President Trump Delivers Remarks at HHS on Ongoing Drug Price Initiatives…

Earlier today President Trump delivered remarks at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services about ongoing efforts to lower the cost of prescription drugs.  Introducing a new set of HHS and FDA pharmaceutical reforms.  Excellent initiative.

[Transcript] U.S. Dept of HHS – 2:14 P.M. EDT – THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you very much.  Thank you.  It’s a big day.  It’s a very important day.  (Applause.)  Thank you.  Please.

Thank you very much, Secretary Azar, for your tremendous leadership.  This really is an important day for me.  I’ve been talking about drug price reductions for a long time.  And now we’re doing things that nobody was, let’s say — because I’m speaking on behalf of all of us — bold enough to do.  And they’re going to have a tremendous impact.

I also want to thank FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb.  Scott — stand up, Scott.  You’ve done such an incredible job.  Really, an incredible job.  (Applause.)  And CMS Administrator Seema Verma for joining us.  Seema, thank you very much.  Seema, great job.  Great job.  (Applause.)

I’m thrilled to be here at the Department of Health and Human Services, and I want to thank everybody.  I understand that it’s been decades since the last President came here.  And I’m very surprised that President Obama didn’t come here for Obamacare.  Explain that one to me.  (Laughter.)  But he didn’t.

But it’s a great honor to be here.  You do an incredible job.  You really do an incredible job.  So I thank you.

Since the day I took office, I have made reducing drug prices one of my highest priorities.  Last year, the FDA approved more than 1,000 low-cost generics — the most in the history of our country.  This year, we beat that record, approving even more generics.  These new approvals are leading to cheaper competitive alternatives for lifesaving drugs like the EpiPen, saving Americans almost $9 billion a year last year alone.

Since releasing my drug pricing blueprint in May, 16 drug companies reduced their list prices, rolled back increases, or froze their prices for the rest of the year.  We called a few of those companies recently, where they raised their prices, and I guess maybe it was one of the times that I realized how powerful the presidency is, because they immediately rolled their prices back to where they started.  And those companies know who we’re talking about, and we appreciate it very much.

Earlier this month, I signed two bills to lower the cost of prescription drugs: the “Know the Lowest Price Act” — “Know the Lowest Price Act,” it’s a big thing — and the “Patient Right to Know Act.”  And, by the way, put those two together and you have a complicated deal.  (Laughter.)  Sounds simple, but that one is not.  Ending the unjust gag clauses once and for all — where you’d go into a drugstore and the pharmacist wouldn’t even be allowed to talk about alternatives or pricing.  How ridiculous is that?  Think of it — how ridiculous.  That’s not going to take place anymore.  And, actually, the pharmacists are very happy about it.

Patients now have the right to know the lowest price and most affordable alternative available at their pharmacy.

Today, we are here to announce another bold and historic action to bring down the price of prescription drugs.  With the action I am unveiling today, the United States will finally begin to confront one of the most unfair practices — almost unimaginable that it hasn’t been taken care of long before this — that drives up the cost of medicine in the United States.

We’re taking aim at the global freeloading that forces American consumers to subsidize lower prices in foreign countries through higher prices in our country.  And I’ve seen it for years, and I never understood.  Same company, same box, same pill, made in the exact same location.  And you’ll go to some countries, and it would be 20 percent the cost of what we pay, and in some cases much less than that.

And I’d say, “Why is this?”  I never knew that I would be able to stand here before you and have a chance to fix it.  And that’s what we’re doing.  We’re fixing it.  That’s called “real-life experience,” I guess.

For decades, other countries have rigged the system so that American patients are charged much more — and in some cases much, much more — for the exact same drug.  In other words, Americans pay more so that other countries can pay less.  Very simple.  That’s exactly what it is.  It’s wrong.  It’s unfair.  It’s not surprising.  I’ve seen trade deals where it’s far more costly to us than even this.  And we’re changing them also.

Foreign countries even threaten to disrespect our patents if they are not given cheaper prices on drugs.  So they’re not going to even look at the patents.  They’ve been very, very disrespectful, previously, to our country and to all of the things that we stand for.  And especially, they would disrespect patents when it came to American-made drugs.

The American middle class is effectively funding virtually all drug research and development for the entire planet.  So we are paying for it.  We are subsidizing it.  Everybody else is benefitting.  And they are paying nothing toward research and development.

The world reaps the benefits of American genius and innovation, while American citizens — and especially our great seniors, who are hit the hardest — pick up the tab.  But no longer.

Here are just a few examples: For one eye medication that helps prevent blindness, Medicare pays over $1 billion dollars a year.  If we paid the prices other nations pay, we’d bring the $1 billion down to $187 million dollars a year.  It’s pretty amazing, isn’t it?

We spend more than $1 billion a year on two drugs to treat bone disease, but we could save more than $800 billion [million] dollars — think of that — $800 billion [million] saving for our seniors by paying the prices other countries pay.  Nothing special — just the prices that other countries pay.  That’s the way the United States has been disrespected for too long in too many ways.

One common cancer drug is nearly seven times as expensive for Medicare as it is for other countries.  This is a highly used and very effective drug.  And it’s seven times more expensive.  Not fair.  This happens because the government pays whatever price the drug companies set without any negotiation whatsoever.

Not anymore.  Under our new plan, the Department of Health and Human Services would allow Medicare to determine the price it pays for certain drugs based on the cheaper prices paid by other nations.  Some people call it “favored nations clauses.”  We have them in business.  We have them in a lot of different contracts that I’ve seen over the years and been part of.  “Favored nations” — so think of that.

So, we’re paying a price based on the price that other nations are paying.  That’s what we’re going to pay.  No longer seven times more.  No longer 10 times, 11 times, even 12 times more — I’ve seen examples of paying the same price.  I’m talking about billions and billions of savings to people.  To people.

We will no longer accept the inflated prices being charged to our seniors.  I had a congressman — respected congressman — come to the Oval Office and say, “Sir, for my constituents, drug pricing is more important than healthcare.”  And I said, “Explain that to me.”  But he actually said “drug prices” — I’ve never forgotten the expression — “drug pricing.”  We know how important healthcare is.  “Drug pricing is even more important for my constituents.”

At long last, the drug companies and foreign countries will be held accountable for how they rigged the system against American consumers.

This is a revolutionary change.  Nobody has had the courage to do it, or they just didn’t want to do it.  And this is a change for the people.  This is not a change for industry or for companies or for pharma.  This is a change for the people.  It will be substantially a reduction in drug prices for our people and our senior citizens.  Tremendous, tremendous difference.

Our plan will also fix a broken payment system where doctors are reimbursed more if they prescribe a much more expensive drug.  Under our new proposed payment system, doctors will be paid a flat rate — and when you think of it, it’s like being a contractor or anything else — if it’s an expensive drug or a less expensive drug, it’s the same.  Doesn’t take any more.

And I think this will be good in terms of the pricing of the drug; it’d be fantastic for that.  But it will also be much better for patients and it very well may be better for doctors.

This follows other significant actions that we have taken to protect Medicare for our great seniors.  We have given the plans that serve more than 45 million seniors on Medicare Part D and 20 million seniors on Medicare Advantage new tools to negotiate lower prices.

Thanks to our actions, this year, premiums for both Medicare Part D and Medicare Advantage have — and I’ll give you a word that you haven’t ever heard — ever heard — have “gone down.”  (Laughter.)  You’ve never heard that word.  (Applause.)

True.  True.  Gone down.  And now they’re going to go substantially down.

Sadly, a majority of Democrats in the House of Representatives have co-sponsored a very socialist healthcare plan that would destroy Medicare, terminate Medicare Advantage, and outlaw the employer-sponsored healthcare plans of 157 million Americans.

We think that they’re going to actually come along with us when they see what we’re doing.  We think.  We hope.  It’s something that makes no sense any other way.  So we really think that can be bipartisan.  It happened to be a Democrat that told me how important drug pricing was.  It wasn’t a Republican in this case; it was a Democrat.

Under this administration, we will always protect Medicare for our great seniors.  And we will always protect Americans with preexisting conditions.  Always.

In every action we take, we are putting America first.  And this is very much about putting America first.  We get tired of having people go to other countries to literally fill prescriptions.  And you know where I’m talking about.

We’re fighting for lower drug prices, which will now be automatic.  It will be automatic and very substantial.  Lower premiums, where we’ve done a really god job with healthcare in bringing the premiums down to a much lower level — much more acceptable level.  And we’re going to be soon announcing some things that will really have a tremendous and positive impact on healthcare also.  And better healthcare, very importantly, for every single American.

So I just want to thank everybody in this room.  You’re outstanding people.  I know how hard you work.  I know how important your work is, how brilliant your work has to be, and how complex a job you have.  You have a very complex job.  You have everything.  You have probably every single element of life in the work you do.

But I just want to let you know, the American people very much appreciate — have great respect for you.  I think they’ll even have more.  That will go up very significantly when they see their drug prices falling.  They’re going to say, “What’s happened?  They must have made a mistake.”  (Laughter.)  It’s true.  They’re going to go up to the counter; they’re going to say, “Did you make a mistake?”  Some won’t say that, they’ll just think it.  (Laughter.)  And some might say, “Did you make a mistake?”  But you’re going to see a big reduction.

I want to thank everybody very much.  It’s an honor to be here.  Thank you very much.  (Applause.)

END – 2:27 P.M. EDT

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, Donald Trump, Election 2018, Legislation, media bias, President Trump, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

59 Responses to President Trump Delivers Remarks at HHS on Ongoing Drug Price Initiatives…

  1. Everywhereguy says:

    Hold
    The
    House

    Liked by 7 people

  2. Pam says:

    Liked by 1 person

    • mimbler says:

      Seems counter to PDJT’s message, and counter to my personal experience.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        Yep. And the two examples he cited (Switzerland and Canada) are probably the “list” prices, in a socialized health system. In Germany the prices are very high too, before getting the Krankenkasse (health system) discount (still have a co-pay, but it’s trivial)(usually…).

        Switzerland is pretty expensive for everything, not just meds. And they are the home to “Big Pharma”, and many of the world’s largest insurance companies and banking institutions. No wonder there are so many huge mirror-windowed skyscrapers there.
        It’s not just chocolate and cheese there. Drat, now I want some Fondue 🙂

        Another example would be the hearing aid industry, which adds exorbitant markups to the COGs of their devices. I read the annual report of Phonak (one of the major players) a few years back, and they had a profit margin of more than 70 percent(!) before taxes. Talk about robbing people who usually can ill afford it. It’s not uncommon to have to pay 3K Euro PER EAR above and beyond what the health system pays (1K/ear). And that for about 100€ in electronics and housing, etc, Saying the high prices are to subsidize R&D is just a load of BS. The 70 percent example above already had R&D costs amortized out.

        Liked by 1 person

      • NewfTea says:

        He was talking about name brand drugs, NOT generics.

        You are forced to use name brands until the patent runs out. Lucky for you if that isn’t the case for you.

        Liked by 1 person

      • tdaly14 says:

        It’s not, he has a thread about what POTUS, HHS and FDA are doing.

        Liked by 1 person

      • GB Bari says:

        Same for me.

        I have a single drug that blows up that argument.

        Colchicine (generic). Now sold as “Colcrys” (brand name only). Look up the price history on that very old and long-ago established medication used to relieve symptoms of gout. The FDA caused the pricing problem. They accused the generic mfrs of not adhering to the medication’s formula. I can’t say of they did or didn’t. All I know is that they worked great for me.

        It was only a few dollars for a 90 day supply of the generic but suddenly, because the FDA removed the generic license and awarded the entire medication to a sole manufacturer, the cost went up over 100x about 7 years ago. Same med., just 100x more costly. Now it’s back down to about 35x more costly. I wonder what will happen with its cost if and after PDJT’s bill goes into effect.

        Liked by 2 people

      • eworth says:

        There is a difference between the branded vs. the generic pricing. Trump is absolutely accurate re the price of branded drugs overseas are much cheaper versus here because we essentially subsidize worldwide R&D. On the generic side, it is pure commodity price competition, and since we have more players in the market given our market size, we get lower prices.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mimbler says:

          I know it is only anecdotal, but the generic eye drops I’m on are 11 dollars in the US and 1.79 elsewhere in the world.

          That’s why I said my experience didn’t match his statistics. And a fellow treeper posted that in Europe it matters what price you are comparing. The retail prices for generics are high, but the discounted prices people pay through insurance, etc. are much lower.

          So, Scott could be right, but I’m remaining at least a little skeptical while I try to do a little investigating on my own.

          Like

    • WSB says:

      Absolutely nothing to do with the multi-billion (Trillion?) dollar scam of putting Americans on drugs and then charging them ransom for the non-generics. We pay for the rest of the world and should not be on many drugs to begin with.

      PS Could we please ban the drug commercials? The side effects alone makes one want to heave his own dinner.

      S T O P!!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liz says:

      Maybe you could explain why when my mother was prescribed Gleevec for her cancer in 2013 it was $6,000/month and 4 years later $9,000/ month. It had long since made all the money back. She got it from Canada for $350/month. It stopped working last fall so she swtis=ched to Sunitinib for $15,000/month, but has since passed.

      Like

      • amaezed says:

        I got rid of my mom’s cancer in a week and have MRI scans before and after to show this. Also a friend of mine had colon cancer. His marriage was on the rocks. If you know about colon cancer; one of the symptoms is very bad breath. They were near divorce. I gave him 3 herbs and within a week it was gone. He also has evidence of this and was grateful for his remarkable recovery as were the doctors. We use far too many toxic drugs most of which were all made from the herb. “Trust me…I’m not a doctor”

        Like

        • Cliff Indiana says:

          Annnd, of course, you performed these herbal miracles without telling the rest of us what said “herb” it is! Makes it a far less credible story IMO.Herbs can be very powerful if you know how, but, you need to know which one to use!

          Like

          • amaezed says:

            The 3 herbs are 1. wormwood 2. cloves (fresh supermarket) 3. walnut husk (has to be the green outer husk). Careful taking these as they may make you vomit. Take food before as a diluter. Go easy. https://amaezed.wordpress.com/health/drhuldaclark/ Cheers 🙂

            Like

            • Fringe Dweller says:

              I’ll just leave this bit of testimony here for anyone reading the above comment. Absolutely disgusting.

              https://www.cancertreatmentwatch.org/victims/ponzanelli.shtml

              Like

              • amaezed says:

                “Absolutely disgusting” doesn’t describe this emotionally charged article so full of holes that it’s hard to be serious about in response. The website you provided are the medical fraternity screeching blue murder that something apart from toxic chemicals actually work. I wont debate this article you have provided. I could also cite just as many successful alt therapy websites. My life was changed around with people in my life that had cancer and cured yes cured including myself. One woman’s life and death struggle with cancer doesn’t prove either way of cause and affect that she died from whatever. Twenty-first century medicine boasts a number of treatments that are actually very dangerous to human health, none more so than for cancer. Every year in the United Kingdom, 200,000 people are diagnosed with cancer and 152,500 people die. In the United States, the annual death rate for this disease is approximately 547,000. These deaths are recorded as cancer deaths, but how many of these deaths are really attributable to the disease itself? How many deaths should in fact be recorded as “death by doctoring”? When we consider that conventional treatment consists almost entirely of radiation, chemotherapy and the long-term application of toxic pharmaceuticals treatments which are all well known for their life-threatening side-effects–then the question becomes all the more legitimate. On chemotherapy, for instance, note the following:
                “Most cancer patients in this country die of chemotherapy. Chemotherapy does not eliminate breast, colon, or lung cancers. This fact has been documented for over a decade, yet doctors still use chemotherapy for these tumors.” (Allen Levin, MD, UCSF, The Healing of Cancer, Marcus Books, 1990). But should we find this so surprising? After all, it’s no secret that with global spending on conventional cancer treatments running into the hundreds of billions of pounds and dollars annually, any news of a successful anticancer treatment extracted from the simple apricot kernel could do some serious damage to the wealth of the mighty Cancer Inc.
                Chemotherapy is an invasive and toxic treatment able to supposedly eliminate cancer cells. Unfortunately, its ferocious chemistry is not able to differentiate between the cancerous cells and surrounding healthy tissue. Put simply, chemo is an intravenously administered poison that kills all living matter by degrees. The immune system is hit hard and doesn’t recuperate enough to protect itself against common illnesses, which can lead to death. Three quarters of those who die during cancer treatment do so through infections as a result of immune system failure. Side effects can include dizziness, skin discolouration, sensory loss, audio/visual impairment, nausea, diarrhoea, loss of hair, loss of appetite leading to malnutrition, loss of sex drive, loss of white blood cells, permanent organ damage, organ failure, internal bleeding, tissue loss and cardiovascular leakage (artery deterioration), to name but a few.
                Doctors were asked to answer a questionnaire as to how much faith they had in chemo treatments. Most answered that they had little faith if administered chemotherapy on their own families. Go figure. One significant factor is our submissive attitude to the medical orthodoxy and its archetypal symbolism: the white coat, the stethoscope, the years of knowledge represented in those framed degrees. Every artifact speaks of our being in the hands of experts, lets not forget the added pressure exerted at the point of diagnosis by Doctor X. One significant factor is our submissive attitude to the medical orthodoxy and its archetypal symbolism: the white coat, the stethoscope, the years of knowledge represented in those framed degrees. Every artifact speaks of our being in the hands of experts, lets not forget the added pressure exerted at the point of diagnosis by Doctor X.
                We are bullied with unfounded, pro establishment headlines: “Another breakthrough at UCLA…yeah but with darn mice. Or “Cancer vaccine close…yes, close since 1975…but please, continue to give generously, because next time it might be you! So, next time you are asked to donate to a cancer charity, bear in mind that your money will be used to sustain an industry which has been deemed by many eminent scientists as a qualified failure and others as a complete fraud. As far back as 1976, the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute terminated the routine use of mammography for woman under 50yrs because of it detrimental carcinogenic effects. A study in Canada found that women who had routine mammograms before the age of 50 also had increased death rates from breast cancer by 36%.
                What is clear is that mammography can’t prevent breast cancer or the spread of it. By the time a tumor is large enough to be detected by mammography, it’s been there as long as 12 years, so it’s ridiculous to advertise as ‘early detection’. The painful compression of breast tissue itself increases the possibility of metastasis by 80%. Doctors claim that between 10% and 17% of the time, breast cancer is non-life-threatening type called ‘ductal carcinoma in situ’. This harmless cancer can be made active by the compressive force of routine mammography.
                “Most extensive studies show no increased survival rates from routine screening mammograms. After reviewing all available literature in the world on the subject, noted researchers Dr’s Wright and Mueller of the University of British Columbia recommended the withdrawal of public funding for mammography screening because the ‘benefit achieved is marginal and the harm caused is substantial’. (Lancet, July 1. 1995). Chemo as a money making scheme..https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdLyMhNdcSc The medical fraternity are a trillion dollar industry. Do you think that they are going to be taken down soon. Doubt it. I have nothing else to tell you. Debating over this is futile. You either get it or you don’t. I am merely sharing my own experiences. Thanks 🙂

                Like

    • Tibetloga says:

      30 years ago, my rescue inhaler cost, without insurance, 25 dollars. And it worked a hell of a lot better before Obama did away with the Chlorofluorocarbon propellants. Yeah, policy before people, thanks a lot. I’m sure a lot of people have died who didn’t have to. Today, it’s closer to 70. The Epipin has gone up so much my Doctor doesn’t carry one, you have to bring your own. This post does NOT match my life experience.

      Like

  3. f.fernandez says:

    I’m glad he doesn’t grow tired of winning. This initiative will be yet another dagger to the Dems’ platform.

    Liked by 7 people

  4. Tony in LA says:

    Problem with an easy fix ignored by all past administrations. Why didn’t O or W do this? Did any D’s in congress vote for this or was it an R [rather, a T] fix all the way?

    Liked by 1 person

  5. rf121 says:

    The solution to this problem is to stay off the pill mill. We are not designed to be medicated.

    1. Eat crappy food. I will be conservative and say 70% of health issues are due to the processed food we eat.
    2. Feel bad and go to the doctor with symptoms X,Y, Z.
    3. Doc perscribes pills A,B,C to treat the symptoms. You may have to go back for more meds to treat the side effects of those pills.
    4. Because you did not fix the problem you are forever on meds. $$$$ to big pharma and health care. Also to the food processors who are the source of the problem because they know food addiction is real.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Cuppa Covfefe says:

      Notice that the seed companies, the pesticide/weed-control companies, the food-additive companies, the perfume(!) companies, and the pharmaceutical companies often fall under the same umbrella?

      These companies are completely horizontally and vertically integrated. They control almost everything from the cradle to the grave. And the globalists would like to move those two points much closer together (i.e. population control/elimination)…

      Still, there are cases where meds are needed. My son takes heart meds, and that has utterly NOTHING to do with processed food, bad diet, or anything else. And there is no “homeopathic” “remedy” that can do anything to help him. So it’s not ALL bad. And he’s neither overweight, nor out of shape.

      Liked by 3 people

    • R.Shanker says:

      Modern medicine is great at carpentry( broken bones) and plumbing(heart attacks). And doling out anti-biotics(bacterial infections).
      In most other respects it is a failure.
      I agree – Food is 90% of the issue for most people. If you only ate fresh veggies, occassional meat, fish. Lots of healthy fats – lard, coconut oil, butter.
      And avoid- packaged foods, Sugary treats, french fries, bad oils ( processed industrial grade seed oils) and sweets ( industrial quantities of high fructose corn syrup) –
      You would probably be better off than that coctkail of statins, diabetic meds, high blood pressure meds etc.
      Think about it – the Pharma executives are just like you – they have large mortgages to pay, a retirement to fund, kids to put through private school etc. What is their motivation when they go in to work every morning? To get yo hooked on a cocktail of very expensive drugs you have to take for the rest of your life. That is the definition of success.

      Liked by 2 people

    • don’t forget exercise…move it or you lose it….

      Liked by 1 person

    • GB Bari says:

      That’s great advice and my hat is off to those who were blessed with very healthy DNA and can maintain their health by eating right and getting some exercise.

      Unfortunately not everyone is lucky enough for that lifestyle to stave off genetically predisposed horrible and debilitating disease, for which natural, non-prescription cures have not yet been discovered. They rely on costly Rx medications to reduce symptoms, pain, and enable sufferers to function in some degree as healthy people.

      This initiative by PDJT and his HHS, if passed by the Conpress without any poisonous amendments (highly unlikely given the amount of K Street bribery dollars that will be spent to oppose) would be a huge benefit to millions of Americans who suffer from those genetically predisposed diseases for which no cure has yet been found and for which prescription medications provide their only relief.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Liz says:

      My mother never took drugs until she developed a rare cancer treated by a chemo drug and had the choice of drug or death. It bought her 5 more years. For the most part your advice works. I eat well and take nothing, but most people by my age are taking drugs. My mother-in-law refuses to take the prescribed drugs and is healthy at 84.

      Like

    • Tibetloga says:

      When I was in my early twenties, I got Chicken Pox. That childhood disease is a killer for adults. When I got over it, I kept having respiratory problems. Turned out it gave me adult onset asthma.

      Like

    • Deplorable Patriot says:

      Yep. Meds are VERY hard on the elimination organs, too. So, spend years on pain killers, antihyperintensives, etc., eventually need dialysis because of failing kidneys. Ditch the inflammatory foods from the diet, which can be front end sort of expensive to choose quality food over cheap crap, and the need for medicine dwindles.

      It’s almost like the pharmaceutical and “food” companies are in cahoots.

      Like

  6. PgtSndThinker says:

    In 2010 I was buying post surgery eye drops. Pharmacist couldn’t tell me how much it would cost until he processed it through the insurance system and store computers. After 30 minutes, was told the exorbitant price for the .1 oz dropper. Refused to buy it. Drove a difficult 45 minutes to the eye doctor’s office for a free sample. Glad the system is changing.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. snellvillebob says:

    I hope Cialis is one of them. My doctor gave me a prescription and pharmacist wanted $350 for it. That is like 7 time my annual entertainment budget.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Somebody says:

      Check out forhims dot com. I heard an ad on the radio saying they had the blue pill for $30 for a month supply, $5 for the 1st month. I assume a month is 30 pills? So for $35 you could get 60 pills, that’s within your budget

      Like

  8. Psycho Monkee says:

    VSGPDJT: Not bought, Not Coerced, Not Threated, Not intimidated, Not greedy, Not a flash-in-pan lying political hack. Heads up D.C., THIS is how you love and lead your Country.

    Liked by 4 people

  9. Redhotrugmama says:

    This is a positive step forward in them right direction. It needs to be applicable to brand names and generics. If legislation could be passed allowing CMS to negotiate all drug prices it would help as well. Also eliminating direct to consumer advertising would be another win. The US and Australia are the only countries that allow direct to consumer advertising for drugs. Pharma companies spend a TON of money advertising to consumers. That money could be best spent in R&D.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Stillwater says:

    All I have to say is…
    That’s my president.

    Like

    • R.Shanker says:

      Amen. the best president in my lifetime – and possibly ever.

      Liked by 1 person

      • R.Shanker says:

        A healthy , robust 70 year old male at the peak of his powers! Healthy appetite for good food, pretty women . A loving family man.
        beats those shriveled up, twisted, hateful, psychopathic creatures on the other side.

        Liked by 1 person

        • R.Shanker says:

          Every culture recognizes this about our potus. Thats why he gets respect from the most unlikely sources like Kim Jung Un.
          Thats why he can joke and laugh and throw out the most outlandish insulkts ( Rocket Man!) and they still love/respect him.
          Humans can instinctively recognize Health.
          And all the rest of the world has seen from our leadership over the past 30 years – is twisted psychpaths.

          Liked by 2 people

    • hdpman says:

      Our president seemed a little tired tonight. Probably not getting much rest.

      Like

      • GB Bari says:

        All of the great ideas he just told us, the commitment he is keeping, the huge impact this will have on the industry and tens of millions of Americans…and THAT’S all you took away from this?????

        Like

  11. Tiffthis says:

    Always something getting done in the Trump Whitehouse 😇

    Liked by 1 person

  12. talker2u says:

    President Donald J. Trump is a good man.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. iwasthere says:

    Trump just broke a lot of rice bowls today. He promised to not be a captive to K Street and boy is he showing that to be true. Nice shout out to HHS line employees. He supports your mission and wants you to do well. Maybe he’s not such a bad boss after all.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Stillwater says:

      That’s what I took away from it. He’s changing the work environment so that HHS employees get their satisfaction from working for the public’s (vs. K street) benefit. There’s probably a lot of good people in that department who have never seen HHS work towards these goals before.

      Trump is bringing meaning back to the term “public servant”.

      Like

  14. deplorable says:

    “Under this administration, we will always protect Medicare for our great seniors. And we will always protect Americans with preexisting conditions. Always.”

    Finally, a president that puts the American people first.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. CaptainNonno says:

    So, market forces will control prices. Other country’s prices will rise some and ours will drop some. Our generics for the most part come from India, China and Israel. Prefer they were made here bc stricter oversight on quality control.

    Like

  16. CaptainNonno says:

    Also, the big reason this is possible is because President Trump owes nothing to anybody including Pharma.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. chuck spence says:

    Mr President you need to go one step further. Make Generics exactly the same as name brand. Now there can be a 20% variance in the active ingredient vs the name brand. In some patients they cannot tolerate this varience. In those cases most of the time the Insurance Co. will not pay for the name brand. Make generics exactly the same.

    Like

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