President Trump Discusses Puerto Rico Relief and Recovery: “Some Very Serious Decisions Need To Be Made”…

President Donald Trump discusses the short-term (relief) and long-term (recovery) efforts for Puerto Rico.    As everyone is aware, even before the storm the island territory was under financial collapse as a result of Democrat mismanagement and generational political agendas’ creating a culture of dependency.

Hurricane Maria has exacerbated Puerto Rico’s problems and is showcasing a governmental structure incapable of governing during crisis.  The media hypes the suffering, yet omits the Island’s inept systems of governance and the culture of dependency.  The only way the U.S. federal government can assist effectively is by taking over almost every aspect of state and local government.

As President Trump points out in this impromptu press conference, congress has some decisions to make on the long-term future of Puerto Rico.  Throwing money at the problem is futile when the recipient systems are fraught with ineptitude and corruption.

.

After several conversations with dozens of relief and recovery workers the message to CTH from boots-on-the-ground is the same: the culture of dependency is jaw-dropping. Watch the raw background footage from Western media on the island and see if you can spot any native Puerto Rican residents doing much, if anything, to help themselves.

FUBAR

Even in the short-term President Trump is going to have to put a parallel system of government in charge of the Island recovery; most likely a U.S. military general and an entire command system to take over every state and municipal agency.

It is going to cost hundreds of billions; if not, trillions. Then, in the longer-term, congress is going to have to decide how compensation for the largest financial bailout in U.S. history is going to be paid back to U.S. taxpayers.

FUBAR

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394 Responses to President Trump Discusses Puerto Rico Relief and Recovery: “Some Very Serious Decisions Need To Be Made”…

  1. RJ says:

    I know a construction company that went down there from Pennsylvania to work at a US Naval Base. The workers told me you couldn’t stop at red lights or stop signs for fear of being robbed at gunpoint.

    Liked by 17 people

    • benifranlkin says:

      Sounds like our big cities late at night…..I have lived in several and when driving after dark I would sometimes just keep going

      Liked by 3 people

    • Lack is not all says:

      Many latin american cities have the same problem happening at stop signs. I was in one once that the natives hang bricks from bridges at the level of the cars going on a highway under the bridge. The brick breaks the car front glass and people have to stop. Then a gang comes from the sides and rob and sometimes more to the victims. Dreadful situation. Crime is rampant in latin american cities.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mariner says:

        So of course we’re importing it as quickly as possible.

        What could go wrong?

        Liked by 5 people

      • I was driving through the Hispanic section of Tucson, AZ late one night in my pov when a yute slipped out of a vehicle next to me at a stop light and crouched down going behind my vehicle apparently to car jack me. I was a federal LEO at the time driving to a hospital where a convict had been taken to for an emergency. I was in uniform and had a 9mm pistol in my hand as the yute came up to my driver’s side door.

        Liked by 6 people

        • allspavig@gmail.com says:

          I live in Tucson and hesitate to drive, in the daytime, through “certain” parts of town. Tucson’s lovely, progressive, socialist city council has cut back on the size of police force.

          Liked by 2 people

      • magagirl says:

        During traffic in hot days (so almost every day), when people are driving with their windows down, motorcycles with two men rob you at gun point. A friend of mine shot the robber instead of handing his cellphone and a second motorcycle came over and shot him back. He almost died and by a miracle the bullet missed the aorta by a mm.

        Like

    • sunnydaze says:

      Saw a report where they were saying that is exactly why the truck drivers didn’t want to drive. They want more “security” before they dare to drive supplies out.

      Liked by 19 people

    • NJ Transplant says:

      That sounds just like Newark, NJ. You can’t stop at the red lights there after dark either. What a mess. I hope Puerto Rico has to pay federal taxes after all this finally.

      Liked by 6 people

    • backwoodsgirl123 says:

      I was checking our properties in PR a couple of years ago. They are very cheap. Then I discovered that they put in tons of solar farms and that caused major drought because it dried up the rain/moisture in the air to the point that it even dried up a hurricane in the hot humid tropics!

      So, they were having such severe water shortages they were begging the US to send a barge of water down there to them.

      And then, I was checking out the social aspects. I was so appalled at the crime that I decided they couldn’t give me a house down there!

      But yet, I wonder…how in the world did they survive before they became a US Territory and decided they needed paves roads and tourism? Somehow, they manage to buy new cars. How is that? If they are in so much debt?

      They used to be coffee and sugar cane plantations and they made rum. Can’t farm if there’s no water.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Madhatton says:

        pr doesn’t pay US income tax . The $$$ they tax there , stay there . So how did that get roads , bridges and emergency preparedness ?? Helova good partay time , though . And now WE rebuild what they didn’tdo first time ???

        Liked by 1 person

    • mcfyre2012 says:

      After 10 pm, the cops in PR would tell you not to stop at red lights because of you’d get robbed…and tis was several years ago.

      Liked by 2 people

    • dginga says:

      Was that before the Hurricane? I have friends who have gone there on vacation who say that, like Mexico, you really don’t want to leave your resort, even during the day.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. trapper says:

    Feed me clothe me house me help me. It reminds me of a person in New Orleans who was interviewed after Katrina, and her comment to the reporter was “who’s going to give me a house?”

    Liked by 19 people

    • Abster says:

      At least she was able to say it in English! Seriously, I am over all these people who want to live off the hard earned money of taxpayers. PR is a cesspool of crime and corruption. I am over caring.

      Liked by 8 people

    • Oldschool says:

      Obama, and a phone too.

      Liked by 1 person

    • backwoodsgirl123 says:

      I went to go read headlines and see updates from the MSM outlets, etc. All a bunch of BS reporting!

      But I did find an HONEST newspaper!

      http://www.miamiherald.com/news/politics-government/article175867361.html

      “The Clock is Ticking for Puerto Rico

      There are multiple agencies — local and federal — at work, with multiple chains of command.

      “The Governor is in charge of the response,” said an administration official. “FEMA, through its FCO, leads the federal support to the governor. DoD is part of the Unified command in support of the civil authorities.”

      Homeland Security Adviser Tom Bossert said the Defense Department is in charge of a lot but not everything. And while he credited Rubio with identifying a problem, he also said they were already working on it.

      In the past, federal authorities would work with local officials and let them distribute resources. But Bossert said a “business model” is being implemented in Puerto Rico where federal officials are now being stationed in local municipalities, including with mayors and water and electricity authorities, to ensure better communication.

      “He identified a problem, but it was a problem that’s already being fixed,” Bossert said of Rubio.

      He added that 10,000 federal forces are on the island, including 7,200 troops. People who need it are being airlifted off the island, but he added that of the 69 hospitals on the island, 44 remain operational.

      FEMA and Department of Defense officials emphasized that Puerto Rican Gov. Ricardo Rosselló is in charge of the island’s response, but that the federal government closely coordinates with local officials.

      “We are in lockstep with those guys,” said FEMA regional administrator John Rabin. “We are not in a waiting mode for anything. We have reached out to all 78 municipalities here in Puerto Rico and we have delivered some commodities to all of them.”

      _ ____________

      So, basically what the article is saying is that the Governor and the Mayors and other local officials don’t know what they are doing and things are moving very slowiy because of it. Which is sort of stupid. They live in hurricane alley down there and they haven’t figured out what to do yet?

      Also, the Mayor is a daggone snowflake!
      Panicking and criticizing and complaining and begging at the same time!
      The Miami Herald article above plainly stated that aid was getting in to ALL 78 Municipalities. So, the Mayor is lying. Anything to make Trump look bad!

      ‘Close to genocide’: San Juan mayor’s dire appeal to US for Puerto Rico relief
      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/29/san-juan-mayor-criticizes-us-officials-for-calling-puerto-rico-relief-effort-good-news

      Carmen Yulín Cruz makes direct call to Donald Trump: ‘I am begging you to take charge and save lives. Enough is enough’

      Liked by 2 people

      • decisiontime16 says:

        Professionals play big role in latest Puerto Rico migration

        Pew Research Center research says more than 50,000 people have left Puerto Rico for the continental U.S., on average, during the past three years.

        That rate nearly doubled the average of the previous six years. That number is expected to increase. Mark Lopez, Pew’s director of Hispanic Research, said job opportunities serve as the primary reason people move.

        “Many young Puerto Ricans are looking for an opportunity, and many are choosing to move to the U.S.,” Lopez said. “It’s really a continuation of the out-migration of some of Puerto Rico’s most productive citizens.”

        http://www.orlandosentinel.com/business/os-puerto-rico-specialists-move-north-20150724-story.html

        Liberals taint everything they touch and then want “help” while still trashing the helpers.
        Losers from start to finish.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Rev.Bro. Generik Broderick says:

    Might we consider re-naming Puerto Rico,”Reperations”?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. kurt72 says:

    This is not America! Let them be an independent nation. Maybe the UN will help them if they won’t help themselves.

    Liked by 8 people

    • jackphatz says:

      If my memory serves correctly, it was the actual citizens who did not want to become a ‘state’, but remain as it was. Fast forward to on the brink of bankruptcy and suddenly the locals want Uncle Sam to take care of them. You know, we’ll be bailing this hell hole out too and the Leftards will be wailing if anyone tries to make them responsible.
      Maybe Hank can make PR tip over.

      Liked by 17 people

      • NJ Transplant says:

        They don’t want to be a state because then they have to pay federal taxes like the rest of us. How many tourists go there anymore with their crime rate?

        Liked by 5 people

        • jackphatz says:

          I’ve never known anyone who vacationed there.

          Liked by 2 people

          • dginga says:

            I know people who have vacationed there and they say that, outside of the resorts, it is pretty much a hellhole, as well as being dangerous.

            I vacationed in St. Croix once and, other than there being not much to do, there didn’t appear to be a lot of crime or anything. There are very wealthy areas and extreme poverty. Friends who live on St. Croix say the U.S. government – meaning we the taxpayers – send hundreds of millions of dollars to St. Croix in welfare benefits every year to pay for the lifestyles of the poor and indolent on the island.

            Liked by 2 people

      • Old fogey says:

        What I do not understand is why the decision to make them a state is theirs to make. Shouldn’t it be up to the rest of us to decide whether we wish to have 51 states? I certainly would not vote for statehood for Puerto Rico.

        Liked by 8 people

      • daughnworks247 says:

        On June 12, 2017, Puerto Rico voted 97% for statehood but only 23% of population voted. Trump DOJ offered other choice on the referendum and they are arguing about the referendum not being approved by USA DOJ.

        Liked by 1 person

        • jackphatz says:

          So really 77% don’t want to become #51 but won’t take to the streets in opposition until it’s actually forced upon them. I think we should also get a say in this too, but we won’t.

          Like

    • Garrison Hall says:

      I was just going to say the same thing. There’s already a strong independence movement in Puerto Rico that is virulently anti-American.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Nivy says:

      How have they supported themselves all these years?? I believe Trump can build this into a tourist Mecca, but at what cost??

      Generations have lived on this island, and generations more can.

      They are strong, intelligent people. Give them the opportunity to build their homeland.

      We don’t have to build them a perfect world. Just give them the tools and the support. They will do it themselves

      Like

      • sundance says:

        …”They will do it themselves”…

        No they won’t.

        If they wanted to, they would have already.

        Accept things as they are, not as an emotional perspective would lead you to think they could be. They will not do it themselves because they choose not do have done it ever. That’s the unfortunate reality.

        Liked by 26 people

        • backwoodsgirl123 says:

          This is SCARY Sundance!

          The Ugly Truth About Puerto Rico Wanting U.S. Statehood
          Stefan Molyneux

          Liked by 1 person

        • kittymyers says:

          One of my relatives, who lives in Boca Raton (if that’s of any consequence), said the deaths in Puerto Rico are on Trump because the supplies are sitting there in the bay on ship and not getting to the people. So I took a big gamble and posted the link to CTH’s post, “FEMA Administrator Brock Long Explains Puerto Rico Recovery Issues….”

          This was her reply: “Read it already. I read all sides. Trump hates Hispanics and doesn’t care how many die. These aren’t rich Texans. The mismanagement of preparation, recovery in the American island of PR is not a mistake and IS unconscionable.”

          Like

        • McGuffin says:

          Thank you! Saved me the trouble. Only you said it nicer than I would have.

          Like

      • theduchessofkitty says:

        The thing is. the tools have already been given! There are plenty of accredited universities over there. Problem is, there are NO JOBS. So, what does a professional with a college degree do when there are NO JOBS at home?

        You guessed it: they pack their bags.

        Thus, the huge migration to the Mainland, especially Florida.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Old Codger says:

        “They are strong, intelligent people.”

        Just what evidence do you possess in support of that supposition?
        I strongly suggest the exact opposite is more correct.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Joe says:

    Why we can’t accept a DACA amnesty (we lose the Electoral College):

    Liked by 5 people

    • theduchessofkitty says:

      First of all, they will NOT be refugees. The majority have relatives in the Mainland.

      Second, the island was already an economic, fiscal, and employment nightmare. Whenever you went to SJU airport, more people were LEAVING the island than arriving there. I saw that with my own eyes – and I was only going on vacation to see my mother.

      Third, many of us give our votes to the GOP. I never considered myself part of a political monolith. I am no one’s sheep – especially a Democrat’s sheep.

      Liked by 3 people

  6. jackphatz says:

    This must be why the Mexicans don’t float to PR!

    s/ but I mean it.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. scott467 says:

    “It is going to cost hundreds of billions; if not, trillions.”

    _____________

    We don’t have it.

    Simple as that.

    Puerto Rico’s entire system was corrupted to the core by Leftism/Marxism.

    Time for Bill Gates and Suckerberg and the rest of the chattering class to step up and bail out Puerto Rico.

    Do it for the chid’ren.

    .
    .

    “Then, in the longer-term, congress is going to have to decide how compensation for the largest financial bailout in U.S. history is going to be paid back to U.S. taxpayers.”

    _________

    That’s not even funny.

    There is a better chance of Puerto Rico saving itself than there is of Congress lifting a single wicked finger and doing a single solitary thing for the U.S. Taxpayers.

    They are vampires, not representatives.

    Liked by 20 people

    • MaineCoon says:

      “Then, in the longer-term, congress is going to have to decide how compensation for the largest financial bailout in U.S. history is going to be paid back to U.S. taxpayers.”

      What the heck are the options for a payback? Seriously?

      Maybe we should make it a gambling destinations and take 75% of the $$$. All the cruise ships could stop over. Promote it in Europe, SA.

      If the Puerto Ricans won’t work in the casinos, we could import some Italians or a few people from Vegas.

      Short of this plan I can’t think of how they will pay the taxpayer back.

      I don’t want to induct PR as a bankrupt state. Nope. Nor anymore future bailouts.

      Any ideas?

      Liked by 9 people

      • wolfmoon1776 says:

        My feeling is that to make this a winner, what Trump and sundance are both hinting at needs to happen. We turn it into an opportunity by MILITARY TAKEOVER.

        We “force them into a deal”.

        We turn crisis into “gunpoint opportunity”.

        Basically, we control the outcome by taking control. And we USE Hillary to do it!

        We take the leftist meme “OMG – it’s Trump’s disaster”, and weaponize it to TAKE OVER in a military fashion, then turn it back into a military-controlled territory.

        Basically used this as Trump’s “economic Grenada”an island invasion, Trump style.

        Basically, we REMOVE SOCIALISM and NEVER GIVE THE ISLAND BACK.

        No – I think this could be a good thing. Cankles started the “humanitarian disaster” ball rolling – so we RUN WITH IT. It’s SO BAD that Trump basically turns it back into an occupied territory. Then we remove socialism completely.

        Liked by 6 people

        • dutzie60 says:

          wolf, I hope this would mean all the natives stay right there in the island. We can’t afford for them to come here. They can be given sea rations to eat.

          Liked by 4 people

        • MaineCoon says:

          Food for thought…

          Liked by 1 person

        • mariner says:

          All those military guns are no use unless we, you know, use them.

          Crime and corruption are rampant there, and supervision or no civil life is not possible.

          Since we’re not willing to shoot criminals this is a fool’s errand.

          Liked by 2 people

          • wolfmoon1776 says:

            Change rules as needed. We’ve occupied many places. “Self-occupation” should be a walk in the park. We control what information gets in or out during an occupation – right?

            We HAVE to do something. What I’m saying is basically finish the job and TAKE control as payment for the fix, then use that to reap political spoils. Show them that Trump can fix it. SHOWCASE. Let the military do what THEY think is best. Guarantee it will work. No nonsense. Treat it as “friendly oppressed population liberated from socialists by a disaster”. Might actually scare Cuba – THAT would be fun! 😉

            Liked by 4 people

            • Benson II says:

              We did it in Japan after the war but I doubt even the military has the same mind set we had back then.

              Liked by 1 person

              • wolfmoon1776 says:

                So true – completely different mindset.

                BUT, on the other hand, our military psy-ops are even better today than they were at the end of WWII, and back then, they were absolutely impressive.

                They may have even been TOO GOOD back then, given that the people of Germany and Japan have been left so sheep-like, that East Germany (Merkel) was able to turn Germany into a bit of a poison pill for NATO and the EU.

                Alas, too few believe me that globalism was as much of a hoax as global warming. Nor do they see the two-handed ripping motion that the East Bloc did on NATO and the EU.

                Merkel comes in and rips Germany to the left with “migrant” nuttiness, pre-tested by the socialist left and dupe right with the Gastarbeiter nonsense (compare to America and illegal immigrants). Meanwhile, rightist late-joiners refuse to take part in the crazy. Rip, rip, rip!

                Communist plots never die. They just get incredibly smart, patient, and deceptive, as the communists get stealthier.

                Anyway, I still think our military has the good stuff, and if tasked with giving PR a makeover, they can do it.

                Love this post!

                Like

        • theduchessofkitty says:

          There was already a military government in the island. Under Spain for almost four-hundred years. Under the USA, for eighteen months.

          Liked by 1 person

      • scott467 says:

        “What the heck are the options for a payback? Seriously?”

        _______________

        You mean ‘real’ options?

        Options that are not a Leftist fantasy or a government boondoggle?

        None. Zero, zip, zilch, nada.

        Even the IDEA that Puerto Rico could ever pay it back is a Unicorn being ridden by Bigfoot on the way home from a successful snipe hunt.

        There’s a better chance that someone working for minimum wage can pay off the United States’ national debt than Puerto Rico ‘repaying’ the cost of rebuilding the entire island.

        It will never happen, and any politician saying otherwise should be shot right in the liar.

        Liked by 5 people

        • MaineCoon says:

          That’s my thinking although I came up with a casino tourist destination scenario. No way it would payoff the debt. Wolf’s suggestion is interesting.

          Like

      • Prettyplease says:

        Suggestions:
        1. US could buy the island for a few beads and then sell it off to oligarchs. I’m sure Russia would love to build a base there.
        2. Maybe we could turn it into Gitmo II and give Gitmo I back to Cuba. Once we start the tribunals and the swamp creatures are convicted, we’ve got to have somewhere to warehouse all their sorry asses.
        3. Turn it into a national Park. If crime isn’t rampant there, maybe Americans would want to visit.
        4. Do like the state of Georgia did with Jekyll Island. The state owns the island and people can build businesses and homes there on a land lease with strict provisions on what can be done. Since it’s offshore maybe they could cut a tax deal.
        5. Maybe if we leave the supplies lying around there, the natives will get tired of doing nothing and pick up a hammer and swing it. Sometimes it’s a do or die situation that finally gets people going in their own salvation.

        Liked by 1 person

        • MaineCoon says:

          6. Compete with Caymen Island’s for the off-shore banking business. Course, USA corps couldn’t benefit, but Eurpeans and SA ones probably could.

          7. See up some major corp manufacturing plants. We’d be able to label it “Made in USA Territory by Americans”

          8. Wonder if they could have pineapple plantations in PR. They were all the rage years ago in Hawaii. Not sure what happened to them in HA.

          9. Can they grow cotton in PR? I like cotton clothing. They could manufacture linens. We out sourced the entire towel industry from NC to wherever. Again using the “Made in USA Territory by Americans” label.

          10. We could send all old aircraft to a graveyard in PR instead of AZ (?). Salt air deteriorates metal much faster.

          Please feel free to add to this list!

          Liked by 1 person

        • The Demon Slick says:

          Phase 1 – recreate dinosaurs
          Phase 2 – release them on Puerto Rico
          Phase 3 – wait a while.
          Phase 4 – Jurassic park!

          Like

      • daughnworks247 says:

        We had the ‘What to do with Puerto Rico?” discussion last night.
        Premise #1. It has to be a money-maker for the USA taxpayer.
        Basic stats from Wikipedia, so take it for what it’s worth:
        45% under poverty line rate, only 18% college grad rate (as opposed to about 31% in USA), 97% literacy rate, about 60% high school graduation rate (low).
        Therefore, the workforce is not as highly trained, educated, as a location in Alabama, Idaho, or Massachusetts.
        Option #1. Major military base/winter training, cyber security for western hemisphere, etc. I think PR kicked the USA out of a major base in 2004(???). No snow and geographically strategic.
        Option #2. Creation of our western hemisphere’s first deep water, super-ports for cargo, mimicing major shipping transhipment ports of Singapore/HongKong/LaSpezia/Salalah. Transport fees become source of income for bondholders.
        Option #2A. Creation of the super-port makes other things possible. Further, STEAL the stone/quartz/dimensional stone/building products industry from China and put it PR. Blocks of stone can easily be brought into the new super-ports, cut, manufactured, for distribution to USA and all of western hemisphere. Same for kitchen cabinets, drywall, lumber, trim manufacturing, and metals. Perfect industries for the workforce of Puerto Rico (or any city within the USA but a super-port makes the transition doable). City of Xiamen, China was built on this idea, employing millions.
        Option #3. Use Israeli technology for salt-water conversion to fresh water, and build on that tech, supplying the whole island. Water ‘fees’ then repay bondholders.
        Option #4. Major airline hub/expansion for travel and cargo for routes from NA to South America.
        Option #5. Big pharma research on rain forrest sources for new meds (they were doing this already, pharms is already a big export of PR)
        Option #6. STEAL the fresh-flower industry of Columbia and move it to PR.
        Option #7. Sales tax of 2 cents/3cents per dollar for every dollar spent, until the USA is paid back.
        Option #8. Tourism with a LOT of advertising. After all, it will be brand new.
        Option #9. Tropical fruit export, fish and…
        Option #10. RUM!!!!!!

        Like

      • TwoLaine says:

        Send the Indian tribes down there to teach them how to get gaming done.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_gaming

        My guess is you will soon see a run on property by the fat cats. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard someone say I have property down there, or a business down there this week.

        Like

    • jackphatz says:

      They way the Hollywoodies are braying in the wind about “Trump not helping PR” they should be shamed into another one of their patented telefundraising scheme so they can be on their moral high horse.

      Liked by 3 people

      • scott467 says:

        “They way the Hollywoodies are braying in the wind about “Trump not helping PR” they should be shamed into another one of their patented telefundraising scheme so they can be on their moral high horse.”

        ________________

        Trump could seize all of the Hollyweirdos’ assets, liquidate them, and use the proceeds to rebuild Puerto Rico. Tell the Hollywierdos he was just ‘spreading the wealth around’ and give them a cheap participation trophy for their contribution.

        .

        Liked by 4 people

    • Old Codger says:

      “Time for Bill Gates and Suckerberg and the rest of the chattering class to step up and bail out Puerto Rico.”

      Just like they bailed out Haiti, riiiight? Only if there’s graft and corruption involved, will the “Chattering class” participate!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. sunnydaze says:

    This complaining about US efforts to help PR is going to Backfire. Big League.

    That is my prediction, and I’m sticking to it.

    So bring it on MSM and Whiners, Inc.

    Liked by 14 people

  9. A2 says:

    China has had a big push to invest in Puerto Rico since their financial crash. Part of the Belt and Road neo-imperialist economic domination by the PRC. I wonder if this recent disaster has changed minds.

    “USD500b investment | Exotic China plan to rescue Puerto Rico’s economy”
    http://uschnews.com/usd500b-investment-exotic-china-plan-to-rescue-puerto-ricos-economy/

    Liked by 3 people

  10. G. Combs says:

    One Word

    P A R A S I T E S

    Liked by 12 people

  11. auntiefran413 says:

    They vote for statehood only when the financial situation is desperate:
    ‘ A 2012 referendum showed a majority (54% of those who voted) disagreed with “the present form of territorial status”. A second question asking about a new model, had full statehood the preferred option among those who voted for a change of status, although a significant number of people did not answer the second question of the referendum.[25] Another fifth referendum was held on June 11, 2017, with “Statehood” and “Independence/Free Association” initially as the only available choices. At the recommendation of the Department of Justice, an option for the “current territorial status” was added.[26] The referendum showed an overwhelming support for statehood, with 97.18% voting for it, although the voter turnout had a historically low figure of only 22.99% of the registered voters casting their ballots.” – Wikipedia

    Liked by 3 people

  12. DeWalt says:

    Yep. I knew it. Scott said here come the Puerto Ricans. Lord have Mercy!

    Like

    • sunnydaze says:

      I wonder if this is why the PR Gov. is allowing all those pallets of supplies to just sit and rot in the sun down there.

      I’m getting so pi$$ed. Saw another vid. of that horrible San Juan Mayor, standing in front of pallets of water, blaming everyone except herself.

      Hopefully, most of these folks will just head up to NY. The LAST thing we need in FL. is a bunch of people who don’t prepare for hurricanes and won’t pitch in to help their neighbors when the SHTF.

      Liked by 5 people

      • backwoodsgirl123 says:

        Amen!

        How in the world an island that is prone to hurricanes can’t get it’s act together and prepare for the inevitable I don’t know!

        We live below the poverty level and yet we manage to prep! We don’t have the nice new vehicles that I saw in the line for fuel, our are old.

        All year long I stick stuff back for prepping. And the day after the hurricane, our roads in our small town were cleared. We piled tree limbs higher than the tops of cars on the sides of the roads but vehicles could get through.

        It was a matter of being able to get out if we needed to and making sure those power trucks could get through. We went a week without power. But we had stored up gasoline for the generator. We had food stuffs put back and candles and batteries.

        You live in a hurricane prone area and if you aren’t stupid as dirt you prepare!

        Liked by 13 people

      • theduchessofkitty says:

        Let me tell you what’s going on. Those supply containers are lingering at the port because, get this, the Trucker’s Union want to bribe the Government. They don’t like FEMA doing the job, do they want lots of money in kickbacks. Meanwhile, they don’t give a rat that people are dying or starving.

        And it gets even worse. Today, I watched a video of demonstrations by the San Juan Convention Center. Their beef: they don’t want the US ARMY to help in any distribution of supplies or rescue, recovery and rebuilding. “NO ARMY! FOOD AND WATER! NO ARMY!” was their chant. Those are definitely Independentistas. They’d rather see PR starve than to see the people get any help from America.

        Liked by 2 people

        • backwoodsgirl123 says:

          Well, they lost all of the way around then, because Trump sent at least 1,000 truck drivers down there with security.

          Liked by 1 person

          • LCSmom says:

            Bring in the scabs if the union drivers refuse to do their jobs.

            I wish Trump could be more straightforward about the problems, but he is too gracious to call these people incompetent.

            He obviously cares more about getting help to the people than what lies are being said about him. What a great leader we have.

            Liked by 2 people

        • dginga says:

          Funny how none of this is being broadcast in the MSM. (sarc). I get the most accurate news about PR from the Treehouse. Trump needs to get this info out into the public domain.

          Liked by 1 person

  13. annieoakley says:

    Somehow, some way the Federal Government is going to figure out a way to take some money out of my little Social Security check, for Puerto Rico.

    Liked by 4 people

  14. Apfelcobbler says:

    Since decisions need to be made, the media decides Puerto Rico is the 51st state and therefore we are obligated to rebuild it.

    Notice Trump was quite tactful, taking care to hurt no one’s “feelings” about being no-shows and layabouts!

    Liked by 4 people

  15. VegasGuy says:

    The Island is only 110 miles by 40 miles…..Give the logistics job to the Army Corps Of Engineers & it should be resolved quickly (relatively in any event).

    For instance, divide the Island into 8 grids along major roadways. The 110 mile length divided into 4 staging area and the 40 mile width into 2 at 20 mile segments.
    Use heavy lift choppers to get fuel bladders to these points. Use the same heavy lift choppers to station Fire Engines there along with commercial generators.
    (Yes I said Fire Engines…If they can pump water they can pump fuel).

    If they emptied just a single aircraft carrier and loaded it with supplies, & stationed a fleet of heavy choppers on deck, the logistics of moving fuel & supplies to the staging areas could easily be accomplished & sustained. Move transport trucks to the staging areas so their distribution cycles would be within a 20 to 25 mile one way trip max. Many round trip capabilities with such a method.

    JMHO but something like this would certainly work and would speed up the recovery big time.
    How do I know? This same tactic was employed in Viet Nam 50 years ago to resupply mechanized units which were mobile for weeks at a time and need constant re-supply of ammo, food, uniforms. and fuel, etc……I served in one such Mech unit so I speak with first hand knowledge….

    Staging areas with short hops. heavy lift choppers to keep a steady supply inbound, generators & pumping ability in place, and Military vehicles (with drivers) to distribute….

    This is not rocket science….Just do it

    Liked by 20 people

    • larry outlaw says:

      Vegas Guy, That would be to easy, There are not to many smart people in our gov. to Think along them lines.All they do is throw money at everything. Thanks for your service and God Bless.

      Liked by 7 people

    • From what I’ve read about conditions in Puerto Rico, you would need to post armed military people at each drop. You would also have to send armed convoys with each vehicle coming in to take supplies out to hospitals, stores, and gas stations. If this wasn’t done, the supplies dropped would be looted, carried away, and then sold.

      The reason that the truck drivers aren’t showing up at the docks, to pick up the supply containers, is that they would be robbed within a few miles after leaving the dock area. They have to all be escorted, to even have a chance of reaching a distribution point.

      This is not the jungles of Viet Nam. This is much worse.

      Liked by 9 people

    • G. Combs says:

      Don’t forget the guards with machine guns just like in ‘Nam.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sam says:

      If there is one thing the Army is very good at, it’s logistics. Piece of cake.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Many of our Treepers are falling into the Libtard trap! “PR citizens are victims. They need help. Doesn’t matter where it comes from.”

      However, it does matter. Remember how Pres. Trump kept emphasizing how well FEMA personnel were working with the local government agencies. Originally FEMA was only intended to help cities and counties, Not people. Cities and counties were supposed to take care of the PEOPLE.

      That is now morphing into Feds must help all! That is insane! Feds have no responsibility at all to take care of local agencies, people or businesses. Like power companies, for example.

      Like

  16. paulraven1 says:

    Trump could do so much more in these exchanges to puncture the media and Left. He always seems to be pulling his punches and missing opportunities.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. CorwinAmber says:

    can you imagine how much better the response could be if Rosey Roads was still open? But, nooooo, activists couldn’t stand the thought of precious Vieques being used as a bombing range. Well, guess what Einstein, once the bombing range was shut down, the naval base was no longer necessary so “vaya con dios, muchachos!” SMDH

    Liked by 3 people

  18. Ber Knar says:

    Watched Geraldo report on the ground. Stood there holding a dangling downed power line talking about the damage. Glad someone didn’t get it hooked up ahead of schedule.

    Liked by 6 people

  19. JAS says:

    Sorry to do this Sundance, but I will call you out on this one – you are wrong.

    Culture of dependency? Do the numbers, I have. Each living person in PR is on the hook for their government’s misgivings for $20,000 or so a head. All of us here in the U.S. are on the hook for $57,142, as of today.

    The only difference is that we can print money, whereas PR cannot. That’s IT. And that is of course why when you and I go to the supermarket to buy beef it’s 200% or so more expensive than it was 10 years ago.

    One more thing, the people of PR have been under colonial rule for the last 100+ years, no collective voice on their own destiny. So, they’ve learned how to work the system. The metrics the US uses to judge the condition of the people in PR are the same they use for us here, and they don’t apply. Why you ask? It’s simple, PR has a cash economy orders of magnitude greater than ours – per capita. That economy is not recorded by our metrics (wages made, taxes paid, etc.)

    You don’t know much about Puerto Rico, and believe me, I do. Been doing business there for over 20 years, and can speak the language (French too in case you’re wondering). There are a lot of very smart, resourceful people there, and I’m talking about average joe’s.

    And by the way, there are no trailer parks in PR. No one down there is that stupid to live in a trailer in hurricane alley (Florida is in the alley with ton of trailer parks). Most all but 6 people so far survived 150mph winds, and floods. And they did not, and could not, flee to Georgia and points North. How did they do that?

    Regards…

    Liked by 3 people

    • Athena the Warrior says:

      Then why is Puerto Rico a pathetic, 3rd world place? It’s just a territory we “won” from the Spanish-American War. The only reason we could have possibly taken it in is because of its proximity to us. Other than that what good is it to us? NOTHING!

      Put the right kinds of people down there and the island would be up and running in three to five years. It could be a great trading, tourism, and agriculture port.

      Their great “cash economy” doesn’t seem to be working out too well.

      Liked by 2 people

    • tony5460 says:

      Good inside. It’s always easy to pain everyone with the same brush. I don’t also blame the government worker or truck driver not showing up in a catastrophe this magnitude.

      Liked by 1 person

      • wondering999 says:

        Not if it means your family will be looted and abused by the gangs while you are away and they are vulnerable, I wouldn’t go to work either, we’d all stick together at home

        Like

    • sunnydaze says:

      Thankyou for that perspective, JAS.

      I really want to believe they are not as big of losers as they appear to be here. Especially since it looks like they may be heading our way.

      That San Juan Mayor and our MSM is not helping At.All.

      I TOTALLY agree that cultures who have been under Foreign Rule, wether it’s Spain or China or whatever totally lose themselves and become pathetically dependent. Kind of a “Giving Up”. Seen it numerous times and it’s very sad.

      Liked by 1 person

    • sundance says:

      Nothing you state refutes the culture of dependency.

      Start with the number of people who work for government.
      Then consider that 50% of the municipal workforce refused to show up post hurricane.
      Then evaluate and explain why 50% of the PR National Guard refused to report for duty.

      Don’t assume I don’t know the Island (I do), or the culture of which I speak, I also do.

      Liked by 12 people

      • joeknuckles says:

        And the mayor of San Juan just whines and makes political hay instead of utilizing the resources that have been sent to her.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Guyver1 says:

          Sundance is absolutely correct.
          That commie dim major of San Juan had the audacity to say in an interview “I’m mad as hell because my people’s lives are at stake… (Trump) is killing us with inefficiency”…
          And she had the audacity to say so while standing in front of pallets full of FEMA supplies…

          Article:
          http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/09/san-juan-mayor-tells-liberal-media-getting-no-help-trump-stands-front-pallets-aid/
          She, like most people on the island, did not take Maria seriously. Did nothing to get ready.
          And she wants the federal government to hold her hand and do everything for her, while she blames the federal government for what is going on in order to cover for her stupidity and corruption.
          Typical liberal.
          Refusing to take the blame for her stupid, and demanding that someone else do everything for her while blaming that very same person for her stupid and lack of action.
          A few days ago she was praising the President for his response.
          Now she got her orders from her liberal overlords, and is criticizing him.
          Liberals are the scum of the Universe…

          Liked by 2 people

          • TwoLaine says:

            Correct. The reason TX & FL worked as smoothly as they did was because of their awesome Governors, and a lot of pre-planning and dedicated work between them, their staff, FEMA, and local law enforcement. Many years/months in advance, and then again in the week(s) leading up to the event. They worked until it was too dangerous to work and then they waited it out with everyone else.

            The minute the storm had passed, they all continued with their duties and never once said I have to take care of my house 1st. They had a plan and they executed on it skillfully and with precision. Have everyone staged to clear the roads and power lines, so transport can start getting through. All hands on deck.

            What a difference.

            Liked by 1 person

    • backwoodsgirl123 says:

      Actually, you are wrong!

      See the video above that I posted to Sundance!

      Liked by 1 person

    • abstain says:

      Thank you.

      Like

  20. starfcker says:

    There is some good in this situation. The return to the primacy of the nation state, in other words, the end of globalization at the expense of the American taxpayer, is going to require the deconstruction of many, many Agenda 21 civilizations. Take away the punchbowl, and communities are going to have to figure out how much civilization they can afford, and are willing to maintain. We might as well start here. Trump knows that. Big decisions ahead, indeed.

    Liked by 5 people

  21. MaineCoon says:

    I’m re-posting my rNt and rebuttal to post earlier this week. It applies here too.

    “Treated as American citizens?…then why don’t they act like the majority of American citizens who work hard? Why aren’t they reacting to this crisis in the same many as the American citizens in Texas and Florida who worked to help themselves and their neighbors after Harvey & Irma struck?

    “Repay its debts”?? Educate yourself. PR is bankrupt. Mismanaged. Extremely corrupt government.

    President Trump waived the initial 25% fee for crisis managment for Puerto Rico. A bail out. Guess you can guess why. PR is broke. Mismanaged.

    https://www.elnuevodia.com/english/english/nota/trumparrivesinpuertoricoontuesday-2360853/

    You say, “if Trump pulls this off, he will win over the 4mill PR voters who live in the States and that will shore up 2020.” Really?

    “Residents of Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories do not have voting representation in the United States Congress, and are not entitled to electoral votes for President. … Like other territories, Puerto Rico can participate in the presidential primary process. Like other territories, Puerto Rico can participate in the presidential primary process. It holds a primary election in the spring of each presidential election year. Then the parties choose delegates to the Republican and Democratic National Convention, who are pledged to vote at that convention for the winners of Puerto Rico’s primary, but that’s the end of their participation in the presidential election.”

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_voting_rights_in_Puerto_Rico

    You say, “We’ve managed to rape the island of all major commerce so it sits in a den of incompetence and thievery.”

    Middle class Americans have been raped and pillaged of everything they have for the last 3 decades. Most are not interested bailing out any more banks, countries or territories based on the consensus of the posters. America First. Americans have generous hearts and are generous people on the whole, but not when they are just plain being taken advantage of. This article states distasteful facts. The article and the comments speak for themselves. It leaves a bad taste in Americans mouths to bail out those who won’t even help themselves.

    We can’t afford any more freeloaders — be it PR or other countries. As PT has said, other countries need to start paying their share. That goes for PR too.

    You say your relatives are “all waiting to see how Trump plays this out long term.”

    Per SD, “The culture within the island nation is based around comfortable dependency, and Puerto Ricans are currently showing no capacity to care for themselves, their neighbors, or take action as individual communities to help their own recovery.
    There are thousands of tons of relief supplies sitting in ports, 3,000 full containers, with the U.S. army ready to help load up Puerto Rican trucks for local delivery. However, the municipal governments and local transportation officials are not lifting a finger to get these supplies into their communities.”

    While PRs wait around and do nothing to help their situation, it is very sad that they will not assist in the restoration of what most likely is a beautiful island.

    They won’t assist in the restoration of their property, their island, their culture? If they won’t, what incentive does the hard working American taxpayer have to bail them out?

    Shame on.

    Liked by 10 people

    • WhistlingPast says:

      +1
      It’s no different when they move to the mainland USA. They bring the same values and same issues to every neighborhood they populate.

      Liked by 3 people

      • h/t Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim
        I like to be in America!
        O.K. by me in America!
        Ev’rything free in America!
        For a small fee in America!

        Automobile in America,
        Chromium steel in America,
        Wire-spoke wheel in America,
        Very big deal in America!

        I like the shores of America!
        Comfort is yours in America!
        Knobs on the doors in America!
        Wall-to-wall floors in America!

        Liked by 2 people

      • tigsmom says:

        My daughter lives in Kissimee, FL. They have a massive illegal and recent emigre PR population. She said the Mexicans keep up their yards, the PR’s, not so much.

        Like

  22. Can we get all that money back Obama gave Iran and give it to Puerto Rico?

    Liked by 2 people

  23. joeknuckles says:

    I wish somebody would ask that screeching mayor what steps she is taking to help people in need. All she’s doing is playing politics.

    Like

  24. MaineCoon says:

    Brace yourself, Florida. Potential 100,000 Puerto Ricans might immigrate to Florida!

    Something needs to be done about that before it happens.

    https://www.elnuevodia.com/english/english/nota/migrationtofloridaafterhurricanemaria-2360820/

    Like

    • Guyver1 says:

      They will be fleeing the island because a hurricane tore it up.
      I hope that when they realize that both Florida and Texas also got hit by hurricanes this year, they will be so scared that most will get tickets to New York City or Chicago, both in blue states. Where they would not affect the electoral college.
      That would be good, it would keep them from turning a red state blue.

      Like

  25. youme says:

    There is the RICO case in federal court over Prepa fuel oil scam that cost Puerto Ricans ~$1 billion. If we give them money, they will steal it…

    Liked by 5 people

  26. Nailbanger says:

    Who is John Galt!
    You want to help em, you pay for it

    Like

  27. Howie says:

    The Tropical Superdome.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. mariner says:

    In other words, Puerto Rico really IS another Katrina.

    The local crime, corruption and fiscal irresponsibility wrecked Puerto Rico, but that’s not the story the media wants to tell.

    Liked by 5 people

  29. CaliVet says:

    I would like to chime in on this. My maternal grandparents where from Puerto Rico, Ponce to be exact. My grandfather served honorably in the US Army during WW1 in France. Fortunately, my grandparents had the good sense to migrate to NY after my grandfather returned, as did many of my relatives.
    I still have very distant relatives in PR, but have not seen them in over 30 years, and have never been close. I have been in PR many times; the last time being in 2008 for business. There is a lot of crime, corruption and laziness among the general population. Not all of the natives are this way, but enough are which makes it look bad for the entire populace. I believe this is more of a generational attitude than an established cultural trait. Though my grandparents passed when I was a young lad, they always would tell me to be honest, dependable, and to work hard to achieve the fruits of your labor.
    I am totally against “bailing” out PR, and would love nothing more for the facts about the corruption and destructive policies; (AKA the truth) to come out. As has been stated here, the citizens of Texas, and Florida persevered and took action. The citizens of PR need to come together and do the same. There is only so much the government/military can do.

    For those of you in Florida who are worried about a mass migration, fear not. For some reason, Puerto Rican’s prefer New York and Chicago. Don’t ask me why. LOL

    Liked by 9 people

    • nimrodman says:

      There is a lot of crime, corruption and laziness among the general population. Not all of the natives are this way, but enough are which makes it look bad for the entire populace.

      As is common among certain populaces, it’s always the 90% or so who make the rest look bad …

      Like

    • mimbler says:

      I’m guessing generational welfare has them evaluating places by their relative welfare benefits. NY and Chicago pay a lot more than Florida.
      But that’s a good thing because those are already blue cities so PR votes won’t change anything there.

      Like

  30. Iwasthere says:

    Listen to a guy from the pr call in to our morning show. Says the politics are so leftist that woman Mayer of a major city wears a red beret and combat boots to work everyday. He said it under the old Spanish system of 72 feidoms – city states – that needs a wholesale make over into like 5 counties and one state like government. The number of people working in the government v the real economy would make even Mayer berrie blush.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Red says:

    Ok, I’ve lived through a few hurricanes the worst for me as an adult with kids was Andrew. After it hit Flordia it hit Louisiana. I was without power for a week. Water for three days, it was tough. But I kept busy sweeping with a broom, washing clothes by hand ect…. we didn’t loose our home but took a lot of damage. Had canned food, flashlights, mechanical can opener, you know just common sense stuff.

    This evening I heard PR was expecting more rain and that was a problem…..now, if i didn’t have any water and it was going to rain, I’d put some freaking buckets, pots, pans, bowls or anything out to catch rain water to drink. WTH????? I be damned if I’d die of thirst ! What the he’ll is wrong with people?

    Liked by 8 people

    • Howie says:

      Social Justice

      Liked by 2 people

    • backwoodsgirl123 says:

      Too lazy?

      We have 6 rain barrels set up and after this hurricane, I told hubby, I want at least another 4 set up for my rabbits because I don’t like carrying water.

      I lived up in VA before I moved back to FL and they had a horrible drought. You remember when FL and GA were having water wars?

      Well, VA was having it’s wells run dry and I always had a garden and canned and stuff so I put in 1 rain barrel at the end of the carport, and went to Walmart for 4 plastic garbage cans and then prayed for enough rain to fill them. Didn’t take long. The carport was 20×20.

      I went out and watered my garden by hand with a cup, and gave each plant a couple of cups of water just to keep my well from going dry like my neighbors.

      So, we have rain barrels. A Coleman stove. A single burner with a tank to supply it. I bought a case of emergency candles last year so I still had those. We bought tons of batteries and I had my hubby check the generator before hurricane season hit and had him stock up on fuel.

      We ran the generator for the fridge and freezer only and kept Ice in an ice chest, but we got bags of ice before the hurricane hit and stuck them in the freezers so that we could pull them out when we needed them.

      Our well water is nasty (so is almost everbody’s water in our community) so we fill it up at the RO system the Dept. of Agriculture runs. And we bought a couple of cases of bottled water from DG which tasted like crap so we gave that to my step son.

      I can’t for the life of me figure out how people don’t prep when they live in areas that are known to get by Hurricanes and Tropical Storms.

      It just isn’t rational.

      Liked by 6 people

      • backwoodsgirl123 says:

        The generator was run for an hour at a time 3 or 4 times a day. We didn’t run it day and night like a lot of people do. Just enough to keep our food good.

        Like

    • TwoLaine says:

      Who’s bringing the buckets for them?

      Like

  32. Howie says:

    If Irma had gone 40 miles west, the west coast of Florida would be just as bad.

    Like

    • Alligator Gar says:

      No, it wouldn’t. We actually have chain saws, generators, trucks, and full pantries here in West Florida–oh, and we know how to use them and we aren’t afraid of work–hard work. Apples and oranges.

      Like

  33. A2 says:

    It is a serious situation, but put me in mind of this:

    Like

  34. n1ghtcr4wler says:

    don’t waste any more money on Puerto Rico. Next year the infrastructure will be destroyed again

    Like

  35. distracted2 says:

    Well, it looks like things have gone from bad to worse. I’m not even sure it’s safe for President Trump to go there now. Curt Schilling has been there for a few days and he said there was what amounts to a media blackout and that none of the horrible things going on there are being reported in the States.

    They buried 8 police officers yesterday. He said that what is happening there is terrifying and you could tell he couldn’t really talk frankly. He said that the southeast part of the island is just gone and it looks like an atomic bomb went off but that the people remained. People are becoming desperate, just like Sundance described after hurricane Andrew. He is seeing the best and the worst of humanity.

    This is a no-win situation.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Ken says:

    After Irma, we were out the next day cutting trees and helping the elderly neighbors get there homes safe to run generators if they had them. Not the same devastation as PR, but still had no power for 8days and the mentality was get it done, not when’s someone coming to help.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Can anyone say Greece?

    Liked by 1 person

  38. mcfyre2012 says:

    The MSM coverage of PR was pretty bizarre this week. My take from it was the people left on PR were just sitting in their homes waiting to be rescued. The ports are full of supplies…so why do we hear reports that there is no one to drive trucks or buses to the victims to give them aid. Does no one on the island know how to drive? Why are the people not doing something to help themselves?

    Why do we not see reports of them clearing debris and cleaning up? Here in FL, we were clearing debris and cleaning up as soon as the winds began dying down. Many of us were back at work the very next day to help speed the recovery process for everyone else.

    Liked by 2 people

    • JBrickley says:

      The vehicles delivering aid would get jacked immediately by looters and gangs. Crime is insane over there. You need to have armed escorts. So perhaps a bulldozer and work crew to clear the road a Humvee with armed soldiers, a truck or two full of water and supplies, another Humvee following up the rear and only do it at daytime as night is too dangerous.

      Like

    • theduchessofkitty says:

      The Truckers’ Union wants their “cut.” One trucker blocked the passageway so no other trucks could go through and distribute the supplies. His demands: money, and lots of it. The people are angry at the truckers.

      Like

  39. Just Sayin' says:

    Remember that Puerto Ricans are automatically US citizens with an unlimited right to move around the country and vote in our elections

    It’s going to be kind of fitting if the small percentage of the PR population that actually lives in PR decides to move to Florida, vote democrat and flip the state.

    Very bad, but kind of a just comeuppance for letting this problem fester unaddressed for so long.

    Like

  40. Ken Sola says:

    Here’s something to think about. Hurricanes devastated three American areas recently. Florida has demonstrated a “can do” spirit and the motivation not to become a drag on our GDP. Given the demographics, mayor, and large number of illegals in Houston; and what I’ve read above (and know from having lived in NYC) about PR and its people, we can’t say the same for the other two areas.

    Our President Trump has a vigorous economic recovery going on. Costs of recovery efforts in Houston and Puerto Rico will blunt that recovery.

    Whereupon the Yellow Stream Media (YSM) will attack him for having lived up to expectations, etc.

    Wouldn’t MAGA be so much easier and faster if we weren’t so heavily burdened?

    Like

  41. Michael says:

    Buell says that PREPA confirmed to him on Monday morning that its first priority is to reconnect hospitals and government facilities to the electrical grid. “Right now, they’re operating on generators — and that creates a potential fuel problem,” Buell says. At some hospitals, back-up generators have failed; others are running short on diesel, Reuters reports. To combat looting, armed guards are delivering precious fuel supplies, the director of the heart transplant program at Centro Cardiovascular in San Juan told Reuters.

    Like

  42. nimrodman says:

    Juan Williams was making some kind of anti-corporation commie point on Fox News, disparaging capitalism and saying that “even President Trump had to go up against the shipping industry and suspend the Jones Act”.

    Now I know that’s likely a red herring since existing supplies are sitting at the dock and there’s likely no shortage due to American flagged ships.

    But Juan’s comment kind of implied that suspending the Jones act “solved some problem”.

    Has it? Has even ONE foreign-flagged vessel offloaded supplies not met by American-flagged and military vessels?

    Inquiring from anyone who’s following this Jones Act issue closely. Thx.

    Like

  43. kidsndogsncats says:

    I love the mental picture of bigfoot coming home from his successful snipe hunt on his unicorn, wish I could draw! How about if the President gets out his cell phone, calls bigfoot on his cell and directs him to deploy to PR first.
    Seriously, I don’t know what to do about this mess, but I trust President Trump will come up with something that works. I think he knows we tax payers are about all given out, time for people to take care of themselves, I do.

    Like

  44. TwoLaine says:

    Woof believes it is a high priority for people to get sat phones delivered to them so they can talk to their relatives. What a dumbaxx thing to say. His head must be up his you know what.

    Like

  45. H&HC, 2nd-16th ('69 to '71) says:

    Can President Trump declare “martial law” in P.R. and have a Mattis “look alike” take over?

    Like

  46. angusmcgeef says:

    Mayor of San Juan, Puerto Rico,
    It is difficult for me to understand why you heap scorn and criticisms on those that are helping your people in a time of need!

    Is it because your socio-political philosophy has failed you and the constituents you serve?

    Have you discovered that making big promises to get elected are not enough and that it takes hard work, costly resources and inspired effort to improve a situation?

    Have you found that since you cannot perform in or accept this reality, you try to shift the focus of attention from your own leadership ineptitude so as to help your political survival?

    Do you think no one sees this?

    What fantasy world do you and your cohorts live in that decisions don’t have any consequences?

    Please wake up and return to reality.

    Like

    • kate says:

      She sounds like so many of our politicians both democrats and republicans who have been in office too long, they all live in a fantasy world or bubble, love to spend someone elses hard earned money and I for one am sick of it.

      Like

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