do they just not interfere with American based brokers selling to the Kurds?
    Sorry, my knowledge on this is limited to the movie War Dogs

    Like

    • Wendy says:

      Better question is where the ISIS has been getting their weapons and money? We all know what Obama and McCain’s rebel army are. It wouldn’t surprise me they still secretly providing for them.

      Liked by 1 person

  30. the right phoenix says:

    God bless the Syrian Kurds!

    Like

  31. saywhat64 says:

    Next up, send arms to a new Green Revolution in Iran. Just like the Kurds, obama just stood by and left the Green Revolution to be slaughtered by his friend, the “Supreme Leader”.

    Like

  32. I do not trust the Kurds, they are know to be brutal to Christians!!

    Like

    • Texas Fossil says:

      Who told you that? I actually know Syrian Kurds and have watched them since the Gulf War. Their leaders long ago admitted limited involvement in the Armenian Genocide. Some of them actively opposed it then and suffered for it. (Turkey has never admitted any of that). That was at the end of WWI. They are on good terms with the Armenians. I have a friend who writes for the Armenian Weekly and also writes about Turkey. She grew up in Turkey. Her work parallels my Kurdish friends work.

      For you information, the Syrian Kurds are totally secular. Depending on the town, the percentage of non-Muslim Kurds can be fairly high. The Christians among them are cautious about being singled out by the Arabs, not the Kurds.

      Liked by 2 people

  33. DallasMatt says:

    Send them Heavy Wespons. About damn time – Bush 41-43 yall s/b ashamed. Go Trump!! Kurds are the only folks in ALL of Iraq that love freedom like non-democrat Americans do (not sure abt Rinos).

    Liked by 2 people

  34. scott467 says:

    “as the United States moved ahead with a plan despite concerns by ally Turkey.”

    __________

    There are citizens of Turkey who are allies of the West in general and America in particular, but Erdogan is not one of them. As long as he leads Turkey, Turkey must be viewed with great distrust, the same as our allies necessarily viewed America while the traitor Obama was the POtuS.

    .

    Like

  35. paris23 says:

    I would like to know if we have armed the Christians and, if not, why? I read the Kurds could become a danger to them once ISIS is taken out. The Christians need protection they just aren’t yet getting, as far as I know.

    Like

    • Texas Fossil says:

      You said: “I would like to know if we have armed the Christians and, if not, why?”

      Short answer: No, not yet. There is a portion of the SDF (Syrian Democratic Force) that is Syriac Christian. They are know as the HSNB (totally Christian) that force parallels the YPJ forces (YPJ are a female mixed religion force; muslim (secular), Ezidi, Arab and including some Christians)

      The Joint Forces Command has been requested to arm the HSNB like they have the other portions of the SDF. Have not heard if anything has happened related to it.

      Like

  36. pochas94 says:

    Trump should draw a border for the Kurds’ homeland and vow to supply them with arms to defend it until such time as the international community recognizes it. If they can defend it, it’s theirs.

    Like

  37. Founding Fathers Fan says:

    The majority of Kurds are sunni muslims with a minority of shia muslims and have been for almost 1400 years.

    Like

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