Despite Dire Forecasts Consumer Prices Reflect Low Inflation Even With Tariffs…

The MAGAnomic Tri-fecta: Jobs growing; wages growing; inflation stable.

When President Trump and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced tariffs on Steel and Aluminum, in combination with Round #1 tariffs on imported Chinese products, the Wall Street financial media went bananas with dire predictions of inflation.

Today the Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS) released the August measure of inflation in consumer goods.  Despite the doom-and-gloom predictions from the self-interested multinationals, the inflation rate is a low 0.2% the same result as July. Core inflation, which excludes volatile energy and food components, increased 0.1%.

As John Carney notes:

[…]  “Compared with a year ago, prices were up 2.7 percent, lower than the 2.9 percent gain in July and June. Core inflation was up 2.2 percent from a year earlier, down from 2.4 percent in July. This means the pace of inflation has slowed.”

The lower than expected rise in consumer prices was foreshadowed by the Labor Department’s report on producer prices and the Federal Reserve’s Beige Book Wednesday. Taken together, the reports indicate that fears that trade disputes and rising tariffs overstated.  (more)

Supplemental to this low inflation index, the US weekly jobless claims dropped to near 49-year low.  As CNBC was forced to admit: “The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits unexpectedly fell last week.”

(CNBC) […] Initial claims for state unemployment benefits slipped 1,000 to a seasonally adjusted 204,000 for the week ended Sept. 8, the lowest level since December 1969, the Labor Department said on Thursday. Data for the prior week was revised to show 2,000 more applications received than previously reported.

Economists polled by Reuters had forecast claims rising to 210,000 in the latest week. The claims data covered last Monday’s Labor Day holiday. Claims tend to be volatile around public holidays.

The four-week moving average of initial claims, considered a better measure of labor market trends as it irons out week-to-week volatility, fell 2,000 last week to 208,000, also the lowest level since December 1969. (read more)

Additionally, nonfarm payrolls increased by 201,000 jobs in August and annual wage growth notching its biggest gain in more than nine years.  Job openings hit an all-time high of 6.9 million in July.

Low inflation; expanding employment opportunity; low unemployment; and rising wages.

These measures all have a cumulative impact on paycheck-to-paycheck Americans.  Prices for durable goods are stable and wage growth is exceeding inflation.  That means more disposable income in the middle-class…. which, when combined with the increased pay from lower middle-class tax rates, is exactly the intended outcome of MAGAnomics.

This creates a situation where the U.S. consumer can fuel the the U.S. economy while President Trump, Secretary Ross, Secretary Mnuchin and Ambassador Robert Lighthizer utilize the leverage of tariffs, to negotiate better America-First trade deals.

President Trump’s economic policy cabinet is the most effective group of individuals every assembled in modern U.S. history; arguably in all of U.S. history.   The economic policy plans are working exactly as projected; and, in combination with the domestic economic strength, this empowers President Trump’s international engagements with a stunning amount of influence and leverage.

Economic Security is National Security.  We are seeing this multidimensional truth being carried out for the first time in our lifetimes, thanks to a blue-collar billionaire.

Part of the push-back against President Trump is due to the success within this doctrine for domestic and international success.  Politicians and the political apparatus of the administrative state are apoplectic that a long-held economic curtain has been dropped by President Trump and his policy team.

It is this easy.

It is common sense.

We have not had the benefit of this economic success in the past 40 years because corrupt multinational interests were paying and bribing -via lobbyists- politicians and public officials within the administrative state to block independent U.S. wealth.

Wilburine, keeping it simple!

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, Donald Trump, Economy, Election 2018, energy, media bias, President Trump, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

88 Responses to Despite Dire Forecasts Consumer Prices Reflect Low Inflation Even With Tariffs…

  1. dd_sc says:

    I hope those last two images show up in GOP campaign ads.

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Great job, Sundance!
    We’ve been waiting for this.
    Message to the Fed: Knock off the BS Interest Rate hikes.
    … Or invite President Trump and the Deplorables to TERMINATE your Gravy Train!

    Liked by 19 people

    • FL_GUY says:

      You wrote: Message to the Fed: Knock off the BS Interest Rate hikes

      Absolutely!!!!!!! Fed, stop trying to stop the USA economical recovery with your BS Globullist policies!

      Liked by 6 people

    • NvMtnOldMan says:

      BKR===do you or SD or anybody have all the charts that Hassert had the Ssrah press briefing the other day. A condensed version that I could download and send to lots of people would be a great help. Thanks

      Liked by 3 people

    • cthulhu says:

      Interest rates have to climb into historic norms.

      Looked at a certain way, interest rates are the economy’s tool for perceiving the difference between smart and stupid courses of action. It used to be that corporate investments were measured by IRR (Internal Rate of Return), which was meant to steer resources toward more useful projects and away from idiotic ones.

      As an example, low interest rates on student loans make it more plausible to run up a $100,000 debt in pursuit of a “race-neutral genderqueer studies” degree rather than an MD.

      I’m not talking about 16%+ like the seventies, but interest rates need to climb into the 5% range so that the economy becomes more efficient.

      Liked by 1 person

      • That’s an ABSURD argument.

        The private sector is perfectly capable of setting its OWN interest rates.

        Student loans are a RIDICULOUS straw man. All we need do is require schools to INSURE the students they take on against STUDENT DEBT DEFAULT.

        Liked by 3 people

        • WSB says:

          Bravo, BKR!!!! And simpler. Student loans need to go back into private loan services. Get the Fed out of student loans, and the indoctrination centers no longer have their money laundering financing from within government control.

          Better. Close down brick and mortar universities and colleges, by only granting loans for online college alternates if the Feds insist maintaining student loans under ‘gubmint’ control.

          Many ways to skin the cat.

          Liked by 3 people

        • cthulhu says:

          “ABSURD” or not, it happens to be correct. Interest rates force inefficient choices to be liquidated, and are thus good for an economy. They also serve to prioritize resources into endeavors where they are likely to do the most good, which is also good for an economy.

          Your next sentence, however, seems to indicate where we get to arguing about semantics in an area where I suspect we both agree. You say, “The private sector is perfectly capable of setting its OWN interest rates.” — and I would say, “yes, yes, it is perfectly capable…..but it isn’t now doing it today, because the Federal Reserve has its thumb on the scale.”

          If we were to discuss whether an American Central Bank is a good idea, I believe that one of our greatest Presidents was Andrew Jackson, and one of the greatest political documents in our history is https://millercenter.org/the-presidency/presidential-speeches/july-10-1832-bank-veto — it’s last four paragraphs ring forth with knell of Truth as surely as the beginning of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

          The history of central banking in the US begins with the Bank of North America, chartered 12/31/1781. It was succeeded by the First Bank of the United States in 1791 over the objections of Jefferson and Madison, but with the support of Hamilton, that guy on a $10 bill. The 20-year charter of the First Bank of the United States was allowed to run out in 1811, but on 4/10/1816 — with the fresh memory of the War of 1812 — the Second Bank of the United States was chartered. Jackson pounded a stake through its heart with his 7/10/1832 veto speech (mentioned above), and the nation subsequently managed to survive a massive Civil War and unprecedented postwar industrial development WITHOUT A CENTRAL BANK. [Note that without a central bank, you have natural interest rates set by the private sector.]

          The Federal Reserve system we have today is, effectively, the Third Bank of the United States. It has become even more evil and corrupt than the Second Bank against which Jackson so eloquently spoke. It has been going since 12/23/1913, which means that it has outlasted both previous national banks, as well as the 80 year period where we wisely lived without.

          Over the last decade or so, the Federal Reserve has suppressed interest rates. This has, as I noted before, suppressed the market’s primary tool for discerning the bright from the stupid. Solyndra, bullet trains to nowhere, student loans, sports stadiums, ramping up the national debt, various corporate mergers…..they weren’t good ideas, but there wasn’t a ruler to measure how stupid they were because interest rates didn’t reflect reality. The Federal Reserve grabbed the handle of interest rates and twisted, hard.

          But if they just let go, there will be horrific snapbacks. Better that the Federal Reserve use their power to move interest rates nearer to their organic values, as reflected in historic norms, before letting go the lever that moves them. It’s not right that they have the powers they have — but it wasn’t right to distort market forces so much in the first place — and it’s better that that they attempt to “put things back” before relinquishing those powers.

          Liked by 3 people

          • MB224 says:

            Excellent summary. I’m reading about the semi-traitor/monarchist Hamilton right now in an excellent biography on Madison, who without question should be on the 50 or the 100. He was more important than anyone but Washington to our Foundation, and it could be argued he was more important after the Revolutionary War.

            Liked by 2 people

          • cthulhu says:

            I’m just going to put it here, because it is so inspiring:

            “It is to be regretted that the rich and powerful too often bend the acts of government to their selfish purposes. Distinctions in society will always exist under every just government. Equality of talents, of education, or of wealth can not be produced by human institutions. In the full enjoyment of the gifts of Heaven and the fruits of superior industry, economy, and virtue, every man is equally entitled to protection by law; but when the laws undertake to add to these natural and just advantages artificial distinctions, to grant titles, gratuities, and exclusive privileges, to make the rich richer and the potent more powerful, the humble members of society–the farmers, mechanics, and laborers–who have neither the time nor the means of securing like favors to themselves, have a right to complain of the injustice of their Government. There are no necessary evils in government. Its evils exist only in its abuses. If it would confine itself to equal protection, and, as Heaven does its rains, shower its favors alike on the high and the low, the rich and the poor, it would be an unqualified blessing. In the act before me there seems to be a wide and unnecessary departure from these just principles.

            Nor is our Government to be maintained or our Union preserved by invasions of the rights and powers of the several States. In thus attempting to make our General Government strong we make it weak. Its true strength consists in leaving individuals and States as much as possible to themselves–in making itself felt, not in its power, but in its beneficence; not in its control, but in its protection; not in binding the States more closely to the center, but leaving each to move unobstructed in its proper orbit.

            Experience should teach us wisdom. Most of the difficulties our Government now encounters and most of the dangers which impend over our Union have sprung from an abandonment of the legitimate objects of Government by our national legislation, and the adoption of such principles as are embodied in this act. Many of our rich men have not been content with equal protection and equal benefits, but have besought us to make them richer by act of Congress. By attempting to gratify their desires we have in the results of our legislation arrayed section against section, interest against interest, and man against man, in a fearful commotion which threatens to shake the foundations of our Union. It is time to pause in our career to review our principles, and if possible revive that devoted patriotism and spirit of compromise which distinguished the sages of the Revolution and the fathers of our Union. If we can not at once, in justice to interests vested under improvident legislation, make our Government what it ought to be, we can at least take a stand against all new grants of monopolies and exclusive privileges, against any prostitution of our Government to the advancement of the few at the expense of the many, and in favor of compromise and gradual reform in our code of laws and system of political economy.

            I have now done my duty to my country. If sustained by my fellow-citizens, I shall be grateful and happy; if not, I shall find in the motives which impel me ample grounds for contentment and peace. In the difficulties which surround us and the dangers which threaten our institutions there is cause for neither dismay nor alarm. For relief and deliverance let us firmly rely on that kind Providence which I am sure watches with peculiar care over the destinies of our Republic, and on the intelligence and wisdom of our countrymen. Through His abundant goodness and their patriotic devotion our liberty and Union will be preserved.”

            Liked by 1 person

          • https://www.globalresearch.ca/who-owns-the-federal-reserve/10489

            Lets not forget who owned the 2nd Bank of the US- and who owns the 3rd Bank Of The US. Central Banks are a Rothschild cabal and the biggest larceny by conversion scam ever invented.

            The maxim that Rothschilds laid down as fundamental: “Let us control the money of a country and we care not who makes its laws.”

            CONgress is bought and paid for with printed money. This is (one reason) why seemingly rational and and relatively decent men go to DC and “flip”. Every man has his price and a fully funded private account with an unimaginable sum in it can bend the staunchest man’s resolve.

            Liked by 1 person

      • Sucker MC says:

        Higher interest rates encourage savings by average Americans. Good! Low interest rates promote debt. Bad! There is a real rate that market forces will settle at without outside forces and manipulation. END THE FED!

        Liked by 2 people

        • cthulhu says:

          You and I could get along….

          Like

        • California Joe says:

          Low interest rates encourage investment by corporations and individuals. High interest rates hinder private development and investment which would have created jobs and increased tax revenues!

          Like

          • cthulhu says:

            Interest rates are the knife that separate worthwhile projects from those that merely look good. Low interest rates encourage investment in random projects that may never pay off; higher interest rates hinder stupid projects that will never yield benefits.

            Like

          • Sucker MC says:

            Building economies through savings vs debts is an economy built on a sound foundation. The borrower is slave to the lender. Check out Roger Garrison’s business cycle lecture. Hope you’ll enjoy.

            Like

    • 6x47 says:

      The Fed is returning interest rates to normal, market levels.

      Central banks have kept interest rates artificially low (zero, even negative) since the 2008 financial crisis, to stimulate the economy by flooding it with money to keep insolvent institutions liquid.

      The benefits have accrued primarily to the banking and finance sector – “Wall Street”, not “Main Street”.

      But now that Trump has restored sanity to economic policy the Fed can back off their mad money printing.

      Like

  3. covfefe99 says:

    Fantastic choice of Ross picture. 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

  4. Sundance:
    Please confirm what the Manufacturing Renaissance chart is measuring.
    I assume it’s Jobs Created.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Pam says:

    When you read all of the good news above, you know the dems know it and are shaking like a leaf. They know all of this is good news for the administration and most importantly for the country.

    Liked by 8 people

    • fleporeblog says:

      They absolutely know!

      I keep sharing day in and day out how well the Economic Train 🚂 and our country is doing! There is nothing that the Big Club, Coc, Koch Brothers, MSM Democrats, RINOs etc. can do to stop it.

      Keep enjoying the hell out of the ride!

      From the article linked above:

      Initial jobless claims and the 4-week average for the week ending September 8 both fell again to their lowest levels since December 6, 1969.

      Don’t ever forget when folks go to vote, they live by the motto; Money talks and BS walks!

      From the article linked above:

      That recession driven grimness hanging over the workplace has lifted and now workers of all shades are feeling good about their future.

      A new survey provided to Secrets said that 72 percent of blue collar workers and 76 percent of white collar workers are optimistic about their future.

      What’s more, half feel that it would be easy to find another job if they needed or wanted to.

      Liked by 8 people

      • Yes and let’s be honest, the mass consumer market, once healthy, is a tremendous engine to drive housing, consumer spending, and bolster social security and tax receipts. And, maybe, improve the birth dearth too.
        This is what happens when you combine government that understands more than one level of the economy, understands how business decisions are made, and actually CARES about the American people.

        Liked by 5 people

  6. covfefe999 says:

    Fantastic choice of Ross picture. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Duke of Cumberland says:

    Wilburine holding up that soup can putting it all into perspective every time they howl “but but trade war, inflation, aaaahh!”. No surprise here though at CTH.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. The Boss says:

    These numbers will improve once we scuttle NAFTA, sign the deal with Mexico and let the Canadian Amateur Government twist in the wind.

    Liked by 6 people

  9. DanO64 says:

    This is winning.

    Liked by 2 people

    • GB Bari says:

      Well gee, Dan, I’m not so sure.

      According to Rush, CNN breathlessly announced earlier today that their latest favorite poll of likely voters has the D’s up 10 points over the R’s (52% to 42%), so that means the House will definitely turn blue in November.

      I guess we should all just give up after that announcement. /s

      So they aren’t shaking like leaves, they are simply recycling their bag of tired, old, worn out “tricks” in a thinly transparent attempt fool the Republican and pro-Trump voters into giving up.

      Problem for the Left is, that’s not going to happen.

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Timothy says:

    I have read that pre fed, a dollar would appreciate in value over time. Deflation, not inflation, was the norm.

    I expect that Trump knows this and will get us there.

    Like

    • SharkDiver says:

      Uhhhh, no. Time value of money is a corner stone of economics. Would you really want to continue losing value in your home the longer you lived in it?

      Like

    • cthulhu says:

      Deflation was the norm in developing industries, while slight inflation was the norm in developed ones.

      Take televisions. Around 1980, I bought a 13″ Sony Trinitron tube TV for about $300. According to inflation statistics, that $300 is worth $917.50 today. On Walmart, $300 (today) will buy you a 55″ Sharp 4K LED flatscreen. Any questions as to whether there has been deflation in TVs?

      Compare this to a one acre lot near a city. It might have been $10,000 in 1980, which would be a tad over $30,000 today — but it’s probably now valued at over $100,000.

      A large part of the dichotomy is confusion between monetary effects, organic effects, regulatory effects, and technological effects — and calling the net result “inflation” or “deflation”.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Dutchman says:

        Riddle me this, batman; 2 sectors of the economyhousing and college tuitions.
        BOTH have consistently, for many years, risen at rates much greater than inflation.
        Both financed they Government loans.
        “I’m from the Government, here to help”

        Liked by 2 people

        • cthulhu says:

          Yep. Government distortions are absolutely the key to understanding malinvestment. Organic, market-based investment self-corrects; government malinvestment persists as long as the ideology-based virtue-signaling does.

          Liked by 1 person

  11. listingstarboard says:

    This is so wonderful for Americans! Praying that the Dems don’t retake the House or Senate and undo all of President Trumps successes–

    Like

  12. Minnie says:

    Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’, keep that train a-rollin’ –

    M🇺🇸A🇺🇸G🇺🇸A!!!!!

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Tony in LA says:

    Damn that Obama is good /s

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Arrest Soros says:

    That pic of Wilburine rivals Andy Warhol classic art.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. California Joe says:

    With inflation so low and below the Fed’s inflation target why are the saboteurs on the Federal Reserve Board trying to kill the economic recovery by continuing pounding the table to increase interest rates?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Big Jake says:

      Deficits. They want to foster the narrative that tax cuts reduce revenue and balloon our national debt.

      Liked by 1 person

    • LafnH20 says:

      Why do we have a Federal Reserve in the 1st place….🤔

      Is the ??

      Liked by 2 people

      • gerkenstein says:

        To (try to) bail out socialists after their policies kick in.

        Like

      • Stillwater says:

        Also, it helps them fund the warfare/welfare machine. It’s easier for politicians to “print money” for their agendas than to tell the public they are going to raise taxes. So instead of taking your dollars on the front end (in taxes… which they often do anyway), they devalue the purchasing power of your dollar so it takes more of them to buy goods or services.

        Not only that, the devaluation isn’t equal across the economy because the politically connected industries who get “first use” of the “quantitative easing” don’t feel the devaluation pinch as much because it takes a while for the effect to be reflected in prices.

        It might be worth noting at this point that in the early part of the last century the term “inflation” use to mean “the increase in the money supply” but clever big government economists (keynesians, etc.) change the common use and defined it in terms of “an increase in the price of goods or services”. They do this to distract from why prices are increasing… which is because they are increasing the money supply. So more dollars chasing after the same number of goods, which is reflected in the price.

        Interesting sidenote: Trump has a portrait of President Andrew Jackson(who shut down the 2nd Bank of the US) in the Oval Office.

        “I killed the bank.” ~ Andrew Jackson

        Liked by 1 person

        • cthulhu says:

          “The way to crush the bourgeoisie is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation.” — Vladimir Lenin

          ….and you can’t easily do that unless you have a central bank.

          Liked by 1 person

    • cthulhu says:

      As discussed above, interest rates are the line between “smart” and “stupid”. The higher the interest rate, the brighter the line. It has been national policy to maintain artificially low interest rates for the last decade…..so that other national policies weren’t immediately identified as “stupid”.

      Like

  16. Big Jake says:

    Meanwhile the media has been beating the drum about a deficit increase.

    Like they really care.

    Dang interest rate hikes.

    Like

  17. TexasDude says:

    The Great Recession officially ended in the summer of 2009!

    What we experienced under Obama was an unprecedented, in firsts and in length, was the Great Anemic Recovery.

    All it took was for a brash, former registered Democrat from
    New York City to obtain the Republican nomination for President and the entire economic dynamic of the US changed almost overnight.

    Heck, Trump has out conservative supposed conservatives.

    Liked by 3 people

  18. My son-in-law’s wages are up from $15 to $19 since January. He was a hillary supporter and still insists that Mr. Trump is a bad guy.
    Funny guy!

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerkenstein says:

      That ain’t funny, that’s downright sad. Hopefully he has to work OT on election day.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      “wages are up from $15 to $19 since January.”

      I would remind him that the democrats fought the tax cuts and are proposing more to take that money away from him. (After all, he did not earn it /s). the democrats had a disproportional blame in why we are trillions in debt because of government spending, so you son-in-law should be expected to bail them out.

      Liked by 2 people

  19. dissonant1 says:

    Sundance, Good News indeed! Your long ago predictions are coming true. The disconnect between Wall Street and Main Street is and has been real. Thank you very much for your educating a lot of us lay people as to what to expect.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Fantastic President Trump and Mr Ross, keep winning Thank you,🇺🇸👍❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Angel Martin says:

    I’d say the risk is much more toward deflation, and also a stock market bubble. Trump’s tariffs go against those two risks.

    This change in trade policy is decades overdue. But, by the Grace of God, it is occurring at just the right time to keep things going strong when blue collar workers, and others so hard hit by globalist “free trade”, are starting to prosper again.

    Pray for President Trump !

    Like

  22. Kokanee says:

    POTUS Trump is so great that he is making hurricane Florence weaken. Eye wall is down, winds at 100 MPH. Is this a great President or what?

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Thinker says:

    I heard today on the radio that Target will hire 120,000 seasonal workers. FedEx will hire 55,000. That is a medium size city. On top of a tight labor market, wages will probably have to be higher to attract temp workers. Working even part time will improve previously unemployed workers job skills. I feel sure Walmart and other retailers will all hire more seasonal workers. More jobs means more tax revenue and less federal jobless assistance. Wow, this economy is going to set records!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Davenh says:

    Off topic I apologize, however massive shit show north of Boston right now. Three communities, several natural gas explosions. https://www.facebook.com/1394636377430162/posts/2394273584133098/
    https://mobile.twitter.com/i/moments/1040350057176825857
    https://mobile.twitter.com/NBCNews/status/1040373704167833600

    Liked by 1 person

    • Minnie says:

      Dear God 🙏🏼

      No one with landlines should be using their home phones 😐

      Whoever recommended calling loved ones in the affected area, with even a hint of natural gas being present, it may cause an explosion.

      Also, often one cannot smell gas, they need to evacuate pronto.

      Praying for all involved.

      Cannot even imagine the degree of litigation on this one!

      Like

  25. Davenh says:

    Several thousand evacuated, fbi on scene.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. jackphatz says:

    For us fixed income recipients, many of who suffered through the Obama years of no growth, no COLA increases, we’re still behind in trying to keep up with the the over riding cost of living. We’re not going to have much fun watching you all if Trump does not do something to even out the playing field Obama plowed under. I’ll take 1980 please!

    Liked by 1 person

    • GB Bari says:

      Trust me, Jack, you don’t want anything that replicates any part of the economy in 1980.

      I lived through it. it was Not good.

      Check this out for background (quick read):
      https://www.investopedia.com/articles/economics/09/1970s-great-inflation.asp

      Liked by 1 person

      • jackphatz says:

        Good read, thanks for posting that. You know, I was racking my brain trying to remember the economy of the early 1980’s. Then I remembered buying a house for too much and closing at 13% interest! Funny what you forget.
        I wasn’t into politics then, still angry over Vietnam. I liked Reagan but didn’t really pay attention until Ole Man Bush scared the crap out of me with his talk of New World Order.

        Liked by 1 person

        • GB Bari says:

          Yep. My sister had to accept 16% on a mortgage with 20% down. And although I was “paying attention” (or so I thought), I completely missed the ominous implications of the talk about the NWO. Thought it was just a phrase describing a reset in global politics that had a more positive outcome for everyone. At least that’s how they “sold” it. Took a decade of the effects of NAFTA to really wake me up to what they were really talking about.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Kenji says:

        My 12.5% mortgage utterly destroyed any chance I had at a REAL COLA. And I thought myself lucky with my 12.5% 5-1 ARM … since the going rate for 30-year mortgages was 16%. Thanks Jimmy Carter! The only US President WORSE than Obama.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Kenji says:

        Hey Obama! Jimmy Carter called and he wants his economy back. Ohhhhh yeahhhh … Obama had a “magic” FED … to artificially ensure Obama became a “magic” half-negro. Here Obama … 8-years of 0% interest … oh, and go ahead … DOUBLE the $10T National Debt. in exchange foe cash for clunkers and shovel ready jobs.

        Liked by 1 person

  27. MAGADJT says:

    I would never presume to second guess VSG political instincts. However, I do wish he would try and create some sort of transfer property between the crossover dems that voted for him, and the GOP house and senate candidates.

    I’d love to see him come out and say “Look, I know a lot of you that voted for me may have never voted for a republican congressional candidate in your life, and it is hard to change old habits. But even if you don’t like them, even if you have to hold your nose, I need you to vote for them. If we don’t keep a republican congress, everything I’m trying to do for you will be stopped. We can’t let that happen.”

    I think that would get a lot of traction with historic dem voters that also support VSG.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. I remember when Obama was President first 2 years. Gas and food prices increasing at Venezuela like levels. No one knew where they
    were going to get hit next. The SWAMP claimed it was out of his control… which was complete BS.

    This is night and day, MAGA.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Kenji says:

    I’m simply curious … because I am not a economic expert … how can we simultaneously expect wages to rise and inflation to remain flat? Are we expecting that the noble business owners will simply eat the increased costs of production, and not pass on the increased costs to the consumer? Isn’t that what we yell at all the $15/hr min. wage people? That businesses will have to increase costs which they will pass on to the consumer? Or is that ONLY true for min. wage jobs?

    Like

  30. Super Elite says:

    Chicken Soup for the Soul.

    Like

  31. siobhan albright says:

    ideology of trump is GNP(influx variety of diverse jobs/business start from scratch)=consumers happy, but endless illegals abusing welfare+excessive monopoly=consumer punished even with cheap outsourced products. dem love raising taxes/inflation to bribe foreigners/gov employees. govener brown love only keeping law makers like himself one sided happy with 2 consecutive pension increase during already high taxes. he could of lower inflation/tax! somebody should tell GOP to attack the many dem flawed logic

    Like

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