AG Secretary Sonny Perdue Discusses Challenges Shifting Food Supply Chains….

The U.S. economy will reopen sooner rather than later specifically because of non-discussed issues in the total U.S. food supply chain.  While government officials have to be very careful in public comments, AG Secretary Sonny Perdue hinted toward the issue today during his remarks at the coronavirus task force briefing.  WATCH:

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The issue is slightly complex; and with two months of manufactured food supply-chain stress; it is now becoming increasingly important to re-open consumer access to the fresh-food side of the aggregate supply chain (ie. restaurants, cafe’s, and food away from home).

Most Americans were not aware food consumption in the U.S. was a 55/45 proposition. Approximately 55% of all food was consumed “outside the home” (or food away from home), and 45% of all food consumed was food “inside the home” (grocery shoppers).

Food ‘outside the home’ included: restaurants, fast-food locales, schools, corporate cafeterias, university lunchrooms, manufacturing cafeterias, hotels, food trucks, park and amusement food sellers and many more. Many of those venues are not thought about when people evaluate the overall U.S. food delivery system; however, this network was approximately 55 percent of all food consumption on a daily basis.

The ‘food away from home‘ sector has its own supply chain. Very few restaurants and venues (cited above) purchase food products from retail grocery outlets. As a result of the coronavirus mitigation effort the ‘food away from home’ sector has been reduced by 75% of daily food delivery operations. However, people still need to eat. That means retail food outlets, grocers, are seeing sales increases of 25 to 50 percent, depending on the area.

•Phase One was retail. •Phase two was distribution. •Phase three was the space between processing/manufacturing and distribution. •Phase four was raw material supply to manufacturing. •Phase five is consumer packaging capacity, and bulk storage inventories.

This is the phase where Secretary Sonny Perdue starts getting concerned…

♦ Phase Five – The retail consumer supply chain for manufactured and processed food products includes bulk storage to compensate for seasonality. As Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue recently noted “there are over 800 commercial and public warehouses in the continental 48 states that store frozen products.”

Here is a snapshot of the food we had in storage at the end of February: over 302 million pounds of frozen butter; 1.36 billion pounds of frozen cheese; 925 million pounds of frozen chicken; over 1 billion pounds of frozen fruit; nearly 2.04 billion pounds of frozen vegetables; 491 million pounds of frozen beef; and nearly 662 million pounds of frozen pork.

This bulk food storage is how the total U.S. consumer food supply ensures consistent availability even with weather impacts.  As a nation we essentially stay one harvest ahead of demand by storing it and smoothing out any peak/valley shortfalls. There are a total of 175,642 commercial facilities involved in this supply-chain across the country

Few Americans are aware of this.  However, that stored-food-supply is the supply-chain for food manufacturers who process the ingredients into a variety of branded food products and distribute to your local supermarket.

That bulk stored food, and the subsequent supply chain, is entirely separate from the commercial fresh food supply chain used by restaurants, hotels, cafeterias etc.  For almost 8 weeks the retail consumer supply chain has been operating beyond capacity and the burn rate of raw food products is up a stunning 40 percent.

Those bulk warehouses, the feeder pools for retail/consumer manufactured food products, are starting to run low.

Believe me: (1) we don’t want to find out what happens when those 800 mass storage facilities run out; and (2) the food supply chain will be a big part of President Trump’s decision-making on reopening the economy thereby re-opening restaurants, cafeterias, etc…. and switching consumption back to fresh supply.

This “bigger picture” is not being considered by politically-minded governors, DC politicians, and public health-centric advisors who focus exclusively on the virus.

Additionally, there are very specific issues within each supply chain (commercial and consumer). It is not as easy as people think to move the commercial supply-chain (restaurants etc.) into the consumer supply chain (grocers). First, there are simply packaging capacity issues.  Additionally, there’s an entirely different set of regulations on the processing side for the consumer supply chain.

One dairy farmer helps explain:

Are we dumping milk because of greed or low demand, no. It’s the supply chain, there are only so many jug fillers, all were running 24/7 before this cluster you-know-what.

Now demand for jug milk has almost doubled.  However, restaurant demand is almost gone; NO ONE is eating out. 

Restaurant milk is distributed in 2.5 gal bags or pint chugs; further, almost 75 percent of milk is processed into hard products in this country, cheese and butter. Mozzarella is almost a third of total cheese production; how’s pizza sales going right now??

A bit of history – Years ago (40+) every town had a bottler, they ran one shift a day, could ramp up production easily.  Now with all the corporate takeovers (wall street over main street) we are left with regional “high efficiency” milk plants that ran jug lines 24/7 before this mess, no excess capacity.

Jug machines cost millions and are MADE IN CHINA. Only so many jugs can be blown at a jug plant.  We farmers don’t make the jugs, damn hard to ramp up production.

I’m a dairy farmer, believe me NO dairyman likes dumping milk; and so far there is NO guarantee they will get paid. Milk must be processed within 48 hours of production and 24 hours of receipt in the plant or it goes bad. Same with making it into cheese and butter, and neither stores well for long.

The same supply line problems exists where restaurants are supplied with bulk 1 pound blocks of butter or single serv packs or pats; and cheese is sold in 10 to 20 pound bags (think shredded Mozzarella for pizza).  Furthermore, it is not legal for this end of the supply chain to sell direct to consumers in most states.

Take cheddar cheese for instance; it goes from mild to sharp to crap in storage. Butter, frozen, only stores for so long and then must be slowly thawed and processed into other uses as it gets “strong”.  At Organic Valley we cook it down into butter oil or ghee for cooking.

We are headed for the same problem with canned veggies.  The vast majority of produce comes off and is processed in season; canned or frozen.  The supply is already in cans for the season; restaurants use gallon cans or bulk bags of frozen produce.

At some point we will run out of consumer sized cans in stock because home size sales are up (40%+) and restaurant sales are almost nonexistent.  Fresh produce out of U.S. season comes from Mexico (different climate).  I’m talking sweet corn, green beans, peas, tomatoes, all veggies are seasonal in the USA.  Fresh, out-of-season, row crops are  imported.  (There are exceptions, like hydroponic grown, but small amount of total).

Someone mentioned “time to raid all those bins of corn”.  Those bins on the farm contain yellow corn, cattle feed and totally unfit for human consumption, now or at harvest.

Eggs? Same problem.  Bakeries and restaurants of any size use Pullman egg cases, 30 dozen at a pop, 30 eggs to a flat, 12 flats to a case.  There are only so many 1 dozen egg cartons available and only so many packing machines.

Industrial bakeries and processors of packaged food buy bulk liquid eggs, no carton at all.  Also in many states it is illegal to sell this supply-chain directly to consumers. 

On your standard buffet of any size, do you really think they boil eggs and peel them? They come in a bag, boiled and diced; those nice uniform slices of boiled egg you see on your salad, a lot of them come in tubes boiled and extruded at the same time, just unwrap and slice. Your scrambled eggs come in a homogenized bag on most buffets.

Another example of Main Street being gutted and “improved by wall street” NO local egg processors available or many small egg producers either, all corporate and huge, contracted to sell to the corporate masters.

This is a warning the same problems exist in all supply chains.

The supply chain is farked.

David Osterloh,
61-year-old dairy farmer

Most people don’t contemplate the bigger issue within the dynamic of total food distribution in the United States.  It is a very complex supply chain that has been reinvented over the past 50 years as more people started eating away from home.

The commercial fresh food supply chain, which is 55 percent of total food consumption, is currently stalled.  The retail or manufactured food supply (grocery stores), which was formerly 45 percent of food distribution, cannot reasonably generate enough product to compensate for half of the total food supply chain shutting down without radical adjustments to the operation; and those radical adjustments take time to implement.

There is still plenty of fresh supply foodstuffs, but processed or manufactured food will likely not be able to keep operating at the current capacity much longer.

Traditional emergency food recovery and distribution models (think hurricanes) are designed for short-term disruptions to the restaurant sector that provides 50% of food outside the home; and, as a result, short-term increases to at home food needs.  Those emergency and recovery models have contingency plans for short-term regional bursts of specific non perishable products into specific areas.  This ain’t that.

The current supply chain disruption is a severe reduction in the availability of ‘food outside the home‘ for a sustained period.  Losing the entire sector is very unusual, unprecedented, unforeseen in scale; and there is no national contingency plan for a nationwide demand on all retail supermarket food products simultaneously.

Once these bulk warehouse fulfillment centers run out, every manufacturer and food processor in the country is pulling from the same upstream supplier network.  Again, there’s no need to panic, the total food supply is not short, we all just need to adjust our shopping habits and get a little creative.

This entry was posted in Big Government, Coronavirus, Legislation, media bias, President Trump, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

200 Responses to AG Secretary Sonny Perdue Discusses Challenges Shifting Food Supply Chains….

  1. SOCRATES says:

    We are Blessed to have an abundant supply of deer and turkeys in our woods

    Liked by 13 people

  2. Fromseatoshinningsea says:

    Per a semi reliable wholesaler sourcd Soros shut down his Smithfield processing plant in ND today. We’re too close to brink, its compounding.

    Reopen soon or 1929.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Conservativeinny says:

      Smithfield is supposed to be Chinese owned since at least 2013 if not earlier. I stopped buying all their product years ago because of this knowledge. When did Soros buy it or buy into It or has he always been involved.

      Also as reported I. Various sources, the plant is shut down because more than half of the employees have the coronavirus

      Liked by 10 people

      • paper doll says:

        That why the South Dakota Gov asked for the malaria drug. The Chinese slaughterhouse in SD is a virus hot spot….shocking, I know! \s.

        Here are Smithfield ‘s products

        file:///storage/emulated/0/Download/EVRuW3PXsAMzzlM.jpeg

        Liked by 2 people

        • paper doll says:

          Oh well, that didn’t turn out 😑

          Like

        • barnabusduke says:

          We had some of their whole ham earlier this week. (We had cut one ham into 3 vacuum sealed sections and put in our deep freezer 2 months ago)….gosh-awful! Tossed it! I always liked their bacon, but now hearing Chinese owned…buh-bye!

          Liked by 1 person

          • churchladyiowa says:

            Our western Iowa town has a huge Smithfield plant. I stopped buying their products ten-plus years ago. Bacon was always par-excellance, but toward the end it fried up with a strange odor and pans full of grease. Actually called the plant and explained. All they did was send me free coupons for more bad bacon. Fast forward five years . . . I’m at one of the local stores shopping and run into the retired plant manager from when hubby worked there. When I explained my issue with the products, he said it all goes back to the almighty dollar. “Smoking is what makes the bacon taste so good. When I was there it would go into the smokehouse for three days. Then one of the up & comings figured out they could save a ton of money by cutting the process to two days. Guaranteed inferior product but they don’t care.”

            Liked by 5 people

          • dottygal says:

            I know, I would never buy dog food made in China, let alone people food. I always check the tags before I buy dog toys too. Everything they make is crap.

            Liked by 2 people

            • dottygal, Same here and I think there is going to be a lot more people doing that. Maybe we can get back like the good ole days when a product was made in the USA it was made to last. Not made to be disposable so the consumer would buy more.

              Like

      • I wouldn’t eat anything from Smithfield…chinese poison

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Payday says:

    That didn’t work out right. Ad rem…could you delete this?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Psycho Monkee says:

    (4) Farm-Fresh egg sellers within 5 minutes of our home. $3 – $5/dozen. Chickens, pork, beef and lamb too. Our Victory Garden seeds have sprouted.

    Liked by 14 people

    • riverelf says:

      Same here, so no eggs for us this week. The turkey hotdogs were back in stock.

      Like

    • GB Bari says:

      Good thing you don’t live in Michigan – Die Fuhrer Frau Witless has commanded that selling seeds ist Verboten!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Somebody says:

      My neighbor just gave me 2 dozen eggs yesterday from her chickens. They usually sell them, but have been gifting neighbors on the street with them instead. I thanked her and offered to pay her, but she refused said it was the neighborly thing to do.

      My granddaughter’s scout leader has chickens, she’s selling to a select group of people. Son and I are on list to get 18 eggs for $3 on Sunday. 18 are $3 and a dozen is $2. So between my neighbor and the scout leader we’re set!

      Liked by 2 people

  5. TradeBait says:

    This nation is going to learn a ton of stuff from this that will be beneficial for decades. Voting in patriots in every office is of critical importance. China is watching every move and counter move we are making through the Democrats, DS and other traitors within.

    Liked by 27 people

    • YvonneMarie says:

      Truth.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Deborah @UnTamedInSD says:

      If only we could rid ourselves of the flower childs spawn and their spawn….way too many red diaper babies who think they are “Progressive”.
      The only babies planned parenthood doesn’t want to abort.

      Liked by 3 people

      • dbobway says:

        Deborah, I grew up with the 2 months of the summer of Love.
        That is how long it lasted.
        Woodstock wasn’t news anywhere, but New York. It sucked for the most part.
        “It coulda’ been great, just they way we envisioned it to be.”
        After it was edited. Woodstock was awesome.
        We are still looking for ‘that moment’ that makes it all worth while.
        Life is a little more complicated than that.
        And surely more precious.

        Like

        • Deborah @UnTamedInSD says:

          I was just barely into teens and remember all the hippie camps, I was fascinated and at times wanted to be one when i was a bit older 😀 But then came the weather underground etc… they have spawned a few generations now , taken over many sectors of our country , who knew that would happen… but history repeats and it is their newest generation that scares the hell out of me for the future of this country. After PDJT who will fill his shoes, Pray his children or some other is up to the task of what our future will demand to hold our republic.

          Liked by 4 people

          • dbobway says:

            Deborah, many in that generation felt entitled. For the first time in history we had more people making more money than ever before.
            Now 16 years old comes with a nicer car than Dad’s with a phone and a computer.
            I got a baseball glove and a list of chores.
            They are terminal, I’ve tried everything.
            I’m not going to shut up any more, I’m done. Thanks for the chat, Be well.

            Liked by 1 person

    • cattastrophe says:

      Voting in patriots has been the main problem for ages. It seems patriots don’t want to be politicians so we’re stuck with rinos. Until patriots start stepping up to run and run a campaign like Trump with truthful policies and truthful information about their opponents the results will continue to be bad.

      Like

  6. surakvulcan says:

    Does anyone know what is the situation with grains? My wife has the sense that there is a flour shortage.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Snow White says:

      It might be because every store I have been to, there is hardly any flour on the shelves if any. But I don’t buy the Gold Medal garbage and all the bleached and bromated kind. I buy King Arthur flour, Bob’s Red Mill or Wheat Montana Farms. Luckily I got several bags before the craziness started.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Somebody's Gramma says:

      I’ll hedge an educated guess regarding flour. The sudden demand for homemade goods wiped out the available flour, just like the toilet paper was wiped out due to people being mostly at home. Even the availability of wheat berries to grind into flour was wiped out. The second issue is transportation. The demand is still so high, they can’t truck enough of it to the stores after processing. I want to throw in a third problem, and that is the wheat harvest last year due to cold and wet weather reduced the overall crop production (no one is talking about this). Although, the US exports wheat, so I don’t know how that is going. Tell your wife, to do small grocery trips 2-3 times per week and check out the smaller stores. Just get 1 of each thing each time. The other option, is for her to contact a local bakery to see if she can purchase a 25 lb bag. That’s a lot of flour, but you can repackage it and freeze it for future use. Until the economy opens back up, I see the perceived shortages continuing because people will continue to panic until we get back to “normal”.

      Liked by 1 person

    • rebelinme2 says:

      Coincidentally, all the yeast is being bought up as well. When this is over, alot of people who used to buy bread and eggs packaged will be baking all their own bread and raising chickens or ducks for fresh eggs. Many more will be planting a vegetable garden this year as well… the seeds are being bought by the handfuls in our local Agway…

      Like

  7. Deplorable Canuck says:

    Problem is, will folks want to go back to Restaurants?

    Also, does anyone know if we have the system in Canada, i.e. dual supply chains?

    Liked by 3 people

    • WSB says:

      Foe, as is Elaine.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Hans says:

      President Trump made his wife Sec of Transportation.. They have a shipping firm that ships containers from China to the US. Yes it’s true… I always felt that PDT made her Sec because Mitch controlled the senate..

      With China basically declaring war on the US. Mitch has a choice… his personal financial interest in China or the United States … PDT knows which way he will bend… that’s why the ultimatum. Time to expose Mitch…

      Liked by 7 people

  8. Ish Kabibble says:

    With the information you’ve been educating us with, yesterday at a warehouse club, they had no chicken parts so I bought a case of whole chickens at case price and will cut them up myself.

    Restaurants aren’t buying cases of chicken right now (learned from you) so they had plenty of them.

    If folks are in a jam and a case is too much, go in on it with other people and divide it up.

    I did the same at a restaurant supply chain a few weeks ago. Plenty of items normal retail stores didn’t have.

    Worked great for me and thanks again, SD.

    Liked by 16 people

    • sickconservative says:

      Back in our lean days my wife would always buy whole chickens and cut them herself multiple meals and really inexpensive.

      Liked by 2 people

      • topavalley says:

        My future mother-in-law taught me how to cut up a whole chicken and why it was so much more economical. I also went to pick up blocks of cheese from the Chase Brothers dairy. I was there along with restaurant workers and small grocery store employees. (1970’s)

        She had 7 children.

        I am not worried. Most Americans are resilient and do not give up.

        Liked by 3 people

        • topavalley says:

          She also taught me how to patch clothes so well that they were more sturdy with the patch.
          When my kids were in middle school and hight school their friends asked where they bought their “distressed” jeans.
          What she and I saw as practical was now COOL.

          Liked by 2 people

    • PatriotKate says:

      I did the same thing yesterday at a local restaurant supply company with my son who is a chef. Bought a case of whole chicken fryers. And a whole tenderloin. Good prices too since they are wholesale to the restaurants. They were well-stocked. Glad I have a big commercial freezer.

      Liked by 1 person

      • PatriotKate says:

        And… where he works their wholesale supplier is also selling to the employees. We also noticed that a couple of grocery stores are selling the larger commercial canned items (clearly the with the restaurant supply label) so at least their some shifting and innovation going on to adjust the supply chain.

        Liked by 4 people

        • topavalley says:

          My son is buying eggs, flour, huge cans of beans, and many more items from his favorite small coffee shop.
          The coffee shop wants to support their loyal customers, pay their rent and keep their supply chain going so they can reopen.
          God Bless the USA!

          Liked by 4 people

          • CirclinTheDrain says:

            My favorite restaurant now take out only is selling all paper goods, fresh vegs, eggs, butter, milk products, chickens, deli meat, flour and yeast. I hardly go to the grocery store any more 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  9. MicD says:

    For the youngsters who’ve never learned about “Orders of Magnitude”,
    So Far President Trump has navigated this Biological Attack perfectly.

    What Orders of Magnitude difference would we be in now without POTUS Trump’s two crucial decisions. Those being early travel bans and Social Distance without which every county in this country would be dealing with ORDERS OF MAGNITUDE MORE INFECTIONS.

    YOU BETTER WISE UP,
    and be thankful that Donald Trump is your President.

    Liked by 13 people

    • GB Bari says:

      That’s a great observation about orders of magnitude.

      However we really do NOT know where we might be otherwise because we never gave the virus the opportunity to spread naturally. Plus we cannot go by the current mortality statistics because we know they are assigning “covid-19” as cause of death regardless of the patient’s condition and other preexisting serious health issues.

      IMHO the stats are deliberately being badly skewed in order to cloud the truth from the public.

      Liked by 7 people

      • JohninMK says:

        Plus a boost as it is highly financially advantageous for hospitals to declare COVID-19 as cause of death and considerably more if ventilator needed.

        Almost as if the system was designed to boost one side of the statistics.

        Liked by 1 person

        • GB Bari says:

          As usual these days everything is politicized and manipulated to the significant financial benefit of those in control of major systems and sectors in our country.

          Like

      • dow40kby2024 says:

        I think a lot of those classifications have to do with billing and how a hospital is going to be paid. Might a hospital want a high number of Covid19 patients for billing purposes rather than a Flu patient?

        Liked by 1 person

      • cattastrophe says:

        You could be correct but if someone goes in the hospital with COVID there’s really no way to know if they would have died from an under laying cause or not or even if they would have been hospitalized because of it.

        I haven’t seen the numbers your talking about being used for people who weren’t also infected with COVID.

        Like

  10. Magabear says:

    I’m in the 80/20 eating outside of home catagory, though eating Stouffers I guess is eating at home. 😁

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Hoosier_Friend? says:

    I have been alerting people to this since before Sundance began writing about it.

    They argue and don’t believe wat I say, what Sundance eloquently lays out.

    I have stocked up while they go about their lives mocking what I’ve tried to tell them.

    So I’ve decided that part of the herd needs thinned.

    Liked by 3 people

  12. TonyE says:

    SO, why don’t restaurants start selling food on a retail basis.

    Trader Joe’s out of eggs? No problem, Denny’s a thousand. They’ll put them in a paper bag for you.

    Mozarella? No problem.

    A gallon of tomato sauce? OK, I got a fridge.

    Just get the regulators and city inspectors the hell out of the way.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Landslide says:

      Many restaurants doing that here in San Antonio. Just received an email from the Landry’s chain of restaurants with links to the ones “selling groceries”. Individual restaurants have lists of the items they are selling.

      Also, thanks to Sundance’s articles on the food supply chain, I was able to give an intelligent explanation to my son today when he was talking about dairy farmers dumping milk.👌🏼👍🏻👏🏼

      Liked by 3 people

    • G. Willikers says:

      From the dairy farmer’s explanation in the article:

      > Also in many states it is illegal to sell this supply-chain directly to consumers.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Peoria Jones says:

        ^^^THIS ^^^ is a big part of the problem. We really aren’t experiencing food shortages, but folks must think outside the box with regard to some items.

        Some areas have restaurant supply stores (or other grocers/markets) which can legally sell wholesale product to retail consumers. Buy the big quantity, and split it with others.

        There are always ways to get around stupid regulations if one is truly starving, but far be it for me to suggest skirting the “law.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • GB Bari says:

      Actually a gallon can of normal tomato sauce can sit on a pantry shelf for many months. Only when you open it do you need to refrigerate whatever is not used. And that can even be frozen.

      Liked by 3 people

  13. theasdgamer says:

    Never Trumpers will ignore these warnings about the food chain and are refusing to take hydroxychloroquine. Death by choice. TDS can be fatal.

    Liked by 7 people

  14. JohnCasper says:

    It is comforting to know we will all be well feed as we are treated like cattle.

    Like

  15. theasdgamer says:

    And surviving Never Trumpers are blaming President Trump for the death of the lefties. Their accusations need to be addressed effectively. Only 18% of lefties would take hydroxychloroquine–President Trump has to show compassion about their deaths and how avoidable they are and how sad it is that TDS is sometimes fatal.

    (Yeah, take 220 mg of zinc daily along with your HCQ if you become hypoxic. Don’t be stupid.)

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Todd says:

    I own a small takeout business in Buffalo, NY and business has been good but my shop is an outlier compared to most. People are ordering take-out from local businesses and I get the sense that many customers are purposely ordering take-out from local businesses instead of the bigger corporate chain restaurants based on simple conversation. My customers have also been tipping me much more than usual! Comfort food is in, and I am so blessed to be able to still serve my great customers with the best subs in town! Thank you, Buffalo!

    Every morning I stop by the Restaurant Depot to pick up whatever is on my list. Lettuce, tomatoes, onions, mayo, oil, mustard, banana peppers, provolone, Swiss, American, ham, turkey, roast beef, bacon, potato salad, macaroni salad, take out containers, butter, hamburgers, steak, and more.

    The only shortage I have experienced since this all started was with shredded lettuce. Plenty of head lettuce, so no real problem. Restaurant Depot is basically like a Home Depot for small businesses. The freezer section alone is the size of a football field. But, the seafood section is shut down, and almost every Asian restaurant is closed.

    Costanzo’s Bakery is the biggest bakery in Buffalo, and they sell their product all over the East Coast. They have lost a ton of business. 3rd shift was laid off, 1st and 2nd shift got slashed in half and they are now closed on Mondays. My best friend just lost his job.

    I do not think there is a shortage of food in America. It’s like oil now; too much oil and not enough customers to consume the product. Prices have fallen. Deflation? Americans need to get back to work!

    Liked by 11 people

    • theasdgamer says:

      Todd, I hope you check the temperature of your employees when they come to work at the door.

      Like

      • I believe the Governors of Michigan and Nevada have now required this… rectally.

        These politicians turned TV doctors have determined rectal temp is more reliable.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Todd says:

        Check the temperature of my employees? Are you nuts? Should I check the temperature of my customers too?

        “Thank you, now please bend over while I check your temperature.”

        That’s not good for business, theasdgamer, and I don’t think the health department would be happy with that.

        Oh wait, I can scan their foreheads with a temperature gun instead of the anal probe.

        And then the phone rings. Sorry, time is money. Taking the temperature of my employees and customers would take hours of time that you don’t have.

        Liked by 4 people

        • JohnCasper says:

          You would never make a good fascist.

          Liked by 5 people

        • Peoria Jones says:

          What a ridiculous conclusion to draw, LOL! Please stay safe, and never leave your house. You could end up in a car accident, or getting a cold…which are much more likely.

          Liked by 1 person

          • theasdgamer says:

            Stay out of health care. Children’s day care might work for you.

            Like

            • Peoria Jones says:

              Ok, gamer. But you’re the one who wants to dictate that a guy who runs a sandwich shop stick a thermometer in his employees before they can earn a paycheck.

              (Or maybe you’d prefer to see even the drive-thru and carry-out eateries shut down, too.)

              Like

              • theasdgamer says:

                Have you been to a hospital or clinic lately? They won’t allow employees to enter if they have a fever. Nor patients unless it’s an emergency.

                It’s a health department thing. Or should be. Covid can be passed through food. Eat a sandwich that an infected employee sneezed on. Pick your nose after without washing your hands.

                Liability lawyers will make a killing targeting restaurants after the dust settles.

                Like

              • Peoria Jones says:

                Good Lord! Do you have any idea where your food comes from?

                With regard to my recent experience at the hospital, or having once sued a restaurant for food poisoning, you have no idea what you’re talking about. You are incredibly naive. (Either that, or agenda-driven.)

                I learned to skip over your comments when you showed up before, and suggest you ignore me as well. Enough.

                Like

    • Perot Conservative says:

      Todd, I loved Buffalo… lots of Italians & Poles (late 80s). Hot Canadians in a nightclub somewhere… a bar where they sell beer by the case (Brick Bar?) … architecture, history … some fancy restaurant with a carousel & lights where Mark Twain once ate? … 1st Buffalo wings … can you answer a few questions?

      Is the Westinghouse warehouse (5 Million square feet) mostly occupied?

      Has the Buffalo business industry diversified?

      Does POTUS have strong support upstate?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Todd says:

        Buffalo is a Deep Blue territory in WNY, but from my experience a lot of self professed Democrats love President Trump.

        Westinghouse warehouse? Are you talking about the $1 Billion taxpayer funded Tesla factory for solar panels?

        Buffalo business industry has diversified in many resilient ways, but it’s still a city dominated by democrats. Niagara Falls is 15 minutes north or Buffalo. One might think that Niagara Falls is a booming town full of tourists, but it’s not. All the tourists are on the Canadian side. It used to be the wedding capital, now it’s a run down town that looks and smells like crap.

        Prior to running for POTUS, Donald J. Trump wanted to buy the Buffalo Bills….the only team in the NFL that wears the Red, White, and Blue.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Zorro says:

      Does the Anchor Bar do delivery to other states ?

      Like

      • Todd says:

        I hope not. That would be gross. You can’t ship wings. By the time it gets wherever the bleu cheese would be rotten, the wings would be soggy ***not extra crispy***, and the celery and carrots would be a waste.

        Sounds like the current state of the DNC.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Snow White says:

      Do you own a Dibella’s? I miss that place. The best subs on the planet.

      Like

  17. 4sure says:

    I am surprised at the number of college grads. Not only the young ones but older ones as well who are advocating for this shutdown to continue until we have a vaccine. Talk about sheep. They have no idea about the food chain.

    Go to some college sports forums and check out the comments re. this chit show.

    Eye opener.

    I’m a huge college football fan.

    Go CLEMSON TIGERS.

    Hope we have a college football season.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Coronavirus is the only way we Buckeyes would have a chance against Clemson.

      Like

    • billrla says:

      4sure: Schools no longer teach critical, indepedent thinking. Schools teach collaboration and concensus–formerly known as conformity. Students learn to fall in line and comply for the good of the hive. Just look at how business is done, these days, and look at cloud-based business applications (formerly known as software). It’s all about “collaboration.” If you think for yourself, you will be ostracized; locked out of the system.

      Liked by 4 people

    • TarsTarkas says:

      They think food grows in stores or in restaurants. They all need to spend some time in the logistics end of stores (shipping/receiving) in order to get a better feel for all the work done behind the scenes.

      It’s a terror of death that makes them want everything to stay shut down until there is absolutely no chance of infection. Death has become so removed from the experience of many Americans that they seem to act as if it is a great and horrible evil that could be abolished by legislation. It’s part of life.

      Liked by 4 people

      • topavalley says:

        Tars,
        Thank you for this comment.
        Not only logistics of shipping and receiving, but disconnect with the nitty gritty of life and death and where does my steak, bacon, chicken sandwich come from.

        Separation from belief in God can lead to terror of death and no uproar in shutting down church services, Easter services.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Perot Conservative says:

      Snowflakes.

      Like

    • JohnCasper says:

      I guess they want to spend the rest of their lives living in mom’s basement.

      Like

    • Lulu says:

      It’s because many white collar workers are getting paid at home. They don’t have skin in the game.

      Liked by 2 people

    • jaxnix says:

      Is there a vaccine for SARS? for MERS? for HIV? No, no and no. Just a reminder, SARS and MERS are also corona virus. They’ll be confined for a good long time.

      Liked by 4 people

  18. jus wundrin says:

    Thank you for laying this out SD, it was a real education for me. I pass this info along to my friends and family, and since Im home now, Im able to compare what I am seeing here to what I was seeing in the south western states where I was staying.

    One thing that I noticed, and Im a big fan, was that the shelves containing salsa were always full along with the store made stuff in the deli area.

    Like

    • John Good says:

      I read that Sundance once was a manager at a Publix Market in Florida, so he should know what he’s talking about.

      AND, IMO that is just a “cover” for what he really did, as he has taught me about economics, politics, security, the “alphabet agencies” & many more areas in such a way that almost anyone can understand the concept.

      And, I attended University during the 70’s, but the way the professors taught, you had to be a genius to follow what they were saying. And, now that I am a genius, I still had to resort to Sundance explaining these concepts to me! LOL!

      Like

  19. Truthfilter says:

    Planted 3 acres of sweet corn and two more acres of veggies. Two thirds more than I normally plant. I’m buying mason jars. I haven’t had to “can” things my whole adult live but this year, I’ll be canning and freezing like never before. We are also buying some chickens. We’ve raised chickens before and I greatly dislike them. But at least we know how to do it.

    Liked by 9 people

  20. mandy says:

    Story from yesterday’s daily press briefing here in Nebraska:

    “The next time Nebraskans get take-out for dinner, they could also get grocery essentials like milk or toilet paper. It’s part of an effort to help local restaurants, by waiving a requirement that all food sold has to have a nutritional label.” …

    “While the food doesn’t need a traditional nutrition label, the packages must have a statement of identity, ingredients, the name and location of the food distributor, the net quantity and allergen information.

    Technically these sales could start Tuesday, but Olson said it will likely take a few days for restaurants to roll out their grocery options. They suggest you call your favorite restaurant or follow their social media pages to find out what their process will look like. ”

    more at link:

    https://www.1011now.com/content/news/Nebraskas-response-to-COVID-19-569632951.html

    I hate to say it, but I’m really impressed with Ricketts so far.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Craig Thomas Marr says:

    Scary stuff. Thank God Trump is President at least he and his team understand this stuff and have actually worked in the private sector and have some experience. Think Obama at the helm or worse yet Slow, Sleepy, Quid Pro Joe!

    Liked by 3 people

  22. keeler says:

    I’m beginning to see other, subtle signs of stress to the distribution system.

    A package arrived yesterday in a Budget Rental truck with a small FedEx decal slapped on. Clearly this was a larger model Budget Truck contracted or leased by FedEx. I have never seen this before. I assume some of the regular FedEx fleet is being redirected towards shipping non-refrigerated grocery items (like toilet paper) or medical supplies, and that Budget (which I am also assuming is not making a lot of rentals right now) is contracting out to shipping services.

    Got another package today. I place orders with this company about 2-3 times per year, and have done so for the last several years. Every prior delivery has come in a white, company-specific box. Today’s delivery came in a generic corrugated box. No big deal… a box is a box. However, it seems likely the switch is a downstream effect of the current pressures on manufacturing and distribution.

    Where am I going with this? Most people are aware the US practiced rationing during World War II. Less remembered is why: it was not a lack of food, but a lack of transportation capacity and fuel, which led to rationing. Boxes today, cans and jugs tomorrow.

    “Are we dumping milk because of greed or low demand, no. It’s the supply chain, there are only so many jug fillers, all were running 24/7 before this cluster you-know-what.

    Now demand for jug milk has almost doubled. However, restaurant demand is almost gone; NO ONE is eating out. ”

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2020/04/14/phase-five-supply-chain-with-a-message-from-a-dairy-farmer/#more-189128

    Liked by 1 person

    • TarsTarkas says:

      Rubber was a big reason for rationing. The Japanese had seized the Netherlands East Indies which was then the major source for the world’s rubber supply, and the manufacture of chemical rubber derived from oil was still in its infancy. Another rationed item was copper, needed for cartridge casings. That is why the 1943 penny was made of steel.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Lulu says:

      It’s because FedEx is busy – the contractor that owns your route had to rent a truck to put more drivers on the road. They do it at Christmas all the time. FedEx Ground doesn’t have a fleet they have thousands of contractors who own all the trucks and hire the drivers.

      Like

    • Not to argue about the milk, just an observation.

      A Landry’s steakhouse and national Italian chain are the examples. My son drinks 2-3 large styrofoam cups of milk when we eat dinner out. The bartenders have learned to bring the gallon of milk and put it in the wine or beer fridge now. It Is normally kept in the back.

      I’m thinking it’s more your Denny’s and other non-bar, restaurants who do the bagged milk thing. They did it when I was 16, working at Perkins.

      Like

    • RedBallExpress says:

      The U.S, rationed food during WWII since it was feeding half the world. Also huge amounts spoiled, were lost at sea and blown to bits. It is interesting to note that almost universally all soldiers of all countries on the front line of all wars were literally half starved while the rear echelon 1/2 mile behind the line had hot food 3 times a day and chased front line soldiers away calling them chickens. There are many very valid reasons front line solders will not discuss their service.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Kulak69 says:

        Yup – The very definition of REMF. Now consider that same ‘command economy’ template applied to the nation at large, as helpful, big gub’mint geniuses (Politics? Nah!) decide where & how to resource & distribute designated ‘essential’ assets. Hello, Soviet Union; where <10% of their ag land, finally allocated to 'personal' use, ended up feeding the whole country – sorta. And the Kommissars ate well…just sayin'…

        Like

    • TwoLaine says:

      Every empty hotel has milk and fruit juice machines sitting idle for their buffet lines. Get those into schools, or somewhere, and tell people to bring their clean jugs in to be refilled. Knock something off the price for using refillables. Problem solved.

      Like

  23. flatlandgoober says:

    Here in farm country there’s another thing in short supply. I called my local butcher shop to schedule in a steer. Usually that’s about a one week lead time. My earliest available date was end of May. I think a lot of farmers who usually sell their livestock on the hoof are making sure their freezer gets filled too. Very glad this is happening as the pastures wake up. My steers are big, fat, and hungry ALL THE TIME! If they can graze, I don’t have to put hay out.

    Liked by 7 people

  24. Tom says:

    “Ag Secretary” makes more sense than “AG Secretary.

    Like

  25. bessie2003 says:

    YouTube video interview that was posted today of a California rice farmer by Juan Brown who does the updates on the Oroville dam repair:

    Like

  26. TwoLaine says:

    Sonny is on FBN with Maria B. He says the USA will be purchasing excess food supplies instead of farmers dumping it and will send it to food banks, etc.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. TwoLaine says:

    Restaurant Depot has a special on LED “OPEN” signs for anyone who is interested. 😉

    Like

  28. TwoLaine says:

    Fighting for the Independent U.S. Cattle Producers
    R-CALF USA’s Request to President Trump in Face of Crisis

    Click to access Letter-to-President-Trump.pdf

    https://www.r-calfusa.com/about-us

    Like

  29. The RS Gadfly says:

    Definitely a multi-faceted problem most of us never think about, sorta like turning on the tap water. And this analysis was only looking at the chain issues themselves. Just saw an article about some chicken farms in the Del-MD-VA area that are going to have to start reducing flocks (killing birds without sending them to market) because processing plants have been closed for illness related reasons. This is going to be one heck of a mess when we tried to restart things.

    Like

  30. TwoLaine says:

    Sundance, can you add an Index with name and link of all your WONDERFUL Food Supply Chain articles at the end of this article, or in a separate article please?

    I want to be able to share. I am attempting to put one together right now.

    Like

  31. Jane Smith says:

    This is currently the biggest challenge we are facing. Dont really know what the future holds.

    Like

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