Republican Senator Ron Johnson Tells President Trump “it makes no sense to try and bring back high labor manufacturing jobs”…

Yesterday President Trump invited the media to keep their cameras on during a round-table discussion on trade.  He did this for a reason.  President Trump wanted the American voters to watch Republican politicians demand that he stop trying to bring manufacturing jobs to the United States.

In essence, Trump doing what Trump does best, played the role of Toto and pulled back the curtain on the Republican anti-American corporate business agenda.  The republicans in attendance never paused to reflect upon the sunlight or the reason for their specific invitations. They are comfortable back-room deals and POTUS Toto relaxed them perfectly.

One by one the Republicans took-the-bait and fully exposed themselves.  Lamar Alexander, Mike Lee, Pat Toomey and Roy Blout all took turns telling POTUS to quit trying to save American high-wage jobs, drop the national economic view and just accept multinational corporate globalism.

The subsequent full-throated establishment display stands as one of the greatest plays of the Trump administration to date. However, it was Republican Senator Ron Johnson from Wisconsin who really went the full distance:

[Transcript] […] In Wisconsin, a big manufacturing state, in seven years I have not visited one manufacturer that could hire enough people. That was certainly my experience in the last 20, 25 years. For a host of reasons, we tell our kids you have to get a four-year degree. We pay people not to work. So we do need to be concerned about, in such a tight labor market, do we have enough workers in manufacturing.

So my final point is, it makes no sense for me to try and bring back high labor-content manufacturing to America. We need to do the value added things. And so I would just say, proceed with real caution there.  (more)

Most people are becoming increasingly aware of the Republican agenda to keep the interests of multinational corporations at the top of their priority list; however, it is still rather remarkable to listen to an entire room of them admit, openly, their agenda is to work against the U.S. middle-class, support mass immigration, and keep the U.S. economy on the “service-driven” path.

Within trade policy is where President Trump breaks away from the modern Republican views. This is the heart of MAGA.  Trade and immigration is where President Trump fractures the party apparatus of both Republicans and Democrats.

Lastly, don’t expect the “corporate conservative media”, Fox News, Ingraham, Hannity, Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, Salem Media etc, to showcase these revelations; it is against their financial interests to do so.

Senator Johnson’s eye-opening remarks begin around 32:00 of the video below [prompted, just hit play]:  {transcript here}

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, Decepticons, Dem Hypocrisy, Economy, Election 2018, media bias, President Trump, Professional Idiots, propaganda, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

904 Responses to Republican Senator Ron Johnson Tells President Trump “it makes no sense to try and bring back high labor manufacturing jobs”…

  1. Seattlewonder says:

    Amazing to me that our elected officials fail to see the correlation between the break down of middle class families and loss of manufacturing jobs in the US. Not everyone is cut out to be a college graduate—I know as I have 3 boys who are all in skilled trade positions. Perhaps if the same emphasis was put on vocational training as academics we would have a stronger, more diverse workforce.

    Liked by 13 people

    • g.w says:

      Specially since the halls of higher education can’t be trusted to educate any longer, but only indoctrinate.

      Liked by 10 people

    • Bendix says:

      Especially when those college graduates are working part-time service jobs and will never pay off those student loans.
      I know way too many ‘STEM’ degreed people working outside those fields, if they work at all.
      I think if I were in high school today, and they kept pushing me into math and science, toward some boring, low-wage job in a chip plant that was going to close in a few years, I’d kill myself.

      Like

    • Bendix says:

      As far as not having enough disciplined workers, do not forget how many of our most disciplined have been in the military in these years of endless war, and will need something to do that pays well when they get out.
      By the time we get our manufacturing up and running again, we will have a new complement of workers coming out of the high schools, who haven’t been ruined yet.
      We are Americans! We can do this.
      As far as the labor shortages today, look how many rushed in for the high-wage fracking jobs, as they became available.
      People can’t move their families for low pay.
      This won’t happen overnight, but then again, it does not have to.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rich Owens says:

      Not everyone will get or want a 4 year degree. Not everyone wants to sit on their butt and get paid to do so. In my opinion, what we need are more apprenticeship and trade school type classes in high school and post high school.

      Liked by 3 people

    • cherylpass says:

      I don’t think they “fail to see.” I think they don’t care. There”s a reason they don’t care…which I’m sure has to do with filling their pockets on global corporatism.

      Liked by 2 people

    • CO Hokie says:

      ‘Amazing to me that our elected officials fail to see the correlation between the break down of middle class families and loss of manufacturing jobs in the US.’
      I’m pretty sure the officials see the correlation because the break down of the middle class is one of their goals.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Deb says:

    Senator Johnson is addressing a real labor shortage here in WI, but my husband sees it everywhere.

    One group of people would rather get high and work a lower wage job than have to deal with staying clean, even if it means more money. They get free health care and SNAP anyway, so they don’t care. It’s a total cultural shift, they care more about being lazy and getting high and have no pride in their work.

    Another group is people who are willing to work, but don’t have critical thinking skills necessary for a manufacturing setting. Our schools are simply not teaching people basic thinking skills, and literacy is terrible.

    Basically, we have destroyed the labor pool through decades of educational “reform” and the welfare/drug cultures.

    This does need to be addressed. Even entry level engineers that my husband hires are poorly equipped to enter the work force, and they are highly “educated.”

    Wisconsin’s economy would be booming if we had a more suitable workforce.

    Ron Johnson comes from a small manufacturing background and runs a non profit that helps train low income workers to take on better paid manufacturing jobs. He sees the problem first hand.

    I think the solution that keeps America First is for these manufactures to start their own job training programs and start educating workers themselves. They also need to raise wages. Then we need to cut the welfare state to incentivize more people to work.

    Of course, multinationals would rather just hire workers in China than actually invest money into developing the American workforce. I’m glad PDJT is forcing them to be open about it.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Bendix says:

      The lazy will have some of the less responsibility jobs to choose from, when the real workers vacate them for the manufacturing jobs, is my hope.
      Johnson is seeing things through the filter of what is possible under globalism.
      We are getting out from under that boot heel.
      I don’t want to sound like I’m criticizing your or your husband’s insights, which are totally accurate, I’m just expanding around that.
      We have President Trump now.

      Liked by 1 person

    • David Vicknair says:

      The comment about engineers caught my interest. This is nothing new. My father (RIP) was Chief Facilities Engineer (mechanical, post WWII, Tulane Univ.) for a large shipyard in Pascagoula, MS. The shipyard had both commercial and Navy contracts (destroyers and LHAs). Getting to the point, he spent many late evenings at home rewriting reports and rough checking (with a slide-ruler, no less) the supporting computations submitted by his junior engineers, some from schools with very good reputations. There is no easy fix for the deep hole we find ourselves in.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Good Job! says:

      “Labor shortage”

      Add $3 or $4 more per hour and that so-called “shortage” will vanish.

      Liked by 1 person

    • progpoker says:

      “I think the solution that keeps America First is for these manufactures to start their own job training programs and start educating workers themselves. “

      It’s funny. Isn’t that what Unions used to do?? What the hell are they doing now besides politics??

      Like

  3. TexasDude says:

    For the Chinese apologists amongst us along with the globalists …

    It is estimated that labor costs per IPhone made in China is $5. It is known that the Chinese government builds huge factories that houses several other types business that may be related. Dorms are built for the workers nearby. Workers tend to work 70 hours or more per week with only 1 day off. Oh, they cannot afford the iPhone.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Bendix says:

      They give them drugs to stay awake, as well.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Deb says:

      And workers in China are desperate to get these awful jobs at these evil corporations.

      They didn’t just send the jobs overseas. They ruined our education system and convinced us that everyone should get a worthless liberal arts degree. Then they created a culture where large swaths of the working class and middle class “labor force” would rather do low skill labor so they can get high and sit around their parent basement.

      This all sucks. But bringing back the jobs doesn’t mean we have enough skilled workers to fill them. We need to address the problems in the labor force by addressing eduction and the culture.

      Liked by 32 people

      • TXGuy says:

        ^^ THIS

        Liked by 4 people

      • Blacksmith8 says:

        Did you catch liddle ronny johnson “In Wisconsin, a big manufacturing state, in seven years I have not visited one manufacturer that could hire enough people.” ?

        Funny, I didn’t hear about any hiring in wisco that went under filled. hmmmm

        I heard a lot about North Dakota and oil and that wasn’t just last year. It seems if there are jobs that pay, people show up to apply.

        So he really admitted that he knows nafta is a failure. He wants to blame the mommies and daddies but the reality is nafta is killing our infrastructure.

        Liked by 13 people

        • WHat he is saying is that Manufacturers and warehousing are continually bringing in new employees. They use large staffing companies to avoid paying benefits. They are very mindful that part-time is better than full-time employees. So there is a continual churning of entry-level employees that fall out due to short hours and low pay. This is due to Obummercare.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Paco Loco says:

          Im sure the Senator RJ was involved getting the Chinese to choose Racine, Wisconsin to build a giant IPhone factory that will employ 2000. He’s been told what to think by his CoC handlers. The US Senate is owned and operated by the CoC.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mopar2016 says:

          Wisconsin voted Johnson in to avoid Feingold again.
          But it looks like they ended up with Feingold again.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Turranos says:

          NAFTA has killed most everything, always has – always will unless it goes away.
          PDJT please make it go away!,

          Like

        • Deb says:

          There’s enough blame to go around. The truth is that where I live there are good manufacturing jobs that are having a hard time being filled. They never even had to advertise these jobs before, friends and family of the people who worked at mills and factories were already lined up looking for a job every time an opening came up. Now people would rather work a low wage job and get high every day. It really is a cultural change brought on by the break down of the family and education.

          This is the reality we Trump supporters see in a lot of formerly strong manufacturing communities. Not all of them, but a lot of them.

          If we don’t address this cultural problem, it won’t matter if we bring back jobs.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Somewhere in Dixie says:

          The intent of NAFTA was precisely that.

          Like

      • tazz2293 says:

        If by Education you mean education to be able to read write and do math along with education in the skilled trades that includes machining, carpentry, furniture making, plumbing, welding, electrical (to include electronics) I am all for it. If you are talking a 4 year worthless college degree that will put one 10’s of thousands of dollars in debt I am not for that.

        Liked by 24 people

        • Gil says:

          I think the former Tazz. Lots and lots of people are cut right for these jobs. Milk toast lib arts majors used to be a joke. Now race based degrees and these are standard. Bring back real education!

          Liked by 9 people

        • jbt says:

          The engineering major asks, “How does it work?”
          The accounting major asks, “How much does it cost?”
          The liberal arts major asks, “Would you like fries with that?”

          Liked by 23 people

          • tazz2293 says:

            The liberal arts major asks, “Would you like fries with that?”

            Unless the Liberal Arts major goes to work for the MSM or government.

            Liked by 6 people

            • steph_gray says:

              Or unless the Liberal Arts major becomes red-pilled, becomes an autodidact, teaches himself how to combine a real skill such as software with a lib arts skill such as writing, and makes his own career…

              But the red-pilling and the autodidact component are both essential. The leftist propaganda education mill works very hard to make sure no student ever teaches himself how to learn. It’s a skill I got from family.

              Everyone of us here at CTH is an autodidact. We are all seeking to teach ourselves more about this historical period we are faced with. We’re arming ourselves with knowledge and our teachers are PDJT and sundance.

              It’s quite a miracle.

              Liked by 5 people

              • Lindenlee says:

                Amen to that. I was married to a man who thought that learning and maturation stopped after college, and all the growth and coping was up to me. So while he flatlined, I grew, and he hated me for it.

                Everything was open to him, but he didn’t want it, and I became a commodity to him, to do what he didn’t want to. I came to despise him. He became a Dim when we divorced. Says a lot.

                Like

            • heidi says:

              exactly, people who will simply agitate for increasing gov’t that will take care of them cradle to grave, and convince others this is somehow a “right”.

              Liked by 1 person

          • nanny210 says:

            ^^^^^^^^^YES!!!

            Like

      • Dixie says:

        But Deb, you have just reiterated Senator Johnson’s point to support the continuation of globalism.

        As I see it, the biggest problem is welfare and disability. It’s too easy to get and people would rather stay home and collect welfare or disability than to work at one of the lower paying manufacturing jobs. And that was President Trump’s point. The transcript (at Sundance’s “more”) of the meeting was very enlightening.

        Liked by 1 person

      • drdeb says:

        Their arguments are so illogical, especially Johnson’s. This is all about lining their own pockets with lobbyist bucks. I wish it were possible to cut their salaries. What they are now paid is way out of line with what Joe Public who pays their salaries is earning. This attitude is the reason federal employees earn so much more than folks doing the same jobs in the private sector. These DC elites, like the city, have no awareness of the economic reality of those they were elected to serve.

        Term Limits! No more RINOS! Prosecute corrupt politicians to the fullest extent of the law!

        Liked by 6 people

      • aet2u says:

        Of course they convince them to go to college – the Libs have turned it into a government funded indoctrination factory. They get all that student loan money – indoctrinate those brains full of mush with Lib/Prog/Socialists ideology and now those poor kids are slaves to the state because they have a massive debt burden (controlled by the government). It is quite the racket. All the while importing more slave labor as illegal immigrants to do the jobs that they have convinced these brains full of mush that they are too “special” to do.

        Liked by 4 people

      • Benson II says:

        Many of the corporations know this and have said they are ready to initiate training programs for workers. I think many more will follow. This may need to be the norm and it could work. Colleges aren’t training the majority of students anyway and this will also give non-college people a chance at a good job. I for one don’t believe that these companies formerly located overseas had all skilled workers to choose from.

        Liked by 1 person

      • skaebne says:

        I was Directer of R&D at a high tech company. That company abused the H1-B visa system, like they all do. Under this program, foreigners with advanced degrees are brought in as little better than indentured servants and paid $60k – $70k per year. What you may not know is that they pay NO TAXES for 5 years, and unlike their US counterparts, they’re not saddled with tens of thousands of dollars of student debt.

        Conversely, I knew of many skilled Americans with advanced degrees who would have loved the jobs going to the H1-B visa coolies, but not only likely could not afford to work at $60k/yr, they were never offered the jobs. Moreover, the majority of H1-B visa recipients are not PhD’s in high tech fields, they’re IT personnel.

        The canard of not having enough skilled workers is a lie.

        Liked by 3 people

        • hillbilly4 says:

          The H1B visa scam is STILL the number one job killer in the US. I worked in IT for 35+ years in various fields with American workers and ‘Visa’ employees. There are good employees from both sides of the line. But, American workers do not have to hold their heads in shame for anyone. We have highly skilled US IT folks. If there is a ‘shortage’ of IT people in the US…it is an artificial, manufactured shortage being manipulated by the Global elite. We have the best schools for IT. What we don’t do is encourage younger and middle aged folks to go into IT. None of it is Rocket science…people of average IQ and interpersonal skills CAN to this work. If the correct emphasis and effort were placed to address the ‘IT shortage’…the USA could solve this problem with 2 years.

          Liked by 4 people

          • SurroundedintheNW says:

            Just walk through the halls of Google, Apple, Microsoft, Amazon… pick your large tech company. There are very few American workers over 40 years of age, and a large number of non-American workers either via H1-B or contract companies such as Tata, infosys and many others. And that number still seems or keep increasing.

            Like

      • Mr. T. says:

        “But bringing back the jobs doesn’t mean we have enough skilled workers to fill them. We need to address the problems in the labor force by addressing education and the culture.”

        President Trump is already on top of that issue, stressing the need for technical school training instead of pushing college. I agree with him. Someone with technical training can make a comfortable living and there’s no shame in not going to college instead of a technical school, either at the high school level, or an adult educational tech school.

        Liked by 1 person

      • sturmudgeon says:

        no, first they ‘transformed’ what was meant by a Liberal education..

        Like

      • Good Job! says:

        There you go, absolving corporations again.

        Republican party will fail again. Trump’s a dreamer.

        Like

      • progpoker says:

        That is what a sane and sensible Immigration System was designed for. Amazing how screwed up we’ve become… 😦

        Like

    • Jenny Hatch says:

      The King of Globalism…

      Give him a CLAP! For Valentines Day…

      Liked by 4 people

    • Zimbalistjunior says:

      Suicide nets.

      Like

  4. EJ says:

    Sundance any coincidence that CNBC (I saw the link in Drudge) is stating that inflation is now a concern?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Running Fast says:

      Inflation is a concern to the “Wall Street” economy. Valuations of stocks/ bonds are primarily based upon projected inflation.

      If inflation is low that means that bonds can pay a lower return. Bond prices are inversely related to price. In turn stock prices are based upon the underlying cost of capital (bond rates).

      If it will cost a company more to produce something then the potential earnings drop… ie the value of the stock goes down. This is what happened last week in the stock market. The fast trading algs calculated in higher long term interest rates causing rapid adjustments of stock holdings.

      Liked by 1 person

      • dayallaxeded says:

        Interest rates on fedgov bonds also have a YUGE effect on the deficit/cost of debt service–what’s 1% of $1 trillion? Multiply that out. I trust PDJT’s killahs to get it right, so we have a reasonably balanced, growing economy, both on Main Street and Wall Street. Face it, most of middle America’s savings, if any, are in IRAs and 401Ks, invested in Wall Street. Not many alternatives, especially for employer-provided 401Ks.

        Like

      • Mr. T. says:

        Running Fast, you left out the part that there was some manipulation involved with the downturn in the market, especially by shorts. It’s happened again and again. People borrow stock through a margin account, sell it, spread a little investment fear rumors around, then purchase the same stock at a lower price to cover their short position, walking away with a nice profit. How do you think George Soros made his billions? The ones who really got screwed were the investors who bought stock on margin, something that isn’t really a good idea, and they lost their asses when many got margin calls and had to cover the difference when their stock got sold for a loss because of those margin calls. Someday, maybe the SEC will actually do their job, monitor the markets very closely, and actually start taking enforcement action against the bad players in the market, including many of the institutional investors who play games to keep stock prices propped up for badly managed companies.

        Liked by 3 people

  5. TXGuy says:

    To those who still believe that our current “free trade” policies are in line with Conservative principles–

    There’s no way Ronald Reagan ever would have supported American-based companies manufacturing their goods in a communist countries to be sold to Americans.

    No.
    Way.

    Liked by 18 people

    • Iwasthere says:

      I was in the government at that time. You r correct, we would have never let these strategic ‘know how’ jobs, eg state of the art intel chip manufacturing have been allowed to be built in China.

      Liked by 1 person

      • skaebne says:

        It costs a billion dollars to build a semiconductor fabrication plant. The environmental laws in California — and most of the US — make it impossible to site a plant in that state. Period. Even the liberal heads of cutting-edge semiconductor companies that were founded in California lament that they have been force out of the country.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. jmclever says:

    94 million unemployed Americans say otherwise, Senator Johnson!

    Liked by 16 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      We HAVE to get the participation rate back up and get people OFF of SS Disability.
      That would be a two-fer.

      Like

      • Mikayla825 says:

        I guess those of us whom have become disabled after working since the age of 15 should go die and get it over with. I’m relatively young so those monies I paid in don’t get any consideration either. Gee Thanks.

        Like

  7. greeneyedcrystal says:

    Looks like iPhone owners are part of the problem, not part of the solution. And this also begs the question, if the workers are paid such a small amount of money, why does Apple charge so much for their phones?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mr. T. says:

      Greeneyedcrystal, the answer to your question is a simple one, GREED. There’s nothing wrong with a company making profits. That’s how capitalism works. Apple is one of many companies who found a way to legally exploit slave labor and charge huge sums for their products, and they’re doing it with the help of the Chinese government. However, there is a bright side to this. Demand for IPhones has been dropping, especially for their new IPhone X. In fact, they have already reduced the orders for new IPhone X’s from their manufacturer in China, because of the reduced demand. That stunt they pulled with the software upgrade that slowed down older IPhone models due to battery life issues and without telling users what they were doing is also costing them dearly. Because of that brilliantly stupid and arrogant move, many IPhone owners are NOT going to be buying Apple products again. Kudos to Tim Cook for being presented with the 2018 Jackass of The Year Award.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Orville R. Bacher says:

    So either automation is killing jobs or there is no one with the talent to fill them? Odd thing that China has boomed for going on a generation now- a country that had nearly no knowledge or techniques in manufacturing until the USA politicians gave them the shop for free.

    Ron Johnson- illogical dunce.

    Liked by 5 people

    • booger71 says:

      Chi-Coms…why create innovation when you can just steal it.

      Liked by 10 people

    • Paco Loco says:

      Johnson was a business man and a entrepreneur before becoming a Senator. Washington is corruption on steroids and anyone going to congress is sullied by it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mark McQueen says:

      Kind of related to automation, I’ve been in a local “building supply” chain store (oh, can I call it a CHAIN store?) more than once when they had all the checkout lanes closed and 2 employees stationed at the self-checkout lanes helping people check themselves out. WTF? How much did it cost them to install the self check out equipment and why did they do it if they are going to pay people to “man” them???

      Liked by 1 person

      • Mr. T. says:

        Even though they are one or two employees at self checkout stations, their philosophy is that more customers can make purchases with less cashiers involved. Home Depot isn’t the only one doing it. Walmart has them and has actually updated their self service checkouts, equipped with new scanning guns and an upgrade to their checkout software. Fry’s grocery stores here in Arizona has them as well. They are known as Ralph’s in California, both owned by Kroger, who also owns and operates various other supermarket chains across the country who have the U-Scan checkout systems as well. They are here to stay as they are more efficient and greatly reduce their overhead, helping to keep prices down. Personally, I like using them as I don’t have to deal with a slow cashier, especially the ones who like to talk to other people when they are supposed to be taking care of your purchases.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Indimex says:

        Because they almost never work! With very little exception, each time I use Self Check Out, there is a glitch of some sort and I wait for my turn with the attendant.
        Still, two employees manning 6-12 checkouts is a huge wage saver.

        Like

      • Lindenlee says:

        Exactly. Themlastbtime I did one of my 1x/quarter Walmart run, and got herded into the self-check lane, I asked the helper, “What is my discount for doing your job?”…. Blank look.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Deb says:

      Automation kills jobs. But it also fills in when people don’t want to do the jobs.

      Why drive a forklift and submit to random drug tests when you can collect welfare and get high?

      That really is an issue.

      Like

  9. tazz2293 says:

    Speaking of all these low skilled jobs Americans won’t do so we import workers so I can supposedly buy cheaper fruits and vegetables.

    How many of us actually read the labels in the produce section to find out where exactly our produce comes from.

    How many of us have noticed that we are paying premium prices for produce grown in Chile or some other South American country that is then processed and packaged for shipment to the United States?

    Not too mention most of this produce has no taste and the texture is awful.

    Liked by 20 people

  10. daughnworks247 says:

    I’m in a town of 8,000, in a county of 25,000, about 35 minutes from major metro and 30 minutes from int’l airport. My grandfather, in 1961, brought the largest factory to the town. My e-husband’s father, in 1972, brought the second largest factory to the town.
    Because we were corporate transplants, we understood “the drill”. My grandparents started the country club, built golf course, beefed up schools, built a community center. My ex-husband’s parents started a Catholic Church, expanded the community college to build a training program for the factories.

    My generation, once I moved back, recruited three more industries to the area. I re-organized fire dept’s and police volunteer organizations into 501C3’s to feed them charitable money. I weighed in heavily on the schools, bringing home millions, making the local public school one of only 2 which achieved top ranking in the state. We worked like dogs to save the local hospital, I ended up on their board and we won. We were all about economic development and I personally recruited doctors, dentists, and hundreds of execs to live in our township. I started charities and because ex-husband was a contractor, I helped dozens of minority subcontractors incorporate as plumbers and tradesmen.

    As the 90’s wore on, Wal-Mart expansion to “SuperStores” hurt small businesses. I was working on a MBA at the time and did my thesis on it. Feds had a program called “Main Street” and exhusband and I spearheaded it since we both owned businesses. Over 30 small businesses participated and we saved many.

    As NAFTA got wound up, we lost a Carter’s (children’s clothing) manufacturing plant to Mexico, cost us 400 jobs. The factory my grandfather brought to town employed 1800 and eventually went to Indonesia. For my ex-husband’s construction company to survive, I began importing building products from China and other countries – but I did everything possible, lobbied state houses and our Congressmen to STOP it. Our Mayor, who was best man in our wedding ended up in charge of Econ Development for the state. We were as plugged in as humanly possible. Yet still, we could not compete with NAFTA and FED policy. On top of that, Wall Street created “emerging markets” and “Pac-Rim” mutual funds, which poured venture capital off-shore to build the factories – helping to cause the demise of middle America.

    By the 2000’s, I formed a little construction company and the march of the Mexican labor force had begun. Whether legal or illegal, one by one, the trades fell. Framing teams were $4/sq ft for American workers but scores of Mexican teams would do the work for $2.50/sq ft, same with mason’s sheetrock crews, trim carpenters, etc. As one of only 8 bonded contractors in the state, we had to remain legal. It killed our pricing.
    To survive, my little importing expertise blossomed as other contractor friends sought me out to help them reduce costs. Eventually, my little company quickly surpassed the contracting company. In fact, I now employ my ex-husband.

    By the time Obama was elected, after the crash, I knew at least 100 local tradesmen, head of family, who were unemployed and considered themselves lucky if their wife had a job, let alone health insurance. Almost all of them were on Social Security Disability and had shifted their families to Medicaid. My property taxes increased 500% from 1994 to 2008. If I wanted anything done, they would insist I “write the check to my sister”. When I issued 1099’s or W-2’s to employees, they often came back as unidentifiable. The underground economy bloomed.

    By late 2009, the crash was so bad, it was effecting our cash flow, and I sought to re-organize what was remaining on my mortgage (only $40K) to increase my credit line to $250K. My bank balked at the idea, which was unheard of. Within 10 minutes, I was standing in my bank President’s office, saying, “What the hell is going on?”, but it was not until that moment did I realize the full extent of the crash on our local township. Over the next month, we got together with 10-15 other businesses and structured a plan to keep our companies running, and our employees – employed. By spring of 2010, we were fighting to…… save the town.

    After Obama was re-elected, Ferguson happened. Our community is 39.6% black and the animosity was palpable among the younger generation. For the older people, we knew each other for generations, cheered for each other’s kids, and often went to each other’s churches and funerals. The food stamp boom caused enormous corruption, cash for clunkers bought everyone a new Dodge Challenger, and expansion of Social Security Disability took millions of what most would consider able-bodied workers – out of the work force. If people are paid 30-40K to sit on a couch, it’s hard to get them off the couch for $50K, minus taxes. AND the guarantee of a gov’t check is more warming than the risk of being employed. They rationalize and become further indebted to the system. Remember the fable – Even a grasshopper with a full belly will not hunt for food.

    By 2013, the “fundamental transformation” was almost complete. My son was working on his Eagle Project, and he was building a new sign for the Catholic Church his grandparents started. I went to the dedication service (we’re Presbyterian). The children’s segment of the service is always cute and I watched as 27 Hispanic children made their way to the front of the church, but only one white child. Half the service was conducted in Spanish and the “announcements” in the program were related to global warming and immigration services available. The church was gone. I brushed my hand over the nameplate dedicating the organ to my deceased father-in-law. I will never return, it hurts too much.

    By 2016, the public school was under new leadership, and very “progressive” leadership at that. It fell from a level 5 to a level 3 in ranking. Those who could, pulled their kids out for home school or private option, or moved away. We approached school leadership, willing to write the grants, proposed 40 million worth, and they scoffed. I went to the school board – they scoffed. A local factory failed, in which the state and local gov’t invested 60 million for the promise of future jobs. The owners were scammers from India. Economic development is dead, bad mayor and aldermen, property taxes increasing. It’s all about leadership.

    Then, something weird happened over Christmas holidays. Husband and I were having dinner at local restaurant when my son walked in with his entourage of friends, some in college but many were not, some were married with kids already, and about a 10 year age span. We were within earshot of their conversation. Husband and I had been talking about whether or not he should run for alderman and turn the leadership around within the town. Then, the hand of God hit us in the face.

    The kids (young adults) were talking about what they were doing over Christmas break and complaining about not having any money. My son took exception. Our son snagged a job working at the FEDEX terminal overnight, making about $21/hour for the holidays. Other kids complained the packages were too heavy. He laughed, told them he wears a Santa hat to work and even Santa needed help delivering packages at this time of year. He explained the key was to make it FUN instead of work. Then, he went on……, explaining his finances to the others……..

    The 529 plan we got when he was a baby pays for his college tuition and most expense. He snagged another big scholarship for a high ACT score, which pays his rent. Then, he is an ROTC student, contracted, which pays him another 5K a semester, plus a stipend. On top of that, because he is an engineering student, he does the take-off of architectural plans for many of my customers at $200/pop. He makes over $2K a month just doing take-offs. Yet, he still drives his grandmother’s 16 year old used car and will run it into the ground – THEN, he will buy a new “used” car. As our son went on, his voice became elevated. By the end of his diatribe, he was almost railing about fiscal responsibility both personally and within government, school systems, H1B visas, and trade policy.

    I was looking at my husband and we were both wincing a little. He is, after all, our son, so we knew where the politics came from…. but then, a cute little girl looked at him and said, “Gunner, you need to run for Mayor.”
    I just about spit out my food.
    My husband looked at me, wide-eyed.
    Other kids at his table were nodding and encouraging him to ACTUALLY run for office, and began role-playing his campaign.
    Of course, he’s only a student, with an ROTC obligation.

    On the way home, I kept shaking my head about what had happened. It’s time for our generation to pass the torch. Perhaps, we are not as bad off as we thought we were. I thought to myself, sometimes it only takes one person to lead…..
    …… and leadership comes from the strangest places.

    Liked by 49 people

    • eagle931 says:

      You have written an amazing story, one that applies to just about every community in the country. Thanks for sharing.

      Liked by 15 people

    • 5Catzm0m says:

      Daughnworks247, this is one of the most inspiring personal stories of survival I have heard. And hope!

      Liked by 15 people

    • Alison says:

      Very inspiring, Daughnworks! One who leads with Truth can light the way. Your son has a bright future.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Congratulations on your great kids daughnworks24/7.

      My husband and I do not have quite the same amazing story as you do. We have a business and a farm and are busy here in Colorado trying to keep the slightly contentious water situation here in the state on track

      Our five sons are all out of college four of the boys have engineering degrees and one with an accounting degree.

      While they were attending college they all worked at least two jobs and had some scholarship money that helped pay the bills..

      It was along hard road but they made it and are now married with families.

      You might be right about “passing the torch,” I have been thinking the same thing for the last few months myself.

      Liked by 11 people

      • daughnworks247 says:

        Chloe, you and I need to gt together for Christmas. All engineers in the family and I am the accountant. God Bless to you and your’s!
        We’re going to be okay!
        It’s a little unsettling when we get to the point when we hear our words coming out of our children’s mouths. They listen and understand far more than we think.

        Liked by 13 people

        • Yes it is daughnworks.

          It is also unsettling when it seem to be almost time to turn things over to the “kids”.
          I am not at all sure what to do with all that time that is not scheduled.

          What do retired people do?

          Liked by 1 person

          • Alison says:

            We perch here in the Treehouse 😊😊

            Liked by 6 people

          • daughnworks247 says:

            We will never really retire. Besides, it would look really strange for rock n’ roll to be blaring out of a nursing home window.

            Liked by 6 people

            • Dixie says:

              Do like I do. Just make your home a nursing home. Then you can play all the loud music your neighbors will allow. As long as just one of you is dementia free, that works.

              Liked by 3 people

              • Indimex says:

                Haha! Dixie, I like your style. 💃🏽💃🏽💃🏽

                Liked by 2 people

                • Dixie says:

                  🙂 It’s true, too. Making all kinds of adjustments to accommodate getting old. Fortunately, I still have what it takes to run a household without the help of my husband. Rather spend the money readjusting the house than on the monthly cost of a nursing home. And you know what?, we are doing okay. Can’t throw him away because he’s broken through no fault of his own.

                  Liked by 1 person

            • Pat Kerot says:

              The Walmart here is using White Rabbit (Grace Slick) as background music!!!!!

              Liked by 1 person

          • rashomon says:

            What do retired people do? They organize campaigns for people such as your son and Donald J. Trump. I was going to travel and do all those activities given up to raise children and create a business or two. Then this man I had been following for years came down an escalator with his wife and….

            Liked by 5 people

          • steph_gray says:

            Hang at the Treehouse and, in my case, become a full-time musician with all the other hours. I’ve been one life-long, but I know a lot of people who just started at or near retirement and they ain’t half bad! Yes, even older Americans have “dreams.”

            Liked by 2 people

    • piper567 says:

      daughnworks, thank you so much for putting human faces and families into the policies and foibles of so many decades.
      Your story has great value and impact, as we can view harm done by reading the reality in the village square.
      Also, to have the circle come ’round in your son’s witness, emphasizes the importance of family and the influence we have on our youngsters
      Thank you for taking the time to write out this marvelous story for us.
      God bless you.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Monadnock says:

      daughnworks247 – thank you for sharing this… helluva handle too, by the way 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • booger71 says:

      Very uplifting story..thanks

      Liked by 2 people

    • MGBSE says:

      Your personal review of Small Town America – then and now – is amazing an sad…but you left out an important detail – UNIONS. The democrats and their unions used the blue collar & middle class workers to advance their agenda and power, while making themselves and the union bosses filthy rich. NAFTA evolved and became law as a result of union greed. Bushiness CANNOT survive if organized demands for wages, benefits and pensions consume all profits. So NAFTA – seen as business survival has now morphed into business greed – and noe, nearly 40yrs into it business LOVES cheap foreign labor, illegal aliens AND small town America is on life support. I pray Trump is our stabilizer.

      Liked by 2 people

      • mike says:

        Excess taxes of a burdensome, overpaid, interfering, sneering bureaucracy
        Corrupt, noncompetitive medicine at ginormous prices often less effective than something old, cheap or natural (my spouse has a $50k-100k/mo cancer that insurance claims handles for most people until they die hard like dogs and in debt; we buy a old chemo overseas not FDA approved, DIY generics and naturals for under $500/mo and live in style)

        Liked by 1 person

    • Marygrace Powers says:

      One of the best posts I’ve ever read at CTH. Must read for everyone. TY.

      btw….GO GUNNER. I love that kid.

      Liked by 8 people

    • Who Is John Galt? says:

      daughnworks247,
      Thanks for taking the time to share. Your Passion is obviously contagious and is to be Encouraged.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Your Tour Guide says:

      Ad Rem/ Sundance

      PLEASE bookmark this wonderful narrative. Place it somewhere
      where it can be re-read by younger individuals. The ones who
      have no idea what was done in the past for excellence. The same
      ones who could maybe be awakened to what they can do to
      bring it back.

      Terrific story, daughnworks. Your family has been blessed in the
      past. Their efforts have helped your community be blessed. Many
      new blessings on you and your area. I and many others are praying
      that the curse has been lifted. We all know that it was caused by
      satan running the show.

      Liked by 7 people

    • mopar2016 says:

      Excellent post daughnworks247.
      Got me smiling, and looking at my old ROTC patch.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Barry Londrigan says:

      This is 2020 Trump rally material….. ” Who wants to go back the the way it was? Complicated business folks… “

      Liked by 2 people

      • daughnworks247 says:

        Barry, you may have a good point there. My son knows every intricate detail of H1B visas and so do all of his friends and those in the age bracket 10 years his senior down to his age lived through the crash. Plus, they completely understand the problem of academia and ultra-feminism.
        ….. and they are mad about it.

        Liked by 3 people

    • dayallaxeded says:

      Praise the Lord for granting you the abilities, opportunities, and pure gumption to do what you’ve done, especially to raise a BASED son!

      Liked by 3 people

    • hillbilly4 says:

      The BEST personal-article ever posted anywhere on the changing landscape of American business. Your story should be told on Hannity, etc. You have a great story to tell the American people.

      Liked by 3 people

    • steph_gray says:

      Daughn, what an amazing story. I teared up at this:

      > I brushed my hand over the nameplate dedicating the organ to my deceased father-in-law. I will never return, it hurts too much.

      Hope your son runs and wins and gets tired of winning!

      Liked by 2 people

    • John Denney says:

      Well done! Well written!

      “Let us not lose heart in doing good, for in due time we will reap if we do not grow weary.” – Galatians 6:9

      Liked by 1 person

    • the_least says:

      Wow. You’ve had an extraordinary life and yours is the story of American exceptionalism.

      I would say “incredible” or “unbelieveable”, but I am a literalist, as well as a patriot, and I am delighted to read your story as an affirmation of my confidence in America.

      Thank you, and God bless you!

      Like

      • daughnworks247 says:

        Hmmm, we all just did what everyone else did. It seemed like the right thing to do. We knew, when you build a factory, you have to build the town too.
        I still hear stories, once in a while, about my grandfather or my dad. Things I never knew. They did not advertise.

        The meeting at the bank at the height of the recession was a little unusual, I will admit. Not sure what we did was legal, but it worked. We protected as many businesses and families as we could. Remember that scene in “It’s a Wonderful Life” where George Bailey is passing out his honeymoon money to save the Building and Loan? It was a little bit like that. We worked together to save expenses and save the community bank.

        Liked by 2 people

    • KittyKat says:

      Thank you for sharing …

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dixie says:

      Wow! Daughnworks247, what makes you think you hit a nerve! Hahahahahaha!

      Liked by 1 person

      • daughnworks247 says:

        I never thought so many would respond to this post. I’ve learned so much from Sundance, Menagerie, and the posters here. I’m honored and humbled.
        Maybe it reminds us of all our little towns/big towns.
        And our lives are always about our kids. They’re why we get up in the morning.

        As parents, we all have a hard time seeing our kids as adults, let alone in any kind of leadership role. I still have the visual of Gunner, at 18 months, sitting in middle of the kitchen floor, eating a gallon of pancake syrup, stolen from a cabinet, poured all over him.
        Yet…., they grow up.

        When we hear other people talking about our kids, it’s a bizarre realization…. or hand of God, kind of thing. He’s still to young, of course, and heaven only knows what life will bring, but his heart is in the right place.

        ……and Ron Johnson does not represent what us honorably!!!!!!!!!!
        President Trump does!

        Liked by 2 people

        • Dixie says:

          It’s been so awesome reading all the responses to your wonderful post. It’s great to know there are many of us out there who feel the same. Kudos to Sundance for giving us a forum to bring us all together.

          Liked by 2 people

  11. Bendix says:

    I want to mention something that Rush Limbaugh said about President Trump’s rocky start as far as his choices of whom to advise him.
    He compared it to his own venture into television. Rush said that he thought he had to listen to the ‘experts’ on television, because Rush had no experience in that area. It turned out to be a disaster.
    He said he saw the same thing with Donald Trump, having no expertise in politics/government, thinking he had to trust the people with experience.
    Rush said what he learned from his mistake was that he didn’t need to be the expert on television, because he, not they, the ‘experts’, was the one who understood the Rush Limbaugh brand.
    He said that President Trump, as he realized he was the expert on Trump, was becoming more effective.
    I’m bringing this up here, because I think we are seeing President Trump confidently doing it the Trump way, and someone clinging to the old patterns is telling him it can’t be done.
    Of course it can’t be done under the old ways!
    Under the Uniparty, we could not do anything!
    Why listen to any of them, who rode the elevator to the basement? What do they know?

    Liked by 18 people

    • RedBallExpress says:

      No offense but how can any blowhard say that Trump has had a rocky start? Sort of like when the MSM ridiculed Trump for poor management and lack of experience for all the leaking that was occurring. They forgot the part that he was under siege and being spied on by the CIA and FBI and OBAMA. And Trump took care of it like it has never been taken care of. He gets results and if you don’t perform you are out the door.

      Trumps been around a long time. He is doing it exactly the way he wants it.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. DGinGA says:

    I am appalled that the Senator from Wisconsin believes that the solution to some serious cultural problems in this country is to STOP encouraging and incenting American companies to do their manufacturing here in the U.S.

    I do believe that manufacturers have a hard time hiring and keeping workers. There are a couple of cultural issues behind that, One is that, since the Clinton Administration, POLITICIANS have been benefiting their buddies in academia by pushing ALL high school grads to go to college, whether they belong there or not. A clear message was sent, primarily by Democrats, that kids who don’t go to college will be “trapped” in blue collar jobs that are for losers. (I truly do not understand why blue collar workers still vote Democrat.) Add to that the strong culture of entitlement among young people today. They think blue collar jobs are beneath them, even as they do without jobs and live in their parents’ basements. God forbid they should have to go out an earn a living by – OMG – working!

    I know people who work in Human Resources for manufacturers. They say you would not believe the people who come to apply for jobs. Many cannot pass a criminal background check. Others who can pass the background check cannot pass a drug test. Then, among those who actually get hired, the absentee rate is high, because apparently they somehow have the idea that they can just show up for work when they feel like it. I have also heard this from plumbing contractors, electricians, builders, trucking companies, etc.

    Let’s bring Vo-Tech training back into the high schools. STOP telling every kid that they should “follow their passion” and get a college degree in some worthless subject. Any job, no matter what it is, carries with it some degree of dignity, and the self respect that comes from a job well done.

    Liked by 20 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      Totally agree.
      I tell young people, show up for the interview, dress nicely, be respectful, be on time, and you stand an 80% chance of getting the job.

      Liked by 10 people

    • Sean F Murphy says:

      Ron Johnson blames the educational system for the lack of workers. Last time I checked, the Republicans have control of the government. Why not push legislation to fix this issue? Oh yeah…his masters don’t want that.

      And I write this as someone who voted for him. What a disappointment…

      Liked by 1 person

      • Deb says:

        Republicans don’t run the school boards in most towns.

        How many schools adopted common core? Too many. My kids attend a private school that did not.

        We need to get more involved locally. Schools can only be fixed from the ground up.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Lindenlee says:

          And what they are doing all over the place is de-fanging the local school boards, moving and centralizing the centers of power, to disempower rhose pesky parents and reformers. Power at all costs.

          Like

    • pacnwbel says:

      I agree with getting a useful qualification or vocational training. A person can indulge their passion outside of gainful employment time. Few are lucky enough to find the job of a lifetime that makes one not want to retire when everyone else is. Having a hobby or pastime one enjoys is good medicine.

      Like

    • Maquis says:

      Self-worth is born of competence. Those that accomplish nothing, attempt nothing, have no business demanding respect.

      Like

  13. Luther Thompkins says:

    I speak to you today from over 400 years of having family in The New World; from over 100 years of having immediate family, as well as myself, involved in heavy, medium and light manufacturing.

    Here are some of the basics of what I’ve learned so far:

    1) The only way to create wealth of any amount is through value-added manufacturing. That means one supplies or utilizes minerals/materials to create a useful item which did not exist before for sale to another at a mutually agreeable price. That’s all there is. All the rest is bankers, insurance companies, and politicians. And we all know what they create….

    2) To see and help a product take life through many or few processes from beginning to end is one of the most satisfying parts of any person’s life. When I stop at a plant, any plant, and watch the trucks or trains being loaded, I often ask whomever may be around what they think of that product, I invariably see a chest puff out, the eyes sparkle, and hear, “I helped make that, it’s damned good.”

    3) In my factories I always fostered pride of workmanship. The young men and women were the easiest to train to that thought. I would assign them a “start-to-finish” or “final” job. Making a subassembly, or finishing one made further up the line. They got the chance to see, in the first case, what they were capable of; in the second, they were responsible for the last bit of work on a product. In almost every case, they would be virtually busting with pride at what they’ve “done”. Until they were settled in, they received effusive praise for good work, and encouragement to improve their substandard work. As they improved so did their paycheck. It’s not a hard method; not hard at all; it’s just been forgotten. You don’t have to teach pride and satisfaction in a job well-done…they’ll do it all by themselves.

    4) Frugality is not having a lot of “stuff”. If you don’t absolutely have to have it to survive or do your job, then you don’t need it, therefore don’t waste your money on “stuff”. Thank you, George Carlin.

    5) God does too care about you. It certainly won’t hurt for you to care about Him a little more than you have been. God knows about value-added manufacturing … His Kid was a carpenter.

    6) Trade schools. Trade schools. Trade schools. Trade schools. Trade schools. Trade schools.
    Trade schools are where you go to learn a trade to make a living to become self-sufficient to become productive to afford a family to raise more kids for more TRADE SCHOOLS.

    Did I mention Trade Schools? You need to as well…just sayin’….

    There’s a few things to think about. Go build something neat.

    Liked by 23 people

    • steph_gray says:

      I do not think that, when Johnson uses the words “value-added,” it means what you use it for (you use it correctly).

      If there is no intrinsic value in the product that comes from overseas to be assembled here, one cannot really add value where there is none to begin with. I’m thinking of the many examples above of badly built appliances finished and packaged here.

      Liked by 2 people

  14. Anonymous says:

    One major issue has been illegal immigration. It has an obvious supply/demand impact on prices for lower level labor. Hurts the working man.

    I’m in shock that Trump and Republicans want to give amnesty to “dreamers”. And I don’t care if we get a wall from it. That is a vanity project. Amnesty is bad news.

    Liked by 1 person

    • AM says:

      The wall is not a vanity project. It’s a deeply important psychological issue at this point and as Israel’s lovely wall shows, it does works. They suffer from far less terrorism and no illegal African in-migration. Lots of Mexican and South American illegals come in on foot. A wall gets rid of that method, just like you wouldn’t balk at locking your door, even though a thief could smash your windows to get in.

      Liked by 3 people

    • dayallaxeded says:

      Gotta focus on the details–it’s not all of 0bunghole’s “drama dreamers;” it’s only the ones who’ve stayed clean and are producing/contributing members of our nation. That small number will be a huge PR win for MAGA in upcoming elections, almost no matter how it goes down. It’s already ripped the mask off the Demonrats and stomped it in the gutter, showing what venal, exploitative BS scammers they’ve been all along–they couldn’t give a crap about real, decent people who came here in tow of illegals as children. If it’s not about scoffing at and abusing the law and this nation’s sovereignty, they don’t care. PDJT does care about all people, especially people who’ve proved themselves to be decent by not getting into crime or welfare.

      Like

    • Bob Thoms says:

      The wall is not a vanity project. The wall is permanent. Border agents, high tech survelliance can all be defunded by the next generation. The wall is forever.

      And if we need to trade a pathway to citizenship for 1) the wall, 2) end chain migration, 3) end lottery and 4) everify enhancement/enforcement. I am all in.

      If these reforms don’t happen w/ P Trump; they won’t happen and we will be living in an open border country.

      Like

  15. Pelicansview says:

    No doubt, the wire transfer from Tom Donahue was hitting Johnson’s account just as he ended his remarks. Conservatives should play his statement in a continuous loop on Wisconsin TV when DJT runs again in 2020.

    Liked by 9 people

  16. Anonymous says:

    One of the great stories of the last few years has been US energy renaissance. Fracking for oil and gas. Where would we be if that hadn’t happened. Back to the miserable economy of 2009.

    The problem is the “Yale or jail” attitudes of elite (and effete) coastal weasels. They think everyone should be designing an I-phone or working for McKinsey or Goldman. Or on welfare. I hate them. The country hates them too. There’s a reason Trump won and why it rocked the soft media clucks world like a left jab cracking their teeth.

    Liked by 7 people

  17. mkp says:

    In the US hardwood lumber industry we have a huge problem with the Chinese purchasing our hardwood logs – unprocessed- and shipping them off to China in containers to be processed into lumber there. Simultaneously, due to the previous 30 years of bad trade deals, China is now the largest ( 70% + in most instances ) market for our domestic hardwood lumber producers. So the Chinese overpay for our raw unprocessed logs and underpay for manufactured lumber. Its a long term strategy, on their part, with an ultimate end goal of destroying our ability to manufacture lumber here – making us solely their resource colony.
    In light of all this, a recent letter sent out by an aide to Senator Cotton ( Arkansas) addressing this very issue, bluntly stated the chances for tariffs on raw log exports were slim to non-existent. Pretty much…good luck to those affected but you just will have to live with it.
    Reading it – my reaction was WTF?
    What I’m beginning to realize is that the Republican party, for the most part, Is comprised of a bunch of Losers. They’re a bunch of total defeatists. Who knows the reasons why…but Losers they are! They all need to go – replace with men who put America and her interests first !

    Liked by 3 people

    • Maquis says:

      In his second term Trump needs to found the MAGA party, the Great America Party, and flush the GOP. I’m pretty sure he realizes that he needs to completely dominate the Republican Party and rebuild it with unabashed MAGA Principles and Trump Courage.

      Like

  18. unconqueredone (American Dreamer) says:

    I voted Toomey last time. I won’t make the mistake again.

    Liked by 3 people

    • MfM says:

      I’ll campaign against him in the primary. If he wins that, I’ll vote for him over whatever leftist Democrat they put up.

      I’ve called him repeatedly and told him what I think of him and that I wont donate or campaign for him.

      If we are able to get rid of Casey he might start seeing the writing on the wall.

      Liked by 1 person

      • unconqueredone (American Dreamer) says:

        While I mostly agree and also contact him, I will not vote for him if this behavior continues and will openly criticize him to my conservative community. Better evil in the open than in sheep’s clothing. Because PA has such scattered population (with more than half the population not in the urban centers) it is possible that someone with good grass roots support and a very well run campaign could win against either Toomey or Casey since they both depend on the urban vote.

        Sad, Toomey used to be one of the good guys.

        Like

        • Benson II says:

          Appreciate what you plan on doing to help elect the right candidate but the vote for the devil is not applicable in this case. We need a majority in the Senate and House. Trump will finesse them to get what he wants even the rino’s. We must not let the Dem’s have a larger number or majority. The time to clean house of rino’s will probably be never ending but now is not the time to do it. Like Trump we much look long term not instant gratification.

          Like

  19. Texian says:

    The corporations are descriminating against American workers.

    Johnson has inadvertently shown some light on their huge illegal discrimination activities.

    The Trump Administration needs to look into the Corporations that claim they don’t have enough workers and the ones with a high number of H1B visa employees.

    The scam they are perpetrating is they put ads out across the internet media until they collect enough applications so they can reject them them till they reach the mandated quota and then “qualify” to hire H1B visa foreigners..

    It’s the same with trade/manufacturing jobs – they ignore American applicants because they only want low wage illegals..

    Sir Trump needs to send in some Federal Auditors to audit corporations’ Human Resource departments. There is a major crime happening across the Country and the Trump Administration needs to look into it.

    Liked by 8 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      Sidenote:
      One of our local kids was thinking about a Space-Ex job and was immediately shot down by others.
      The word is out. Everyone loves the glitz of Space-Ex but the word is, they work their engineers 70-80 hours a week, burn them out, pay them peanuts on a scale to compete with the H1B foreign nationals.
      No one wants to work there.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Maquis says:

        That P****s me off. We need to own Space, lead the way to the planets and stars. It would appear that Musk isn’t concerned with “building the town” along with the factory.

        I cheer Space-X and every American enterprise that bears our dreams beyond our beloved yet fragile nest. Sad to hear that Americans are discouraged from participating, in favor of foreign profiteers.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Maquis says:

          Dang. It only occurs to me after I post! L’esprit de l’escalier…

          If product dumping is intended to damage and destroy our industries, is not the H1b visa program “skill dumping”?

          Are not cheap illegals then essentially “labor dumping”?

          Destroying incentives to seek a skill honing job with Space-X and such is not only discouraging applicants, it is discouraging the cultivation of skill and talent at all levels of education and practice.

          We happily educate foreigners alongside our own children, because they will pay more for it, then hire the foreigners for a fraction of the pay a well skilled American would expect and well earn. I wonder how many of our youth change majors or drop out as this reality dawns on them? Our talent pool is being flushed away. Our labor pool as well.

          Skill and Labor Dumping is a National Security Emergency.

          GBPDJT
          🇺🇸

          Liked by 2 people

  20. Madison Grant says:

    I’m content to let the wealthy make their wealth, and make our nation wealthy. But I’m not content to let them buy the government and make all its laws in the place of democratic input and nationalistic, civic interest by the American people. Anybody who thinks this kind of extreme ‘hands off’ Libertarian approach was the intent of the founders needs to brush up on some John Locke and the idea of the consent of the governed.

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Ziiggii says:

    HOLY SMOKES – Ben Garrison finally gets it!

    Maybe there is hope for our Republic…

    Liked by 15 people

  22. annieoakley says:

    I just have to reply to daughnworks and her part about the Catholic Church in her town. The Catholic Church is the largest facilitator of illegal immigration into the United States ever. It really makes me angry. I feel betrayed by the whole organization.

    Liked by 10 people

    • Bob Thoms says:

      A lot of Catholics feel the same. way; I don’t give them a nickel, but I enjoy attending mass at my local church.

      Liked by 2 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      Annie, I know what you mean. My family was Presbyterian but for as long as I can remember, the women in my family made items for the Catholic ladies Christmas bazaar. When they needed help building the church, we all pitched in together. Then, I married a Catholic, son to the family who started the church. So we had our feet on both sides of aisle.
      New husband is also Catholic, leader for Knights of Columbus, trying to get the new immigrants involved to volunteer and they will NOT do it. I don’t know why.
      He finally quit going – sad day.
      We were the largest contributors to that church.

      Liked by 6 people

      • AM says:

        He finally quit going Mass all together or to the volunteer stuff? We need to be so careful about not turning church into a social club. Honestly, heading to Presbyterian services is much better alternative than no church at all, if the emotional barrier is that high.

        We give next to nothing to the Church, nothing to the Bishop’s fund we’re just generally waiting for the collapse of the American Catholic Church while we go to Mass each week.

        Liked by 1 person

        • daughnworks247 says:

          We still do Presbyterian stuff, attend, contribute. Rather than force the family to choose, we did both for decades. He still volunteers for Knights of Columbus but he’s the youngest one, and he is 61.

          Liked by 1 person

          • annieoakley says:

            I did go and my children went too and it was great until I found out land and money donated to the Church for elderly in the neighborhood was full of illegals, from mainly Mexico. Stayed up all night, trashed the place and the seniors had to move out. I wrote a letter to the archbishop of the diocese and he said, “We believe every one has a right to a place to live.” Kinda did it for me.

            Liked by 1 person

      • Lindenlee says:

        If the “immigrants” are Hispanic, forget it. They are there to take, not to give. I have a house in Mexico, am not Catholic, nur almost all the charity work actually performed in the area is done by gringos of various or no faith, and very little by the Catholic church. Wthe charitable giving of most Americans is a distictly American thing.

        Like

    • AM says:

      ” I feel betrayed by the whole organization.”

      I do, too. The solution, rather than abandon the truth of the faith is to stop giving the human based organization until the message become clear that the job of the Church is to save souls, not run a border running operation or a social services center.

      Liked by 6 people

      • Deb says:

        Yes, we need to fight to make the church great again, it is more important than MAGA!

        Liked by 1 person

      • annieoakley says:

        You are right but the sermons are all about immigration and more immigration. I hear many were encouraged to vote for Barry who immediately allowed the partial birth abortions and encouraged abortions in other countries with our tax dollars too.

        Liked by 2 people

    • heidi says:

      USCCB receives millions in tax payer dollars/yr for “refugee” resettlement. Paid to betray!
      I refuse to support them even by my attendance!
      https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/tag/usccb/

      Liked by 1 person

    • Maquis says:

      Mormons too. I checked out over that. God loves a strong America.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dixie says:

      The Baptists are just as bad…..

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Bob Thoms says:

    I like being able to go to Home Depot and get a cheaply priced (and cheaply made) sander for my home improvement projects, but not enough to accept the destruction of our manufacturing base and working class families…………I wouldn’t mind if I had to pay an extra $10.00 to make that Ryobi sander in Minnesota.

    Liked by 11 people

    • Bob Thoms says:

      Especially if I get a superior product that lasts longer than 3 years.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Madison Grant says:

        It’s like my plumber told me. I can replace that connector with this Chinese part that costs 50 cents, but you’ll be calling me back out here because the cheap material will spring pinhole leaks eventually and the brilliant Chinese intellectual thieves can’t or won’t machine the threads properly. Or I can put on this American part that costs 5 dollars, and you’ll never have to replace it.

        Liked by 7 people

        • daughnworks247 says:

          Bingo.
          Don’t get me started on Vietnamese 10 penny nails.
          They stink!
          Or Chinese Steel…… it’s too green.
          Or ANY cabinet with a melamine veneer. They would not last 5 years in my kitchen.

          Liked by 6 people

        • Dixie says:

          Speaking of plumbers…..a subject for another day, but I have to tell you about my hot water heater saga. Absolutely the most ridiculous experience I’ve ever had in my life. The quality is just not there anymore; neither is the customer service.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Lindenlee says:

        I have an old Rockwell orbital hand sander I bought 40 years ago, still going strong, made in the US, and you would not believe the older workmen who want to buy it from me, even as old as it is!

        Like

    • daughnworks247 says:

      Bob Thoms, interesting tidit.
      When importing into Brazil, customs for foreign items is 35%. 18% for federal, which supports their form of social security, and 17 for state which supports their municipalities.
      When we import FROM Brazil, it’s 3.9% customs duty.
      Remember the Brazilian granite counter top craze? Yeah, that.
      But we do business in Brazil.
      And guess what our factories always want me to smuggle them —— DeWalt saw blades for tile cutting.
      De Walt is the best.

      For the guys we do business with in Egypt, they CONSTANTLY ask me to send them Milwaukee cordless drills with 2 battery packs, and extra bits. They pay almost 100% duty on them but they don’t care. They love the blue of Milwaukee.

      Here’s a wild story:
      Years ago, I had a salesman in Yemen, no kidding. His brother-in-law was the Director for the port at Aden but lived in Sana-a. He sent me a request for 8 Caterpillar backhoes and excavators, because they wanted to add onto the airport.
      I turned that one down.
      They did not want Chinese equivalents – no matter what the cost.

      Liked by 2 people

    • billrla says:

      Bob Thoms: It is rare to find U.S.-made, high-quality power tools. However, if that is what you want (it certainly is what I want), and you can find such tools, you should be willing to pay 25% to 50% more, at least. That is the real cost. Consumers have been “spoiled” to expect cheap products, but, cheap is what they get.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Bob Thoms says:

        I have alot of tools that I almost never use; maybe five or six times in my lifetime…….but when I need such a tool, it makes the job all the easier. Most weekend warriors don’t need professional level tools. That said, I wouldn’t mind paying a bit more, knowing something was built in America to higher standards than the imported crap that is on my big box hardware shelves.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Retired EE says:

        I have various tools in my shop and am careful about the quality I buy. I recently purchased a new drill press made in the US. A very good machine but when testing the runout on the chuck it was showing about 0.008″ which is not particularly good. The chuck was a no-name Chinese chuck (without the required country of origin). I put in an old Jacobs chuck I had picked up at at flea market. Without any change it was less than 0.003″. That led me to look at Jacobs a bit. It turns out they were bought by a conglomerate that closed all of their factories in the US and Europe and moved it to China!! Most of our tooling is now made in China or has a large Chinese content. Most electronic components are made off-shore with a large percentage of this in China. We are still a major manufacturing nation but critical components and materials are made off shore. We are loosing our economic base. It is very troubling.

        Liked by 1 person

  24. Elizabeth Carter says:

    Why did Senator Toomey look like the saddest, most worried man of all during the meeting? What is wrong with him?

    Liked by 3 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      tThat garbage about the USA only importing 16% of steel is absolutely WRONG (and they further claim only 2% of it is Chinese).
      I call BS.
      Ex-husband still does a lot of the welding for local contractors. 15yrs ago, he was furious with Chinese steel and tasked me to go buy American only. I can’t tell you how difficult it was to source. The Chinese steel – was everywhere.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Elizabeth Carter says:

        I have heard that the Chinese steel is of a much lower quality than US Steel. Is that true?

        Like

        • daughnworks247 says:

          Yes, it’s true. Chinese steel is “green”. That’s what American contractors call it. They mean it has not been “cured” long enough. Ex-husband hates it and every contractor I know, which is a lot of contractors, jokes about it.

          Liked by 4 people

    • ladypenquin says:

      I believe Toomey is up for reelection. Probably lots of COC dollars flowing his way, but he has betrayed the people of Pennsylvania.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Elizabeth Carter says:

        That explains a lot.

        Like

      • MfM says:

        No Toomey is not up for reelection, he got in on Trump’s coattails in 2016 so he’s up in 2022.

        In PA, it’s Casey this year. He’s run on his father’s good name for years and I really hope that he’s out this year.

        This will be one of the races that the Republicans will try and flip. Up until now Casey’s was considered a safe seat.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Lindenlee says:

      On some level, he knows he has sold his soul. At least it troubles him, unlike Mclame or Schumer, or Cory Gardner, that lying POS.

      Like

  25. LibertyONE says:

    The Elitist/RINO Repukelicans are what the DACA- DemonRATS Against the Citizens of America are….concerned ONLT with their self interests one for CHEAP LABOR ( i.e. U.S. Chamber of Commerce) the other for votes. As my old economics teacher( a youth in Nazi Germany) once said….” A COUNTRY THAT IMPORTS MORE THAN IT EXPORTS IS EVENTUALLY DOOMED TO FAIL”. Just look at of “balance” of trade DEFICITS.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. uptothere says:

    One small kernal of truth from Johnson was the false need for a four year degree to get ahead. As a result, we have educated a segment of our society with skills and work habits totally in conflict with what’s needed by our new economy. I could say the same for the majority of what now passes for an high school diploma, i.e., when was the last time a checker was able to count your change back without referring to the register?

    Liked by 3 people

    • ladypenquin says:

      Many (not all) of those four-year degrees are handed out with the person barely able to read and write literately. They get them out of high school that way – social promotion, and then have to spend their first year in college taking remedial classes.

      Yes, the cashiers can’t count the change back or do simple arithmetic. Just the other day I told the girl the amount was wrong on the register for what I had purchased and she could not add up the two items and comprehend what I was telling her. Had to call a manager over to fix the problem.

      Liked by 4 people

    • booger71 says:

      College Freshmen should be able to read, write, and perform at a 12th grade level before they become college freshmen.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. bosscook says:

    As the owner of a manufacturing company (along with my husband, who does the day to day heavy lifting) for the last 30 years, with over 50 employees, I don’t have enough fingers and toes to count the times an applicant stood in the hiring office and scoffed at a very good starting wage (mind you, these are inexperienced applicants who obviously didn’t realize that there is tremendous upside to sweeping warehouse floors first) and sneered, “heck I make more with the government paying me’ and left the building. We HAVE to destroy that mindset. We all understand WHY leftists want government to be in control (duh…I’m preaching to the choir here!) and WHY they encourage deadbeats and support them. Now, the encouraging news is that we (and all suppliers, vendors, etc in our line of manufacturing) are experiencing growth like never before. Make America Great Again….it’s going to take a complete cultural earthquake to re-establish the work ethic in a big part of the population. Just my two cents.

    Liked by 9 people

  28. ladypenquin says:

    “WE PAY PEOPLE NOT TO WORK.”
    “We pay people not to work. So we do need to be concerned about, in such a tight labor market, do we have enough workers in manufacturing.”

    I wonder if Sen. Johnson realizes what an ignorant remark he just made. He stated a conceptual oxymoron. If we’re paying people not to work, why couldn’t we STOP paying them not to work, ie. the generous welfare system, and then we would have enough workers in manufacturing and other labor intensive jobs. Republicans are fools if they think a country like America can sustain a decent way of life on a Starbucks service model. That’s not even light industry.

    Hey GOP. We have the workers, we want our industries back, (American workmanship is far better quality than foreign-made stuff) and we want a strong middle-class, not a peon class dependent on government largess to sustain a basic level of subsistence.

    The GOP is rotted and dishonest, and this is what the Tea Party folks discovered along the way. We already knew about the Dems, but the veil is gone from the GOP. Hope the President makes mincemeat of both parties.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Ditch Mitch says:

      Ahhh… “Lamar, it didn’t work for Bush, but nothing worked for Bush.”

      Liked by 6 people

    • piper567 says:

      one v big incentive to getting to work re mid-terms: Our President has stated he wants substantial Welfare Reform.
      Hard to imagine the cucks in Congress actually supporting whichever “pillars” Trump uses to define “Substantial Welfare Reform”.
      I have no doubt the President’s ideas on Welfare Reform seek to address this problem of it being more attractive to stay home and collect $$$ for nothing.

      Liked by 2 people

      • ladypenquin says:

        Piper, a few years ago, I saw numbers which indicated the average welfare recipient could collect over $50,000/yearly in benefits: Sec 8 housing, food stamps, funds, medical care. As long as they can make more OFF of the government, they won’t work. You’re right, this is what President Trump must address, and I think he plans to.

        BTW, have you heard the screams yet about replacing food stamps with actual food staples? Those non-shaming EBT cards are used for garbage food (if they’re not sold for drugs) and that too, needs to stop. Or bring back the actual paper food stamps.

        For years it bothered me how we’d buy chicken, and welfare folks are checking out at the register with steak. Hasn’t changed. Also, need to end them having fancy cars and being on welfare, or getting extensions at the beauty shop (very expensive) and nails done, all the while collecting a welfare check.

        Liked by 5 people

    • Ditch Mitch says:

      And since we can’t win with a third party, as PDJT learned with the Reform party, PDJT’s America First policies are about appealing to voters both parties by projecting a center right position.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. wodiej says:

    It’s all about the money.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ditch Mitch says:

      Interesting this morning CPI was slightly higher than estimates so the futures markets tanked.

      Guess the instituions showed their displeasure with America First policies. You know, cheap raw materials, cheap labor, low import taxes.

      Like

  30. I read through the transcript yesterday and it was disgusting.

    Liked by 3 people

      • MVW says:

        Let me point out, 60% of all Americans have 1 or more chronic disease, 1 out of 8 have 5 or more chronic diseases… and that is increasing. Don’t think this is old age, the young workers have these diseases.

        Cause is immune system suppression. Treatment is based on prior Microbiome discovery, 20th century paradigm that the body is sterile, so treatment is based on feel good immune system suppression, palliation, symptom and marker management, using high cost monopoly granted big pharma, no cure drugs.

        Lowering cost of immune system suppressing drugs is wonderful, but you are still on the down escalator to evermore sprouting and blossoming chronic diseases.

        Feel good, take a pill, then a handful of pills is a dead end. And the medical industry monopoly has our no cure treatment stuck in the 20th century.

        Liked by 1 person

        • yadent says:

          The high carb/low fat nutritional ‘guide’ that the medical industry, aided by the government, has pushed for decades is/and has been paying ‘dividends’ for some time now. And those ‘dividends’ are increasing (see Type 2 diabetes). Follow the money…….always.

          Liked by 1 person

        • “60% of all Americans have 1 or more chronic disease, 1 out of 8 have 5 or more chronic diseases”

          Sobering.

          Liked by 1 person

        • waltherppk says:

          Doesn’t anyone ever have the feeling that something is just not right, that not everything is what it seems, as if too many things have been engineered and planned out for them in advance….planned by something, or someone, a zoo keeper or overseer of sorts, and that much of what we have been observing, cooperating and accepting as sheep following the master plan, may be an illusion, manufactured as a prison for our mind?

          Like

  31. Giant Ground Sloth says:

    Even if the defense budget were increased to a trillion dollars, the military would still have issues maintaining equipment and procuring new equipment because of the country’s insufficient manufacturing capabilities.

    Like

  32. Tseg says:

    109M Americans receiving welfare and no Americans to fill manufacturing jobs? Maybe I’m bad at math?

    Liked by 1 person

  33. jfhdsiu says:

    In the vernacular of yesteryear….. “Doncha just gotta DESPISE dose DemoRepublicratcans”?

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Tony says:

    God bless Donald Trump. What do we even need political parties for? They only exist to further an agenda that leaves the American people with nothing and gives everything to the corporations, who are the real enemy of America (with a few exceptions). What happened to corporate charters? That’s a forgotten government policy that needs to be revisited and reinstituted. If a corporation won’t operate in the interest of the American people, their charter is revoked. Period.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. SeekerOfTruth says:

    Labor observations from Milwaukee, WI. Yes Ron Johnson you are blowing smoke.
    And here is why from a local with experience in this area.

    1) blue collar labor used to be strong in the inner city areas – 30-40 years ago.
    2) Then came NAFTA and other bad trade arrangements. Helping to speed the gutting of the core city manufacturing.

    3) Inner city kids used to go to school and finish High school and then find a nice paying job within a few miles of home. So they had motivation to stay in school and get a nice job like their parents had done.
    4) Now since there were no good jobs locally for the non college kids, school dropouts went up to 50% not finishing high school, crime went up. welfare went up, people pulled out of the work force and turned to less good activities.

    Sen Johnson response.
    1) Yes there is a immediate shortage of good blue collar good labor. But why? When there are thousands of local people that could be trained and motivated to fill those jobs.
    2) Manufacturing left the city leading to no job incentives and people pulling out of the work force and crimes and other things going up.

    ==> 3) High school guidance counselors always advise a child to go to college versus a trade school or other apprentice or short term training program. Why? High schools are rated by the percent of students that go to college. In fact it is a very key rating factor on the strength of the high school. They do not care if any get good jobs or have max debt, they just want that stat of how many went to college.

    4) Thousands and thousands of Milwaukee people (legal US citizens) are out of the work force with no motivation to get back in. Not enough good jobs in recent years to increase motivation for those jobs.

    Personal example from a talk with my neighbors.
    1) A new couple moved in next door to me. They are both school music teachers. They had to work 10 years to work off enough debt to get in a position to buy a modest house.
    2) We had major school reconstruction right across the street from me this last year.

    3) As I was talking the the husband (the wife is a snowflake, sorry) I pointed over at the school workers. I said look those workers are making more than you after 3 years on the job (age 20), have no debt, have a house and two kids already and live just a few blocks away from me – as I pointed. (display the US flag and wave at me as they go by)

    4) I mentioned we need more focus on blue collar training and less pushing children into a college degree that gets them nothing. He agreed. He is an Iowa farm boy like me and has many good mechanical and construction skills and I could see how he somewhat regretted his music career decision. But got pulled there by the school advice he got.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Madison Grant says:

      Excellent story. We see examples all over the place. I was a school teacher for 6 years, and there was a kid I knew who was making straight Fs in 7th grade who I later found out as an adult was making more than me because he learned how to work heavy equipment and got in with a successful construction company. I’m not glamorizing failing and being a twerp in 7th grade. The point is the young fellow had some skills that he was able to benefit from that had very little to do with what he was being required to sit still in a desk and learn in 7th grade that year. That, and he obviously matured quite a bit between age 13 and 18. Which also goes to show all these misanthropes who sneer at working class people who are living in their parents basement now or on opioids or living an aimless existence are selling short the ability of people to evolve and adapt in their lives, to learn from their screw ups, and to change course with sometimes a little tough love, but also a little opportunity.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Dixie says:

        You are so right. Some are just not inclined toward “book learning” but are better working with their hands and should follow that inclination. I know young people who never graduated from high school, yet have learned a trade that is in demand and now makes more money than we ever thought possible.

        Liked by 1 person

  36. Morgan says:

    Careers at Pacur
    Quality/Process Engineer

    Job Title: Quality/Process Engineer

    Job Description: Looking for a hands-on, self-motivated individual to fill an entry level position in our Quality/Technical Department. Duties include product development, manufacturing process improvement and quality process improvement. Activities include performing/reporting analytical tests, collection, compilation and analysis of samples/data as well as investigation and quantification of continuous process improvement activities. Responsibilities include providing technical service and reporting results of all quality and process improvement activities to both internal and external customers.

    Qualifications: Excellent communication and computer skills required. Bachelor degree in science or engineering field is desired. Experience helpful but not necessary.

    Application Instructions: Send resume to: Technical Services/Quality Manager, PACUR, 3555 Moser Street, Oshkosh, WI 54901 or email your resume to Suneer Patel at spatel@pacur.com

    This is the sole job posted on Ron Johnson’s company website. It has been there for many months.
    I guess all those Lazy, Shiftless, Quality Engineers are playing video games instead of filling Ron’s High Value Added open position.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. daughnworks247 says:

    My best girlfriend has 6 kids.
    Second to youngest, now 26 years old, is still in college after changing his major 6 times. He’s never had a job, same girlfriend for 7 years.
    Youngest one skipped college, now 23 years old, has been promoted, is making $92K a year, plenty of overtime, building roads, getting married in the fall.
    Pretty obvious who wins there.

    Liked by 5 people

  38. Bill says:

    Republican Senator Ron Johnson is clearly an a low IQ bureaucrat. It’s important to realize that one generations high tech is a another generations low tech. Manufacturing of hardware will evolve and so will the meaning of mechanics, doctors and I hope bureaucrats. Today’s mechanics have a skill set, that will be different than tomorrows mechanics, today’s doctors will have a skill set that is different from tomorrows doctors, etc. We can expect, that Knowledge and Hardware will continue to change, at an increased rate with a focus of *re-education*.

    It only means that the type of jobs will change and change quickly.

    Like

  39. daughnworks247 says:

    How can anyone own a home if they don’t know how to change out a light switch?
    The very idea would make my dad roll over in his grave.
    I found a little arc welder in the garage, brand new, still in the box, and gave it to my son for Christmas. Created a monster.
    Gotta know how to spot-weld!!!
    And…… order in French.

    Liked by 4 people

    • steph_gray says:

      I’ve always enjoyed this list of human-being skills by Robert A. Heinlein.

      “A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.”

      Liked by 4 people

  40. PGlenn says:

    Johnson seems to be suggesting that government policies and our pseudo-elites helped to create a growing population of shiftless males and, so now, we’re stuck with that paradigm and should plan 3 or 10 years into the future, accordingly. Really, dude?

    Partly because Prohibition failed, history largely forgets that alcoholism was a huge problem among the “working classes” in late 19th/early 20th America – which created large numbers of unreliable and shiftless males – yet industrial output grew substantially during that era.

    In the 1920s, after the 1921 immigration restriction act, the big corporations screamed about labor shortages, but industry boomed until the Great Depression. During the depression, there was a glut of labor, but industry did not boom. After WWII, labor was scarce, while industry boomed again. I’m not saying that labor scarcity leads to industrial growth; rather that big business crying about labor scarcity (they really mean that CHEAP labor is scarce) does not hinder industrial growth. Companies and workers find ways to produce when economic conditions and government policies are suitable . . .

    As recently as 10 years ago, “progressive” Democrats argued that “urban” crime and dysfunction wasn’t due so much to ghetto culture, welfare dependency, etc., it was because the gainful employment that once was available in the modern industrial economy was being outsourced by greedy “neo-liberals.” Now that such arguments are no longer consistent with the Democrat electoral regime and/or Cultural Marxism, they’ve discarded them like 2-year old I-phones.

    Liked by 3 people

  41. In aerospace, many of our government contracts have DFAR requirements in which specialty metals most be melted and forged in the USA (or other approved country).
    I want this principle applied to all industries and and for the metals to be USA only.

    Liked by 2 people

  42. Publius2016 says:

    The “facts” used by the Globalists are very powerful because the New Economy is based on “value-added” industries…the reality is that without an American Competitor, there will be nothing to add. Take steel, once the steel industry is consolidated overseas, there will be no jobs left. America First!

    Like

  43. . InAz says:

    Johnson said…”We need to do the value added things”.
    What the flip does that mean?!

    Liked by 1 person

    • PGlenn says:

      He essentially means advanced (or “high tech”) manufacturing as opposed to labor-intensive manufacturing. The thing is, by definition, advanced manufacturing will always be a smaller segment of the industrial economy – even if we put it on steroids. So, that leaves all other prospective, non-high-tech manufacturing workers (high school grads, etc.) in low wage service industries such as fast food workers? (And, of course, the welfare system pays better).

      One reason that advanced manufacturing became vogue in the west in the era of “globalization” is that the multinational corporations simply can’t do those functions in the third world. Believe me, they would if they could.

      So, a lot of arguments about “we need to concentrate” on value-added manufacturing are disingenuous. Yes, we must excel at advanced manufacturing, but we must not be content with that alone. We must rebuild our industrial base across the board!

      Like

  44. Doc Moore says:

    I am confused by a conflict I have seen. We are told that unemployment is very low, or nearly the lowest in history, but, I see 150 people apply for the same minimum wage job in Massachusetts. Meanwhile, here in MD extremely qualified software professionals, quite the other end of the pay spectrum, are unable to find jobs. So…who the hell is getting employed?

    Like

  45. Phil aka Felipe says:

    THIS is what our Founding Fathers fought against and warned us about and why the Constitution is structured as it it.

    FREEDOM from Bondage and Tyranny!

    Like

  46. Ross says:

    I find the comments of Mr Johnson intriguing. Doesn’t he realise that adding value to manufacturing will more often than not require high wage/salary jobs –ie higher labour costs. He is right about adding value. It is the way to go, but it does not mean low labour are needed for it to succeed. The opposite applies as high skilled labour will be needed to add the value.

    Like

  47. Good opinion piece (I think) 🙂
    https://vanguardblog.com/2017/11/01/robots-will-build-better-jobs/

    “We researched nearly 1,000 occupations and classified the more than 18,000 activities people do into 3 loose buckets totaling 41 tasks. We found that most of us spend our collective workdays on:

    Basic tasks—harvesting, moving objects, and recording information.
    Repetitive tasks—assembling, inspecting, and processing information.
    Advanced tasks—problem-solving, strategizing, and creative thinking.

    Advanced tasks are uniquely human. No matter how smart a computer becomes, humans have a comparative advantage in executing them. IBM’s Watson knows every fact and figure about the Battle of Trenton.

    But it can’t think creatively and inspire us the way my 11th-grade history teacher did when he walked us across the battlefield in the dead of winter and told us to take off our shoes. “There’s a foot of snow on the ground,” we protested.

    “Gentlemen,” he said, “the American volunteers who fought here that day didn’t have shoes on their feet.” When I close my eyes, I can still feel the snow beneath my feet. And I’ve been a student of history ever since.”

    Liked by 3 people

  48. map says:

    Ron Johnson displays a high level of dishonesty here.
    His business attracts a low-quality worker because his business pays a low-quality wage. This is the “shortage” to which he keeps referring: he pays peanuts and wonders why he gets monkeys.
    When the wage you pay for a skilled or semi-skilled manufacturing job is largely that same as fast-food or living on welfare, then, sure, you will scrape the bottom-of-the-barrel in possible employees.

    Furthermore, it’s obvious that Johnson’s company is not hiring anyone. You hire people because there are contractual obligations to fill: you need the extra people to run extra shifts and the wages reflect that urgency.

    Unwinding stupid ideas held by Republicans is a major challenge.

    Liked by 1 person

  49. JIm Murphy says:

    Yeah, who wants to bring a large tax base and well paying jobs to thier states.
    Who are these idiots?
    Why and how do we elect such morons ?

    Like

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