Ambassador Wolverine – U.S.T.R Robert Lighthizer Discusses U.S./China Trade Reset….

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer appears on Fox News with Maria Bartiromo to discuss the current status of the U.S. -v- China trade reset.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Ambassador Robert Lighthizer are the targeted one-two punch behind the ‘America-First’ reciprocity program.  In this interview Lighthizer discusses the connectivity of tariffs within the larger trade strategy.

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We are very fortunate to have an awesome wolverine trade and economic team; stunningly so.  The main reason for their effectiveness is the reality that for the first time in our lifetimes we have an economic team acting entirely without influence from Wall Street, K-Street, special interest groups and CoC lobbyists.

As unbelievable as it sounds, we actually have pro-USA administration and government officials writing the actual trade policy without any influence by corporate interests.  And with trillions at stake, this is driving the multinationals -writ large- bananas.

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, China, Decepticons, Deep State, Dem Hypocrisy, Donald Trump, Economy, Election 2018, media bias, President Trump, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

149 Responses to Ambassador Wolverine – U.S.T.R Robert Lighthizer Discusses U.S./China Trade Reset….

  1. Justice Warrior says:

    Love it!!!

    Liked by 15 people

    • Daniel says:

      I’m all in favor of what the president is doing, but how will that affect the Foxconn plan to set up manufacturing in the US?

      Liked by 2 people

      • svenwg says:

        Likely they will set up an even bigger factory and employ more American workers.

        Liked by 11 people

        • Daniel says:

          Did you catch the part about restricting what Chinese investment and all that? I know some consider Taiwan to not be Chinese. I know Taiwan considers itself not to be Chinese. It’s a complicated issue but it’s definitely true that China lays claim on Taiwan. Not applying such policies to Taiwan and Taiwanese companies could be seen in a variety of ways.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Deb says:

            The US recognizes Taiwan as an independent country.

            Liked by 8 people

          • Yes, it could. Do you remember POTUS-elect Trump taking a phone call from the President of Taiwan? The Chinese didn’t like that at all and DJT *knew* they weren’t going to like it and did it anyway.

            It is *inevitable* the US and China are going to clash. With any luck, it will not be a military clash, but the *best* way to prevent a military clash is to strike at China *logistically* by reducing their access to US technology and dollars.

            The Chinese are a threat to the US, make no mistake about it.

            Liked by 8 people

            • Steve Herman says:

              China is probably more capitalist than the USA. They have a large and growing middle class. In light of their middle class, China does not want an economic/trade war with the USA. In a similar manner, the Chinese middle class does not want a military war with the USA. The 1989 Tienanmen Square protests was the rise of the middle class. The protest took the lives of thousands of China’s middle class. The protest made the case for economic power that the middle class was willing to die for. IOW, the Old Guard has the political power, the middle class has the economic power and proved they are willing to die to keep the economy flowing. If the Old Guard screws up and escalates a trade war that depresses, or God forbid, collapses their econ, then the Old Guard realizes this could tear the country apart with the real possibility/probability of taking down the Old Guard.

              Liked by 6 people

              • Lis says:

                Any “old guard” must allow itself to trust and allow some “new guard” in, or kill itself off and be forgotten.

                Liked by 2 people

                • A2 says:

                  ‘Old guard’ is gone, mostly six feet under or sleeping their remaining years off at Beidaihe.

                  These are the ‘princelings’ that are in charge now. They are even more Marxist than the old guys.

                  Like

              • The validity of your first sentence depends upon your meaning of ‘capitalism’. There is virtually no private investment of any kind in China. In the final analysis all investment activity is under the authority of the Party. I have seen the system described as ‘state capitalism’.

                In the rest of your analysis, I think you correctly described the fact that China is fraught with various internal — quite restless — groupings.

                Because of the control of the media in China, there is much information to which we are not privy. For example, at one time China was reporting thousands of incidents of significant ‘domestic disturbances’. Because these disturbances were embarrassing to the Party, they simply stopped reporting them.

                China cannot afford a ‘trade war’ but, just as importantly, China cannot afford any significant change in US/China trade that creates a reduction in their exploitation of the US/China trade relations.

                My view is that we will know they have decided to ‘put the pedal to the metal’ when they start selling off a considerable amount of their US dollar holdings.

                My sense is that the US sees this coming, which is part of the reason why Mnuchin has been so involved in the trade discussions with China. It is also, at least in part, the reason why Mnuchin and Trump are proposing changes to the banking system that would create a separate banking system somewhat insulated from international currency activity.

                Liked by 2 people

                • Steve Herman says:

                  Hadn’t heard the term “state capitalism” but it is a great description. My comment of Tienanmen Square deaths in the thousands is prob understated. The AUS press believes that tens of thousands may have lost their lives in the industrial belt of China during the Tienanmen Square protests.
                  If the Chinese dump Treasury bills and tanks the $$$, wouldn’t that work to their disadvantage by driving up the price of Chinese made products in the US?
                  Could you also expand upon your comment about China ‘put the pedal to the metal’. My Macro-Econ is questionable.

                  Like

                • DGC says:

                  For those unfamiliar with the term ‘State Capitalism’, it is just another euphemism for a centrally planned economy. It doesn’t matter whether it is more technically correct to call it fascistic, communistic or some hybrid between the two either, as ‘State Capitalism’ still assumes a central government has the ability to plan and control the allocation of financial, commodity and manufacturing resources over private individuals.

                  Liked by 1 person

              • Maquis says:

                That might have a greater degree of credibility if the Chinese protested the massacre in great number. Especially if they acted in force as you suggest they now will.

                Their middle class is about 300M out of 1.4B. That’s not all that large, really.

                As far as growth is concerned, it can only happen if we remain suckers. We won’t.

                Their middle class is inadequate to spur growth. The Chinese have built fifty vast ghost cities and continue to do so. It is done solely to prevent idle hands.

                They are hugely dysfunctional. If they were to take down the old guard, what happens? Do they take down the PLA? How?

                Who would capitalize on the chaos? Russia? Tibet? Mongolia? Neighbors South with historical resentments and large armies?

                In any case, those that died at Tiennanmen proved the nature of the regime. Of their personal courage too. But their resolve since has not been in evidence.

                Liked by 2 people

                • WSB says:

                  I agree with your post, however, China has the oldest merchant class on the planet. The USA standing up to the comminist leadership may just burst the bubble so China can find that productive side again.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Maquis says:

                  WSB, I so hope that comes to pass. So amazing, it seems, how the tyrannized respond to US courage. Equally interesting how tyrants respond to US strength.

                  Gotta have both if Humanity is to win.

                  Like

              • jbrickley says:

                Not to mention the return of Hong Kong and Shanghai back to China from the UK. You had millions of people with western freedoms suddenly thrust into the population. At first, the old Communist guard would show their military might and try to threaten them but it didn’t work.

                Liked by 3 people

                • WSB says:

                  China has been trying to ruin HK ever since they were able to take back the island. The Brits should never have abided by that silly treaty.

                  HK is in a continual fight now to retain the freedoms they had. I remember being there on business when it happened and it really has not gotten any better.

                  What holds the situation at bay is capitalism. Thank goodness.

                  Liked by 2 people

                • A2 says:

                  It was HK and Macau in 1997. Macau was a Portuguese colony, HK a British Crown Colony. Not Shanghai. 😀

                  Liked by 2 people

              • Carrie2 says:

                Steve, it is very entrepreneur with lots of millionaires and billionaires now. The Chinese people want good stuff and are having more freedom as well. China is very afraid that the “peasants” are in larger numbers and would rebel big time, so they tread now on how far they can go. They know the importance of learning/speaking English because they know it is important.

                Liked by 2 people

            • A2 says:

              Meanwhile, as the Summit was going on, the US quietly opened a brand new AIT (American Institute Taiwan) in Taipei.
              TAIPEI, TAIWAN
              “The U.S. dedicated a new de-facto embassy in Taiwan on Tuesday in what officials described as an indicator of robust ties with the self-governing island democracy that China claims as its own territory.

              The ceremony, which drew an angry response from Beijing, is the latest sign of how the administration of President Donald Trump has strengthened relations with Taipei amid a litany of disputes with China and rising tensions in the highly militarized Taiwan Strait.”

              (many ways to skin the panda, and China is indeed furious :-D)

              http://amp.kentucky.com/news/nation-world/world/article212996434.html

              Liked by 2 people

          • Carrie2 says:

            Daniel, the Taiwanese are straight out they are NOT Chinese and even still speak the old Chinese language so I have to stop and think when in Taiwan. What I have seen over the years that many Chinese are beginning to look and sound and learn like the Taiwanese.

            Like

          • Jedi9 says:

            That all depends! Taiwan after all voted in favor of China when the Hague ruled against China’s so call 9 dash line controversy in the South China Sea!

            Like

      • Perot Conservative says:

        Foxconn just broke ground in Wisconsin.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jedi9 says:

        https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/china-hacked-a-navy-contractor-and-secured-a-trove-of-highly-sensitive-data-on-submarine-warfare/2018/06/08/6cc396fa-68e6-11e8-bea7-c8eb28bc52b1_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.fcd86ecb6f43

        Yes China continues to steal our technology! Does stealing our military secrets count too? I mean if they are suppose to be our friends and trading partner then why continue to steal from us? I am glad that this is happening, and China’s threats of retaliating is not something I am going to lose sleep over, although the chorus of the Uniparty crying foul on farm goods such as pork and soybeans will no doubt be used as the counter argument all paid for by the Chinese lobbyists! Hmm, McConnell is the first thing to comes to mind, and I wonder why!

        Liked by 1 person

    • motreehouse says:

      Wilburines Rule!

      Liked by 2 people

  2. john edward lorenz says:

    the short term pain, if any felt by the consumer will be offset in the long run by fairer trade.

    Liked by 10 people

    • FofBW says:

      IMO, it will hit the stock market in some way till it all the anxiety and unknowns wear away.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Bert Darrell says:

        The stock market looks at the future and puts a price on potential productivity and earnings. There is no way America will lose a trade war with China, Mexico, Canada or the EU. We know it and they know it.

        If they want to play the “unfairness” game let them do so. In the end, a trade war will generate new jobs here. Businesses set up where the taxes are lowest and the environment allows them to grow and and profit. And businesses, both old and new, need workers. We will end up hiring THEIR workers, who will come to America tax free.

        In the meantime, relax, sit down and watch Canadian car makers re-settling in Michigan, Ohio and other states.

        Liked by 16 people

        • The stock market is just the stock market, it isn’t Main Street.

          It pays to understand tariffs and other trade measures as protecting and encouraging US business *investment*.

          If you understand that capital is the result of *resources* investing in *productive capacity* you will understand why *only certain* US-based companies are threatened by ‘protectionism’ (i.e. the transnationals).

          I also think that important parts of the ‘investment class’ understands that increased investment in the US results in more jobs which means more income that can be applied to lowering personal debt and more tax receipts that can be applied to lowering the national debt. Many members of the investment class fear debt default more than they fear protectionism.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Fools Gold says:

          Excellent! My attitude is Trump has cards that trumps all of them. They all know it but will do their best resist the USA movement. Remember they’ve got away with it for decades and new rules are hard to get used to when your seen as the losing party.

          Liked by 2 people

        • sickconservative says:

          Or just trying to sell China made parts and materials as Canadian made.

          Like

        • WSB says:

          I agree. The stock market’s individual stocks that do well may just transition from global non-producing entities to stateside producing entities.

          So, there may not really be a spiral or choking effect…just individuals who need to get in on the transition.

          Like

    • CharterOakie says:

      And higher value-added within our borders, resulting in higher earnings for Americans along with lower budget deficits, ceteris paribus.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Carrie2 says:

      john edward lorenz, as I have said before, when I was growing up the world wanted Made In USA because of the quality and durability, so we get back to manufacturing as before, and the world will come back to wanting our products.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Dick Bass says:

    USA trade deficit with Canada thru 2016….
    “since 1994, the year Nafta came into effect. Since then, Canada’s cumulative surpluses have totaled C$1.2 trillion, the Statistics Canada figures show.” Bloomberg 12/12/2017

    A little here and a little there… pretty so we are talking about Real Money!!!

    Liked by 11 people

    • FofBW says:

      No wonder there have been so many Canadian Snowbirds spending the winters down here.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Kaco says:

        Yes, and Europe was counting on us to pay for their hordes of third world migrants. Now they’re stuck with the bill because they won’t work and live off the government!

        Liked by 8 people

      • Dekester says:

        Yes we are truly a pampered nation, and many of us are disgusted at the way Trudeau and his sycophants have back stabbed PDJT.

        Middle America may be surprised that literally millions of Canadians spend several of the winter months in U.S. States such as Florida, Arizona, California and Hawaii.

        Liked by 14 people

        • Alligator Gar says:

          This Floridian is literally sick of it.

          Like

        • MSO says:

          I knew many Canadians who spent 13 months in Viet Nam with me and our fellow Marines. Canadians are our friends.

          Liked by 4 people

        • singingsoul says:

          Dekester says:
          “Yes we are truly a pampered nation, and many of us are disgusted at the way Trudeau and his sycophants have back stabbed PDJT.

          Middle America may be surprised that literally millions of Canadians spend several of the winter months in U.S. States such as Florida, Arizona, California and Hawaii.”
          ________________________________________________
          I had a Canadian friend who spent from before Thanksgiving to almost Easter in Texas near the Mexican border. Where i live southern OH Canadians often come through here to go to Florida and SC.

          Liked by 2 people

          • listingstarboard says:

            Many Canadians especially from Alberta spend their winters here in my little corner of AZ. I like them they are usually very conservative.

            Liked by 4 people

            • Trumpismine says:

              People to our north are hard working lovers of life and after a long cooold winter live life to the fullest. Nothing but respect for the people ‘of the north’. OH Canada!

              Liked by 1 person

    • Kaco says:

      We are paying for their and Europe’s socialized medicine, basically. No wonder they don’t want to let go.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Don’t forget we are also paying for almost all of their ‘national defense’ (while they open the door to an invasion of Muslims).

        The question of NATO is, I think, behind POTUS DJT’s comments regarding Russia returning to the G7.

        If the US can establish a good working relationship with Russia, what is the point of NATO? I think you can see where this is going.

        Liked by 13 people

        • Kaco says:

          Yes, which frees up their cash for their social welfare, free medicine, free university, free money for migrants, etc.

          Very smart on the return of Russia, we don’t need a NATO if Russia is a participant and not a communist nation.

          Liked by 4 people

          • A2 says:

            If you do not read anything else in the 2017 National Security Strategy read this on page 14:

            “A democracy is only as resilient as its people. An informed and engaged citizenry is the fundamental requirement for a free and resilient nation. For generations, our society has protected free press, free speech, and free thought. Today, actors such as Russia are using information tools in an attempt to undermine the legitimacy of democracies. Adversaries target media, political processes, financial networks, and personal data. The American public and private sectors must recognize this and work together to defend our way of life. No external threat can be allowed to shake our shared commitment to our values, undermine our system of government, or divide our Nation.”

            China, DPRK, Iran and CNN could be inserted after ‘Russia’.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Carrie2 says:

              AR, and don’t leave out Soros and his ilk attempting to take over America as they have other countries. Freedom is not a free condition but we must always be prepared to keep it.

              Like

        • zucccchini says:

          “keep your enemies close!” 😉

          Like

    • The world has been bleeding us dry over the last few decades. A couple million here, a couple billion there. The whole plan was to steal the wealth from the USA and distribute it to other nations under the guise of some economic plan, social welfare plans or free military. The wealth of this nation was taken from us with the blessings of our political leaders.

      Liked by 3 people

  4. MS Idaho says:

    I are iggorant (uneducated on the subject). How long has it been since vested interests wrote our trade agreements? I never knew…

    Liked by 2 people

    • svenwg says:

      If you go back and read SD’s old posts you will get a very comprehensive education on who or what writes Trade Regulations as well as all the laws that are passed by Congress.

      Liked by 10 people

      • MS Idaho says:

        thank you

        Liked by 1 person

      • Lindenlee says:

        Hint… NOT Congress.

        Liked by 2 people

        • MS Idaho says:

          I have been reading. it seems that anyone with a vested interest has been writing trade regs. what I was wondering is – how far back in time? when did the people we elect stop doing what we elected them do to? Not from the beginning, but….? And I get it that this extends to many other aspects of our government. Not important to have a date. More an increasing sense that it has been going on for longer than I have been alive – and I am 76. As I follow along reading & learning with all of you (thank you sundance) it seems that much of what I have sensed is wrong I have not been able to articulate the problem, . Just hold the nose and vote, knowing that even if I contact my elected rep nothing would happen or change. Then along came VSGDJT (smile) He really does shine the light on problems and educate us. I love and appreciate him BIGLY!

          Liked by 5 people

          • Lindenlee says:

            Well, we know that Eisenhower warned us against the “military-industrial complex”. I think there have BigBoy players since the reign of mercantilism, robber barons, etc. But the administrative state as we know it now really started to emerge with the advent of the technology to do it on a very large scale. Just my two cents. And the government has always had 1st dibs on the tech.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Maquis says:

            Idaho, when? I can’t say certain, but NAFTA seems to be when the Nitrous kicked in, about 30 years ago.

            Liked by 1 person

          • zucccchini says:

            About the time the oil industry decided ‘railroads’ were not very profitable for them. Hence, tear up the rails and put all commerce on 16 wheels destroying roads, burning up oil and gas, wearing out rubber. Not a good option for the public. I would say early sixties, about the time I graduated High School….and that was a long, long time ago. They (big business, foreign traders) slid that whole scenario by Congress and the public, so why not start making our own rules. Hence the lobbyist started writing the legislation and presented it with heavy envelopes underneath. Simple. This is why so may career “legislators” are retiring. The gig is up.

            Liked by 1 person

      • A2 says:

        This didn’t take long:
        “Beijing said on Friday that it will retaliate for U.S. President Donald Trump’s tariff hike on US$50 billion of Chinese products by immediately imposing penalties of the “same scale” on American goods.

        The Commerce Ministry said it also is scrapping deals made with Washington in talks aimed at defusing a sprawling trade dispute.

        A ministry statement gave no details of what U.S. goods would be affected, but China announced possible targets in April including soybeans, light aircraft, orange juice, whiskey and beef.

        “The Chinese side doesn’t want to fight a trade war, but facing the shortsightedness of the U.S. side, China has to fight back strongly,” the statement said. “We will immediately introduce the same scale and equal taxation measures, and all economic and trade achievements reached by the two sides will be invalidated.”
        http://news.rthk.hk/rthk/en/component/k2/1401975-20180615.htm

        Liked by 2 people

        • USTerminator says:

          Trump is having another $100B for the second round. Yes China can match that too which will cover everything. However, China is running out of ammunition and becoming sitting duck. What we can not buy from China, we can buy elsewhere or make them ourselves. What China can not sell to US there is no one else big enough to absorb it and there will be a lot of unhappy Chinese. Trump is playing poker with Chinese and holding 4 aces, while Xi is hoping for the royal straight flush but got a couple pairs. Trump knows, Xi knows, everyone knows except the Uniparty globalists demand that Trump to fold the cards. Not going to happen.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Carrie2 says:

          AR, not to worry as this is all part of the art of the deal. The Chinese people today like living a freer and better upscale life so the leaders will huff and puff but will have to come to the table and accept the new America and its President.

          Liked by 1 person

  5. I am not trolling, but asking a serious question. I heard a guy on Fox calling out Wilbur Ross for several conflicts of interest with steel shipping. Can anyone confirm or call BS on those statements? Is the host of the show, Steve Hilton a fake newsologist?

    Like

  6. Sunshine says:

    Now that Trump has secured NoKo, thus eliminating China’s weapon of choice, the Chinese are left in a vulnerable economic situation. Trump’s strategy is outright brilliant. Bring on the tariffs!

    Liked by 6 people

    • Daniel says:

      It’s too early to say that. Things have been signed and hands have been shaken. But we don’t know what long-term things are required from North Korea or the USA within any agreement(s) made. Also, we’re talking about two countries which have historically been untrustworthy.

      It’s great if it truly all done and North Korea becomes a new country with a new outlook on the world and gives freedom to its people and it opens its doors to investment and productivity and all that great stuff. But do we actually know what the plans are? Do we really trust that it will happen? Do we have any idea what China may do in response to their loss of the puppet country?

      Liked by 1 person

      • svenwg says:

        If China steps in and scuppers the NoKo Peace agreement, it will have to face the world with it’s Panda mask ripped off and it’s Dragon face revealed for all to see. That would lead to China being sanctioned by the world and it’s economy will fold like a house of cards.

        Liked by 6 people

        • Daniel says:

          China wouldn’t need to be directly implicated. A simple assassination of KJU would be all that’s needed to break the whole thing apart. Blame can be directed anywhere.

          Like

          • Deb says:

            No, it would be directed at China. That is the point, because of the summit if China messes with NOKO or tries to use NOKO to cause problems, PDJT can call them out. He’ll be able to really take the gloves off then. That is the leverage the summit gave him.

            Liked by 6 people

            • SwampRatTerrier says:

              Right Deb.

              Trump points out who is “responsible” for certain actions, and then holds that party responsible for their actions.

              Trump is all straight talk with no pussy-footing around.

              Liked by 4 people

          • Dennis Leonard says:

            Daniel I can tell you love to read fiction books.Buckle up and go for the ride.

            Like

        • Dutchman says:

          I agree. The reason China benefited from Nork, was deniability. That was the whole mask.

          With the worldwide exposure, China cannot (I think and hope) intervene, without openly exposing that which it can’t. Kind of like Kennedy withdrawing air support, at the bay of pigs.

          It only works, as long as you maintain the illusion of plausible denyability.

          They are trapped in a device of theor own construction: hoist in their own petard.

          Have to wonder: did previous occupants of the oval not realise that China was using nork as proxy (doubtful) or did they and their overeducated idiots think it was in our interests to maintsin the illusion?

          Keep thinking of DJT, (paraphrasing)
          “I dont NEED no stinkin foriegn policy experts!”

          Liked by 4 people

          • Nice ‘Treasure of Sierra Madre’ reference.

            It’s not obvious that China wanted NK to have nuclear capability any more than the rest of the world, which is at least part of the reason they supported sanctions to the extent that they have.

            It’s entirely possible that NK was building nuclear capability to address concerns about China at least as much as the US.

            I know it’s probably not wise to cite Dennis Rodman, but what if he was *right*: During all this time no high-ranking US person ever really sat down and talked with the NK leadership?

            To counter with another movie reference, I think of the NK Summit as like that moment when Josie Wales rides into Ten-Bears camp along and delivers this great speech about making peace or making war. Ten-Bears accepts peace because he recognizes that Josie’s willingness to come alone and being ready to make war shows that Josie is the kind of man he can trust.

            Liked by 2 people

            • Lis says:

              I know it’s probably not wise to cite Dennis Rodman, but what if he was *right*: During all this time no high-ranking US person ever really sat down and talked with the NK leadership?

              What makes you say that?

              Like

            • Peter Rabbit says:

              Great Post. Kim is not yet Ten Bears, but wants to.be and the comparison is excellent!! . The POTUS extension of help and respect is highly likely to pay huge dividends to all sides. Kim educated in West as was his sister. He knows China is not the way forward. God bless Dennis Rodman, whom God has used to bring the two sides together.

              Liked by 1 person

          • Trumpismine says:

            👍

            Like

      • Angel Martin says:

        “Do we have any idea what China may do in response to their loss of the puppet country?”

        What we do know is before Trump, whenever China was under any trade pressure, North Korea would act up and China would “intervene” and “mediate”.

        Then a grateful USA would back off on trade (which wasn’t difficult since none of the globalist Presidents in the last 30 years was interested in doing anything).

        Trump explicitly called out this behavior in 2017. And ever since, the pattern has been, NKorea acts up and Trump moves to even more punitive action on trade against China (which he wants to do anyway).

        So now we have the dynamic that instead of China getting a better trade deal, the worse NKorea acts; under Trump, China gets a better trade deal the better NKorea acts !

        MAGA !

        Liked by 9 people

        • GB Bari says:

          PDJT knew that removing NoKo as a threat would partially “disarm” China. His main goal all along has been to kneecap China economically and get back that trade deficit plus the theft of I.P. But NoKo became more than a pawn in the strategy. The President recognizes the political benefits and the economic potential of a more open NoKo, and he convinced KJU of that potential.

          So in reality, when this comes to fruition, POTUS gets a twofer.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Wretched1 says:

          Nice, AM, keep the insight coming!

          Like

      • USTerminator says:

        Kim and finally North Korean sees lives outside of NK and they want for themselves too. Trump practically guarantees Kim and regime survival is NK gets rid of nukes and ICBM and open NK for commerce. South Korea would more than happy to make Kim as a figure head of State if United Korea. Everyone understands $ and security, dictator included. I watched the “commercial “ video that Trump showed Kim at the Singapore, it is so good that it is almost impossible to resist. That is “The Art of The Deal”

        Liked by 1 person

        • zucccchini says:

          I think the POTUS was not kidding when he said he has been preparing for this for a long , long time. He has no trouble keeping up with all the things that are on a Presidents plate. As a civilian businessman and his kids pretty much taking over, he was constantly commenting on national and world affairs. Having to deal with these people, he was privy to information no one in government had. He was formulating all this in his mind between China, North Korea. He has been planning what and how HE would do things with OPEC., Germany, France. I bet he had his cabinets pics in personality already picked out ten years ago. But I think his election surprised him as much as the left. I truly think he thought he had lost election night. But he also knows how deep the shadow government is.
          The POTUS will not move to get rid of Sessions OR Mueller until after the elections. He is hoping and praying the American public see the corruption and give him a Congress with like minded. THEN he will have the power to move some folks out that have been there too long, fire some bad apples and put the FBI and DOJ back together. He is waiting on US.

          Like

  7. Kaco says:

    They are the best team ever! Finally, someone to put this country’s pieces back together!

    Liked by 4 people

    • 4sure says:

      “The main reason for their effectiveness is the reality that for the first time in our lifetimes we have an economic team acting entirely without influence from Wall Street, K-Street, special interest groups and CoC lobbyists.

      As unbelievable as it sounds, we actually have pro-USA administration and government officials writing the actual trade policy without any influence by corporate interests.”

      Can you imagine how much greater. prosperous, free, and united our nation would be if we had elected officials working like that for us in everything they do.

      It’s a damn shame we have not demanded, by watering the tree of liberty, if necessary this of our government. We have no one to blame but ourselves.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Mercenary says:

    So it appears as if the ultimate solution that President Trump wants is new, locked-in bilateral trade deals on a one-on-one basis.

    Right now, China continues to flood the market through the NAFTA loophole. Other Asian nations continue to do so as well, no doubt.

    Trump is beginning to charge tariff entry fees on a one-on-one basis.

    It would appear that if Trump terminated NAFTA, he would eliminate an enormous percentage of the problem. China et al would no longer be able to send products tariff-free through Canada and Mexico. I am not sure how that affects Europe’s trading position and whether they utilize the NAFTA framework either.

    Sundance is convinced that Trump will terminate NAFTA, but Kudlow was on just after G-7 saying that would not happen. It seems obvious that Canada is daring us to do so and thinks we are either cowards or fools.

    So what’s taking so long? Haven’t we been negotiating with them over it for like 12+ months now?

    Like

    • Dutchman says:

      My reading of Sundance is we don’t HAVE to DO anything on Nafta. The process is such that it will self destruct.

      Ironically, what DJT wants is REAL, HONEST “FAIR ” trade, not the fool trade we have had.

      Mirror tarriffs, particularly if applied by the biggedt kid on the block, will inevitably lead to a minimisation of tarrifs, across the board.

      First, need bi-lateral trade desls, caus difficult to apply mirror tarriffs in multilateral trade agreements.

      Then, largest market in world, by far, thst EVERYONE wants to sell to, says;

      “Mirror tarriffs: you charge us 50% tarriff, we charge you 50% tarriff.”

      Makes it much harder to justify tarriffs.

      And, tarriffs are a key tool globalists use, for exfiltration of wealth, and middle class jobs, therefore lifestyle, OUT of U.S.

      Liked by 9 people

    • Angel Martin says:

      What I observe is that the Trump pattern is, while negotiating:
      -be nice for a while
      -then threaten them
      -then back off a bit and be nice to them
      -then threaten them some more

      rinse and repeat…

      Eventually the deal gets done or Trump realizes it will never happen and he walks away.

      I thought we were almost there but, Navarro apologized for going after Trudeau, so we have at least one more cycle of nice, and then threats… before the final breakdown.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Kudlow was being cute…”we won’t withdraw from NAFTA. We are heavy into negotiations. And the negotiation will either be bilateral, or they’ll be trilateral–”
      If POTUS negotiates bilateral agreements it won’t be NAFTA as we know it…
      Transcript below.
      https://www.cbsnews.com/news/transcript-white-house-economic-adviser-larry-kudlow-on-face-the-nation-june-10-2018/

      Liked by 4 people

    • jeans2nd says:

      Mercenary, Larry Kudlow is not in charge. Pres Donald J Trump is in charge, and Pres Donald J Trump makes the decisions. Not Kudlow.
      At G7, Pres Trump’s last offer was no tariffs, for all involved.

      Liked by 6 people

  9. Eastender says:

    I have total confidence in Trump’s team. It’s all a matter of trust.

    Liked by 8 people

  10. John_in_IN says:

    I think the stock market will have a bumpy ride for 12-18 more months. Then it’s Katy bar the door after companies have time to react to actual free trade.

    I do a happy dance every time I’m reminded that Hillary is not my president. Sometimes my face hurts from smiling so big. And, no. I’m not tired of winning yet.

    Liked by 15 people

  11. 6x47 says:

    “We are very fortunate to have an awesome wolverine trade and economic team; stunningly so. The main reason for their effectiveness is the reality that for the first time in our lifetimes we have an economic team acting entirely without influence from Wall Street, K-Street, special interest groups and CoC lobbyists.”

    It just goes to show how much can be accomplished. And I never forget Obama scoffing at Trump’s promises on the economy, saying Trump had no plan and no magic wand. Phooey!

    Liked by 7 people

    • TheWanderingStar says:

      “…scoffing at Trump’s promises on the economy, saying Trump had no plan and no magic wand.”

      That statement alone demonstrates the complete ignorance of [The name that must not be spoken].

      Liked by 4 people

  12. Pam says:

    Lighthizer is a very brilliant man along with Wilburine and Mnuchin. POTUS knew what he was doing when he selected these individuals. They are putting American interests first and I appreciate them for it.

    Liked by 11 people

  13. CharterOakie says:

    These steps have to be taken. As PDJT has said many times, these issues should have been handled decades ago.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Dobegirl says:

      Q has been telling us from the beginning that we have to make noise, make our voices heard.

      Patriots fight.

      Liked by 3 people

    • CharterOakie says:

      Dispassionate, well-reasoned and persuasive. Thanks for posting, elena.

      Liked by 2 people

    • AH_C says:

      I like PM’s and Tracy Beanz videos breaking down Q and current droppings.

      However, I think PM missed a key point at 5:25. In reading out loud the highlighted text on pages 6 and 7,he misread “without” as “with”. With that momentary brain freeze, he missed the import of the final sentence. Mueller also received a copy of the same report as the public. Only congress got the full version including the 2 classified appendices, along with the complete chapter 13. Mueller, like us, only has a redacted chapter 13.

      Interesting situation. IOW, if Mueller or his team has anything to say about the report, just know that he doesn’t have everything, let alone, know what congress now knows is in the report.

      Liked by 1 person

      • AH_C says:

        PS

        Later on, PM talks about the unexpected form of redactions in the OIG report.

        A thot just occurred to me about a discussion a coworker and i had yesterday. There are two angles, neferaious, to using Gmail (the report section on Comey).

        1) Password can be given out to your gang, so they can log in and you have a conversation using drafts, without any emails actually being sent. Originally, it was thot the NSA couldn’t track and record drafts, but thanks to Snowden, we know NSA has everything. Another twist, would be for them to log into an online game (Call of Duty, etc) and discus secret matters while playing. NSA wouldn’t or couldn’t monitor that as well, eh? (See Netflix “Occupied” Season 2)

        2) I think the real reason Comey worked on certain documents at home was so his puppetmasters could review and edit it. Also, editing using a document application that wasn’t locked down, like the app would be on the FBI Gold Windows. Like the Army standard, there are certain loggers that track the Metadata of everything you do on your work computer. Passively recording everything in case forensics has to be done on your computer.

        The actual reason the OIG itemized the Gmail issue, wasn’t that he didn’t fully follow protocol, it was that he broke protocol, yet the report was “redacted” by Rosenstein into a “nothing burger” nitpicking. Soon, we’ll find out what that really was about.

        Final thot, what if RR had help in editing the report from outside the DOJ and FBI? How could he accomplish that? OIG report used a custom format, but Rosenstein and his pals were clueless about formatting.

        Like

      • There is another good one I just stumbled on:

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Theresa Keys says:

    Takes a while for companies to actually move. Site scouting, plant purchase/move, delivery, labor sourcing and training blah, blah. NAFTA is dead. Companies just need a little time to sort out the move . Can’t smash them whilst they are spending $$$$ going back to us. We want to attract them not destroy them.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Psycho Monkee says:

      Suggestion: Try the Governor Walker & PDJT fast track approach. Like Foxconn. 1,000 trucks a day movn’ dirt. It’s a sight to behold. BTW, Foxconn just announced the location of their North American HQ. That would be downtown MKE. 500 employees. 📸💵💰

      Liked by 5 people

  15. MSO says:

    What America needs now is the reestablishment of t traditional marriage with mom, dad and three or four kids. In this way, we can supply all the skill and labor manufacturers and high tech companies will need without importing the endless third world problems.

    Tax breaks for families with children to be recaptured if children do not graduate from high school.

    Liked by 2 people

    • SwampRatTerrier says:

      Well said.

      Leftiists and Dems always ignore the monstrous expense of the double-income needing family. The real education of children in single-earner families is far better. The home-schooled children are more proof of that since they are usually far ahead in their learning than public schooled ones.

      Liked by 1 person

    • billrla says:

      MSO: I agree on the need for stable families, but disagree on the tax breaks. As a society, Americans must reach their own conclusions on what is best for family and country. The less government involvement, the better.

      Like

      • MSO says:

        We have a birth rate problem in which we are not replacing our lderly. We either encourage an increase in the birth rate or western civilization dies a very hard death. If we can subsidize solar panels, we can subsidize children.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Janie M. says:

          MSO, as a child in the 50’s and 60’s, I recall it was not unusual for parents to have 4-5 kids. It was the norm and mom stayed at home. Then the SJW began their “world is over-populated/natural resources will run out” song in the late 60’s, early 70’s..

          Liked by 1 person

  16. grlangworth says:

    “Don’t be afraid of your fears. They’re not there to scare you. They’re there to let you know that something is worth it.”
    ― C. JoyBell C.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. GB Bari says:

    Big thought to keep in mind is the short term mentality of American business owners and investors. They want big ROÍ in less than 5 years, often just 2 or 3. Chinese always have had a longer term strategy. Investor attitudes and expectations must also adjust to this “new” economy.

    Like

  18. jbrickley says:

    So long as Trump doesn’t mess with the Federal Reserve Bank which is certainly not under the control of the US Government. It is a private institution with private investors and no-one really knows what goes on behind those doors. It controls everything. I think that’s how Kennedy got assassinated, he was working to remove power from the Fed.

    That particular problem will take some in-depth work that would take years and years to resolve.

    Like

  19. porkyspen says:

    I, for one, have no problem paying 25% (or whatever) more for something made in China, because at that price I would simply decide, absent any competing product made in the USA, that I really didn’t need it.

    That’s what China and their lackeys don’t understand- 75% of what China imports to our country is shit we can, and will, live without.

    Like

  20. A2 says:

    Here we go again. The Global CCP mouthpiece Times is ramping up the rhetoric again. Here is a choice bit:
    China knows better as Trump tariff strategy tricks US voters
    Source:Global Times Published: 2018/6/16 7:37:48
    “Anyone with a primary education could easily realize there will never be a balanced China-US trade relationship by selling soybeans and petroleum. There isn’t one country who would give up their rights to advance technology and make industrial upgrades, and yet President Trump insists on selling agricultural products to China.

    The secret is that US elections are a form of “square behavior” that rely on slogans and labels to garner votes, and Americans eat it right up. President Trump sympathizes with agriculture states, safeguards the Rust Belt region, and protects the country’s high-tech industry by imposing tariffs. It is this kind of impression the White House wants Trump to make with US voters. ”
    http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1107169.shtml
    (You have to read the entire screed to get the flavor and odor.)

    Liked by 1 person

  21. ltravisjr says:

    As I was opening a new box of cereal a couple days ago and the box collapsed in my hand before I could get to tear open the inner plastic, I got to thinking…

    Cereal boxes, cracker boxes, etc are as thin as paper it seems. Water bottles can’t hold their shape once you open them. Whatever happened to those perfectly sized convenient metal band-aid containers. Or metal containers for anything. And on and on and on and on…

    As I thought about these things, I wondered why, for all the technical progress and advancement in our society, do goods just keep getting, well, crappier? I had been aggravated to think all companies in general are just greedy and maximize profits at the expense of quality.

    Now I wonder: could a lot of this possibly actually be that we don’t produce much here anymore and so there is no more homegrown, local, American pride? Could it be that those who make our stuff don’t care about or have a connection with the consumers that could inspire them to treat them as more than cash flow? I may be off base, but just wonder – is this whole cheap crap throwaway culture of diminishing quality goods a result of the offloading of American production. If it all had stayed here, would things still have gotten less expensive via innovation yet be of even higher, dare I say “old time” quality?

    Liked by 1 person

    • ltravisjr says:

      I also forgot to mention, I had also chalked up lesser quality to companies being forced to meet green sustainability goals, which I always thought was a crock because American innovation, if free, should lead to better quality, and less waste, etc. should just happen as a matter of course. So maybe lesser quality is from government intervention but also, and resulting from that, loss of American production and its benefits. Things are starting to make a lot more sense to me now.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. NewSister says:

    Excellent

    Like

  23. NewSister says:

    Excellent

    Like

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