President Trump Begins Dismantling The Regulatory and Administrative State…

Upon leaving CPAC, today President Trump took another step to dismantle the choking network of regulations that strangles economic growth, impedes business and weakens the overall economy. Today builds upon the LARGER BACKSTORY.

The details pertain to dismantling ridiculous regulations, but the larger picture is President Trump removing the regulatory and compliance systems the U.S. CoC have used as a special interest leveraging tool to control the legislative influences upon our economy.

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President Trump is, importantly, working to remove the larger legislative business lobbying community – and structurally reform the direction of business interests to traditional pro-growth, pro-worker, America First principles.

Allow me to attempt clarity – What we are continuing to witness, including today with this Executive Order, is Trump building out his economic coalition to be stronger and larger than the economic coalition represented by Paul Ryan, the GOPe, Tom Donohue and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. (Much more on that aspect will follow…)

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you all very much for being here.  We have tremendous people standing behind me, and the biggest in the world in terms of manufacturing and business.

Some of the people involved are Ken Fisher and Ken Frazier, Chairman and President, CEO of Merck.  Alex Gorsky, Chairman, CEO of Johnson and Johnson.  Marillyn Hewson — and she has been very tough to deal with but that’s okay — (laughter) — she’s a very tough negotiator, President of Lockheed Martin.  Gregory Hayes, Chairman and CEO, United Technology.  Andrew Liveris, my friend Andrew, Chairman and CEO of Dow Chemical Company.  Mario Longhi, the President, CEO, United States Steel Corporation.  Juan Luciano, Chairman, President, CEO of Archer Daniels Midland Company.  Denise Morrison, President of Campbell’s Soup Company.  Lee Styslinger III, Chairman and CEO of Altec, Inc.  Mark Sutton, Chairman, CEO of International Paper.  And Inge Thulin, Chairman, President of 3M Company.

And we have made tremendous progress with these great business leaders — amazing progress.  They’re getting together in groups and they’re coming up with suggestions about their companies and how to bring jobs back to the United States.  And I think it will be a fantastic day for the country.

And we met yesterday, and — I met with these folks and some more.  Excessive regulation is killing jobs, driving companies out of our country like never before.  Although, I must say, I think we’ve stopped it to a large part, Marillyn, right?

MS. HEWSON:  Right.

THE PRESIDENT:  Reducing wages and raising prices.  I’ve listened to American companies and American workers.  I’ve been listening to them for a long time.  I’ve been listening to them complain for a long time.  But today, this executive order directs each agency to establish a regulatory reform task force, which will ensure that every agency has a team of dedicated — and a real team of dedicated people to research all regulations that are unnecessary, burdensome and harmful to the economy, and therefore harmful to the creation of jobs and business.

Each task force will make recommendations to repeal or simplify existing regulations.  The regulatory burden is for the people behind me and for the great companies of this country, and for small companies — an impossible situation, we’re going to solve it very quickly.  They will also have to really report every once in a while to us so we can report on the progress, and so we can come up with some even better solutions.

This executive order is one of many ways we’re going to get real results when it comes to removing job-killing regulations and unleashing economic opportunity.  We’ve already issued an order which says that for every one new regulation, two old regulations must be eliminated.  So that in itself is going to be tremendous, but what we’re doing is much more than even that.

Every regulation should have to pass a simple test:  Does it make life better or safer for American workers or consumers?  If the answer is no, we will be getting rid of it and getting rid of it quickly.  We will stop punishing companies for doing business in the United States.  It’s going to be absolutely just the opposite.  They’re going to be incentivized for doing business in the United States.

We’re working very hard to roll back the regulatory burdens so that coal miners, factory workers, small-business owners, and so many others can grow their businesses and thrive.  We cannot allow government to be an obstacle to government opportunity.  We are going to bring back jobs and create more opportunities to prosper, maybe more than ever before in our country.  We’ve made tremendous strides over the last short period of time.  This is — I guess we’re four weeks into it.  I think for four weeks I’ve done a good job, wouldn’t you say?  (Laughter.)

But again, I want to thank these great business leaders.  Some of them are with us and the White House, and they’ve had tremendous success — Reed and Jared and so many others — in business.  And they’re helping us sort out what’s going on, because really, for many years, even beyond — long beyond Obama, President Obama — I will say that it’s been disastrous for business.  This is going to be a place for business to do well and to thrive.

And so with the signing of this executive order, I would like to just congratulate everybody behind me.  And, Andrew, I’d like to thank you for initially getting the group together.

MR. LIVERIS:  Thank you.  Thank you, Mr. President.

THE PRESIDENT:  Really a fantastic job you’ve done.

MR. LIVERIS:  Thank you.

(The executive order is signed.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Should I give this pen to Andrew?  Dow Chemical.  (Laughter.)  I think maybe, right?  (Applause.)

MR LIVERIS:  Thank you.

THE PRESIDENT:  That means a lot of jobs.  Thank you, everybody.  Thank you very much.

(Transcript Link)

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296 Responses to President Trump Begins Dismantling The Regulatory and Administrative State…

  1. FofBW says:

    One hell of a Friday! Thank you Mr. President Trump!!

    Liked by 41 people

    • Cow wow says:

      Whoo hooo! So true!

      Liked by 12 people

    • Grace Anne says:

      Cheers!

      Liked by 7 people

    • 2x4x8 says:

      right on, under Obama, he would use Friday afternoons to sneak in some terrible reg/policy/EO as the MSM folks were about done for the day and heading into the weekend, so the action would be overlooked

      Obama, what you do in the darkness, I, Donald Trump do in the light (twitter)

      Liked by 11 people

    • drdeb says:

      This is YUGE and this sings to my heart! Thank you, Dear Sundance for this VERY important post.

      Liked by 4 people

    • helix35 says:

      The business community is not necessarily evil. For years, they have been at the mercy of predatory politicians (and their paymasters). “Play ball, or we’ll destroy you.” Trump is showing them a way out, where everyone wins. The only losers are the corrupt politicians and the lobbyists who pull their strings.

      Liked by 1 person

      • SpanglishKC says:

        I agree there is been some of that. I would not paint all big business with a broad brush.

        HOWEVER, I cannot ignore the number of big business that put themselves above America and the American people first. Countless examples. Facebook and Google just to name a couple. So many more. Their leaders care not one wit about America or Americans and their actions attest to this charge.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jimmy Jack says:

          The tech companies are by and for the worst. The problem with this is that the are gaining disproportionate influence quickly with no end in sight. They envision a world where the technocrats rule over a complaint populace that is content to live without any borders on a universal basic income.

          This is what we are facing.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Here’s the thing about the tech companies, Jimmy. And I assume by that you do not mean the big old guys like IBM and Iintel, but the newbies MSFT, FB and Google, etc. Note that the formers are Big Iron and what I like to call Big Sand (silicon chips). They are more engineering and building oriented.

            The new ones are, let’s call them Big Ions – and I would throw Apple in with them since all were founded by youngsters raised in the current education system. BTW, private schools are just as messed up as the public schools educationally. Private schools foster “correct” talk, speech (accents), clothing and behavior, but all with an overlay of SJW. Public schools just do the SJW stuff.

            Anyway the newbies are lacking in history, and civics knowledge. They do “know” that national boundaries are “bad.” This is a worldwide phenomenon that is slowly being reversed, but nevertheless, these characteristics are much more formative of the C-level office people than the much more important and educational School of Hard Knocks.

            I do think, or hope, that they will get over it. Being in the neighborhood of Pres. Trump and SoS Rex Tillerson, among others will be excellent. This is a form of mentoring that our president is bringing about and may be much more important than any EOs!

            Like

  2. beaujest says:

    When Obama said you didn’t build that,he was referring to the giants of industry,Paul Ryan,Schumer,Turtle,Pelosi and their ilk ! They were not included in this meeting !

    Liked by 8 people

    • JAS says:

      I’ll say it again. President Trump, by bringing these great CEOs to the White House and listening to them, is cutting out the middlemen. Those would be the lobbyists and Congress. It’s a gorgeous sight to behold!!

      Liked by 18 people

      • The Boss says:

        How many Dow Component companies were there yesterday and today? Toss is a few NASDAQ biggies a couple weeks ago, and we’ve got a hot stock market.

        Liked by 1 person

        • MaineCoon says:

          I repeatedly watched when President Trump gave the pen to Andrew Liveris of Dow Chemical. Mr. Liveris was so excited to be chosen to receive it because President Trump recognized his efforts to get this group of CEOs together. He kept smiling, graciously & repeatedly thanked “Mr. President”, was smiling from ear to ear, and some one behind slapped him on the back to share in his recognition.

          President Trump is a detail person. This sort of detail goes a long way. I really liked watching this scene several times.

          We have a great President.

          Liked by 30 people

        • tellthetruth2016 says:

          Can we Please get rid of CoC and Donahue ???? Which means Lyin Ryan would be out of a job too … A person can at least hope to be rid of these cockroaches along with McCain …

          Like

      • Right! Our new President Trump not only speaks directly to the people, he also speaks almost every single day directly to the job creators!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. This EO will result in creating more jobs than can be quantified.

    Liked by 22 people

  4. Cow wow says:

    This is such a win for the little guy- the mom and pop, family owned, under 50 employee businesses!
    I think most of the massive, regulatory nightmare’s purpose has been to bankrupt them, make starting up a new business almost impossible-and enrich the big boys and globalist so that no one else can compete.
    Thank you Mr. President!

    Liked by 35 people

    • FofBW says:

      Great clarity on the issue.

      Liked by 11 people

    • wyntre says:

      Also a way to impoverish the middle class and stick it to whitey. Remove all manufacturing jobs and then make it impossible to start a small business: win-win for the BLM agenda and another way to “fundamentally transform America.”

      😡

      Liked by 5 people

    • 2x4x8 says:

      the most destructive regulations the CoC and Wall St politicians conspired on, was getting rid of the small neighborhood Banks, Credit Unions and Savings & Loans, control the finance in fewer Globalist hands

      put your money in your local Chase Bank, and they lend it to China manufacturers who have an outsourced American company contract

      Liked by 6 people

      • Credit Union membership has exploded. There has been some consolidation as the CUs became more financially sophisticated. It’s true life has been tough for the Community Banks. S&Ls are a bit wobbly in my area. I think that’s b/c S&Ls are very local and specialized – a tough business model. Also many S&L people seem to be do-gooders, or at least that is how they talk.

        Like

  5. Sentient says:

    Let’s remove the prohibition against importing pharmaceuticals from outside the US (like from Canada & Europe) so that Americans are no longer charged many times more than Canadians and Europeans are charged for the exact same drugs.

    Liked by 16 people

    • SteveInCO says:

      Let’s first find out WHY that is; i.e., why the drugs are expensive here and cheap elsewhere. And I don’t know for sure but I have my suspicions, so I am going to ask:

      Do they charge us big bucks because it costs huge money to develop the drugs, but every other country has price controls and the only way they can recover those costs is by charging US customers?

      If that’s the case, we need to address the regulatory cost of developing drugs. Because if we simply stop buying the drugs at the high prices…they will never again develop a new drug, because they won’t be allowed to recover the cost.

      Liked by 6 people

      • wheatietoo says:

        Not price controls…Liability Caps.
        Those other countries have Limits on how much you can sue the Drug Companies.

        I commented about this below, but that comment has been bumped into “moderation”.
        No idea why.

        Liked by 4 people

        • shannynae says:

          Tort reform would solve so many problems.

          Liked by 8 people

        • Oldschool says:

          Most of my comments are also being bumped into waiting for moderation. Thanks for the info on liability limits.

          Liked by 2 people

        • SteveInCO says:

          Interesting. Still, what would happen if we could re-import the drugs is they’d just raise the prices overseas to pay our lawyers.

          Like

          • wheatietoo says:

            In most cases…it’s the same drugs.
            Same drugs, made in the same factories.

            They just lower the prices for them when they’re shipping them to countries where they won’t be sued for millions of dollars.

            Like

        • rsanchez1990 says:

          I’ve noticed comments I’ve posted start going into moderation too. Gonna put my tin foil hat on, but could it be WordPress trying to stifle discussion?

          In any case, remember to thank your friendly neighborhood AdRem! ☺️

          Liked by 5 people

          • wheatietoo says:

            Yes, yes! Thank you, Ad Rem!

            Liked by 5 people

          • Ad rem says:

             photo foilhatcg3_zpsdi6tamv8.gif No need for tin foil hats Treepers!!! Sometimes a word(s) in your post matches one (or even part of a larger one) that is on our black list. This will automatically trigger the holding of the comment. It’s just an unavoidable factor in blogging.
            If you are going to be “moderated”, one of us doing the moderating will let your know. 😀

            Liked by 15 people

            • joshua says:

              when does “moderation” stop….my posts have been moderated for months, yet I have done nothing spectacular to maintain scrutiny.

              Liked by 2 people

              • Ad rem says:

                Okay….I took you off moderation. Be good! 😀

                Liked by 3 people

                • Reality Wins says:

                  WOW… everything is becoming ‘unbound’ today. I guess the witches’ spells to ‘bind Trump and his supporters’ and ’cause them to fail’ isn’t working so well. Even joshua is now unbound. 🙂

                  Seems everything the leftists do has the complete opposite effect.

                  Fifty years of ‘war on poverty’ = more poverty than ever
                  Obamacare promises $2500 year savings = skyrocketing costs
                  If gays can just marry, they’ll be happy = still miserable, suing everyone
                  More $ to schools for better performance = test scores plummeting
                  Gun laws will lower crime = more murders in gun free zones

                  Witches cast spells for Trump failure =
                  SUCCESS BEYOND OUR WILDEST DREAMS!!!

                  Liked by 6 people

                • MaineCoon says:

                  Our God is bigger than their witches. Go fly a kite you jezebels! Shew!

                  Liked by 1 person

                • joshua says:

                  thank you SO MUCH.
                  “free at last. free at last. great God Almighty free at last”, MLK Jr.

                  Unbound….feels so good…

                  Liked by 1 person

              • Blade says:

                Consider it mildly extreme vetting 🙂

                At least its not TSA level scrutiny, they’re not grabbing your junk and they let you keep your shoes on!

                Liked by 3 people

              • 2x4x8 says:

                you will also need to pass Captain Caturday inspection

                (mentioning mediocre spectacular will get you KP duty)

                Liked by 6 people

              • Mickey Wasp says:

                Hey, Joshua … think of it this way Not sure of your age and if you know of the comedian George Carlin? Years ago he came up with a routine and spoke of the ‘seven words’ you can’t say on TV, even if one implies them or attempts a miss-spelling of them – FLAG.

                Also, there is a courtesy that threats, intimidation, or statements that may be deemed beyond a polite discussion can result in a FLAG. Not to say one cannot disagree strongly with someone on any given subject / topic – just come with verifiable sources and links that pertain to the issue at hand.

                On a personal level, I have found, the average CTH poster is more knowledgeable than most everyday folks and will openly discuss any subject. And enjoy the ‘snarky’ laced with humor, rather than a deeming attack.

                Like

                • joshua says:

                  I am OLD enough for sure to remember George Carlin, Red Skelton, The Three Stooges, Groucho Marx, and some of Charlie Chaplin….well, not really Chaplin….but OLD is not my vacancy….

                  Like

              • MaineCoon says:

                I made the hit list today for the very first time, but I recovered very quickly and moved on to my next post after a brief moderation pause.

                Like

            • amwick says:

              chicken tickie??
              PITA??

              Liked by 1 person

            • 2x4x8 says:

              “Blacklist” is a great series, James Spader is at the height of his career and giving the best performance of his life

              Liked by 3 people

            • rvsueandcrew says:

              Thank you, Ad rem, for explaining moderation black list.

              However, my posts never show up anymore. Am I banned? I’ve never written profanity or attacked people. At first I thought it was malware on my computer, now I’m thinking I was kicked out of the treehouse. Very distressing.

              Maybe I should have donated to the treehouse. I donated to the Trump campaign and to Nehlen’s campaign. When I was going to switch to donating to the treehouse, I was hit with some big expenses and couldn’t do so.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Ad rem says:

                Rvsueandcrew….I did just find this comment in our trash bin. I’ve checked your IP# and email, and neither of them show you are being either moderated or banned. The “history” on your comment indicates it was caught by the “blacklist”….which would indicate the WordPress filter found something amiss. I did notice that the first five numbers in your IP address match someone else who IS on the blacklist. Other than this, I’m at a loss to explain why your comments are being held up. BTW….donations have nothing to do with how WP views the comments.

                Liked by 1 person

        • Dekester says:

          Heel a naturopathic manufacturer out of Germany had to stop supplying to North America because of the threat of lawsuits.
          We used many of their products with great success. Now we order on line and have the products shipped from Europe.

          Liked by 4 people

        • bertdilbert says:

          They passed a law here putting in price caps as I recall. The jury could not be informed that there was a cap when making an award. Weird. Karl Denninger wrote about it. So the jury can make a big award but what the drug company pays out in damages is pre set.

          Like

      • Oldschool says:

        I agree with you Steve. I want to know more about the causes of the high prices here. I am not sure that importing drugs because they are cheaper is the best answer, and I am not at all convinced that the quality of certain drugs are on par with ours. At a time when we are striving for “made in America”, I would much prefer we can find solutions to bring down prices of our products.

        Liked by 3 people

        • JAS says:

          Very expensive regulatory controls are part of the causation as well.

          Liked by 1 person

        • CaptainNonno says:

          From what I know, other countries apply a price ceiling on different drugs. We do not (we are pretty close to a single payer system already -that’s you and the rest of us). Therefore the market determines price. If you want the drug, how much would it be worth. They study this before market. The drugs we get from abroad ar mostly the generics which have been cheap. Recently, however, generic companies have consolidated their product portfolios to reduce competition and thereby result in higher pricing to consumers. (Wink wink). Lastly, refs in USA are so the ugh in research, most of that occurs elsewhere and our companies either acquire, co-fund or co-license. The other issues regarding tort reform also contributes significantly to product pricing.

          Like

        • Nordic Breed says:

          One big cause of high drug prices is the fact that drug companies are spending billions (probably) in advertising directly to the consumer. However, only certain medical professionals can prescribe them. What sense does that make?

          At the same time, drug companies are spending a lot of money trying to stop consumers from getting access to legitimate supplements which work better with no side effects. Just about every prescription drug has negative side effects, some deadly. Big pharma is not the friend of the American people.

          Liked by 1 person

      • SharonKinDC says:

        I read several years ago that the EU specifically, will NOT pay any R & D costs. IIRC, I *think* Canada & Oz were the same and perhaps other countries, too. There may be other issues as well, but this is a biggie. Americans are indirectly subsidizing other nations meds.

        Liked by 4 people

      • Bob says:

        The FDA regulation of drugs must go. Manufacturer makes a drug it is on them. Builder builds a house it is on them. Just close down the FDA approval process.

        Like

      • tommyd22 says:

        One reason they charge us big bucks is because they can..
        It is like being a American in a 3rd world foreign country. As an American in one of those countries everyone, including fellow Americans btw, looks at you as being rich, having money ,, not saying it’s right or wrong but to the majority of them a true statement, and many of them then go about attempting to figure out how to separate you from some, any, or all of that perceived money..
        It just the way it is..

        Like

    • wheatietoo says:

      The reason those drugs are cheaper in those other countries, is because of Liability Caps.

      You cannot sue Drug Companies for mega-bucks in those countries.

      We are all paying higher prices for drugs here…because of the multimillion dollar lawsuits against Drug Companies.

      Liked by 4 people

      • SteveInCO says:

        So if we import our drugs and stop paying for the domestic ones that have lawyer costs built in…they’ll just have to raise the costs of their drugs overseas to pay our damned lawyers.

        Like I said, we need to know WHY the big difference, before trying to attack the problem.

        Liked by 1 person

        • wheatietoo says:

          That’s the biggest ‘WHY’…liability.

          And also, the other countries accept our ‘FDA Approval’ and do not require those drugs to go through the process again in their own countries.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Proud Deplorable says:

            We should also meaningfully accept ‘FDA Approval’. A finding that a drug is safe and effective should mean, as a matter of law, that the drug is safe and effective, full stop. Then deal with people who are allergic to a drug, or whatever, with that person’s insurance and arbitration. That would get the lawyers out of the process, to the country’s benefit.

            Liked by 1 person

        • MaineCoon says:

          The years of R&D, the related drug trials, all the FDA refs, plus legal fees for the med mal cases, which often end up as Class Actions (Oxycontin, Phen Phen, tobacco litigation, etc) = astronomically, high priced drugs.

          Out. Of. Control.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Another reason drugs cost more in the US: Unbridled marketing. Pharmaceutical companies spend more for marketing than they do for research. Their annual advertising budget in the US alone is tens of billions of dollars. Many countries limit advertising by drug companies.

        Liked by 5 people

        • lisabrqwc says:

          This! If I’m not mistaken, we’re one of the few, if not the only, country that allows Direct To Consumer advertising. I’m sick of every other TV commercial telling me to ‘ask your doctor’ for whatever while they proceed to whisper a bunch of side effects way worse than the original malady.

          Liked by 14 people

          • Sharon says:

            It’s always interesting to compare the visual on the screen to the audio, listing all of the things that are going to happen if you take the stuff……unbelievable. The consumers most likely to respond to those ads—–must drive their docs completely bananas.

            I can’t imagine going to my doc saying, “I saw this ad – doncha think we oughta……”

            I’m sure it just makes the docs feel really good about their student debt and their malpractice insurance premiums when their patients come with that…….

            Liked by 3 people

          • Those list of side effects make me never, ever want to try those drugs. In a way, I am glad they have those. It has made me read the inserts with the medication from the pharmacy but I know did not do this before and would never think to ask the doctor

            Liked by 2 people

          • louche9 says:

            When I came back to live in the States after years of living in London, I was shocked by two things. First was how casually I was expected to hand over my social security number. Everyone seemed to need it for every little thing. It’s a miracle anyone’s number is secure. Second was the proliferation of TV drug hawking, which I hadn’t seen in England (don’t know whether they do it now), and which seemed outrageously irresponsible. Call this number and we’ll send you a free sample of Wonder Pill (which may cause psychosis). WTH? Big Pharma makes Los Zetas look like pikers.

            Liked by 3 people

          • janc1955 says:

            I’m especially fond of the drug advertised for constipated prescription opiate users. First, prescribe a narcotic painkiller with a sky high rate of addiction. Then, when you have enough people hooked and no longer able to “go,” develop a drug to help them “go.”

            Wrong on so many levels I don’t know where to start. People seriously need to wise up and participate in their own healthcare.

            Liked by 6 people

          • paper doll says:

            Those ads for drugs are usually followed by ads for law firms asking if you took the hot new drug of a few years before and experienced ill effects… in an endless cycle.

            Liked by 3 people

          • I tried to find the link and couldn’t – Sharyl Attkisson did a show on this issue and basically said, if you see an ad that says “Talk/ask your doctor,” beware. I will keep looking.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Captain Nonno says:

          it was a mistake to allow pharma advertising on TV. There is no overall consumer benefit, just leads to unnecessary pressure on prescribers.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Illegal says:

        Lawyers seem to be the biggest hinderance to a thriving economy. Tort reform is absolutely necessary if we are going to cut cost. We need to solve the litigious nature of Americas. These million dollar settlement are killing the goose that lays the golden eggs.

        Liked by 10 people

        • wheatietoo says:

          Yep.
          And the lawyers are the big winners in all these lawsuits.
          Also…the IRS.

          The actual plaintiffs get very little of the money.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Illegal says:

            Exactly!

            Liked by 1 person

          • woohoowee says:

            Medical malpractice awards are not taxable unless you’ve taken an itemized deduction for medical care related to the condition the malpractice the award is for, then you have to reimburse that amount.

            (No, I’ve never sued anyone. We lost a granddaughter due to egregious medical malpractice.)

            Like

            • louche9 says:

              My deepest sympathy for the loss of your precious granddaughter. That is tragic.

              Liked by 4 people

              • woohoowee says:

                Thanks. It was rough. That is when I learned that there is no question there is a God and that he loves us.

                Liked by 6 people

              • woohoowee says:

                And louche9, if there is one thing I’d share with others it would be this: If you have a loved one in a hospital for days and aren’t comfortable with their care so wish to have them transferred to another facility, don’t take no for an answer. And if the attending doc pulls AMA (against medical advice) with you…call 911, tell them you’re moving your loved one AMA, what emergency room you’re going to and that you are requesting an escort. It can save a life and millons of “what ifs”. *Always* trust your instincts.

                Liked by 6 people

            • wheatietoo says:

              I’m sorry to hear of your loss, woohoowee.
              The loss of a child is a sorrow that words can hardly express.

              I’ve been told that jury awards, even for medical malpractice, are taxable…like winnings.
              Perhaps I was told wrong.

              Personally, I think that there should be Manslaughter charges brought for deaths caused by medical malpractice.

              Liked by 1 person

              • woohoowee says:

                We appreciate your kind sentiments.
                God and time heal all pain.

                I think most jury awards are taxable, just not medical malpractice. Hubby and I are pretty to close to you on consequences re: malpractice, not just deaths due to it. We think if a professional harms a person on purpose there are laws against that and those are the laws that should apply. If there was no harm intended then professional retraining under the supervision of competent professionals is in order, and we don’t mean just a few hours of continuing education. A probationary period. If retraining doesn’t work, revoke the license.

                Liked by 1 person

      • amjean says:

        And we see an attorney commercial
        re class action lawsuits on TV daily;
        sometimes, hourly.

        Liked by 2 people

    • MVW says:

      China’s goal is to manufacture 50% of the world’s drugs. They are well on their way. There is no reason for this other than tax and regulatory strangulation of business in America. none.

      Liked by 2 people

      • NvMtnOldman says:

        Better go back and take a look at the Thalidamide (sp) mess. Women went to Europe to get the drug because it wasn’t approved in the US. Look at the results!!!!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Bendectin was another drug pushed during pregnancy for nausea. My military doctor prescribed it for me in 1979. I read an article in the Enquirer (which is why I never completely discount this tabloid) describing birth defects from the drug. I showed my doctor and he pooh-poohed it – regardless, since I didn’t have a big problem with nausea, I did not take it. Thank God I didn’t – not long afterwards, it was pulled from the market because of……drum roll…..birth defects.

          Liked by 1 person

      • We can only hope the quality of said products meets the “high” level of current offerings from this venue………….. OY

        Like

    • Negotiated “Lowest-Global Drug Prices” in America are President Trump’s ace in the hole for Congress to FIRST Repeal-and-Replace.

      Liked by 3 people

    • filia.aurea says:

      There’s no prohibition on importing pharmaceuticals. Have you seen how many generic drugs are made in India? Canadians and Europeans pay less because their governments set a cap on allowable prices that big pharma can charge consumers. Obama rolled-over on that provision in the U.S.

      Like

    • msdonnal says:

      Oh this is my dream! What a savings this one thing alone would be!

      Like

  6. paulraven1 says:

    The task force concept is brilliant. Feel the burn, Obama.

    Liked by 7 people

    • WSB says:

      Give each a two-week deadline for the first submission.

      Liked by 1 person

      • dutzie60 says:

        How about this section. It’s the “You’re fired” one. LOL

        Sec. 4. Accountability. Consistent with the policy set forth in section 1 of this order, each agency should measure its progress in performing the tasks outlined in section 3 of this order.

        (a) Agencies listed in section 901(b)(1) of title 31, United States Code, shall incorporate in their annual performance plans (required under the Government Performance and Results Act, as amended (see 31 U.S.C. 1115(b))), performance indicators that measure progress toward the two goals listed in section 3(g) of this order. Within 60 days of the date of this order, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (Director) shall issue guidance regarding the implementation of this subsection. Such guidance may also address how agencies not otherwise covered under this subsection should be held accountable for compliance with this order.

        (b) The head of each agency shall consider the progress toward the two goals listed in section 3(g) of this order in assessing the performance of the Regulatory Reform Task Force and, to the extent permitted by law, those individuals responsible for developing and issuing agency regulations.

        Liked by 3 people

    • bettycooper says:

      Especially a task force comprised of mega U.S. corporations with big donor money. They can influence Congress and the CoC bigly.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. toriangirl says:

    BOOM! < that was my brain. Has something like this ever happened in the history of the United States? I can't recall a time. Though this isn't exciting as the EO Travel Ban, this one EO will be have even more positive impact than the travel ban. Trump is bringing America back to life while the Left is worried about giving men access to women's bathrooms.

    On a side note, notice the deference that Trump gives to the CEO of LH. There goes the narrative that Trump is sexist.

    Really, I am so amazed I'm almost speechless.

    Liked by 17 people

    • rsanchez1990 says:

      I’ve seen a lot of comparisons with Andrew Jackson lately. If President Trump can dismantle the Federal Reserve, like Jackson dismantled the Second Bank of the United States, he’ll end up on money.

      We can dream big!

      Liked by 9 people

      • Illegal says:

        End the Fed mantra again! Tell me where you are going to place the banking oversite function that the Fed is responsible for? Create another cavernous federal agency? No thank you. We are trying to drain the swamp not create new swamps. All government programs that deal with finacial services should be moved to the Fed instead. Take the SEC, FDIC and make the Fed responsible for funding and administering these function.

        The Fed should have their power to set interest rates and print money taken away.

        Like

        • rsanchez1990 says:

          Take away their power to set interest rates and print money, and you might as well dismantle them. They will have no real power after that. They will just be a meeting of bankers every few months. And if the Fed will be effectively neutered, why consolidate other federal agencies, thereby creating a cavernous federal agency, and cede them to the Fed?

          Where are we going to place the oversight functions the Fed is responsible for? That assumes they have been responsible in the first place. The Fed has proven it is not responsible, not to the common people at least, since they have taken that power to print money and set interest rates to bail out the bankers around the world to scales that would make Timothy Geithner blush.

          You can’t seriously say dismantling the central bankers club that is The Fed is not draining the swamp.

          Like

        • They have no power to set interest rates. They want you to think that, but if you look closely, the Fed follows the market! Printing money is something else. Yes, they do this. It is called monetizing the debt, IOW, selling government debt (the deficit each year has to be made up somehow, right?), automatically “creates” more money.

          This is why anti-counterfeiting laws are so ridiculous now! No counterfeiters’ printing presses can run fast enough to keep up with the government and whatever they would print would be a mere drop in the bucket compared to “legal” currency!

          Okay, so why don’t we have inflation, as everyone confidently predicted years ago when the huge debt began to climb? Because we have been exporting it. It’s what we did after WW II, when we had all the money and the Europeans had essentially none. So we instituted the “humanitarian” and “do-good” Marshal Plan to “help” the Europeans.

          So, again, the much-feared post-war inflation didn’t happen! Pissed off the French, but everybody else was pretty happy with it. Then, somebody asked, “How much gold is there in Fort Knox? Aren’t all those US dollars backed by gold? We’ve got tons of $$, let’s turn them in for gold.”

          BOOM! The “gold window” closed, we stopped backing our USD, and greenbacks no longer promised to pay the bearer in gold in exchange for the greenback.

          Oh, what a tangled web they wove!

          Like

    • My brother employs me (part-time) at his small business. We’re both super excited about the potential effects of this! Me especially, because once a lot of the dumb regs get tossed, it’ll free up a lot of $ for expansion, and I can quit my lame-o full-time day job, and work for him full-time. 🙂 NO MORE RUSH HOUR COMMUTE! 😀

      Liked by 9 people

    • Um, toriangirl, you really don’t know the Left, do you? That’s a good thing! LOL
      But actually Pres. Trump giving deference to a woman CEO is PROOF of his sexism! Doesn’t make sense, I know, but that’s how it is.

      Like

  8. This EO is a Regulatory Burden KILLER.

    New Regulatory Review Officer in every entity with Task Force, Progress Reporting and ACCOUNTABILITY.

    Liked by 11 people

  9. quintrillion says:

    Andrew Bremberg talked about this EO and how it will function within each agency with assigned taskforce in each. Very thorough deregulation. video (12:47)

    Liked by 5 people

    • Kentucky Steve says:

      You ain’t seen nothing yet! Once Trump’s deregulation gets rolling, along with the tax cuts, this economy will explode! What we’re seeing now in the market is just the start!

      Liked by 10 people

      • TheLastDemocrat says:

        Yes. Maybe.

        I have heard one well-credentialed radio advice prognosticator say that ALL of the potential Trump-upside has been valued into the market, upon his win – – and so there is most likely nowhere to go but down from here, if Trump’s economic moves bear fruit.

        Like

  10. Pam says:

    President Trump continues to demonstrate that this is a business friendly white house again. It’s still hard to believe all of this winning is happening.

    Liked by 8 people

  11. SteveInCO says:

    I’ll be honest here. I’m not happy with the idea of taxing imports. I don’t like protectionism. (This is probably my biggest single disagreement with President Trump.) It’s often a way to force a company to operate in a crappy business environment, when the real fix is to change the business environment.

    Which of course means I DO like the idea of cutting taxes and regulations here. Those burdens have in the past pushed companies out of the US. If we stop doing that, and become a better environment for business than overseas (or even just tie with them; but offer them no shipping costs), we won’t “need” those taxes any more.

    Liked by 1 person

    • georgiafl says:

      Steve – We have to tax imports from companies who leave our workers high and dry while they import cheap labor or move to the sources of cheap labor.

      Protecting US and its workers is the primary job of a US President.

      Liked by 8 people

      • SteveInCO says:

        I understand the rationale.

        I want to fix the reasons companies want to do this, though rather tham pumishing them for escapimg a bad system. Trump is really trying to do both at the same time, which is why I’m not complaining too much.

        Liked by 3 people

        • WSB says:

          Steve, this is just leveling the playing field. 100 countries apply an import tax on the US. We have never done this.

          Adjusting for currency strength, this will elevate imported products and incentivize companies to produce products in the US. This is why some Japanese are considering creating investment here, because between shipping costs and decreased corporate taxes in the US, this will swing the scales.

          I thought the same as you until I realized how the tax tips the logistics. Prices on certain imported items might increase, which means we may not buy them for awhile, but the same or another entrepreneur will start making those items in the US for less.

          Liked by 5 people

        • Deb says:

          Yes, I support tarrifs as long as we also fix the problems that led to the companies leaving in the first place. This is something the NeverTrumpers left out of their arguments when they blasted the the tarrifs. Not sure if they simply didn’t believe Trump would actually roll back regulations, if they weren’t listening, or simply lied to make Trump look bad. Probably all of the above.

          Liked by 2 people

    • Oldschool says:

      I am hoping the import tax that Trump threatens with is just that, a threat, and with tax reform and regulation relief, there will be no need to impose such a tax.

      Liked by 4 people

    • wheatietoo says:

      We put hobbles on our domestic companies…and then we expect them to compete with foreign imports that are free of those hobbles.

      That’s like putting a ball & chain on your kids, and sending them out to compete with kids who are not hobbled like that.

      Even with cutting regulations and cutting taxes…it will still be difficult for our companies to compete with products from countries that have low labor costs.

      If we are going to hobble our own companies, then we *should* protect them from competition that is free of those same hobbles.

      The only solution is…remove *all* the hobbles from our own companies.
      But that would mean, eliminate things like:
      — Minimum Wage
      — Employer’s matching Soc Sec/Medicare taxes
      — Environmental regulations

      It would be tough to remove those.
      But that would be the only other way to make it an ‘even playing field’ with foreign products.

      Liked by 3 people

      • SteveInCO says:

        Indeed. I think you’ve said the same thing I’m thinking.

        Protectionism is just a way to protect the parasitic costs imposed on a domestic economy. It’s (sort of) “needed” if you don’t want to do something about them. The problem we’ve had here is we’ve imposed the costs, but not kept the businesses from escaping them, so we have huge unemployment. In principle, you can address this by either imposing protectionism OR cutting those costs. I’m of a libertarian bent; and I prefer the second solution alone. Both together can work (depending on the mix) and not be too bad. Since this is what Trump is doing, we’ll see how it works out.

        Simply imposing protectionism would be a disaster. We’d end up with a bunch of high priced merchandise, a global economic collapse and still a ton of unemployed people. (See Smoot Hawley, which undoubtedly made the Great Depression worse.) SOME trade is good and desirable when there is a genuine advantage to producing product overseas. If the advantage is artificial (because we cut ourselves off at the knees), then there’s a problem.

        Liked by 2 people

        • wheatietoo says:

          The choice is simple…

          (1) Cheap prices on merchandise & No Jobs.
          Or:
          (2) Lots of Jobs, but higher prices for merchandise.

          With choice No. 1…SocSec/Medicare goes bankrupt, since it depends on jobs for funding.
          We also have pretty much no hope of ever getting out of Debt.

          Liked by 7 people

          • LEET says:

            Wheatietoo

            Agree, but I would also argue there is another cost to American society with choice #1 that includes high government welfare costs, and all the associated problems of that, but also the demoralization of those who want, and should work. The loss of work ethic over time, etc. There is a “hidden” cost to society that often gets overlooked.

            Liked by 2 people

        • pyromancer76 says:

          Free trade is an invitation to large corporations to engage in “slave labor” — find the lowest labor cost and cheapest conditions of employing workers. This idea is one of the problems of libertarianism, in my opinion, and why the Chinese are manufacturing so much. Want to be a Chinese worker? Want Americans to live like Chinese workers? I didn’t think so.

          Then we have to be smart with our trade and make it fair trade. The purpose is to make the U.S. strong and prosperous and to provide jobs for all American workers.

          Libertarians are also responsible, in my opinion, from the conservative side of politics for no push back re welcoming open borders and all kinds of illegal aliens. Then their corporations can “compete” on the level of slave-wage quality of global corporations.

          Free trade. Fair trade. A prosperous America. Like President Trump says, we got to get smart.

          Liked by 4 people

        • SharonKinDC says:

          Everyone mentions Smoot Hawley. I agree it was a bad idea… However, THEN we had a HUGE trade SURPLUS. We now have a HUGE trade DEFICIT. No one seems to ever mention this fact.

          Liked by 1 person

    • MVW says:

      Import duty to level the playing field is indeed necessary. Long term, internal taxes and regulation must be minimized and that is essential to keep the import duty from being an added cost.

      Liked by 3 people

    • trapper says:

      Border Adjustment Tax

      Anyone who has ever taken a tax course knows that American tax law has no logic to it. It is a hodge podge of rewards and punishments to encourage or discourage various behaviors, put in place by brilliant strategists who knew exactly what the consequences would be. Forget the politicians who enacted them. They are largely numbskulls and donation whores. Think lobbyists, Wall Street, and academic social planners. Want to destroy the American family? Put a marriage penalty in place and sit back and wait.

      American companies have for decades been incentivized by the tax code to close factories and ship the tooling and piece part drawings overseas to factories where they now build various components, subassemblies, and entire products and ship them back to America. Similarly, American textile mills were closed, the looms sold for scrap, and mills set up in South America and Southeast Asia, where fabric is woven and shipped back to America to be made into clothing. Encouraged by the tax code, it took American companies decades to destroy American manufacturing, and imposing an immediate 20% border tax on foreign goods when there are no American made products to compete with them just punishes the vulgarians who buy stuff.

      The border tax is nothing more than punishment of the American people for electing Donald Trump. It is a great big “F YOU” to America from the globalists, pushed by their number one whore.

      So, what should Pres Trump do? I suggest he fall back on an old negotiating gambit: your price, my terms.

      He should say “OK. You can have your 20% border tax, but I pick the start date,” and then set the start date in 2020. American companies will have three years to open factories and mills in the US, knowing there is a penalty on the horizon for not starting NOW. Couple that with either hyper-accelerated depreciation or even immediate write-offs of the capital costs (perhaps even at the taxpayers choice), and just watch the American factories start going up.

      Oh, and one more thing. I would condition the depreciation/write-offs on a quarterly certification that every person who works on the factory construction site for every contractor and sub, and every person later employed in the factory, is either an American citizen or legal resident. ONE violation and the tax benefits are all forfeited, maybe even retroactively.

      Border tax? OK, but delay implementation to allow American businesses to source American made products to replace the foreign made goods. Propose the 2020 effective date and listen to the globalists howl.

      Liked by 4 people

    • JAS says:

      I agree. Taxing imports is a band aid. It doesn’t fix the problem. And WE the peopl pay for that tax, don’t think for a minute we wont. And once a tax is in place it is impossible to get rid of it.

      The more independent we become the less we need the rest of the world’s products. That is the key. It sounds callous maybe but it really isn’t when other countries are scalping us by pushing cheap stuff on us artificially.

      One way or the other we will pay more for imports in the short run. The key is to eventually make it all “in house” and sell our stuff worldwide.

      Mark my words, if Trump has his way in four years we will be the largest exporters of energy, to the chagrin of the middle east, and Russia. And we will be raking it in big time.

      With a strong dollar relative to other countries imports will de facto be cheaper. That’s the way to fix the whole thing IMHO.

      Liked by 2 people

      • TheLastDemocrat says:

        Jas – Yes. And no.

        Why should I pay 12,000 for a toyota corolla when I could pay 9,000?

        For nearly all of us, an operating car is a tool that enables us to be productive at employment.

        Why have a policy that requires a major tool to be 12,000, when it could easily be 9,000?

        Why should I pay $3 for a jug of American-grown orange juice if I can get a Brazilian jug of same OJ for $1,50?

        Why?

        This is a classic inherent trade-off with no clear answer except: the innovators and producers win.

        So, as long as any policy is ethically tolerable, SUPPORT the innovators and producers!

        Like

      • SteveInCO says:

        Damn good point re energy.

        Like

    • How often do you need to buy a new Appliance, Car, or Phone/TV/Computer, anyway? My American made Toyota Corolla is about 7 years old, still looks like new, and still drives like new. Have had my fridge, washer, dryer, water heather, and HVAC for over a decade, and they’re still running strong.

      SSDs and CPUs, and the like, might go up a bit, in the short-term, until Intel opens it’s new plant.
      I haven’t heard about any plans for GlobalFoundries to expand it’s presence in the USA, but they probably will, in order to be able to compete.
      HDDs might get kinda pricey for a while, so you may wanna stock up, if you have a server in your home?

      Like

      • SteveInCO says:

        Lots of snaller stuff people buy too, but on the whoke, a decent point.

        But then, if it doesn’t matter that much because such purchases are rare, by the same argumemt, not many jobs are involved. Something doesn’t track in your argument.

        Liked by 1 person

        • When writing the post above, I didn’t put any research into the necessities (products) for people living in a first world country, specifically the US of A, instead just pulling from my own experiences. I live a modest life, in Texas.

          Was hoping my post would spur others to cite specific examples of any necessities an import tariff would do great harm to, as I couldn’t think of many.

          As I sit here, writing this, I realize that I left out two fields I’m not well versed in; Agriculture and Textiles.

          I can kinda hand-wave away Agriculture (a little bit), with the “People could prolly do without fruit X, and just eat some Y, during an off-season” line, but would rather hear from an expert.

          Textiles may be a sort-term issue for parents, until (or unless) we have plenty of clothes making factories, here in the states, since kids grow so fast.

          Like

  12. R-C says:

    “Regulatory Reform Officer”…now THERE is a job I could relish! (I’d favor the ‘Hack and Slash’ method of reform.)

    Liked by 9 people

  13. psadie says:

    Can Tom Donahue be fired? He seems to be another HUGE swamp rat.

    Liked by 4 people

    • quintrillion says:

      Donohue is a lobbyist for wall street. President Trump has cut out the middle-man lobbyist and corporations can go directly to President Trump now . No need to pay a lobbyist any more. Draining the swamp by elimination.

      Liked by 10 people

      • MaineCoon says:

        I dare say no lobbyist will set foot inside the Oval Office. Just the small/large corp. businessmen and workers.

        At some point lobbyists are going to accept they have been eliminated. Everyone is still playing the game…until there is no game to play.

        Liked by 2 people

      • 2x4x8 says:

        but “some” of the International Corporations are part of the Globalist Cartel and are on board with “the agenda”, just look at the “hits” some of these companies have taken, Macy’s is closing stores after they cut off Donald Trump Tie collection, Nordstrom and Ivanka, NYT downsized office space in their building etc, etc

        the Cartel Companies have an agenda, if the company go under, oh well, small price to pay

        Liked by 1 person

    • Sandra says:

      Adding on to quintrillion’s post … Donohue’s organization isn’t part of the government even though it sounds like it is. It’s just a private lobbying organization. And Donohue is indeed a DC swamp rat with massive influence on elected officials.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Grace Anne says:

      Great question. Do we even need CoC?

      Liked by 2 people

      • MaineCoon says:

        And the answer is (drum roll)….Nyet!

        Blame the Russians!

        Liked by 3 people

      • justfactsplz says:

        As Sundance has stated before Tom Donohue’s COC has nothing to do with your local Chamber of Commerce. They aren’t necessarily bad and are in many ways good for their communities. Tom Donohue’s COC is really a misnomer and gives people the wrong impression. He is a lobbyist for Wall Street, plain and simple. Big money, big money. Trillions are at stake.

        Liked by 2 people

        • psadie says:

          I thought the CoC writes the legislation for Congress to sign…don’t ask me where I read it for I just did somewhere! So these clowns are the ones that are doing the trade deals???

          Liked by 2 people

          • justfactsplz says:

            They are the authors of the legislation they want shoved through Congress. Then they use lobbyists to pay off Congress Critters to pass the legislation in their favor. Being globalists they are behind all of the bad for America trade deals. They paid lobbyists big money to try to get TPT deal through. Thank God President Trump stopped that deal.

            Like

            • psadie says:

              So no wonder the fools in Congress NEVER READ what is in the Trade Deals because they want to be PAID. You know ANYONE with a brain and common sense can do Congress’s job for its not that difficult they just want you to think it is so they can stay in DC and PRETEND they are working! The CoC makes sure the legislation is soooo confusing and twisted in order for no one to understand what they are really doing…fleecing the American citizens!!!

              Liked by 1 person

        • Grace Anne says:

          Great info. Thank you!

          Liked by 1 person

  14. Your Tour Guide says:

    Be interesting to see if this will include throttling some old EPA regulations that killed the
    corner body shop. Have talked with numerous people that switched careers over the years.
    All of them formerly made a good living by either working at body shops, or using their
    own garage to paint cars. After the EPA standards regarding scavenging of chemical
    exhaust through costly equipment, almost all of the little guys got priced out of the business.

    I’m sure some others here can find some similar instances where regulations put the little
    guy out of work.

    Liked by 10 people

    • MaineCoon says:

      So many entrepreneurs were kicked to the curb. Their small businesses were extinguished. Their spirits were crushed.

      Patriots. All of them. Investing in the American Dream, themselves and their country.

      Obama, Bush43, Clinton, Bush41, Reagan too, Johnson did not protect our country, our people, our jobs, our USA companies. Not one.

      I hope these Patriots have hung on. A new day is dawning. They might not return to what they once created, but that entrepreneurial spirit will return and blossom in new areas.

      Thank you Mr. President.

      Liked by 2 people

    • PreNanny says:

      Say buh-bye to unfunded mandates of all stripes. Heck the cost of autos will go down a minimum of 10K alone, much more for higher cost ones.
      I do not want or need 49 airbags or Sat radio or GPS.
      Can we get real bumpers again, nice shiny chrome ones?

      Liked by 2 people

  15. SomebodyNobody says:

    We need to change the name of the One World Trade Center. Sounds like George Bush Sr. himself came up with the name. Screw that. It needs to be named Satan’s Temple. That day Hillary collapsed, the Demon was leaving her body to travel back through the portal to hell GWB created.

    Liked by 6 people

    • The Devilbat says:

      Does anyone else wonder how Hillary went from attack after attack with her eyes rolling and with a man next to her holding a diazepam injector and whispering into her ear to being a bouncy healthy but still very nasty person? Was she perhaps replaced by one of her doubles? She was reported to have died on 9-11 by a news anchor on ABC national news while at the same time her death was announced on the ABC website. The excuse from ABC was that their news anchor simply screwed up. Hmmm, then how did it get put up on the ABC website??? Enquiring bats want to know.

      Liked by 8 people

      • PreNanny says:

        Nope I do not think about her one iota.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Always wondered if it had anything to do with the recent rise of explosions of Lithium Ion batteries… 🤖

        Like

      • TheLastDemocrat says:

        i have to say this is pretty wild to contemplate.

        I have run a marathon, etc., etc., and have hit the wall, and been on the ropes.

        I have traveled a lot for work.

        —I don’t see the average 65yo doing this as Hiraly supposedly has done.

        Trump – we have evidence of his work habits, plus apparently he does not drink – that is a big deal to popping up at 5am and having a full day of work.

        Like

    • SteveInCO says:

      Well there was One WTC, Two WTC, and so forth. I don’t think it was “One World” trade center so much as just numbering buildings in the World Trade Center.

      Liked by 1 person

    • wyntre says:

      I think the rebuilt site is called One World Trade Center after its original address. The two towers were 1 World Trade Center and 2 World Trade center. There were 5 other buildings. One World Trade Center (the North Tower) was the tallest. While the site was rebuilt with just one tower, the Freedom Tower, it is also still referred to as One World Trade Center.

      I don’t think the name has anything to do with globalism.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I understand what you are stating but no, it should remain One World Trade Center. It replaces the Twin Towers. As far as I am concerned it is a middle digit to terrorists….we overcame what you did to us and we have rebuilt — you cannot stop our spirit.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I cannot say it enough. ThANk GOD for this man. A giant amongst thieves!

    Liked by 8 people

  17. The Devilbat says:

    The globalists are all going to be so, so sad. They have been purposely dismantling America as part of their plan for a communist new world order. They simply won’t understand how President Trump could ever be so mean to them.

    Liked by 5 people

  18. Ghostrider says:

    Sundance, of all the language you have written and posted over the years, this sentence, “Trump (is) building out his economic coalition to be stronger and larger than the economic coalition represented by Paul Ryan, the GOPe, Tom Donohue and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce” is the one of the most meaningful, impactful and powerful observations you have made. It is directionally telling. The picture says 1,000 words. All Paul Ryan ever does is beg the companies these CEOs run for donations. America can see the differences between business men and politicians. Clear as day. Because of Trump, America’s future is bright.

    Liked by 17 people

    • WSB says:

      This is Trump’s economic siege. Trump’s business moguls just out-lobbied their own lawyers lobbying Congress.

      LOLOLOLOLOLOL!

      Liked by 6 people

    • Bull Durham says:

      He is isolating those CEOs from their investors. If they bolt from Growth and Prosperity in favor of anti-Trump alliance with COC and the UniParty, they may jeopardize their hold their on corporate career.

      You can’t be against America when the country is in need and the President has honored you.

      Trump is playing a coercive game if you look deeply at these meetings.

      Very Putin-esque, if I may add some levity to the observation.

      After all, you have been called to patriotism. Can your answer be No?

      Liked by 5 people

    • pyromancer76 says:

      Exactly. The most perfect sentence to describe the transformational qualities of President Trump. Thank God we have a real person who has run a real business and made real money and maintained real relationships with people from all walks of life and from all aspects of the economy. The real deal is now becoming much larger than the illusionary deal. Stronger and larger. Couldn’t be happier.

      Liked by 5 people

    • justfactsplz says:

      I found those words of Sundance to be very profound. There is so much hope and promise there for real change. Today has been a wonderful day of winning. President Trump is the best president ever in my book. I will never get tired of the winning. I wonder what can be done about the big box stores and huge corporate banks that are putting small businesses and local banks out of business?

      Like

  19. aur1640 says:

    If I remember, please Treepers, correct me if I’m wrong, Obama never held a press conference to sign his Executive Orders. He just did it right and we find out later?

    I’m happy that our President meets with people, gets their feedback, formulates the order and signs it. The transparency is so breathtaking it makes me smile and grin ear to ear!! He thinks of Americans and loves us all. I think of the pictures of him protecting our flag and patting it. I’m going to cry 😭 I can’t think of any words to say about how I feel now… MAGA!!! 👍😎😁

    Liked by 10 people

  20. abstain says:

    I just remember that sometimes he would sign something with 10 or 20 pens and give them away. Also he had his Auto Pen.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. floridahoosier93 says:

    Donahue, Soros…both should be neutralized. Stat.

    Liked by 4 people

  22. Paco Loco says:

    Regulatory reform needs to be followed by tort reform. The “sewers” i.e. trial lawyers, are responsible for the high price of everything.

    Liked by 3 people

    • MaineCoon says:

      starting with med mal.

      Liked by 1 person

    • TheLastDemocrat says:

      This is where you and I depart, Poco Loco.

      Several years ago, my wife was offered, and was ready to accept, Essure.

      I said hold off while I review the data.

      I figured out: not safe – where do all the springs go? No one had an answer.

      Ten years later, FINALLY, the FDA catches up and puts out a Black Box Warning.
      https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm488313.htm

      This came out of the efforts of ERIN BROKOVICH exposing the abuses of Big Pharma.

      You side up with who you want to side up with. (D) or (R).

      I am with Brokovich.

      Before it became outlawed, I took Vioxx – now known to be scurrilously approved and promoted. I loved it. It was a wonderful painkiller. I have taken many, post-op.

      There are too many clear examples to show some oversight on business is needed in American business.

      Let’s be in the real world.

      Like

  23. Craig W. Gordon says:

    The ol’ end around.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Gov Jay says:

    Simple solution… stop agencies from issuing ‘regulations’ that have the force of law… As such, these ‘regulations’ would be merely “guidelines”, “best or recommended practices”, etc… According to the Constitution, only Congress can pass laws…

    Liked by 5 people

    • PreNanny says:

      Pathetically congress has passed all too many laws that give the agencies the power to do as they please. It is that whole uniparty thing again their shared self interest has been above the Constitution and the American people.

      Liked by 1 person

    • TheLastDemocrat says:

      Sure. But this is, frankly, naive.

      Legislatures set governance, and then executive administrations carry out the specifics of the general law.

      You don’t want a world where every foot step has to be expressedly approved in code law.

      Like

  25. armie says:

    There’s wisdom there. Assigning to each agency the obligation to find and eliminate unnecessary regulation enables them to deal with the details, and the management to focus on getting a result. One big flaw in prior administrations was to dump the assignment on the VP, which resulted in much smoke and very little heat. Assigning the work to the guys who know where the skeletons are and just showing up monthly and demanding bones is the way to go. Of course, you still have to make sure they’re giving you the real bones…

    Liked by 3 people

  26. keeler says:

    I wonder if President Trump is familiar with this quote from General Grant:

    “Oh, I am heartily tired of hearing about what Lee is going to do. Some of you always seem to think he is suddenly going to turn a double somersault, and land in our rear and on both of our flanks at the same time. Go back to your command, and try to think what are we going to do ourselves, instead of what Lee is going to do.”

    If he isn’t, he certainly embodies its spirit.

    Like

  27. 2x4x8 says:

    what is missing is a Task Force website so Americans can “tell their stories” of oppression

    Hello Clive Bundy

    Liked by 4 people

  28. Illegal says:

    I am concered the left will litigate changes to rules. As an example Trump signed an EO which froze the effective dates of all pending regulations for 60 days. One of the regs frozen was the endangered species designation of the rusty patched bee. The NRDC has filed a lawsuit over the listing delay. This lawsuit could impact Presidentstregulatory freeze through executive order.

    Like

    • MaineCoon says:

      One possible reason for potential extinction of the rusty patched bee:

      “Climate changes that may harm bumble bees include increased temperature and precipitation extremes, increased drought, early snow melt and late frost events.”

      Back to climate change again. NRDC name the wrong Defendant. They should be suing God, the Creator. I’d say climate is within His jurisdiction.

      Liked by 3 people

      • I see it as the planet just self-regulating. For awhile, the planet was getting colder and people were talking about an ice age. So, now the planet is getting warmer in order to balance out the cooling factor. Has no one ever thought about the fact that maybe what humans are doing is helping the planet self regulate. We are not separate entities, we are just another piece of the whole.

        Like

  29. wodiej says:

    Proud to be an American.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Finalage says:

    Trump with all of these meetings is gutting K-Street in a way. He’s cutting out the middle man, also known as lobbyists, just as he did in the campaign with all of the consultants, donors and pollsters. Trump is saying if you want to deal with me, you don’t have to go through K-Street. That’s a reform in of itself. By opening up the White House like never in a long time, he allows industry to bypass K-Street. Very interesting to observe.

    Liked by 3 people

    • MaineCoon says:

      I like to think of it as downsizing — everything! A new rendition of taking the lumps out.

      The big by-pass. President Trump goes from A to Z by skipping over the middle 24 letters!

      Liked by 2 people

  31. What really strikes me about these meetings with business leaders is how humble they all seem. As a child of the 60’s and a former leftist, I always have thought of business leaders as greedy capitalists. And maybe they were, but I don’t see this in these people today. They seem humble and really wanting to create jobs for Americans. Of course, this is the because we have a leader in the White House who has that perspective….I am very happy and pleased to see this. A whole new perspective for me.

    Liked by 3 people

  32. paulraven1 says:

    The whole reality and scenery of Trump making these public presentations and invoking the interests of America is unprecedented. Did Obama do this once?

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Gail says:

    Obama take note. This is what transparency looks like.

    Like

  34. RuckusTom says:

    I wish Trump would / could ban all federal public sector unions. IRS employees should not be able to unionize.

    Like

  35. psadie says:

    I read on a site, forgot where for I am all over the place, that Reince Preibus wants EVERYTHING to go through him as Chief of Staff. So if Americans are using WH.gov to SHARE THEIR IDEAS/THOUGHTS I wonder if good ole Reince is sabotaging those comments by not making “important ones” available to President Action.
    I believe that PTrump needs to get out of Washington DC just to clear his head hence the trips to FL and elsewhere. He looks rested and rejuvenated when he does even though he is working tirelessly…it’s a different environment.
    I pray each day for the safety and security of The President, his family, and his Cabinet!

    Like

  36. TheLastDemocrat says:

    Yes!! The federal government should have NO BUDGET!!??!!

    Not one warship, not one federal court, not one patent library, not one diplomat, etc.!!??!!!

    No federal level approach to Zika, etc. – let all disease fund themselves!!!

    NO interstate freeway!! Which, BTW, Zoe NEVER uses – on principle.

    Let the Fed run on contributions from elected officials, t-shirt sales, cake-walks, and nothing else!!

    End the Fed tax!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    We don’t have to end it – it was never there to begin with!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Like

    • Lovely sarcasm, Democrat, but you forgot your /sarc tag. Actually, Interstate freeways were paid for by users paying gasoline taxes. So no problem there. Defense and Justice are among the few legitimate fed govt functions.

      Pro-tax anti-libertarian people always bring up the roads. Gas taxes have paid for all, except for the hundreds or thousands of private roads, paid for by property owners who live on those roads. The Fed does not receive tax revenue, as many people have pointed out with alarm, the Fed is made up of private banks, hence is “owned” by those national banks.

      Really, people need to get better information about how taxes, tariffs, regulations, etc. work in our country before they form opinions on how to reform these systems.

      Like

  37. Rip Tide says:

    It is interesting that Liveris is set to retire soon.

    Like

  38. Rip Tide says:

    Wow Sundance, another beautiful post well done Sir! It is awesome to learn together, share angst, pray together, and have the freedoms that we do.
    “As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another.”
    ‭‭Proverbs‬ ‭27:17‬ ‭NIV‬‬
    http://bible.com/111/pro.27.17.niv

    I love the dialogue and wisdom of this community. When I feel dull, I know I can come here for refreshment and sharpening. Thanks to all who are a part of CTH!!

    Like

  39. Rip Tide says:

    Wow Sundance, another beautiful post well done Sir! It is awesome to learn together, share angst, pray together, and have the freedom that we do.

    I love the dialogue and wisdom of this community. When I feel dull, I know I can come here for refreshment and sharpening. Thanks to all who are a part of CTH!!

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Millwright says:

    To me the overriding significance of today’s “signing event ” is its the first step in easing the burden excessive government regulations impose upon the wellspring of our economy – small businesses ! Not only is “small business” our largest employer; creating opportunity for those of entrepreneurial spirt increases our “middle class economy ” and employment opportunities for immigrants seeking to assimilate !

    Like

  41. Garrison Hall says:

    We’re in for a big fight. The UniParty will not go easily and it has lots of experience defeating those who seek to change The Way Things Are And The Way They Should Always Be. The insurgency is a response to that, although until Sundance began writing about it, I think many of us (myself included) didn’t fully grasp just how deeply entrenched the UniPary actually is. I think Trump knew all about this all along. What’s interesting about him is how he can convince his opponents to underestimate him when, in fact, he already several moves ahead. If you know what to look for you can tell he’s been doing this stuff for a very long time. The cold hard truth is finally sinking in that Donald Trump really intends to drain the Washington DC swamp. After realizing the inherent weakness of The Tea Party movement, we morphed into a substantially more aggressive insurgency. We needed a hired gun. In Donald Trump we found him. Things are about to get very, very interesting . . .

    Liked by 1 person

  42. Maquis says:

    All I can do is pray, there’s nothing else really I can do, other than be vocal when the occasion arises, so I do pray. I literally envision a innumerable guard of Angels standing guard to protect him, against ALL of his many enemies, that no harm comes to him nor his own.

    I pray that his plans succeed beyond even his expectations. That his mind will be amplified and his natural talents elevated. That the Spirit will be always with him and inspire him. That his family will be safe… It seems the list always gets longer! I really can’t keep going…

    I just know that this is the most talented President I have ever known. He astounds me daily. And I served under Reagan, and my love for him is not one whit diminished; he was the right man for that time, and he toppled an Evil Empire. But I have never seen such a whirling dervish of Exacting Executive Energy. What History is being crafted before our eyes!

    Much Evil trembles now.

    I shall watch, and pray. Eight Years. What this man could do with Eight Years. May it be so.

    Like

  43. Dana Doran says:

    Hopefully this strips away the unintended power granted to agencies to impose rules and regulations not enacted by law. Enough is enough.

    Like

  44. PowerCord says:

    Wait a minute. He is creating a Regulatory Reform Task Force for each agency? Now, the end result might be good but isn’t this creating a bigger government to make a small one? What happens when the Task Forces are “done”? What defines “done”? This smells funny to me and I’m not happy.

    Like

  45. Mike diamond says:

    President trump is doing his best to help america and bring back more jobs, we need to be thankful,Obama did nothing,Hillary would of done nothing, the demo- rats have done nothing, except yel let men in the women’s rest room,what a shame!!!!!!!

    Like

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