“TERMS” – Secretary Tillerson and Secretary Mattis Release Joint Remarks on North Korea…

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Secretary of Defense James Mattis release a joint Statement/Op-ed discussing North Korea and accountability.  However, against the backdrop of visible diplomacy the joint statement is more about terms, than accountability.

Note a pointed subtlety.  Secretary Tillerson lays down the terms to China; while Secretary Mattis lays down the terms to North Korea.

WASHINGTON – The U.S., its allies and the world are united in our pursuit of a denuclearized Korean Peninsula.

In the past few months, multiple illegal North Korean ballistic-missile and ICBM tests—coupled with the most recent bellicose language from Pyongyang about striking the U.S., Guam, our allies and our interests in the Asia-Pacific region—have escalated tensions between North Korea and America to levels not experienced since the Korean War.

In response, the Trump administration, with the support of the international community, is applying diplomatic and economic pressure on North Korea to achieve the complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and a dismantling of the regime’s ballistic-missile programs. We are replacing the failed policy of “strategic patience,” which expedited the North Korean threat, with a new policy of strategic accountability.

The object of our peaceful pressure campaign is the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. The U.S. has no interest in regime change or accelerated reunification of Korea. We do not seek an excuse to garrison U.S. troops north of the Demilitarized Zone. We have no desire to inflict harm on the long-suffering North Korean people, who are distinct from the hostile regime in Pyongyang.

Our diplomatic approach is shared by many nations supporting our goals, including China, which has dominant economic leverage over Pyongyang. China is North Korea’s neighbor, sole treaty ally and main commercial partner. Chinese entities are, in one way or another, involved with roughly 90% of North Korean trade. This affords China an unparalleled opportunity to assert its influence with the regime. Recent statements by members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, as well as other regional and global voices, have made clear the international community holds one view regarding North Korea’s provocative and dangerous actions: They must stop. Pyongyang must stand down on those actions.

China has a strong incentive to pursue the same goals as the U.S. The North Korean regime’s actions and the prospect of nuclear proliferation or conflict threaten the economic, political and military security China has worked to build over decades. North Korea’s behavior further threatens China’s long-term interest in regional peace and stability.

If China wishes to play a more active role in securing regional peace and stability—from which all of us, especially China, derive such great benefit—it must make the decision to exercise its decisive diplomatic and economic leverage over North Korea.

Our diplomatic approach also proceeds through the United Nations. The Security Council’s recent unanimous vote imposes new sanctions on North Korea and underscores the extent to which the regime has chosen to isolate itself from the international community. This vote, which also had Russia’s support, reflects the international will to confront the North Korean regime’s continuing threat to global security and stability.

We urge all nations to honor their commitments to enforce U.N. Security Council sanctions against North Korea and to increase diplomatic, economic and political pressure on the regime, specifically through the abandonment of trade, which finances the development of ballistic and nuclear weapons. The U.S. continues to consolidate international unity on the North Korean issue through increased engagement at the U.N., at regional diplomatic forums, and in capitals around the world.

While diplomacy is our preferred means of changing North Korea’s course of action, it is backed by military options. The U.S. alliances with South Korea and Japan are strong. But Pyongyang has persistently rebuffed Seoul’s attempts to create conditions whereby peaceful dialogue can occur, and has instead proceeded on its reckless course of threats and provocation. As a result of these dangers, South Korea’s new government is moving forward with the deployment of U.S. Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense against the threat. We commend South Korea’s decision to deploy this purely defensive capability.

Installing Thaad launchers on the Korean Peninsula and conducting joint military exercises are defensive preparations against the acute threat of military actions directed against the U.S., our allies and other nations. China’s demand for the U.S. and South Korea not to deploy Thaad is unrealistic. Technically astute Chinese military officers understand the system poses no danger to their homeland.

Absent China using its influence to show the world how a great power should act to resolve such a well-defined problem as North Korea’s pursuit of nuclear weapons and long-range missile capability, others in the region are obliged to pursue prudent defensive measures to protect their people. China’s Security Council vote was a step in the right direction. The region and world need and expect China to do more.

The U.S. is willing to negotiate with Pyongyang. But given the long record of North Korea’s dishonesty in negotiations and repeated violations of international agreements, it is incumbent upon the regime to signal its desire to negotiate in good faith. A sincere indication would be the immediate cessation of its provocative threats, nuclear tests, missile launches and other weapons tests.

The U.S. will continue to work with our allies and partners to deepen diplomatic and military cooperation, and to hold nations accountable to their commitments to isolate the regime. That will include rigorous enforcement of sanctions, leaving no North Korean source of revenue untouched. In particular, the U.S. will continue to request Chinese and Russian commitments not to provide the regime with economic lifelines and to persuade it to abandon its dangerous path.

As always, we will embrace military preparedness in the defense of our homeland, our citizens and our allies, and in the preservation of stability and security in Northeast Asia. And we will say again here: Any attack will be defeated, and any use of nuclear weapons will be met with an effective and overwhelming response.

North Korea now faces a choice. Take a new path toward peace, prosperity and international acceptance, or continue further down the dead alley of belligerence, poverty and isolation. The U.S. will aspire and work for the former, and will remain vigilant against the latter.  (LINK)

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This entry was posted in ASEAN, Big Government, China, media bias, Military, N Korea, President Trump, Secretary of State, Secretary Tillerson, Trade Deal, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

85 Responses to “TERMS” – Secretary Tillerson and Secretary Mattis Release Joint Remarks on North Korea…

  1. Brilliantly executed with T-Rex speaking directly to China and Maddog Mattis speaking directly to North Korea.

    Liked by 24 people

  2. Brenda Purington says:

    Powerful

    Liked by 13 people

  3. One of the aspects of the recent UN Security Council sanctions resolution which bothers me is the failure to prohibit the export to, or the importation by, North Korea of oil. The North Korean military is a principal user of oil, gasoline and diesel fuel.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. fleporeblog says:

    This is what is important and should be understood by everyone in the USA 🇺🇸! Everything else is White Noise. Including our President’s comments earlier today regarding VA. If you think for a minute that ALL those involved won’t face the wrath of our President, you haven’t been paying attention. Our President needs to remain focused on the reality facing us right now. We as a country under his leadership and God’s hand are closer today than at any point over the past 64 years to seeing a diplomatic conclusion to the Korean War. Folks this is for all the marbles and the ability for us, our kids and grandkids to never have to fear NK again.

    I really loved this piece of the statement by TREX above:

    The object of our peaceful pressure campaign is the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. The U.S. has no interest in regime change or accelerated reunification of Korea. We do not seek an excuse to garrison U.S. troops north of the Demilitarized Zone. We have no desire to inflict harm on the long-suffering North Korean people, who are distinct from the hostile regime in Pyongyang.

    Our diplomatic approach is shared by many nations supporting our goals, including China, which has dominant economic leverage over Pyongyang. China is North Korea’s neighbor, sole treaty ally and main commercial partner. Chinese entities are, in one way or another, involved with roughly 90% of North Korean trade. This affords China an unparalleled opportunity to assert its influence with the regime.

    The Panda 🐼 can’t escape that reality no matter how hard he tries. Our President and his team are pointing it out for two reasons. One is to make the world aware but the second is the moving of the cheese so that the Panda 🐼 realizes the new maze could have him seen by the world as the HERO. Panda 🐼 is smart enough to realize that our Lion 🦁 isn’t going to back down. Later today, the Panda 🐼 and the world get to see the first missles in the Economic War with China 🇨🇳 unleashed by our President. Panda 🐼 will have this all resolved before our President lands in late November early December in China 🇨🇳!

    Please let the rest of the 💩 go!

    Liked by 38 people

    • Kevin Finnestad says:

      Flep your comments are always spot on and uplifting! Thanks for your research, time, and timely remarks!

      Liked by 8 people

      • Charlie says:

        Sundance I am ever so grateful for this dialog and knowledge. I’m a kid coming from work passing the kitchen and onto the couch grabbing my computer clicking TCH to read, absorb, re-read and repeat. Family is hungry, dogs are begging for more food (they’re labs) and the sun sets as I finish my daily ritual. I’m happy to have found you, et al : )

        Liked by 8 people

        • Charlie says:

          There’s more, Fle (pepe) always read, re-read your comments too, thanks!

          Liked by 2 people

        • Wink says:

          Charlie, you are so right. This is the only place I go for news and insight! Enjoy!

          Liked by 4 people

          • shallbe4 says:

            Once again Thank God for Sundance. Every other site is attacking Trump for being a Racist by not mentioning strongly enough White Supremistists in the near riot in Virginia. This site has just stated that Trump will save us from Nuclear War with N. Korea. The fact that Kim will think about attacking Guam for a while is a good beginning. Tillerson and Mathis will work with Trump to keep this nation strong and safe. Bless you Sundance for bringing us real news.

            Liked by 2 people

  5. positron1352 says:

    I’m probably out in left field. I love what they said, no question. Personally, I would like to see reunification of N. and S Korea. N. Koreans have suffered far too long while the world does nothing. If we do not disarm N. Korea of nukes now, it is kicking the can down the road again. Having said this, I know that the Trump team will thankfully, not do that. Reunification, in my humble opinion should be the goal.

    Liked by 2 people

    • mimbler says:

      We may have had one, but I can’t think of a single regime change we’ve been involved in that was what I would call a long term success.

      While I too would like to see NK and SK re-unification, I’m guessing it would have to come about internally, not imposed externally to be successful.

      And even then, it might not be a good thing. The NK people are not the same people they once were. Multiple generations have grown up knowing nothing but communist indoctrination.

      Liked by 4 people

      • dalethorn says:

        East Germans, from 1933 and Hitler through 1989 and the end of the wall, were in an oppressive state for 56 years. They made it.

        Liked by 2 people

        • mimbler says:

          Good point, but I might note that Germany is now governed by someone (Angela Merkel) who was a communist. I’m still not sure about the long term success of that.

          Liked by 5 people

          • SSI01 says:

            East Germany turned out to be the economic and demographic case from hell for the West Germans. Its economy was moribund, people living in poverty, unused to a capitalist work ethic and very used to the govt taking care of them from cradle to grave – it took a major effort by the West Germans to assimilate the Easterners into a united Germany. Lots of thinking set in place since 1945 had to be changed, and quickly. It wound up costing the West German govt a ton of money to effect that change.

            Liked by 5 people

            • JoAnn Leichliter says:

              Not to mention that it was a cesspool of industrial polution, and West Germany had to foot the bill for cleaning that up, too. At least, however, it had transportation infrastructure, factories (however obsolete), etc. Not so sure about North Korea…

              Liked by 2 people

            • melski says:

              Please remember, Poland was also under the foot of Russia as was East Germany since the end of WWII. After the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989 both countries were pretty much on there own to make a change to a Democratic form of government and rebuild their entire country. At the time West Germany poured tens of Billions of dollars into East Germany to rebuild it. Also at the time, the joke being told and repeated in Poland was “What is the difference between East Germany and Poland?” Answer: “There is no West Poland” Yes folks, Poland did it mostly on it’s own and what a miracle they have created!!! And I am proud to say I played a small part in the transformation!!

              Liked by 3 people

              • G. Combs says:

                AND Poland did it without hand outs and is a lot better for it.

                Germany on the other hand gave handouts to their poor communist cousins and now is a socialist/communist country.

                Like

          • Sylvia Avery says:

            Yeah, I think the jury is still out on Germany.

            Liked by 3 people

      • shallbe4 says:

        positron I totally agree but if we install reunification of the Koreas we must make certain that China who seems to play a great role in North Korea allows them the freedom to make this successful.

        Like

    • China wants NK as a buffer. They won’t allow it.

      Liked by 2 people

      • SSI01 says:

        If I were the Chinese Communist government I would be losing a lot of sleep over the fact a Stalinist state that practices a brand of Communism unchanged since the end of the Korean War shares a border with my country. If the leader of NORK is crazy enough to launch a nuke against a neighbor like South Korea, Japan – or even a possession of the US – why does not the Chinese Communist govt realize NORK could potentially hold THEM hostage as well, if the ChiComs do something to displease – seriously displease – that nut in Pyongyang. What’s to stop him from becoming so furious at the PRC for turning its back on him in a showdown with the hated USA, that he perceived the PRC as actually being an ally of the USA, and shoots a few short/intermediate-range nukes into Communist China in retaliation?

        Liked by 2 people

    • regrulz says:

      I think this comment from the article covers that issue:

      “The U.S. has no interest in regime change or accelerated reunification of Korea.”

      From that I take that ‘accelerated reunification’ is not being sort after, but a slow and gradual is not excluded and is perhaps even implied.

      Cheers

      Liked by 3 people

    • shallbe4 says:

      positron I totally agree but if we install reunification of the Koreas we must make certain that China who seems to play a great role in North Korea allows them the freedom to make this successful.

      Like

    • bkrg2 says:

      Unification would be great, but I will settle for neutralizing the threat from maniac Kim.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. BebeTarget says:

    This will succeed just as POTUS planned. We are witnessing a great historical moment in world history. You anti-Trumpers take note and see how a real American leader who is not in anyone’s pocket, works for the benefit of our country and the world. MAGA for the benefit of all.!!

    Liked by 18 people

  7. dekester says:

    Yes indeed, everything else is White noise, your President is truly killing it.

    I just had the T.V. on for a minute, on our Canadian business channel. Your President had just finished signing the document, and Acosta at CNN shouts an insulting and inflammatory question at your President.

    Your President politely lets him have it…beautiful. Even our leftie business talking heads, are starting to see how pathetic your CNN morons are.

    God bless PDJT.

    Liked by 27 people

    • Niagara Frontier says:

      I’m on the border and my many Canadian friends are constantly amazed at how rude and discourteous the White House press corps is to this President. I can’t explain why the WH often seems to let them get away with it. Frequent offenders should have their press credentials revoked.

      Liked by 14 people

      • dekester says:

        The press corp is being strangled by their collective arrogance. The world is watching those fools make horses arses of themselves.

        PDJT has not lost anyone who voted for him in the election. He has done everything he promised, or has sincerely tried to.. He picked up tens of thousands today when he nuked the Merck weasel about higher drug prices.

        Americans pay ridiculously high prices for drugs. Sad too that several common over the counter drugs available up here ( Canada.) require a Doctors note down your way. Hopefully this will change soon.

        He has even gone beyond what was promised in many instances.

        His next address to the nation will be among the highest viewed T.V. slots of the year.

        Liked by 11 people

      • Oldschool says:

        Not a fan of the whitehouse enabling this behavior. Bad precedent.

        Like

      • WSB says:

        Indeed! We need a new press corpse!

        Like

    • shallbe4 says:

      To my more polite Canadian Brothers and Sisters. Our President is attacked daily for something or another and he has decided if he is ever to get anything done he needs to ignore some of things which are said to him. But a little Prayer from you guys up North for our President would help quite a lot.

      Liked by 3 people

  8. Chuck says:

    “Absent China using its influence to show the world how a great power should act to resolve such a well-defined problem as North Korea’s pursuit of nuclear weapons and long-range missile capability, others in the region are obliged to pursue prudent defensive measures to protect their people. China’s Security Council vote was a step in the right direction. The region and world need and expect China to do more.”

    That is powerful stuff!

    Liked by 15 people

    • Niagara Frontier says:

      The message to China couldn’t be more clear. I suspect China believed that their vote for sanctions in the U.N. would be sufficient, and that they could simply go back to business as usual.

      They were seriously mistaken. When was the last time a U.S. President put such expectations on China? Never!

      Liked by 10 people

  9. Pam says:

    Brilliant statements both from T-Rex and Mattis! While the swamp and the MSM continues to beat a dead horse, POTUS continues to his job working hard for the American people.

    Liked by 12 people

  10. Covfefe-USA says:

    Regarding the above photo: Its the first time I’ve noticed to flags of the various military branches in the oval. Excellent visuals. Message is our 45 is truly the commander in chief of all armed forces – that he recognizes and values each branch. Very well done, MAGA.

    Liked by 9 people

  11. CharterOakie says:

    Very direct and clear statements. And they reinforce that this is the policy of the Executive Branch of the United States, with senior cabinet officials united with the President.

    Very effective internationally and domestically.

    Liked by 10 people

  12. frank field says:

    I am absolutely stunned. I am massively thankful and proud of this administration. I cannot imagine how this could be more clear, level headed, sensible, forceful. The sweet ring of truth and common sense abounds here.

    I suspect Trump will not be on earth when his accomplishments are fully appreciated. I love and appreciate America more because of him.

    I’ll say it again…behold a greater than Reagan is here.

    Liked by 17 people

  13. n1ghtcr4wler says:

    Whats surprises me is that the WSJ is printing this. The editorial board must be very upset. wait for their next hitjob on Trump

    Liked by 4 people

  14. MVW says:

    ‘Once NK has a nuclear warhead on a missile launching submarine Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, or NYC can be struck without warning or without the US really knowing who did it.’

    That is the argument. Decapitation of the US Gruberment can be carried out at that point with impunity. So, at what point is action taken beyond words and sanctions which clearly don’t work and Trump has no confidence in?

    At this point all I see is more words and no trigger point between present and the sub launched nuclear tipped missile (NK can already launch missiles from a sub).

    Like

  15. M33 says:

    Are we sure China isnt trying to use NK as leverage for us to give up protecting Taiwan?

    Like

  16. HolyLoly says:

    I just love Rex Tillerson. He is the epitome of grandfatherly strength, sound wisdom and steady confidence, and he is a perfect match for Trump.

    MAGA

    Liked by 7 people

  17. DoggyDaddy says:

    China controls NK. China is the solution to the problem. What China wants in NK is what will happen. We’re trying to make China want what we want — a sane leadership and a denuclearized NK. Economic and diplomatic pressure against China are tools in our arsenal. But I wish we would exercise military pressure by telling China that we will consider an attack by NK on the United States as an attack by China on the US and will retaliate in the fullest measure against China. That stance will clearly tell the Chinese that whatever games they may want to play about how much influence they have in Pyongyang, we won’t play along. Putting China’s future in the balance completes the moves to get their immediate attention to the problem of NK.

    Like

    • Johnny Bravo says:

      And as there always needs to be a win-win in negotiation (DJT believes this), where does that come from in your scenario?

      Liked by 1 person

      • DoggyDaddy says:

        A NK ICBM nuclear attack on the US, no matter how small the warhead, would be a catastrophic event — one which would take many decades from which to recover (just look how long it takes to recover from natural disasters like Mt St Helens or Katrina). China would benefit greatly from it. Telling China, who controls NK, that we would respond on China gives them incentive to be more controlling of NK and less hands-offish — that’s my win-win…knowing there is a big stick behind the carrot.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mimbler says:

          We are China’s biggest customer, and they have loaned us untold billions or trillions of dollars, and they have bought a huge amount of real estate here.

          We are reaping one of the few benefits of globalism. China does not want a disaster happening to the US, because it will cause a disaster to China.

          Liked by 1 person

  18. Sylvia Avery says:

    This was a beautifully written statement. So very clear. Not overwhelming bureaucratese. I am so proud of this President and his Cabinet. I am so grateful to have the adults in charge.

    May we never again have to see the spectacle of James Taylor strumming his guitar and quavering “You’ve Got A Friend” as a substitute for diplomacy.

    Liked by 7 people

  19. lfhbrave says:

    “If China wishes to play a more active role in securing regional peace and stability—from which all of us, especially China, derive such great benefit—it must make the decision to exercise its decisive diplomatic and economic leverage over North Korea.”

    The keyword here is “DECISIVE”. That word leaves no doubt the U.S. is prepared to hold China accountable.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. China and India seem to be approaching war over their dispute about Bhutan. Here’s a link to a recent article. Will China’s problems with India be a useful distraction from its opposition to regime change in North Korea?

    Like

    • Ogzy says:

      I hear that that India is winning the argument!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Joe says:

      Clearly a strategic opportunity for the US.

      Liked by 2 people

    • DoggyDaddy says:

      “The Convention Between Great Britain and China Relating to Sikkim and Tibet” was formally signed in 1890 between Sheng Tai (the Qing dynasty’s “Imperial Associate Resident in Tibet”) and Henry C.K. Petty-Fitzmaurice (British Viceroy and Governor General of India) [ http://www.chinaforeignrelations.net/node/150 ]. Article I of the agreement clearly delineates the border as the water break (ridge/crest) in that area. The Doklam Plateau stands on the Chinese side of the crest. In 1998, China and Bhutan worked an agreement where the status quo of the Doklam would be maintained. China recently introduced some road-building units into the Doklam area. Bhutan says this a violation of the 1998 agreement and called for Indian support. On June 29th, Lu Kang, a Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman, displayed a photo showing a group of Indian soldiers and vehicles had overstepped the crest and into Chinese territory on June 18th. [ http://www.fmprc.gov.cn/mfa_eng/xwfw_665399/s2510_665401/2511_665403/t1474166.shtml ] This is the extent of the “crisis.” Nothing to write home about. Hiccups along the vast Chinese border with Bhutan-India-Nepal-Kashmir are not unique. It is extremely doubtful that India has any legal leg to stand on under international law in this matter. It really is a matter between China and Bhutan and the terms of their 1998 agreement.

      Like

  21. First Last says:

    Lost me at “United Nations”.

    Like

  22. TwoLaine says:

    Speak softly but carry a big stick.

    I am so thankful these guys are all in charge!

    Liked by 2 people

    • shallbe4 says:

      Something else Trump has done today. He says he may pardon Joe Arpiao. He said that Joe has done so much to stop illegal immigration he has to help him. They don’t make people like the 45th President of the US. We will know for sure in a couple of days but it sounds like Joe will be able to stop worrying about his future.

      Liked by 3 people

  23. BakoCarl says:

    Obozo administration basic strategy: “Strategic patience” . . . ostensibly do nothing, “leading from behind” . . . while covertly aiding our enemies and subverting America.

    Trump administration basic strategy: “Strategic accountability” . . . take the lead in accomplishing carefully planned actions to suppress our enemies, economic and militaristic, to Make America Great Again.

    Vive La Différence !

    Liked by 3 people

  24. jbrickley says:

    The all out economic attack puts more and more pressure on NK but it is not just NK, its China too. The pressure on the Chinese is more subtle to give them a chance to save face. Leveraging the economic power of the US and it is a great deal of leverage, will box in NK but force China’s hand. Standing ready with the full might of the US military is a way of saying you can do this the easy profitable way or you can have the hammer. Your choice, the ball is in your court. The chess pieces have been on the move for months maybe since day one. The friendly embrace of China included.

    The solution is completely holistic using all resources at the US disposal. Here is true ‘Smart Power’ not that mess Obama and Hillary considered smart. You don’t sympathize with your enemies. You don’t try to reason with them nor understand them. You ‘know’ them and you show them how good things can be then you squeeze slowly at first as you close all other avenues of escape where the decision is to make nice or go to war. You hope they don’t chose war because you will kill them all.

    Applicable Mattis Quotes:

    “I come in peace. I didn’t bring artillery. But I’m pleading with you, with tears in my eyes: If you f@%k with me, I’ll kill you all.”

    “Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.”

    “I’m going to plead with you, do not cross us. Because if you do, the survivors will write about what we do here for 10,000 years.”

    “My belief is that we have to stay focused on the military that is so lethal that on the battlefield, it is the enemy’s longest day and worst day when they run into that force.”

    At the same time Mattis has proven he is excellent at diplomacy and politics. He is capable of not saying the wrong thing at the wrong time. But you give him the order to go and break stuff and stay out of his way, he will succeed.

    Liked by 5 people

  25. MaineCoon says:

    Well written. Plain speaking English. Nothing to be lost in the ‘translation’.

    “In particular, the U.S. will continue to request Chinese and Russian commitments not to provide the regime with economic lifelines and to persuade it to abandon its dangerous path.”

    …..or else….

    Liked by 3 people

  26. David R. Graham says:

    POTUS Trump grasps the economic slavery of Americans and America and is moving to eliminate that, thankfully, as Sundance so capably describes. As best I can see, POTUS Trump does not grasp the political subversion of Americans and America, is not moving to eliminate that subversion and in fact is getting whipped by it daily because it does not grasp it.

    I crave the day we hear sedition indictments read against the likes of Noam Chomsky, Ibrahim Hooper, George Soros, Laurence Tribe, Pinch Sulzberger, Hillary Clinton, John McCain, Tom Steyer, Harry Reid, Angela Davis, Jane Fonda, Linda Sarsour, Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, Tamika Mallory, John Brennan, James Comey, Susan Rice, Samantha Power, Valerie Jarret, Robert Mueller, Barak Obama, Tom Perez, Michelle Obama, “journalists,” “professors” and “politicians” too numerous to name and on and on.

    I cannot see eliminating economic slavery without simultaneously, at least, eliminating political subversion. In the 1950s, a largely ignorant, half-hearted and unintelligent effort was made to eliminate political subversion while economic enslavement was let to dig in and expand. In the 1980s, an effort was made to overwhelm or nullify political subversion with targeted — but not plenary — releases from economic slavery. This left political subversion — always sourced in academe, originally at the Sorbonne — in place and it grew mightily, bursting forth in the 1990s to full bloom as “diversity training” (aka mandatory re-education camps, gulag-style).

    What has not been tried yet, in the past 100 years anyway, is simultaneous, at least, full release from economic slavery and direct annihilation of political subversion. I am not sanguine now about seeing that happen during my lifetime. I think — perhaps wrongly — if it were on the horizon now, Rich Higgins would be the White House tasked with shuttering Ivy League schools and their imitators, and mosques, and “journalists,” and “media” who kick against USA sovereignty … and ones who grasp subversion and attack those engaging in it would be AG and DAG.

    I cannot see economic slavery subsiding without political subversion subsiding right along with it. Perhaps I am ignorant. It is my observation of these many decades.

    Liked by 1 person

    • David R. Graham says:

      We face the question of authority and its place of residence.  We are an Anglo Protestant nation.  That is a clue.

      Like

  27. LafnH2O says:

    Interesting Times!!
    Fascinating!!
    Thank you, Sundance

    Liked by 2 people

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