President Trump Delivers Remarks During White House Opioid Summit…

Earlier today First Lady Melania Trump and Senior Policy Adviser Kellyanne Conway held a summit on the opioid epidemic at the White House (videos below).  At the conclusion of the meeting, President Trump delivered closing remarks:

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Full video of the summit is below:

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53 Responses to President Trump Delivers Remarks During White House Opioid Summit…

  1. Ziiggii says:

    Liked by 7 people

    • dalethorn says:

      My sister was a bad case for decades. Amazingly, she made it to 60. It was very hard on her 4 daughters during those years. Her need for pain treatments and medication was due to back surgery removing a couple of discs. That runs in our family, so I can see millions of people at risk of getting dependent on narcotics and synthetics.

      Liked by 9 people

  2. Richard Wicks says:

    The biggest drug runners today are the US intelligence agencies. Do you think it’s a coincidence that in 2001 Afghanistan produced 3% of the world’s illegal opium supply, and that’s been increased to 85%, under US occupation, AND the US has an opium epidemic?

    The government is entirely corrupt. If you can’t see this by NOW, you’ll never be able to see it. 95% of the Federal government are just go-along-to-get-along criminals.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Tired Mom says:

      Richard, I completely agree with you, and I would add that the recent push to legalize pot is also a part of this plan to render us helpless. Who is easier to control than a doper who is happy lying on the couch, eating his Doritos. As long as the stoners can get their pot and their snacks, they are compliant. The idea that pot is not much different than alcohol is a total lie. It attacks the myelin sheath of the nerve endings in growing kids, causing nerve damage and stunting brain development. If someone has a likelihood of eventually developing a mental disorder, pot use will make the disorder come on earlier in life, and with a vengeance. Our local hospital has seen a rash of teens with dissociative disorder, and guess what they all have in common? Pot smoking. It just drives me nuts to see teens and twenty-somethings smoking weed, and worse, smoking it with their parents. So irresponsible and dangerous.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Richard Wicks says:

        Pot?

        OK, I can tell you have never used that particular hallucinogenic so I’m going to explain the effects of it are – in small doses, not for wake and bake stoners.

        Cannabis’ effects on a normal, sane person, increases empathy and awareness to the point of confusion. It increases creativity at the expense of decreasing the ability to concentrate or do detailed work.

        When I was in college, I would use cannabis at maximum once a week. During my senior year in electrical and computer engineering (fun year!) I had a very interesting project – make a VLSI computer chip, from the ground up. I would smoke on Saturday, come up with a ton of ideas, wake up on Sunday, realize most of the ideas were stupid, and during the week, I would implement the good ideas. My professor thought I was a genius.

        I live and work in Silicon Valley now, and I’d say at least 1/2 the population has smoked at one point or another. Cannabis today is insanely strong.

        The reason it’s banned is that police departments which had a large number of police dedicated to prohibition needed some sort of job to do, and the effects of the hallucinogen allows in lower doses allows you to be more open to ideas that you’d normally simply reject. Ideas like, the United States Federal government is running opium for profit.

        Sometime I want to warn you about – if you meet somebody who is violent on cannabis, that person is a psychopath. There was some kids back in Indiana 20 years ago who were catching neighborhood pets and burning them alive by caging them and then spraying them with lit aerosol cans (the propellant is flammable.) Those kids used cannabis, and they are dangerous to society.

        Now there might be stoners who are perfectly happy to munch of Doritos and lie around watching television. The last time *I* got stoned, I read Propaganda by Edward Bernays from cover to cover.

        I would NOT recommend that children use the drug. I also don’t recommend you use it more than once a week. You cannot and should not operate a car on it. You shouldn’t mix it with alcohol.

        The first time I used pot was in college, at 21. I stopped using it with any regularity in my late 20’s.

        Years ago, I used to hang out with my cousin about once a month walking with my dogs through the many bike paths in Silicon Valley. We would smoke, I’d get my two dogs (Samoyeds), and we’d go walking for 12 hours discussing politics, engineering, science, etc, and end up at a nice Mexican place to eat. I’d dote over my dogs the entire time letting them determine the pace and sometimes even direction, and when I was in this state, I was the nicest, most generous person imaginable, and the effects when you’re in nature is to appreciate just about everything.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Tired Mom says:

          I’m glad you are nice when stoned, but not everyone is. As you said, today’s pot is MUCH stronger than in the past. And those kids in Indiana, the psychopaths you talked about? That was probably pot-induced psychosis, whether you want to admit it or not. I don’t care what you say, it is bad for you. I hope you don’t smoke it anymore. I hope you don’t tell your kids — or anyone else’s— that it is A-OK to smoke it.

          Also, I can enjoy nature, a walk with my two awesome mutts, have deep, soul-baring conversationsations with people I love, open my mind to new ideas and have the occasional, amazing epiphany (usually while in prayer) —all without being high. I wish the same you.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Tired Mom says:

            I wish the same FOR you.

            Like

          • Richard Wicks says:

            “I’m glad you are nice when stoned, but not everyone is.”

            Then they are dangerously psychotic in my estimation. The idea of hurting anybody, or even anything, is entirely repulsive to me when I’m in that state of mind, to an extreme. This is probably because I am not a sadistic person. When you’re under the influence of cannabis, everything is more “intense”. If you normally like music, you love music, if you’re normally kind, you’re kinder – but again, it’s at the expense of a temporary if not drastic reduction in intelligence.

            “I hope you don’t tell your kids — or anyone else’s— that it is A-OK to smoke it.”

            I wouldn’t recommend anybody try a drug, and I would actively discourage anybody below at least college level from using it.

            “Also, I can enjoy nature, a walk with my two awesome mutts, have deep, soul-baring conversationsations with people I love, open my mind to new ideas and have the occasional, amazing epiphany (usually while in prayer) —all without being high.”

            I didn’t say you NEED it, it just intensifies your feelings, again, at the expense of dumping your intelligence for a period of time.

            Remember when you were a kid and an hour seemed like FOREVER? When you were waiting for dinner at 7, and dinner would be ready “soon”, in “about an hour”, and this seemed like an eternity? That’s another effect of it.

            Maybe the best way to describe the effects, is that it temporarily makes you feel like a child again.

            One thing that really irritates me about the propaganda against pot, is that it’s so false. But the propaganda against other drugs, isn’t anywhere near as false. For people who try it, they realize that everything the media has said about it, is just a complete lie, and they assume that they are similarly lying about all the drugs. THEY AREN’T. Meth will kill you, heroin can almost be instantly addictive and cocaine turns you into a horrible person.

            Those drugs, stay away from. The ONLY drug I think might be reasonably ok, is pot, and in moderation.

            Like

            • Tired Mom says:

              WHAT propaganda against pot? I only see/hear propaganda FOR it.

              Like

              • Richard Wicks says:

                I don’t know, perhaps times have changed since I still watched television 20 years ago.

                I do occasionally take the bus to work, and there’s plenty of advertisements there and at the bus stops against it.

                You can find a film called “Reefer Madness” which was the sort of propaganda against it before I was born. It’s a tradition for many engineers in my field to get stoned and watch it, when they are still in college. Same with 2001 A Space Odyssey.

                I don’t care to argue about this because…. I really don’t care.

                Keeping pot illegal just makes a monopoly for distributors who pay off cops, bribe border guards, and are well connected with the intelligence agencies. Do you think a PLANT would sell for $100 an ounce if it was legal? The mafia doesn’t want to lose their monopoly on distribution.

                Like

        • I smoked pot in college and on and off again in my 20’s..also hash…I have similar experience as yours….very pleasant, lots of good, no bad. I have not smoked in many many years and have no desire to smoke. I think it should be legal.

          However, I do have friends who have smoked daily for nearly 50 years, and it does affect the brain over that time period. Hey, my friends still work…and function,etc…but there is a degenerative effect on the brain. They are not criminals, they have not moved on to hard drugs…all of that is simply not true. But, I do not find myself interested in being around them…something just silly and off…but to each his own…not as bad as alcohol…although, very bad for the gums….must be the smoke…and probably the lungs, smoke is smoke.

          Like

          • Richard Wicks says:

            I’ve smoked too much before, that’s bad. I tend to get paranoid and that’s very unpleasant but that’s only when I smoke too much. For me, it actually seemed to increase my motivation at school, later at work and just general self improvement.

            The last time I smoked was about a year ago when my cousin was visiting. I hadn’t smoked in years. What is produced today is nuts compared to what was available in college. I had a very bad time on that.

            I’m really too old for it I think anymore, and what is made today is just far too strong. This is a common complaint from a lot of people who only occasionally smoked in my age group and above “please, can I get something weaker?”

            And I’m not surprised you have older friends that might be having problems after 50 years, given how insanely strong it’s been made today through decades of trying to increase the THC in it which they’ve been very successful at.

            I had a friend years ago that gave me a medical hash brownie for helping him move or something. I had several days off so I was like “why not?”. I took a SLIVER, less than 5% of it, and ate it – was stoned to such a degree I couldn’t sleep that night, remained stoned through most of the next day, and returned the rest of it. That was awful.

            It’s like I want to have a beer, ONE BEER, not a bottle of EverClear, but EverClear is all that is offered. It’s just about impossible to control the dosage to reduce it to something reasonable for me today.

            And I agree, it ought to be legalized – and now is in my state of California, for recreational use.

            Like

        • Charlie says:

          “I would NOT recommend that children use the drug. I also don’t recommend you use it more than once a week. You cannot and should not operate a car on it. You shouldn’t mix it with alcohol.”
          You sound like pharmaceutical company doing the CYA on products that have major side effects.
          Here, finished your warning label to CTH readers,
          “seek medical help is any of these symptoms occur”.
          Sad commentary. May your kids nor people you love follow your advice.

          Like

          • Tired Mom says:

            EXACTLY.

            Like

          • Richard Wicks says:

            Hahaha!

            Hey, anything I said about pot, would you recommend with alcohol? Where’s the “bad advice” I gave?

            Because there’s so many outright lies told about cannabis, when people do try it, have a tendency to think it’s absolutely harmless. I would say it’s about as debilitating as alcohol, and anything you shouldn’t do on alcohol, you shouldn’t do on pot.

            Furthermore, if you drink before smoking pot, you have a very high possibility of blackout if you’re considerably drunk. The reverse is not true, if you’re high and go out drinking, you will be well aware when you’ve had too much to drink. One beneficial effect of smoking is you’re *very* aware of everything – but you also have diminished mental facilities. You’re not going to do any good work while stoned or serious thinking.

            I’m just saying, people who rage against cannabis, know absolutely nothing about it.

            I’m also absolutely serious about how many engineers in Silicon Valley have used it. Why do you think there’s been so much creativity from this area?

            I think this is the real reason the government fears legalization, it makes it a lot easier to think outside of the box.

            Like

            • Charlie says:

              “I’m just saying, people who rage against cannabis, know absolutely nothing about it.”
              Ignorant blanket statement.

              Creativity coming from Silicon Valley???
              Google, Facebook et al are throwing huge red PARANOID flags. Censoring, collecting ALL data from consumers and it goes on and on. Yea, creativity! lol funny.
              Looks like silicon valley is having their own creativity overdose.

              Like

        • Hoosier says:

          In college I was literally a wake and baker. Graduated in 3 years with a 3.9 on a 4 point scale in a pretty tough subject. While there my room-mate who was a finance major was studying for his series 7. He called me a wasteoid. I said OK give me those books and I will beat your ass on the test. Waked and baked and got into it. Took the test a week later and he wasn’t even ready yet and I outscored him by 8 points when he finally took it. He had studied six for months. Went on to trade commodities and corner a market, a really small one, but my opposition was Conagra, again as a wake and baker. Taught myself how to program and then wrote a extremely small but insanely profitable industry’s standard software package, again as a wake and baker. Have not worked much in many years and no longer care for pot. My hypothesis is it depends on brain chemistry. Some people want Doritos on the couch and some get fire in their belly. When high all I wanted to do was read and work. Today I have hobbies.

          Liked by 1 person

      • dalethorn says:

        Democratic Opportunity (as in Democrat party).

        Like

    • frankie says:

      And the biggest killers of blacks are taxpayer funded Planned Parenthood abortionists.

      The auther or howtobeypurowndetective.com strikes again in terms of a sarcastic, true, and raunchy post about Planned Parenthood this evening.

      His post “The Devil In Margaret Sanger” is the R-rated true story of the racist bisexual b-word who got Planned Parenthood going

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Sharon says:

    He never explains why he uses the term “accidental overdose”. Accidental would mean that someone emptied out the Ibuprofen bottle and replaced the contents with opioids, and he didn’t know what he was putting in his mouth. Is that what happened?

    It’s convenient to call something accidental that was most likely deliberate. Unless someone forced his son to take the pills or they were in a mislabeled bottle, it would appear that he swallowed them on purpose.

    It doesn’t change the tragedy of the young man’s death.

    It just doesn’t help the situation to use language that masks the reality that choices were made by an individual that resulted in that individual’s death. Murky language reduces the likelihood of effective solutions.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Sharon says:

      Maybe he didn’t use the term “accidental overdose” – but that is what it’s labeled in the note –

      Like

    • goddessoftheclassroom says:

      “Unintentional” May be more apt.

      Liked by 3 people

      • redridge45 says:

        Agree, still addicts know what pills and powders get them high, they know when they will run out of it, too (need more). Often someone will get out of rehab, relapse and use the same amount of drug that they were used to before; they OD because their tolerance is lower after detox. Most detox is only 5 – 7 days, so if they think they are cured and they go back out, it is very dangerous. It takes much longer for their brain to understand they are not well yet. It’s sad. Ruins everything it touches.

        Liked by 3 people

    • AngelOnejudicial says:

      Agreed. Buying illegal drugs laced with illicit fetanyl analogs smuggled in through our southern border is not a problem solved by going after physicians or pharmaceutical companies. It’s a cartel southern border problem and FYI 99% of overdoses are accidental by definition as unless someone is suicidal they’re not intending to die. Obviously taking illegal drugs is a bad idea.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Tired Mom says:

        Angel, agree that fentanyl-laced drugs are a huge problem. A college boy with whom we are acquainted nearly died when he snorted cocaine, but found out later — after a heart attack and nearly dying — that it was laced with fentanyl. China is making it and sending it to Mexico. I wish President Trump would get tough with China AND Mexico on this.

        I would also like to see a massive anti-drug campaign in the schools. Does anyone remember Nancy Reagan’s “Just Say No” campaign. I was in school during that time, and the campaign worked on me! Never been interested in trying drugs! Have passed the passion for sobriety on to my children.

        Liked by 2 people

    • gingergal says:

      I think it’s because the intention was not to commit suicide. It was just too much for their system to handle and they passed away.

      Liked by 3 people

    • SharonKinDC says:

      In Bolling’s case, the kid thought he was buying a Xanax. Well, it wasn’t a branded one and it was laced w/ fentanyl. Lights out via accidental OD, imo.

      Like

  4. James F says:

    Not just talk. Today there was some action from DOJ.

    Former Georgia Medical Examiner and seven others federally indicted for opioid distribution
    https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndga/pr/former-georgia-medical-examiner-and-seven-others-federally-indicted-opioid-distribution

    Liked by 6 people

  5. AngelOnejudicial says:

    I’ve had a type of chronic leukemia for 23 years. I rely on these medications to survive my treatments and have a decent productive quality of life. These medications have been the only treatment available for moderate to severe intractable pain for centuries. America had no problem until Obama opened up the Southern border. I’m tired of being blamed for others abusing drugs. Reactionary ineffective policies have cost me my career and quality of life. Further reducing access to these medications to patients hurts us, not drug abusers. This is a complex issue but banning opioids suing drug makers it’s the equivalent of banning guns and suing the manufacturer, the good guys will be harmed while the bad guys buy it illegally and harm us all.

    Liked by 11 people

    • redridge45 says:

      It’s not just the pain meds being controlled; if you travel and forget your Claritin D, you cannot buy more until the wait time is up unless you have a prescription. Isn’t is already costly enough? Crazy.

      Liked by 2 people

      • woohoowee says:

        It is crazy, but so are the actions of the people who use ClaritinD to make meth. I’ve tried to think of a better policy to no avail. It isn’t right to continue punishing or inconveniencing the law abiding, but what to do?

        Like

      • G. Combs says:

        No to mention they took the OTC Sudefed for horses off the market. Now I can not get it AT ALL!!!

        I already lost two of my ponies to heaves since I could not medicate them in the winter when I have to feed hay.

        Like

    • InAz says:

      I do not have a condition such as yours. I do have a condition that puts me in the same situation to where I need narcotics. I am treated like a drug addict. I try to find a better doctor and I get accused of being a Dr Shopper.

      In the small town where I live the doctors will not even write a prescription for prescription cough medicine! It is ridiculous that hones people pay for the few who break the laws.
      It is like this with everything. The people who legitimately need certain drugs are the ones who literally suffer.

      (Also Sudafed is another drug that is stupidly limited )

      I do not know if it will do any good but I wrote the White House once about this issue. I will do it again.

      Liked by 3 people

      • InAz says:

        Also, my husband is now having chronic pain issues due to his degenerative muscle disease. The doctor treating the disease refuses to give him low doses of pain medication. The go to drug for every doctor today is Tramadol. So the doctor gave Tramadol to my husband. It did not work. (It never worked for me) My husband is suffering because the doctor is a jerk.
        And we can not change doctors because this doctor is the only one in the state of Arizona that is familiar with my husband’s particular disease. So flipping frustrating.

        Liked by 1 person

      • texastrumper says:

        You may not be aware that Sudafed and other amphetamines are used to manufacture methanphetamine. That is the reason it is limited in sale.

        Like

      • gingergal says:

        We have written three times. Next step is phone calls and seeking out local representatives.

        Like

    • The government oversight has every single doctor terrified to prescribe appropriate medications for chronic pain management. Keeping the doctors afraid to prescribe for legitimate needs has led to an increase in the suicide rate for these innocent and suffering people. My heart goes out to them.

      Like

  6. gingergal says:

    I hope they start addressing chronic pain patients who are suffering needlessly because of new regulations and whatever else is coming. Suicides, turning to street drugs, agonizing pain and being treated like addicts are what chronic pain patients are suffering since the government has tried to “solve” this issue. In addition, studies have shown that restricting opioids for chronic pain patients has had no impact on the overdose deaths. I never hear them address the needs of the chronic pain patients who use opioids responsibly and have a better quality of life because of them.

    Liked by 6 people

    • tuskyou says:

      The patient with chronic pain should not have to prove their not an addict or be treated with suspicion. I’m very familiar with this situation and it infuriates me when people have to justify why they need narcotics for unrelenting chronic pain.

      Every avenue for pain management should be persued. Other meds/treatments can be used with narcotics so that the smallest dose is used. We want productive people–if someone needs narcotics to be productive and keep pain to a minimum so be it.

      Liked by 3 people

    • I have a friend with chronic back issue…contemplating suicide, doctor won’t give her anything. I have a sister with severe hip pain, can hardly walk..doctor gives her prescription for extra strength tylenal…I don’t get it…who gets these prescriptions and how? I know two people suffering terrible with no help. Both decent working people…don’t get it.

      Like

  7. dez91 says:

    I love our President but this opioid is sadly a manufacturered problem ,So the guys kid wanted to get high after having it sooo bad ,and it felt sooo good he did it again and again sometimes street heroin sometimes fentenal, or Doctor driven oxys,then his dad coddled him through it ,all night long ,wow ,how about fire on the addicts azz then jail then STFU ,im as sick as the junkie struggle as I am the manufacturered BLM struggle.

    Like

  8. woohoowee says:

    If you’re going to watch the video of the full summit grab a box of tissues. Our First Lady and Kellyanne are doing a tough job with the utmost compassion.

    Liked by 1 person

    • woohoowee says:

      And I agree with President Trump45 about getting much tougher with drug pushers. Without serious consequences for the traffickers and pushers things won’t improve. Well, once the big beautiful wall goes up the flow of drugs will be impeded and with serious consequences for the traffickers and pushers things should get *much* better.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. KBR says:

    Disclaimer: I am not a doctor. I am not advising you to do anything, except read up for yourself about the effects of these drugs and talk to your doctor. And do not stop your medication on my say so.

    When the doctors are drugging people with really strong drugs, many many kids, from the time they start kindergarten claiming ADHD and depression and so on, when most of the people are basically NORMAL,

    Eventually many will become physically addicted to psyche meds, even Prozac or Ritalin. And when the Rx stops, or stops working so well, when they go looking for something, anything, to relieve their desperation and yes pain, they will likely end up with opiods.

    Serotonins, for instance affect smooth muscle, liver functions, bone regeneration, sex drive, sleep cycles, as well as the brain/mood/attention span.

    Yet serotinin-uptake-inhibitors flood the body with excess serotonins by keeping the body from “uptaking” what the body itself determines is an excess of it.

    Apparent that “science” and big pharma believe they know better than the Creator of the human body and brain, is it not?

    It is a very serious drug. The claim that it is “not addictive” is ridiculous. What they mean is it won’t be likely to be sold on the street because it takes six weeks or more to work, and street drug buyers want an immediate result. If it was not addictive to the body it could be stopped without “tapering off” but that is not recommended! If it was not addictive to the brain, no people would have committed suicide when taken off of it, methinks.

    Do Antidepressants Increase Violent Behavior?

    https://www.livescience.com/32934-do-antidepressants-increase-violent-behavior-111102html.html

    Too many Americans are-and have been for YEARS- prescribed serotonin-uptake-inhibitors for too little cause, especially since there are still arguments about it in the scientific community.

    Think!
    It affects the bowels and other smooth muscles. Got pain involving bowels? Took Prozac for years? Might there be a connection there? Don’t bother to look up that connection, it won’t be found as a side effect (but maybe as a treatment! the doc says it is “irritable bowel syndrome.”)
    Gee wonder what caused the bowel to get irritated… well serotonin “cuts down acid secretion by the stomach and contracts the muscles in the wall of the intestine.”

    Is the heart a smooth muscle? The aorta? Look up vasoconstriction… Look up which muscles are smooth muscles…

    It affects platelets. Lets see…constriction of the vein + platelets, so it is something that messes with the clotting of blood? Platelets normally, when they need to form a clot, put MORE serotonin into the bloodstream, TO CONSTRICT the vessels. What platelets do normally…what do they do when there is already an abnormally large amount of serotonin: do platelets act differently then?

    Sound kinda like maybe too much serotonin could cause a stroke: a blood clot in the brain? Or in the heart? Won’t see this as a side effect…common sense.

    I was once offered an Rx of Prozac because I felt sorry for baby birds being killed by a crow! I said no. When my Dad died I managed without that. I surely got over the baby birds faster and easier than my dad.

    But look at this:
    serotonin a monoamine (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) formed from the essential amino acid tryptophan. Its widespread actions include vasoconstriction, inhibition of gastric secretion and stimulation of smooth muscle. It is also an important neurotransmitter in the central nervous system; as such it is involved in pain transmission and perception, and can influence a variety of behaviours, including tiredness, sleep, mood and mental fatigue. It is suggested that an increased level of serotonin makes it mentally harder to maintain a steady pace of exercise, as in running or cycling (‘central fatigue’). Administration of branched-chain amino acids has been claimed to reduce uptake of tryptophan by the brain and therefore to diminish serotonin production. See also ergogenic aids; appendix 4.4 .
    Dictionary of Sport and Exercise Science and Medicine by Churchill Livingstone © 2008 Elsevier Limited. All rights reserved.

    Let me stress, from the above definition:
    Involved in PAIN TRANSMISSION and PERCEPTION…got pain?
    Involved in CENTRAL FATIGUE…got “chronic fatigue syndrome?”
    Involved in “tiredness, sleep, mood and mental fatigue”…can’t THINK straight?

    See here:

    https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/serotonin

    Really my point is that the “opium problem” might have increased because of the over-prescribing in the USA of SSRI’s and similar drugs!

    And until the USA gets a handle on THAT, the problems will continue.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. rashomon says:

    How different is President Trump’s approach to national concerns vs. The Zero’s assignment of “Safe Schools” Czar Kevin Jennings whose work had to be hidden from the public. I can’t believe parents didn’t take to the streets over that misuse of educational time and money.

    Kudos to the people taking part in this effort. It was a challenge in the ’60s and has grown to be a national tragedy now.

    Like

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