Republican Senator Ron Johnson Tells President Trump “it makes no sense to try and bring back high labor manufacturing jobs”…

Yesterday President Trump invited the media to keep their cameras on during a round-table discussion on trade.  He did this for a reason.  President Trump wanted the American voters to watch Republican politicians demand that he stop trying to bring manufacturing jobs to the United States.

In essence, Trump doing what Trump does best, played the role of Toto and pulled back the curtain on the Republican anti-American corporate business agenda.  The republicans in attendance never paused to reflect upon the sunlight or the reason for their specific invitations. They are comfortable back-room deals and POTUS Toto relaxed them perfectly.

One by one the Republicans took-the-bait and fully exposed themselves.  Lamar Alexander, Mike Lee, Pat Toomey and Roy Blout all took turns telling POTUS to quit trying to save American high-wage jobs, drop the national economic view and just accept multinational corporate globalism.

The subsequent full-throated establishment display stands as one of the greatest plays of the Trump administration to date. However, it was Republican Senator Ron Johnson from Wisconsin who really went the full distance:

[Transcript] […] In Wisconsin, a big manufacturing state, in seven years I have not visited one manufacturer that could hire enough people. That was certainly my experience in the last 20, 25 years. For a host of reasons, we tell our kids you have to get a four-year degree. We pay people not to work. So we do need to be concerned about, in such a tight labor market, do we have enough workers in manufacturing.

So my final point is, it makes no sense for me to try and bring back high labor-content manufacturing to America. We need to do the value added things. And so I would just say, proceed with real caution there.  (more)

Most people are becoming increasingly aware of the Republican agenda to keep the interests of multinational corporations at the top of their priority list; however, it is still rather remarkable to listen to an entire room of them admit, openly, their agenda is to work against the U.S. middle-class, support mass immigration, and keep the U.S. economy on the “service-driven” path.

Within trade policy is where President Trump breaks away from the modern Republican views. This is the heart of MAGA.  Trade and immigration is where President Trump fractures the party apparatus of both Republicans and Democrats.

Lastly, don’t expect the “corporate conservative media”, Fox News, Ingraham, Hannity, Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, Salem Media etc, to showcase these revelations; it is against their financial interests to do so.

Senator Johnson’s eye-opening remarks begin around 32:00 of the video below [prompted, just hit play]:  {transcript here}

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, Decepticons, Dem Hypocrisy, Economy, Election 2018, media bias, President Trump, Professional Idiots, propaganda, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

906 Responses to Republican Senator Ron Johnson Tells President Trump “it makes no sense to try and bring back high labor manufacturing jobs”…

  1. nigella says:

    Thankfully “Can’t be done” is not in President Trumps vocabulary…

    Liked by 34 people

    • WSB says:

      Dang! President Trump takes Ron Johnson to the wood shed after that…100,000,000 million who could work but do not because they get a better deal with the Government.

      I am assuming that is Welfare and SS Disability as both have been abused by Obama’s removal of regulations.

      Shame on you, Ron!

      Liked by 29 people

      • wheatietoo says:

        Pres Trump also mentioned that employers are having to “compete with the govt” for workers.

        Which is absolutely true!
        It is outrageous that we’re paying people to Not Work, at a higher level than they would make by working.

        This has to stop.

        But the key is to Get Jobs Back first, then cut back on all the welfare moochers.

        Liked by 25 people

        • WSB says:

          I meet a lot of contractors, and I now wonder if they give up looking for work that has been taken over by illegals? Then they claim old injuries and get hooked on the welfare state.

          Liked by 6 people

          • 🍺Gunny says:

            If you read up on the jobs / employment in Wisconsin, Illegals in Wisconsin tend to work in hotels, cleaning services, canning or meat industries, farms, construction, landscaping, home repair and roofing. Most are from Mexico but there are others from the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, India, Ivory Coast, Lebanon, Macedonia, Mali, Mexico, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Peru and Poland. Our proximity to Chicago – a major illegal immigration destination – has fueled the increase in the population of illegals locally.

            Johnson doesn’t have enough workers because illegals are doing it all.

            Wisconsin is home to an estimated 85,000 people who immigrated illegally, three-fourths of them from Mexico.

            http://fox6now.com/2014/11/18/study-wisconsin-is-home-to-an-estimated-85000-illegal-immigrants/

            Liked by 6 people

        • starfcker says:

          “But the key is to Get Jobs Back first, then cut back on all the welfare moochers.” Wheatie for the win. It really is that simple.

          Liked by 9 people

          • Esperanza says:

            This, to his credit, is what Blair did in Britain. Got a booming jobs economy and then, once the jobs were there cracked down on benefit fraud, both governmental and personal.

            Liked by 4 people

        • Charlie says:

          And…. Larry the Lawyer feeding off business. Employers are scared into submission with all the BS lawsuits.

          Liked by 4 people

      • glissmeister says:

        The difference between Trump and the parlor culture of the beltway is really quite stunning. The trending holds great promise. If they can find the individual political courage to collaborate in the spirit of good faith mutualism, they can do truly good things for our American nation and our future.

        Liked by 7 people

      • farmhand1927 says:

        Ron Johnson has been enjoying praise here lately for his comments regarding Obamagate. He reverted to his true self yesterday. He was an early Never Trumper. Most of them just can’t seem to help themselves—they attempt attitude adjustments in order to align with their Trump-supporting voters but then the Chamber of Commerce and other big donors play a siren song that’s apparently too hard to resist.

        Let Johnson’s voters decide how to respond to their senator’s opinion that they don’t need good paying jobs..

        Liked by 20 people

    • The key to increased wages is increased labor productivity, which comes from increased capital investment combined with worker training. You get fewer workers in the plant but each makes more money. When we keep importing cheap labor,companies don’t have to make capital investment nvestment, so labor productivity never increases. You end up with no middle class, which is where we are going now.

      Liked by 18 people

      • starfcker says:

        Bear, good point. I would add that the bigger improvement to the lives of Americans won’t be higher wages. I don’t think President Trump believes higher wages are the answer. The keys to a prosperous society are abundant employment and a low cost of living. The ways you go about getting there are fights for later. He’s doing great. Someone chided me on another forum as if I didn’t understand moving the Overton window. The box of food proposal was the best move I have ever seen, and he’s done some good ones.

        Liked by 6 people

        • Esperanza says:

          Box of food, I missed that, could you explain. ( I can’t watch too many vid, I’m on a metered connection)

          Liked by 1 person

          • Florida_Frank says:

            He has proposed giving those on food stamps a box of food each month instead of part of their cash.

            Liked by 2 people

            • Esperanza says:

              Good idea.

              Liked by 1 person

            • Alligator Gar says:

              The government used to do that. They gave “commodities” to the poor. These were grade A US blocks of butter, cheese, bologna, grains, you name it. My grandma used to pick these up in her ditch on “commodities” day where the poor black folk threw them b/c they didn’t want them. We all ate well from them. The food was higher quality than my engineer dad’s salary could afford in the ’70s. Let that sink in, folks.

              The poor don’t want a box of food. We’ve tried that.

              Perhaps, only help those who actually get off their butts and come demonstrate need and ask for specific amounts of food for their families. As a quid pro quo, make them go to jobs training.

              Liked by 2 people

              • Yep, there is no helping anyone that won’t help themselves, and at the end of the day that is still NOT the “government’s” duty. Was never intended to be. America was an incredibly charitable nation until “government” grew into the nasty beast that it is today.

                Liked by 2 people

      • TheLastDemocrat says:

        bearlodge:
        the key to increased wages is partly advances in productivity…
        but it is also competition for labor.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Esperanza says:

          Remember what broke the servitude feudal system. Scarce labour due to the black death. Nineteenth century industrial revolution was powered by people leaving the land for high wages. Then they imported foreign cheap workers from eg Ireland and wages collapsed leaving the new townspeople in deep doo doo. Thus workhouses and massive emigration to the US.

          After second world war, scarce labor, hence good wages and increased opportunities for women. Oh they broke that with West Indian, Pakistani immigration. But now we have no escape. There are no new frontiers to populate.

          As I said when there was the article about “cultures that needed to die” You gotta live somewhere. And if you are going to live in poverty you might as well do it surrounded by your family. You can’t keep moving. I have emigrated for new opportunities, now moved because I could no longer survive where I was, changed profession totally. At some point enough is enough.

          At some point they have to admit the system was broken for maybe 30 percent of the population. It wasn’t working AT ALL.

          Liked by 4 people

      • harrietht3 says:

        That’s the goal, Johnson: No middle class. The middle class are just too unpredictable for your- and the global-communists’ ambitions and must be culled by any means possible.

        There are just too many of them; and all the public school indoctrination into secular-atheist-humanist dogma still cannot control them, as shown — gloriously — in our most recent general election.

        So they are expendable; more than merely expendable, they are targets for elimination from the economic and POLITICAL life of our nation. Thank you for telegraphing this important detail.

        Much preferred it is to have the masses of malleable underclasses to control, whose bread and butter you deliver via myriad government services than to have the beefy impediment of millions of free-thinking Americans breaking down your chamber doors in righteous indignation. Men and women who revere self-respect and an honest day’s labor, whose self-sufficiency gives the lie to your socialist-globalist initiatives — these you must destroy.

        So you’re the figure John Adams, James Madison, and John Jay had in mind when they with great labor helped to birth these United States? I think not.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. Mark McQueen says:

    This made me think back. I’m 62 and I can’t remember when vocational training and/or learning a trade became generally undesirable.

    Liked by 30 people

    • Mark McQueen says:

      …among young folks looking for a career, I mean..

      Liked by 6 people

      • Sylvia Avery says:

        I do think it started in the 70s with a lot of emphasis on going to college after HS, although there were still lots of people going to trade or vocational schools or learning skills. But that is when it began. When the tide turned and the ONLY real viable option presented to kids I’m not sure.

        But now kids talk about wanting “the college experience” which, when pushed for an explanation, comes out meaning I want to live away from my parents with other kids my age and be able to drink and smoke dope and have someone else pay for it, or I’ll put it all on “the tab” and I’ll pay for it….some day when I have a really good job doing….something.

        It is kind of a shock or at least it was to me.

        Liked by 33 people

        • kltk1 says:

          It’s interesting, POTUS talks a lot about trade/vocational schools. Not in the time I’ve been paying attention to politics (the 80’s) have I heard any President talk about tech/vocational schools to the degree POTUS is. And we need to keep hearing it.

          Also, we have to stop denigrating manual labor as though it’s an un-noble way to make a living. Not to mention the tremendous health benefits that come from not sitting at a desk all day. I know the effects, I’m in IT and sit for a living.

          Liked by 32 people

          • Sylvia Avery says:

            “Also, we have to stop denigrating manual labor as though it’s an un-noble way to make a living.”

            This is really true. I have a college degree. I worked hard for it. I am proud of the effort I put into getting it. But as my dear mother used to say, college isn’t for everyone. Very true, for a variety of reasons.

            But somehow, now, it has turned into a state of mind where if you don’t have a college degree you are some kind of a neanderthal or ignoramus or loser. How the heck did that happen?

            And at the same time, the colleges started getting kookier and kookier. I swear to heaven if I had a child who wanted to go to college I’d lock them in a tower until they were forty.

            Liked by 18 people

            • With access to good education without the “college experience” available online and in local settings, for the life of me I can’t understand how any parent would want anything less.

              “Unapologetic Homeschoolers: University Graduates by Nineteen” by Tanya Letham et al. Amazon Link: http://a.co/8XYECZa

              Liked by 11 people

            • boogywstew says:

              I have 28 credit hours and I’m trying to get my life in order so I could go back to school and get a 4 year degree. I want an education for education’s sake. I love learning.

              Liked by 15 people

              • kltk1 says:

                Well done. That’s the right reason to be in school. Because you’re passionate about it. It’s every bit as inspiring to see someone excited about showing up to do landscaping at your home.That’s the person I want working on my house. We have to get away from “You have to go to college because you don’t want to wind up being a plumber for the rest of your life” and move to “You’re going to welding school? Fantastic!”. Encourage being passionate and education based on the passion, not spend a bunch of money, in hopes of making a lot of money only to find out when you come out of college you have no money because you’re swamped with a monthly payment to pay off your student loans. If you’re good at what you do, and you love it, the money will find you. It always does. Could be selling/building real estate in Manhattan or selling baseball cards in Peoria. Have you been to Comicon? It’s a huge event and a lot of people are making an honest living selling/talking about comics.

                Liked by 6 people

                • boogywstew says:

                  If someone told me when I was 16 that I’d spend almost my whole working life in a heavy labor trade I’d have drove my bicycle over a cliff. My work is honorable and I consider myself a craftsman despite anyone else’s opinion of my trade. I always wanted to attend college and I took a college bound curriculum in HS. I’m a New Yorker and I graduated HS with a Regents Diploma and won a NYS Regents scholarship. I kicked ass on my SATs and ACTs but it wasn’t in the cards for me to attend college before but now it’s my time.

                  Liked by 12 people

                • ThingsWeTakeForGranted says:

                  We are all different. My oldest brother did well in college but the next brother was more hands on. The eldest flew jets while the next built them. Not everyone is made for a university but I grew up believing that was the best road for my kids. PT is right. Bring back trade. There is pride in working. You feel good.

                  Liked by 2 people

              • brh82 says:

                Right now, your education would be by the progressives. To me, critical thinking is what education is all about, but you can’t get that these days in our universities.

                Liked by 5 people

                • GB Bari says:

                  Absolutely spot on. Unless my child or grandchild is looking into a technical or focused professional program, I would steer them towards acquiring skills that are competitively marketable in business and industry. Teach kids to study where the jobs are not just today, but what industries will be around 10 years and longer from now. I had to change careers three times over 45 years, but knew well in advance each time because I kept an eye on my company’s progress and strategic plans. When they appeared to be plateauing, I prepared to change jobs and did so before the downfall. I worked part time in high school as a night timer janitor and later flipping burgers. I worked in retail for years and didn’t get a BS degree until I was 36 after which I turned professional. So I’ve worked all types of jobs and was never unemployed in my life. It’s possible, even today.

                  Liked by 2 people

                • boogywstew says:

                  I’m thinking a lot about that problem. Instead of public schools I’m considering private schools. From what my research is showing me I’d have to go to a private religious affiliated school if I want to be educated in an environment of respect for the US Constitution.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • brh82 says:

                  I think DePaul is a private religious affiliated and they are THE most liberal of ALL universities. Had we known that, we never would have sent our granddaughter there for 4 years!

                  Liked by 1 person

                • boogywstew says:

                  Many Catholic Universities are extremely liberal.

                  Like

            • kltk1 says:

              Just notice how the MSM often refers to Trump supporters as “Non-college educated”, they’re signaling to their troops that non-college educated=uneducated. Those of us in the know, know otherwise.

              Liked by 13 people

            • Another Ian says:

              Readers Digest short quip of years agone

              “When everybody in US has a Ph. D. the last plumber will make a fortune”

              Liked by 21 people

              • Ozwitch says:

                Plumbers deserve every penny they make!

                Liked by 3 people

              • kate says:

                I truly believe this is true, from what I have observed through the years and knowing people who are in the trades, most people would be surprised to know that they are the productive, happy, independant and have built up wealth for their families to live comfortably.
                My husband and I met a man today at the AFBase gas station who repaired small breaks in the windshields, he had done a landside business because when we signed tie signoff sheet I noticed it was almost full, he told me me it was the 4th sheet he had filled today, I was impressed with his inititive, exuberance and professional attitude and thought good for him, it is can do people like him who help to make our country great.

                Liked by 1 person

              • Esperanza says:

                My plumber Wears Italian shoes and expensive slacks. And employs about 20 people. My actual plumber decides what he will and will not do. I felt sad covering his work with kitchen units because it was beautiful.

                Like

              • Mark McQueen says:

                So true. I retired early and got a job working for a painter. It always amazed me what people were willing to pay 2 guys to paint a room in their house.

                Like

            • PaulM says:

              Speaking as someone who is retired from a blue collar trade, owns multiple properties that are all paid for, has multiple sources of income and no financial liabilities. My college indoctrinated nephew (who is on the public payroll) said to me not long ago, “You used to work with your hands, didn’t you?” I replied “Yes, me and Michaelangelo”.

              Liked by 13 people

            • CM in TN says:

              I remember years ago, during the “Monica” scandal, I was an apprentice working at the Watergate Hotel in D.C. We had to use the freight elevator to go to the floors we were working on. Anyhow, there were a couple electricians, carpenters, and us steamfitters riding together. One day, a secretary rode the freight elevator up with us and immediately turned her nose up at us and proceeded to ignore us. The carpenter foreman busted out laughing about it and said, pointing at me, “I bet this fitter apprentice makes more than this snobby twit and she looks down her nose at us?” She exited the elevator with us all laughing.
              Moral is, you can make good money with your hands if you’re willing to put in an honest days work.

              Liked by 3 people

              • Dave says:

                Amen, CM! I’m a retired pipefitter with a pension and no debts, and life is good! I’ve helped get younger guys into apprenticeship school in my area, and enjoy to see them become welders, fitters, plumbers, or HVACR techs! Who needs college unless you want to be a doctor or MBA?

                Liked by 1 person

              • ChuckE says:

                CM I like your avatar. I think we may have something in common. I am moving from MD to TN this year. I will miss the steamed crabs but not much else. MAGA

                Liked by 1 person

                • CM in TN says:

                  There’s an asian market in Knoxville that we get live blue crabs from, but it’s not the same as chicken neckin’ or putting out pots and catching them yourself.

                  Like

                • dayallaxeded says:

                  Ah, Old Bay! I need to look out for that flavor of Utz. Never saw it before! Not OT, b/c it was college in B’more that introduced me to Old Bay, steamed crabs, coddies (Sterling’s Seafood–gone but not forgotten), and urban decay. Beautiful to loll in Federal Hill Park and soak in the sent of spices on the breeze from McCormick (also gone but obviously not forgotten).

                  Sometimes I think I would’ve been happier as a barber or electrician, both things I’ve tinkered with, but never “professionally.” Glad I relocated to NOLA, where great fishing is 20 mins. from downtown–when just out of grad school, a friend or two and I could run out to the Rigolets, buy some market shwimps for bait, catch a few fish and a few crabs, then home in time to make stuffed flounder or whatever fish using the crab meat and remaining shwimps with butter and spices as garnish. Really good food for a couple of days for about $5/person. Give a man a fish; he’s fed for a day. Teach a man to fish and he’s got food for life. Similar rubric for all trades.

                  Liked by 1 person

              • New Nonna to be Again!!! says:

                I absolutely agree w all giving ‘working w your hands for a living’ a thumbs up. 👍 Done w integrity, it is a truly honorable trade/service/job. I include firemen in this category.

                My New Gramps to be Again worked VERY hard for our gas company for 36 years! He had good days, too, but they came about mostly through interactions with co-workers. Besides working loooong hours in ALL weather conditions, both under and above ground with sometimes arrogant customers or vehicle drivers, some co-workers and upper management caused bad days, too.

                We moved to a neighboring state upon his retirement (where pension income isn’t taxable by the state) and while he can do most e’thing we may need (he was an apprentice plumber for a short time, & took EVERY HS shop class offered), we have on occasion needed a tradesman for this or that around the house. He’s at a point where he’d rather pay someone to do a messy job than use his free time to do it.

                We are flabbergasted that tradespeople up here don’t seem like typical go-getters from our original state. We’ve asked neighbors about their experiences with trying to get someone in to do work and they say the same thing. So strange to us. It seems like they’ll work just enough to pay their bills but they’re not ‘hungry’ like those in our original state.

                Liked by 1 person

            • TheLastDemocrat says:

              How did college become the default?

              I suspect two things:

              The Marxists, traditionally, have all been pointy-headed intellectuals. They believe everyone should be like them, and be in school getting advanced degrees in whatever. (This is one of the weaknesses in their world view – the women need someone to raise their kids while they are off getting an education and a career. So, who raises the kids? Some cheap, underclass labor force, like we have nowadays.)

              Banks/Big Business, once student loans became common.

              I am solidly of the era where everyone was expected to go to college, and where it was shameful to get into Vo Tech. It was definitely a social thing. Like getting dumb tattoos nowadays.

              Liked by 5 people

              • Sylvia Avery says:

                You make some great points. I remember as a young kid the discussion in our home. My mom was a stay at home mom. The talk involved strong feelings about not wanting other people to raise their kids.

                It was during the Cold War and my parents viewed with suspicion the notion of having one’s children turned over to the state for raising.

                Also, my dad had an accounting background and he said the costs associated with my mom working a fairly low wage job would eat up so much of the income earned that it just didn’t make financial sense.

                But now, it is a social thing as well for women. If they choose to stay home and raise their kids they can expect a lot of social pressure for not working.

                The whole thing is kind of a mess.

                Like

            • chiefillinicake says:

              If you take the time to explain the world to them as they’re growing up, they develop a callous that the Libs can’t penetrate. Send them in uneducated in things American and the truth about human nature and they will be toast.

              I know. I have a 22 and 23 year old who have just graduated. They still have their heads on straight, thank God.

              But they confirmed that the socialist onslaught on campus was perpetual.

              Liked by 3 people

            • Bendix says:

              I think as the Student Loan financial racket advanced, it served two purposes: one, to keep the outrageous sums of money coming into the schools and surrounding rackets; and two, to have Americans, particularly black Americans, brainwashed into believing that if they didn’t have a decent-paying job (because the jobs left), it was their own fault, because they didn’t go to college.
              I think that’s part of the reason young men in the inner city neighborhoods kill each other.
              There is a lot of anger and self-hate, even if they can’t articulate it.
              I said the other day, I’m glad to see Mark Steyn is going to investigate the Student Loan racket.
              I was trying to, but I’m just not that smart as a researcher.
              Bernie was right that student loan debt is a racket, but he’s wrong about the solution, to make the taxpayer pay for it.
              Bernie is not as deep a thinker as he should be, because he is blinded by ideology. Therefore he’s useless to the people who looked to him as their champion.

              Liked by 2 people

        • The Admiral says:

          Hey… college is a great gig… for the Academic Industrial Complex.

          Young impressional kids that think they know everything, dropped into a full immersion manipulative entrainment program that trains critical thinking skills OUT of them, and indoctrinates them with left leaning worldviews that can’t pass a 4th Grade logic test…

          …and then get this.. make them pay 20 to 40 thousand dollars a year for it on borrowed money they can not dispose of through bankruptcy, if they crash their lives on the rocks of debt slavery

          Liked by 11 people

          • glissmeister says:

            President Eisenhower alluded to this in 1961 when he warned of the MIC. Ike said: “The prospect of domination of the nation’s scholars by Federal employment, project allocations, and the power of money is ever present – and is gravely to be regarded.” There is no greater example today than the infested institutional malignancy that now dominates the administration of the modern university, their departments of education and our public education system; millions of ticks burrowed in deep, feeding upon our children, their families and their future. I would argue this diseased state is far more dangerous to our nation than the appropriate Darwinian outcomes of opioid abuse being misrepresented to justify the usurpation and subordination of the physician/patient relationship by the very same university-government complex.

            Liked by 6 people

          • Jeff says:

            ” Academic Industrial Complex ” AIC …BAZINGA !!

            College debt for the sake of the AIC . Sallie Mae easy money for manufactured degrees in gender studies , art history , Afram studies , etc . fractional reserve banking on steroids .

            At best those degrees land a job in the DEEP STATE FEDGOV bureaucracy . Where their purpose is to VOTE for the candidate that promises more $$$ to their FEDGOV agency .

            President Trump is a clear and present danger to their gray train FEDGOV do nothing not serving the America people jobs . WORKFARE .

            There is noting more evident than the VILE HATRED of a hard working American entrepreneur who works their way in to the middle class . These Jonathan Gruber types get off on making their declaration …” NOT IF WE CAN HELP IT ”

            The layers of FEDGOV regulations and licensing fees all disguised as the benovelent government looking out for the little guy . Sheesh . They are toll takers who HATE EVERYTHING that MADE AMERICA GREAT in the first place .

            Liked by 3 people

          • TheLastDemocrat says:

            Admiral: Bingo!

            And, where does the money come from?

            Student Loan system / taxpayers. Yet another set-up: even if you fail to pay your loan back, lending to immature directionless students is a no-loss deal – the govt backs up the loans, or a network of laws press individuals to pay them off. –In some states, a professional license stipulation is to not be in default on a student loan. <–So, you need the license to work and pay off the loan, but they will yank the license if you are not paying. Alanis, a black fly in your Chardonnay is not ironic. ^THIS is ironic!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Bendix says:

            Don’t forget the lucrative “speaking fees”, and the cushy landings for the Janet Napolitano types.
            She can’t keep a speaker safe from hired thugs? What was her job in government, again? I could swear it had something to do with security.
            Higher Education is one of the bigger NFP rackets going.

            Liked by 1 person

        • LEET says:

          Sylvia: you are exactly correct! However, some people, myself included, used the trade school training in high school to work their way through college going to night school, took 7 years but graduated with only $2,500 debt which was paid back within a year. Seems to me the college loan debt crisis is also another consequence of the past 30 plus years

          Liked by 5 people

        • farmhand1927 says:

          “The college experience” in this day and age too often means complete immersion in radical Left, global, intolerant politics. Sadly, it doesn’t just begin at the college level. As early as kindergarten, American kids are being brainwashed with racism toward white people, Christians and Jews, the heterosexual lifestyle and conservatism.

          “The college experience” now includes taxpayer supported safe spaces, coloring books and therapy sessions. Free speech and free press are openly banned and applauded. A professor can launch a death wish toward the POTUS and get away with it. Police and military are openly disrespected and worse, threatened.

          Growing numbers don’t understand the concept of working their way through college because they have the Bernie Sanders’ types telling them their educations should be ‘free’. Too many students aren’t critical thinkers because they don’t understand that as future taxpayers they would then have to pay everyone’s tuition for the rest of their lives. They can’t figure out they’re better off paying for only one education–their own. Obviously, Cause and Effect are no longer taught.

          Too many graduates emerge into the real world with gigantic chips on their shoulders, perpetually offended abt something, rather than energized to go after their slice of the American dream. Immature, ill-informed and unprepared for real world work and adult responsibility, they think attacking the American Dream and capitalism somehow is a plan for success and fairness. When they quickly learn it’s not a plan, they throw tantrums, get frustrated and crawl back to Mom and Dad’s basement.

          Beyond marijuana use, heroin and opioids are common party drugs on campuses, complete with a critical rise in numbers of overdoses and deaths. While mourning these losses, the same kids advocate for open borders where the drugs enter the country. Suicide rates among people 21 and under are skyrocketing. Seems the modern day college experience is too often far less than desirable or productive. Too many college students are lost, empty, and yes, guilty of squandering the enormous blessings of youth and unlimited opportunity. Just what the Marxists have always hoped would result for American youth…

          The epitome Ivy League education mindset and pursuit thereof, has resulted in America becoming a nation of ignorance when it comes to every day intelligence and ability to handle common repairs or even knowing how to react to them. Young men used to know how to change a tire. Today, we laugh at a TV commercial where two boys are on the side of a road at night, on the phone with Dad trying to pretend they know what a lug wrench is. In fact, there’s nothing funny abt our failure to equip our kids with skills and knowledge needed outside their college safe spaces or without a computerized woman’s voice coming from their phones to light their way.

          Sometimes higher education simply educates the sense right out of people.

          Liked by 7 people

          • harrietht3 says:

            Great comment.
            In other words, now public schools from K-12 and beyond are purveyors of Communism 101.
            It would be enlightening for the public to have *regular and widespread dissemination* — from all media sources available, including social media — of the stated goals of the Communist Party USA written for posterity around about the 1960s, and for every stated goal the degree to which they’ve successfully achieved those goals and supplanted our American way of life.
            Point-by-point.

            Like

        • TXGuy says:

          The “college experience” also includes 4 years of brainwashing to hate your own country, and even your own race if you are white, and embrace global Marxism.

          Does anyone really believe this was all by accident?

          Liked by 3 people

        • leebelieu says:

          I finished High School in 2002. I was told my whole life that you go to college or flip burgers. Trade schools, Home Ec, Shop class, were gone in my middle/HS days. Perhaps they persisted in other areas but the city I lived in all were taught that college was the way to go. I decided to flip burgers. Wasn’t easy and I made poor decisions at times but I’ve always liked working and whether it’s a well crafted plate of food or a public address system in a school(current profession), I like seeing a job well done. Many schools here are bringing these skills back here, hoping my kids get these opportunities.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Sylvia Avery says:

            It is an absolute crying shame that you didn’t get to have any exposure to vocational training in HS. I learned some really good stuff in those types of classes as well as some of the more traditional classes. You were really cheated.

            However, it sounds like you were smart enough to figure a few things out on your own and are doing fine. Good for you!

            Liked by 2 people

      • snarkybeach says:

        maybe around the time Shop & Home Ec were eliminated from high school

        Liked by 2 people

        • Mark McQueen says:

          Funny you should mention that. My Father was a High School Vocational Arts teacher. He retired in the mid 80s. I still run into people all the time that recognize the last name and tell me how much my Dad help them learn useful skills and how much the appreciated it.

          Liked by 3 people

    • boogywstew says:

      I’m a few years older than you and still working. Doing trade work has become less and less desirable with the rise in welfare benefits going hand and hand with public acceptance of immoral behaviour. When cheating social services and just being plain lazy has become not only acceptable but viewed with humorous approval … it just follows. Shame has gone out of style.

      Liked by 23 people

      • starfcker says:

        Does he not realize Trump is bringing Foxconn to Wisconsin? I think Trump reminded him. Bought and paid for, no question

        Liked by 6 people

        • The Boss says:

          Foxconn is setting up in Wisconsin for a reason. A good, long-term reason which will outlast Ron Johnson’s tenure and outsmart the liberal trash found at a certain self-proclaimed academic site in Madison. Make no mistake about it.

          Liked by 4 people

      • Phooey says:

        You are 100% right, there is no shame any more. I’ve seen it in healthcare, “disability” became the new welfare over the last 10 years. Folks who should be out working and contributing have instead taken to figuring out how to get as many government checks per month as they can. People of all walks of life are gaming whatever government benefits systems they can get into.

        Which reminds me, I’m glad to see POTUS talking about bringing real food back to SNAP to actually *feed* people, and reducing some of the “free money” that’s handed out and destined to be fraudulently converted into cash around the corner at that local, sleazy convenience store that everybody knows about.

        Liked by 5 people

    • wheatietoo says:

      During the Vietnam War, young men could get a ‘college deferment’ and avoid being drafted.
      I don’t think a deferment was allowed for Vocational Schools or Junior Colleges.

      As a result, Colleges/Universities were full of young men who were only there to avoid being drafted.
      It was a boom time for the Colleges, too.

      After the Vietnam War ended…Colleges had to figure out ways to keep their enrollment up, or they would have to cut back and lay off professors.
      Can’t have that!

      That’s when slogans like “everyone has a right to a college education” started being parroted by educators and politicians.
      At some point, colleges even started paying high school counselors a ‘commission’ for steering students their way.

      That’s also when it became ‘undesirable’ to go to a trade school or junior college.
      There was never any thought given to whether there would be Jobs available to those college grads when they got out of school.

      This was also the time when liberal elitists in the education system would cheer whenever one of our ‘dirty factories’ was shut down…because doing so was ‘saving the planet’.

      Liked by 18 people

      • prenanny says:

        Wheats I think you hit some nails on the head there. It is important to know how we got here for synergistic solutions going forward. SO much has been bastardized from
        previously good intentions.

        Liked by 5 people

      • brh82 says:

        When I troll liberal sites, looking for WHY they hate Trump so much, the major focus is on what he’s doing that will destroy the planet. In my generation, the focus was on saving the trees, but they’ve gone way beyond that. They justify so many facets of their lives by preaching about saving the planet.

        Liked by 1 person

        • steph_gray says:

          Saving the planet is code for killing all the people on it. I am not kidding. Well, except maybe for a few elite enclaves who will presumably survive and prosper through slave labor.

          Liked by 3 people

        • New Nonna to be Again!!! says:

          ‘Save the planet’ May indeed be their mantra, but killing babies as they’re birthed is ok.

          All those sappy animal commercials talking about how they suffer from abuse?! I LOVE my current and prior dogs, but how about those liberals try to prevent some cruel abuse that results in death, suffered by just as innocent CHILDREN, who through no fault of their own were made and then are unwanted?

          O, but children from another country brought here illegally by a parent should be protected. Given whatever medical care they need to survive, right?? While we kill the littlest among our citizens. Just sick. And WRONG!!!

          I just can’t stomach it. Save the planet indeed. 😢
          DACA, yea right. /s 😡

          Like

      • And they knew all the while that they were clearing the way for the latino invasion they had planned for America. Those people are to be our, have become our, replacements. I own a renovation business and have watched my income go down steadily over the years while my competition is gone. My American competition, that is.

        I’ve always handled real estate management as well, and owned properties back in the day. The money was and is still in the management, and the only reason I even still have a renovation company. Otherwise, I could be at Home Depot like some of the other guys, or worse…

        It’s infuriating, and yet we have allowed “them” to do this to us and our progeny. Hence the incredible need at this point for The Great American Reckoning, in which we truly cannot afford to fail. Now is definitely the time.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Mark McQueen says:

        I agree. That was definitely a factor.

        Liked by 1 person

    • WSB says:

      My grandfather was a school superintendent for a large area in Pennsylvania. I went to his retirement party in the late sixties as a child. I remember he had over 200 alumni show, many of whom were from his vocational programs.

      Liked by 8 people

    • Esperanza says:

      A lot these metro people think there are no median IQ natives, only immigrants because they have been pushed out of metro areas, where they refuse to live in crap (literally more and more viz San Francisco). I always say, well how are these people supposed to make a living? He tells you, they aren’t. They will be put on benefits.

      Also, this is rubbish. The reason the sh@@@@it cheap is that there are no healthcare, unemployment, environmental, school etc benefits attached like in the US. Just put in tariffs that reflect this and lots would change. Also they should remember that if we have no jobs we won’t be able to buy their cheap sh@@@@t.

      Liked by 4 people

      • TheLastDemocrat says:

        Esperanza -yes, tariffs are a solution.
        We should consider another solution: quality-graded tariffs. Foreign producers could get audited, just as many areas of American industry get audited voluntarily, and get imprimatures of quality: Baldridge Award, etc. If you provide decent, humane working hours, healthcare, etc., to your workers, which all adds to labor costs, you get a higher labor accreditation, and that qualifies your products for a lower tier tariff.

        If not, then you have higher tariff.

        Same with environment: manage waste stream well, and you get certified at higher level, and have lower production tariff; throw mercury in the local river and you don’t get certified, and you have the highest tariff level.

        Problem solved: allow foreign producers to select their own tariff level. Plus, we in the U.S. develop the accreditation standards and process, and we send out the accreditors.

        This shifts the cost balance back toward the U.S. without a trade war, and while promoting decent labor and environmental standards.

        Like

        • brh82 says:

          Forcing other countries to change their culture to mirror ours…..hmmm, isn’t that the goal of Globalism? A friend works for a company that sells sporting goods, sleeping bags, chiefly. Their bags are made in China and fall apart after one season. She is charged with teaching China that 1/8 inch seams are not acceptable. They tell her 1/8 inch seams guarantee selling more bags because they have to be replaced every year. She tells THEM, in the USA, we have to replace shoddy bags for free! She traveled there, thinking she would train their workers. They are who they are….making cheap things with planned obsolescence. China preferred losing the account rather than make the bags with 1/2 inch seams. Their reasoning is in their DNA!

          Liked by 1 person

        • Esperanza says:

          This as a French Socialist proposal. It’s called Social VAT. Health care would be funded by it. I prefer tariffs.

          Also I hate the hypocrisy. Stricter and stricter environmental standards here, which means the polluting of the planet is being done there, not here. Let’s participate in the egg breaking for the omelette.

          As I say, we’re not allowed plastic bags, but no-one cares if what’s put in the environmentally friendly paper ones comes half way across the planet.

          As for the seams, I’m making my own stuff. I refuse to buy crap from China. And people should know I’m a Chinese water buffalo. I tell ya I know a thing or two about stopping in my tracks.

          Like

    • ahem says:

      When kids started getting college deferments so they could stay out of the war in Vietnam. Screwing up in college meant you’d invariably end up serving. Back in 1968, school was your only ticket out.

      Like

      • RJ says:

        Don’t forget those “revolutionaries” who stayed in school, then later went into education and government (lawyers). Look at what they have achieved in our educational system and done to our government (granted, we vote them in and keep them in, which is a reflection on aggregate ignorance–education lost).

        Liked by 2 people

    • Dekester says:

      M.M.

      I am approx your age, and personally know of three mid twenty somethings. One female and two males ( am I allowed to say that😉)

      All three have either an excellent career they enjoy, or vocation. For different reasons, neither one of them wanted to spend the money, or were interested in university.

      Two are already building equity in their own homes.

      Sure, university is a must for Law, Medicine, Engineering. But the rest of it is pretty much a huge scam/con a scam that fleeces parents and youngsters. Or worse.

      Of course every community is a little different, but up this way. HVAC, Electricans, Elevator repairman, automotive techs etc, are in great demand and making great money, and all have the opportunity, because of their skills. To be able to relocate if required, and become entrepreneurial they so desire.

      Never mind the fact that they are all not only useful, but necessary in a modern society.

      Ninety percent of degrees are feel good fluff, expensive fluff too.

      Your President is embarrassing these smarmy a**wipes in your Senate.

      The sunlight is destroying them. No wonder the vast majority of the slugs despise him so much.

      God bless PDJT.

      Liked by 5 people

      • harrietht3 says:

        Dekester:
        90% of degrees are socialist or blatantly Marxist indoctrination.
        My experience of full-time college was from 1986-1991; I got to experience first hand the transition — at my small local college — both the incipient and the full-blown effort to fundamentally transform my own world-view, gained in 35 years of life experiences, a life lived with great self-reflection.

        That is to say, that in 1986 the incessant cues to liberalism in my humanities classes were nuanced and I hesitatingly dismissed them, still feeling my way. But by 1991-92, the attack on me and my worldview and opinions breached unacceptable levels; I took lower grades rather than deliver to my Marxist professors the regurgitated pablum they demanded.

        But how terrible it is that these satanic-inspired institutions and the credentials they confer serve as the entry into all professional occupations.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Dekester says:

          Harriet, that is really powerful.

          When I was in High School a teacher needed only two years of teachers college after getting out of High School in order to get qualified. Registered nurses were two or three years.

          Now both require full degrees then special training after that.

          What a racket.

          Policing too. One is not getting promoted in most P.Ds or F.Ds without a silly degree.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Dogstar_K9 says:

        @Dekester: “Sure, university is a must for Law, Medicine, Engineering. But the rest of it is pretty much a huge scam/con a scam that fleeces parents and youngsters. Or worse.”

        It’s a money laundering game. There would be riots in the street if tax dollars went to pay for indoctrination camps but if you hide it through college tuition, the sheep would never catch on.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mark McQueen says:

        My son-in-law (he’s early 30’s) has developed a very successful contracting business (construction ie. backhoe, dozer, etc.). He started from scratch while in his early 20’s. No college that I know of. Yes there are indeed exceptions and it’s probably not as bad as we imagine. It’s one of the reasons I used the term “general” in my OP. It did become a general trend. IMHO.

        Like

      • New Nonna to be Again!!! says:

        Good post, dekester. Good points.

        Re: ‘One female, two males (am I allowed to say that 😉)… ABSO-FREAKIN-LUTELY!

        That’s how God made us. Male and female. The FEMALE was God’s last created being. We stop at perfection, now, don’t we. Guess we learned that from Him. 😇

        Like

    • Esperanza says:

      Actually in real life, it isn’t. It’s in the metro elites. I’d say, I agree, 70s

      Like

    • In my area, Pittsburgh Pa, it was the 70s. By the 90s, VoTech no longer seen as an option. Go to college or the military. Wearing a uniform is the new VoTech.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. boogywstew says:

    Americans will fill manufacturing jobs if they pay decently but what are the odds on that if illegal immigrants are willing to work for substandard wages? I install flooring in the Buffalo – Erie,PA areas and I have to compete with illegal Latin American workers who undercut me. I kid you not … I also compete with retired government workers who retire at 55 or such and want to pick up a few days of work a week for spending money and my personal favorite … I compete against part timers collecting disability.

    Liked by 23 people

    • prenanny says:

      part timers collecting disability.
      Who “oddly” are perfectly capable of working just enough hours that won’t reduce their disability.

      Liked by 4 people

      • boogywstew says:

        What I’m referring to is folks that are supposed to be disabled and not working at all … nada … no work. They don’t run ads or work on the books. They land jobs via friends and family. Their overhead is completely paid for so they can afford to work for less than I can.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Fannie says:

        SSDI is the one behind the idea to get those on disability to take on part-time work. To qualify for disability as a former worker, they determine whether the disabled person can be “competitively employed”—will an employer be at a disadvantage when competing in the market with a worker who has permanent physical limitations and is absent frequently due to appointments and therapies. There is another type of government disability which is more like welfare for those who have not earned the benefit with a work history.

        Like

    • doit4atlas says:

      Exactly!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ddanna says:

      In quite a few of the jobs, I see people who get some government benefits, but do work for cash so they don’t have to pay taxes or social security on their wages. These people are ripping the American taxpayers twice!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Paul Killinger says:

    I caught this live…

    Meanwhile, back in the REAL world, Walmart just eaised their starting wage to a WHOLE $11/hour.

    Thank you, Mr Johnson, sir.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Paul Killinger says:

      …While Sam Walton’s kids, who now run the place, are on the list of the 10 richest people in the world!

      Liked by 1 person

      • boogywstew says:

        There are many people who are not remotely worth $10 an hour. If you want to make more money … make yourself worth it.

        Liked by 12 people

        • I hire and fire up to a half a dozen people a year that demand $12 or more an hour and aren’t worth paying one red cent to. I cannot keep a good helper around anymore to work with lead guys.

          Then there are the few that I’ll give a shot knowing that they don’t know there butt from a hole in the ground but tell me how they really want to work and learn, but don’t even show up for the first day of work…

          Liked by 2 people

          • boogywstew says:

            I’m a floor covering sub contractor … carpet – sheet vinyl – VCT tiles – parquet wood tiles etc. I install sub floors and also repair right down to the joists on occasion. My 2 big issues with hiring apprentices or helpers are pot smoking and cell phones. I cannot afford someone who smokes dope before showing up for work due to the short term memory loss that goes with it and I can’t afford someone who yanks out his cell phone whenever I’m out of sight to text. I work with other tradesmen and I see this behaviour day after day.

            Liked by 1 person

      • PaulM says:

        If you put and end to welfare, walmart would have to close 90% of it’s stores. They sell chinese crap to naive people who don’t care because they didn’t have to work for the money.

        Like

      • brh82 says:

        Sam Walton’s kids carry ALL the risk, which is easy to discount unless you’ve owned a company and been responsible for the thousands of workers whose lives they are responsible for. There is soooo little respect for risk-carrying, it amazes me.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Donna in Oregon says:

    President Trump mentions the 100 million Americans that would work those jobs. President Trump will also be smart enough to set-up a partnership with employers to have accelerated training for high-skill jobs for Americans, not Visa holders.

    Johnson needs to get in the 21st Century. Robots will do the menial work, we don’t need more low skill. People that have worked in Silicon Valley know that the low paid Engineers that the Visa system brings in DO NOT create innovations that the world has never seen before.

    When was the last big invention in Silicon Valley? Facebook, (snicker) is not an invention it’s a college toy. Steve Jobs created a company that invented. Intel created inventions. Hell, Edison created inventions. We don’t have that now.

    Hire American and get some inventions going. If they don’t Silicon Valley is brain dead.

    You get what you pay for.

    Liked by 12 people

    • John R says:

      Ok – so I think some of you might be missing a very important distinction in what Johnson is saying. I’m from Michigan originally and now live in Switzerland. It is true that “It makes no sense to bring back high labor manufacturing jobs”. Factories are being automated – especially in China. Switzerland is a high wealth, low tax country that has adopted business friendly principles, but viciously protects its labor market. The manufacturing done here is all high tech and the people doing it have been educated in vocational schools, training programs etc. Going into a vocational program is not looked down upon, and people make good wages here (however it is very expensive because they protect their market from imports in areas like agriculture etc.). It is also an interesting example – because college is “Free” here. But not Bernie Sanders “Free”. At 12 years old they determine if you are on college track or not, that is approximately 10% of the class. By 18 it is down to about 5%, of the class. And then you can go to University fully paid ($300 a year in fees or so). However, if you choose a high profile program STEM, medicine, law etc. Then about 50% fail the first year. They then get one more try, and after must switch to a different discipline. This is also only offered to persons educated in there public school system. If you go private high school, then it is not free, if you want a private college it is not free, etc.

      Liked by 5 people

      • dilonsfo says:

        Very interesting. I have never heard this before. Thank you for the education and insight into how another country handles education of it’s citizen.

        Like

      • georgiafl says:

        Law is not STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) it’s another field entirely, following out of a History/Political Science/Liberal Arts degree.

        Like

      • dman1971 says:

        LOL Switzerland has a socialist base that is why it is more expensive to live there however “free” is not free you left out the high tax rate they have there as well to pay for all that “free” stuff. Personal income tax is 40%,corporate tax rate is 17.77% which means you as the individual is paying for the “free” stuff. Sales tax is between 7.70% to 8%, Social security is between 12.10% and 18.10%, SS for companies is between 6.05% and 11.55%. What I am getting at here is Switzerland has a lot less people then America it is easier to have “free” crap paid for by individuals that are willing to pay the higher taxes in smaller populated countries rather then in large population countries. College is a privilage not a right if you want higher education then the individual must pay for it period. Part of the problem we have in this country is the self entitled mentality that because I want it you must pay for it because I am worth it. That needs to change. I had to earn it just like most people had to earn it and earning it means working for it and paying your own way. What good does a degree do you if you didn’t earn it? Or had to work for it? Does it mean you are smarter? What happens if say the self entitled cheated their way through college does that make them better then the laborer? I know people that work trades that would run circles around any PhD. College now days is a joke actually worse then a joke. Our kids are coming out dumber then when they went in and couldn’t find a job if their life depended on it. Most college kids are required to have us parents co-sign for them because they are not responsible enough. Hell we have Dems trying to make us parents responsible for providing healthcare to our kids up to the age of 26 now. Why? I was 17 when I started my career and retired at the ripe old age of 39. I paid my way I earned my way and I have never taken a handout. Nor should my kids. Too bad you traded America for Switzerland hope you enjoy it.

        Liked by 4 people

        • prenanny says:

          “Too bad you traded America for Switzerland”
          Consider it a Blessing, now if we could get 20 million more to follow him…

          Liked by 2 people

          • John R says:

            I didn’t trade – I live here, still an American citizen and paying to the US tax system which is ridiculous especially considering the U.S. is the only country to do that to its citizens except Eritrea which most people don’t even know where it is.

            Like

        • John R says:

          LOL – Switzerland has lower taxes than the US. Not sure where you get your figures. Personal income tax hits 40% only when you make around $500,000. My effective tax rate in Switzerland is lower than the US, their SSC is 6% not 12??? Sales tax (VAT) is 8% or 3%.

          I do enjoy Switzerland, and just because I live here doesn’t mean you should respond like that. I’m sure I pay more to the US tax system than you do and I get nothing for it, with the exception of a passport and the right to vote.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Dekester says:

            Thank you J.R.

            Your post is most informative.

            An accident of birth, and circumstances beyond my control have determined that I am dual citizen of Canada and the U.K. and both a Canadian and E.U. passport holder.

            We rented a house to a Swiss national. The fellow that rented the house ( for eight years.) spoke four languages. German, Italian, French and English. It took him years to get his Green card. He works legally in Canada and the U.S. and pays his taxes to “ Uncle Sam”

            He has moved on now, and lives in the U.S, twenty minutes from the U.S. Canadian border. Sadly he is a die hard Liberal idealist, he and his American wife both drive Subaru’s, the Pacific Northwest’s ultimate liberal status symbol.

            Switzerland is a a unique country, may be like a Liechtenstein. Their people are highly educated, and have not been destroyed by tragic wars. Neutrality brought them great wealth. You will remember the days when one paid interest to have your money in Swiss francs. One cannot really compare Switzerland to the U.S. and the corrupt form of government that it’s citizens are now waking up to as a result of PDJTs election.

            Try immigrating to Switzerland, good luck with that. The refugees they must take in is causing them enough distress.

            The Swiss are also are very well armed nation are they not?

            God bless PDJT

            Liked by 1 person

        • doit4atlas says:

          GREAT comment!

          Like

      • prenanny says:

        Switzerland has a population less than New York City.
        The education system you describe sounds very creepy to me and should be frightening not lauded.
        Did you keep your American citizenship or are you Swiss now?

        Liked by 1 person

        • John R says:

          I’m not lauding it or not, just giving an example of what ‘Free’ really means. It is very restricted and limited and would never fly in the US. Can you imagine if parents were told their 12 year old is not able to go to college (90% of parents will hear this in Switzerland.

          In contrast, I do admit I like that they don’t force college on everyone. Trade schools are well regarded here. Switzerland does have a population less than many major cities, but it is a small country and every citizen must do military service with a few modern exceptions.

          I do like the tax system here, because it encourages capital investment, is reasonable for personal income tax, and best of all the majority of the tax you pays goes to your State and Village, where the federal gets max 9% by law.

          Like

          • boogywstew says:

            In years past and maybe still to this day, Switzerland did more around the globe to encourage organized crime by allowing unnamed, numbered bank accounts. I had a very liberal friend stun me with what I now consider a well thought out answer to the question, “What is the number 1 terrorist nation?” His answer … “Switzerland”.

            Like

            • John R says:

              Ha, walk around in Switzerland and then walk around in Libya, Iraq, Iran, Palestine etc. Tell me what you think then.

              Like

              • boogywstew says:

                I equated Switzerland with enabling criminal activity and my liberal friend equated Switzerland with being a terrorist state. I stand by my comment and think my friend should follow your advice.

                Like

      • brh82 says:

        In the “olden days”(my generation) parents chose for their kids education in a “College prep high school”, or an ordinary high school. Each had different requirements, in terms of what courses were offered and required for graduation. For instance, college prep schools offered Chemistry and Physics, and regular schools didn’t. The electives differed too.

        Like

    • The Boss says:

      So right about Silicon Valley. I’m advising a tech start up which used developers in India to do basic, initial development work. When it came time to “add in the innovation” (i.e., show us your Yankee Ingenuity) the company hit a brick ceiling. All “innovative” development and testing will be done in the US from now on. And guess who’s doing it? Creative Americans who were displaced from Silicon Valley by low-wage foreign cannon-fodder. They solve problems matter-of-factly, and are generally so productive that the company will likely move to it’s next stage under budget and ahead of schedule. (very Trumpian, I know). The good news is that the best contractors will be hired full-time, given employee ownership shares, and hopefully make a fortune when the company exits via acquisition.

      [I do not mean to disparage all of India. I know a number of professionals from India who have become citizens and fully embraced their US citizenship and new culture. A large proportion are innovative and hard-working, and they enjoy a good party every now and then. I know this because I’ve been to a couple of their shindigs. Not one is on welfare. They are great examples of what assimilation looks like.]

      Liked by 2 people

      • prenanny says:

        I have worked with MANY Indian contractors and 8 out of 10 of them are crap.
        Ten lines of code where 2-3 would suffice, goto loops where an if-then
        should be, garbage sloppy spaghetti code.
        Their attraction was never the quality of their code it was because they were cheaper to hire and could be used to meet minority/female hiring quotas that governments require.
        I won’t get into the kickbacks that were also involved..

        Liked by 3 people

  6. The Deplorable Tina says:

    If he can figure out a way to get all the people on opioids rehabilitated and back in the workforce, 2020 is a lock. I have heard many stories about manufacturers having a hard time hiring because the workforce is addicted. Seeing him in action makes me think he’s already working on that 🙂

    Liked by 11 people

    • CirclinTheDrain says:

      There would be a lot less drug abuse if people had to work as opposed to sitting around all day with no job other than collecting “benefits”.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Esperanza says:

        Or could aspire to something. It’s obvious here, in the countryside where I now live, the young people are already broken. Compared to Paris, where they know they can succeed, but are under massive pressure.

        Like

    • Donna in Oregon says:

      There is a new drug. Of course we aren’t hearing about it, but it exists for opiate addiction.

      This drug thing is a temporary issue. With a cure for opiate addiction it will be easy to get back on track.

      Actually, I believe the whole opiate deal is Big Pharma and China. Somehow it is connected, some evil business deal.

      This is an attack by China to disable Americans. China should not be allowed to mail anything to the USA until this Fentanyl attack has been stopped.

      The Drug Cartels are lazy violent criminals. They should be treated like ISIS.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Paul Killinger says:

    Prediction – This US Senate will NOT pass an immigration bill that includes Mandatory Everify, which is the one GUARANTEED way to stop the illegal migrant flow.

    Liked by 10 people

    • Paul Killinger says:

      Which must mean they think we’re STUPID!

      (And we must be… After all, we elected them, didn’t we?)

      Liked by 4 people

      • Actually… they know that enough of “us” are literally stupid, that enough of us are apathetic, enough of us are downtrodden and have no possible hope of anything ever changing, enough of us are incredibly busy trying to simply keep food on the table for the family leaving no time to even pay attention or enjoy living, and that enough of us are actually profiting from their schemes to keep us from caring what they do… etc…

        I could go on for a while, as I see it all through talking with so many people and “hearing their stories”. Bottom line is “they know that enough of “us” are handled”… and they know their psychopathic globalist masters have seen to it.

        UniParty must go.

        Like

    • brh82 says:

      Why won’t the Senate pass E-verify? Homeland Security is now responsible for cleaning up voter fraud. Can’t the president write an EO for E-verify, if that is the recommend of HS?

      Like

      • Because UniParty doesn’t work for us, they work for the psychopathic international bankster cabal of self described “elites” and “philanthropists” that would wipe out half of mankind in one fell swoop if given half the chance.

        Because evil.

        Liked by 1 person

        • brh82 says:

          HHmmm, I forgot for a moment that the Congress I thought we had turns out to be Uniparty. I worry that we few here in the Tree are the only ones who know the TRUTH!

          Like

  8. Kevin Rendon says:

    Laura Ingram and Hannity I him k care about American workers
    the rest I don’t know

    Like

  9. Gadsden says:

    When we remodeled our house a few years back, we were shocked at the poor work ethic and attention to detail of the American workers. They showed up late, were disorganized and sloppy. Culturally, we need to regain that discipline and work ethic that made us the great country that we are.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Paul Killinger says:

      No offense, but that was the contractor you chose.

      Liked by 9 people

    • Esperanza says:

      My experience has been the opposite. Moved from Paris where it’s a disaster. Non speak French. Illiterate. Some I’d be afraid to be alone in my house with. Here, all very good, local people. Because they’re local, news travels fast, they have to be good.

      Liked by 2 people

    • prenanny says:

      Well that is interesting as you imply that you had illegal workers to compare them with.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Esperanza says:

        There aren’t really illegal workers here, as it’s a criminal offence to employ them. Employers MUST have a copy of immigration papers. Also banks are obliged to freeze illegals’ accounts.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Not long after my “city” “officials” invited 25,000 criminal alien mexican workers to invade a good part of my work load came from going behind the crap work they left for people to deal with… some of those calling me being clients that had abandoned me for the “better deal”.

      They also told me later that it wasn’t any “better” of a deal at all. I reminded them it wouldn’t be, as American scum would be taking that profit line for themselves. Yep. “government” scum to boot… one councilman was caught taking huge kickbacks. One.

      As if there weren’t many more… fall guy.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. WonkoTheSane says:

    This is why I became an Independent in 2006. It became glaringly obvious that that Rs were for open borders and cheap labor. None of their policies had anything to do with creating an environment where American citizens could thrive. The hope I had for our country when Rs won The House, Senate and Presidency on 2000 and 2004 just slowly died. The next 10 years were filled with a sense of helplessness. I watched the Dimms abandon their blue collar union base and devolve into social justice and transgender issues as their platform. That was kinda funny (in a dark way), but they kept gaining power. These effing rinos kept rolling over on every issue and I learned to hate them more than dimms. Cantor getting primaried was the only bright spot in those long, dark years.

    Now it all seems so long ago. I love our President. I have hope for this great nation and for our future generations. We were so close to losing everything. Shadilay, MAGA and may God continue to bless America.

    Liked by 13 people

    • Phooey says:

      2011-2012 really drove it home for me, after the R’s got control of Congress in the mid-terms with a lot of big talk and then proceeded to do none of it and *nothing* to stop Obama.

      Liked by 1 person

      • brh82 says:

        Obama was Black, which gave him a pass on everything, as we now see! I’m gonna bet there will not be another Black president for at least 5 generations, he so destroyed race relations.

        Like

      • ghw bush drove it all home for me, and I have been mocked mercilessly since I began warning everyone I could about the evils of the district of criminals, the bush/clinton cabal of globalist treason, and “government” gone wild in general.

        As a voracious reader and student of results of “good government intentions” I was already well aware of the so called new deal and great society evils foisted upon us, as I was also disgusted by the fractional bankster credit economy scheme… all the while a long haired rock musician/self employed engineer, producer and of all things contractor. No wonder some people thought I was “off the charts”.

        I was 28 when that bassturd announced from OUR oval office that the “new world order” was here and “would be successful”. My cold anger and inevitable hatred of all things “global” is in full adulthood now and I’ve been waiting for Trump the whole time. I am more than ready for a full and glorious Reckoning, which will take each and every one of us to actually accomplish if it is to last.

        Not much mocking going on anymore, either…

        Liked by 2 people

    • prenanny says:

      So you ONLY vote for Independents?
      You do understand that Independent is a PARTY affiliation it is not ” I hate Republicans and democrats equally”.

      Like

      • TheLastDemocrat says:

        prenanny – yes.
        Wonko could be like me: clinging to a vision of party that doesn’t exist. I don’t want to give up the label just because my party got co-opted by communists. But I have no one to vote for, either way.

        Like

      • WonkoTheSane says:

        Independent, Decline to State is how I’m registered. It’s not a party. I can vote for whomever I wish. Why the hell would I be a member of a private, big club national party that doesn’t give a hoot about me or my fellow citizens? Sorry I don’t fit in your pigeon hole.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Alligator Gar says:

      In my state, not wanting to align with any party is called NPA–no party affiliation. I am again NPA until I need to be a temp R to vote in a primary.

      Like

      • NC PATRIOT says:

        Being independent is fine—-but I would not let my disgust with the GOPe interfere with my ability, in my state, to give P45 all the Republican support he needs, at he ballot box.

        The establishment Repubs have, after all, with the narrowest of margins, given us good conservative judges, SC justice—-and tax reform. That helps our President.

        Like

  11. maiingankwe says:

    Oh boy, did Johnson make me angry. I don’t know where he’s been in Wisconsin to throw out those ridiculous claims, but I’d be more than willing to give him a tour of a few towns where manufacturers had to either shut down business or had moved overseas.

    I have good, hard-working friends who lost their jobs in a number of plants. They had been making good money and had plan to work in these places until retirement. I’ve watched 2-300 people get laid off in a small plant and then go out and compete for a job when a couple of other hundred or so lost theirs too. All of them competing for a few openings. It was devastating to watch.

    I also remember a video approved by Nehlen when he was running against Ryan. I believe he was riding his motorcycle and going by manufacturing places that had been boarded up and shut down. He was showing what a nasty job Ryan had been doing by running manufacturing companies out of his district.

    I wonder how many thousands and thousands of jobs have been lost in the last 20-25 years Johnson has claimed to be flourishing to the point there aren’t enough workers. What a bunch of bull.

    I can guarantee the local news stations won’t be showing that clip and if they dare, I’m quite sure they will cut it off when our President Trump said, I agree a 100%.

    I despise these politicians.

    Liked by 15 people

    • starfcker says:

      Yeah, but how cool is it keeping the press in these meetings. You don’t want to see the sausage getting made? I do. Smoke them out. These kinds of meetings will be bonanzas for opposition research for MAGA candidates in the primaries in years to come. Excellent way to put sunlight on the kinds of legislators that say one thing back in the district and do another thing in Washington

      Liked by 3 people

      • maiingankwe says:

        Oh I think it’s the best thing ever since sliced bread. He’s absolutely brilliant to have the msm tape these meetings. I appreciate what he is doing, and it is working. His audience will get bigger and bigger as time goes on as well. I know it. People want to see and hear what their elecected officials have to say, Well, most, the ones who vote anyways.

        I just had to vent my anger at the outright lies Johnson was saying is all. He deserves that.
        Take care,
        Ma’iingankwe

        Like

    • colddeadhandsyoudirtyape says:

      Yep. I kinda cringed when POTUS said “I agree 100%” What was that?

      Liked by 1 person

      • prenanny says:

        It is like when he says so and so is a great guy.
        The Lion distracts them with compliments.

        Liked by 1 person

      • maiingankwe says:

        He does that all the time. I used to cringe at his rallies when he’d say how much he liked some idiot politician or other. I guess it’s just the way he is. If we block out those lines and just listen to the rest, he really tells us how much he doesn’t like the person. At least that is how I take it. He always compliments his adversaries when he has to work with them too.

        How many times have we heard him say something nice about Ryan or McConnell when he’s working with them? So I never take it as how he really feels. However, there are so many people who don’t know or realize that about him, and that’s why it worried me at first when I heard him say it. But when I listened to what he had to say afterwards, that’s the part I took home.

        You might have to ask someone smarter than me or at least one who has worked next to him for awhile. I know it would be something I’d ask a real honest person who has worked with him.
        Take care, 😁
        Ma’iingankwe

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Troublemaker10 says:

    Trump used to say that “we (America) don’t make anything anymore”. It resonated with me.

    I don’t think a country that doesn’t build and create its own goods can survive for long. It just doesn’t make sense to ship our own resources overseas to have someone else make things to then sell back to us.

    Some outsourcing is good for sure. However, there needs to be a balance….and it has been out of balance for a while.

    College education is good, but so is working with your hands in a trade or manufacturing.

    I want to be a country that builds things again.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Paul Killinger says:

      It surely cannot survive a war. Indeed, that’s the #1 reason nations lose wars.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Donna in Oregon says:

      Exactly, some people can’t stay in a cubicle all day, they gotta move and create. To some Americans that type of job is a punishment.

      When the US government decided We the People were going to be a “service industry” I think that is how we got to this point.

      Would you like fries with that?

      Liked by 4 people

    • WesternWhere says:

      Manufacturing is the only way to create wealth.

      A manufacturing economy creates wealth.

      A service economy creates servitude.

      Mine, farm, smelt, smith, mill, machine, build, sew… and for the love of God, could we start repairing things again so our wealth grows instead of being recreated over and over again?

      Liked by 10 people

      • Noonan says:

        There are 3 ways to create wealth: Mine it, manufacture it, or grow it. Unbeknownst to the GOPe, printing money and trading paper do not create wealth.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Dekester says:

          Correct, it just redistributes it. Of course that is their intention.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Dekester, printing fiat money and trading paper does not redistribute anything but destruction and the erosion of liberty while those doing it maneuver all the actual wealth in other forms like property, precious metals, and power through control into their own hands and pockets.

            Every time they crash it they gain more. It’s the ultimate in “money changers”. Americans are fiat debt slaves to the “feral” reserve, period. They take in millions per hour in literally fake debt interest. No one on our level really “owns” anything, life is just “rented”.

            Those who disagree should just stop paying property taxes and see what happens. It’s personalty tax time again, my accountant is currently figuring up what I “owe” yet again for business tools and equipment I paid tax on at the time of purchase, and then each year afterward simply because I still have them. She once told me at least they depreciate it over time… oh joy.

            Just saying.

            Like

        • TheLastDemocrat says:

          Classically, there are four ingedients for creating wealth, as drummed into my head:
          land, labor, capital, and entrepreneurship.

          I have come to believe that there is another one or two essential ingredients, and these are governmental roles: law based on possession of personal property (legally binding contracts and a court system to back that up), and protection of professional name/reputation/intellectual property: I can do a great job, but if you irresponsibly slander me, and so taint my stock-in-trade, you need to suffer. False-witness and covetousness set these principles in God’s code.

          Liked by 2 people

          • rashomon says:

            Last Democrat, you are so right. Patent and copyright protection is critical. Just ask Hillary about Inslaw/PRISM. Ask IBM Eclipse about the code they have stolen. Ask the Japanese, Chinese and Koreans how much they have invented from scratch. I remember when the Japanese actually formed a town they named USA, so they could label their products “Made in USA” to thwart those trying to buy American products. Our global conglomerates are sneaky little buggers grown too big with too much power to corrupt.

            We must be more protective of our entrepreneurs.

            http://www.fbcoverup.com/docs/library/Michael-T-McKibben-AFI-backgrounder.html

            https://aim4truth.org/…/facebook-unmasked-how-the-worlds-most-relevant-entrepren…

            Like

      • The Boss says:

        WesternWhere says: “A service economy creates servitude”.

        Truer words were never spoken. That I can tell you.

        Like

      • steph_gray says:

        Remember that in “Brave New World” by Huxley, a view of a soft dystopia, women were brainwashed during sleep to “End, Not Mend” so that there would be a continuous market for clothes.

        I learned to hand-sew when I was 7 – arthritis won’t let me do a lot, but I can fix up well-worn but valuable well-made clothes – and my best pieces are American-made. They cost more initially but they last and never go out of style (at least not in my opinion).

        Liked by 3 people

    • Conservativeinny says:

      I said that 25 years ago … a de-industrialized country will not remain power. People thought I was wrong, some thought I was crazy for saying it. I have not changed my stance in all these years.

      Liked by 9 people

    • Jo says:

      When I came to the USA in 1990, I really tried to buy American made household items. Some of the things I loved were kitchenware such as Oneida flatware, Corning Ware, Revere Ware pots & some US made crockery.
      Over the years, they all disappeared, or were manufactured overseas, but my last set of pots were Calphalon Unison, (made in the USA) & I managed to find a beautiful set of top quality flatware from Liberty Tabletop, made in Sherrill, NY. I bought Corning Ware from Replacements – looked for the made in the USA stamp.
      Nothing quite comes up to the quality of that Revere Ware pot set with the copper bottoms though, it was really good quality & over many years I have never found anything to match it.
      Recently I thought about buying a new induction stovetop, but when I realised that I couldn’t use my Calphalon Unison pots, I nixed the idea.
      When I found a good quality product, I bought them for my 2 sons & their families as well.

      Liked by 6 people

      • WSB says:

        Reverware is wonderful! As is anything from Corning. The museum is terrific if you ever get to NYS.

        Liked by 1 person

        • grandmaintexas says:

          Used to live in Corning. The museum is tops. The Finger Lakes are a great vacation spot, too.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Pat Frederick says:

          Have you been to the museum lately? The signs as well as all the demonstrations are in English and Chinese.

          Like

          • WSB says:

            Oh my! I was there last about four years ago. That is strange. Have a link to that information?

            Like

            • Pat Frederick says:

              not a link–just my personal experience. we live near the museum and every time we get visitors, they want to go see it. This past summer we went with my nephew and everything had changed. The glass making exhibition was twice as long as before because there were 2 narrators–the first in English, the second in Chinese. Every exhibit was like that–the market place was full to the brim and there were 5 tour buses in the parking lot. The kiosks in the cafeteria had chop sticks wrapped in napkins and we were hard pressed to find forks and spoons. All the signs inside the museum –above doorways, etc–were also in both languages.

              Liked by 2 people

              • WSB says:

                Really odd.

                I just heard that a new casino resort near our location in NYS just opened a week ago. One couple who went there today, just relayed that there wer busloads of Chinese.

                The owner is Chinese, but I still find it odd that there were busloads.

                Liked by 1 person

        • Jo says:

          WSB, I used to live in Upstate NY, so I’ve been to the Museum a few times, always took overseas visitors to see it too.

          Liked by 1 person

        • brh82 says:

          RevereWare WAS wonderful but is NOT the same anymore. I have some 60 years old and some 10 years old, a world of difference, produced in China now, I assume.

          Liked by 1 person

      • prenanny says:

        When my Mother and Sister decided they would replace their Revere ware with more “trendy” products I said HELL YES I want them ( got lecture about cursing from my Mother ). They are light weight and durable timeless products.
        A few years ago noticed that my Mother was not cooking as much anymore and I attributed that to the all too heavy pots and pans she had, got her a few pans that were much lighter and she cooks more often, hence eating better. Have to keep an eye on our elders!

        Liked by 2 people

  13. stats guy says:

    I read thru some of the transcript. Two thoughts. One is the arrogance of these pols in telling Trump to be careful wrt steel….as if Trump doesn’t know what an I-beam is. How stupid these pols are.

    Second, these are not Senators in any way, they are beaten men…they have themselves surrendered. Perhaps because the money is good…or perhaps they are just stupid. They list the reasons that we have to be ‘careful’. Well, most of these reasons are because of the Leviathan State has a policy of paying people not to work, or increasing the price of electricity because of Global Warming.

    These are policy decisions. So the eviros (or the unions) drive out steel…so at the end of the day someone is a fry cook. Policy decisions made over the last 30 years have trickle down effects and the hardest his are at the bottom.

    Honestly, Rs have always said that they are the Business Party. The Dems claim to represent the working man….but they’ve gone off the rails. Sadly, if the RINOs had a brain between them, they’d seize the opportunity to be the working class spokesman. Let the Left represent the oligarchs and monied interests.

    Sadly no. Trump is one of the few that gets it.

    Liked by 10 people

  14. We do NOT have a federal government, and Trump damn well knows it. We have a feral corporation of globalist traitors that have invaded EVERY aspect of our lives and need to be taken the *#%^ out of them. Period.

    And, here I go back to the feral “reserve”. Get rid of it now, or nothing has changed in the long run. 7 years left… until the globalists reverse everything done, unless we return to a constitutional republic not based on fiat currency and a manipulated credit economy.

    Not one of those sons of b!tches at that table “represents” any of us. Preaching to the choir, I know.
    The Founders did NOT form a nation where the federal “government” was responsible for providing Americans with jobs, nor perpetual leech payments, as you all know.

    Just get the *#%^ out of our way. Counting on President Trump to make that happen. Get ’em out, and take their coats and our money back from them.

    Liked by 14 people

  15. Beigun says:

    Johnson is Gilipollas Gordo

    Look the Corporate World over.

    The Real Titans worked their way up the chain, and that has not changed for a millennia.

    No matter the era, no matter the technology, the real Masters worked their way to the top.

    Same in China, Germany, Japan, England and Africa.

    America’s secret weapon is the greater opportunity of all to become the best.

    Manufacturing, making things, no matter cars or software.

    The best ride to the top, unless there is an unfair, corrupt competition.

    America has suffered a 60 year trade deficit with Japan, 30 year deficit with Korea, and 20 year deficit with China. And the Middle Class became a minority, Sen Johnson!

    American workers can outcompete their competition if given a “fair, open door” overseas.

    Unfortunately, foreign cash has usurped America’s workers by snookering the elite’s responsibility of Noblesse Oblige

    Liked by 6 people

  16. Joe says:

    I am a small business owner (started a heat treating facility) under Obama since 2014 pretty rough start. I have met with other larger manufactures and local and state entities and from my experience even at the local level, they don’t get it (or they do but only the cronyism). For example my city and county want to lure in manufacturing (composites) but they don’t support small business. They are after large corporations and this is how they do it. Large business comes in city, county, and state offer them performer tax credits. So they city, county, state get tax revenues and then turn around and give the companies tax breaks.

    Small business can’t compete with that.

    Utah is also Silicon Crazy and I assume giving huge tax credits to these corporations to move to Utah.

    Why the Hell is Mike Lee in the room? Besides being on the anti trust and other committees he has no business experience what so evar.

    I told my wife if Mittens runs for Senate here and wins I will challenge him during his next run.

    Would like to do it now. Word on the street is he is going to have a lot of finical backing. And for whatever cultural issims he is slated to win.

    Liked by 9 people

    • WesternWhere says:

      Every small town hero wants to land a white whale and they will destroy their own crew to achieve it.

      It is too bad that so few die in the process, life is just not closely imitating art closely enough.

      Like

    • Esperanza says:

      We’ve done that for decades, all the multi nationals do is hosepipe the subsidies, then move once they run out. It’s corporate welfare. The US auto bail out was a classic case. They took the money then left Detroit anyway.

      Liked by 3 people

    • brh82 says:

      Why are you not challenging Romney NOW!!!! Now, while all the Republicans HATE him for trash-talking about Trump. He is definitely running…and winning if no one challenges him. Once he becomes an incumbent, he will be in the Senate until he dies. You run! Treepers will broadcast your name all over Twitter and Facebook so you have name recognition galore. RUN!!!!!

      Liked by 4 people

  17. Maquis says:

    I read the transcript Sundance provided us. I was disgusted by both the lame “we can’t bring jobs back without starting an unnecessary trade-war” and all the “I don’t see National Security implications” crap, practically calling Trump a liar on the latter and naive on the former.

    These morons poured the lighter fluid on their own trousers and eagerly struck the Zippo PDJT lent them.

    GBPDJT
    🇺🇸

    Liked by 15 people

    • Esperanza says:

      We’re in a trade war. We’re losing. Not even turning up to fight. Our remaining industry is giant sucking sound to Germany because of the Euro.

      Liked by 6 people

      • Alligator Gar says:

        Esperanza, you are in France? I love France. It is my adopted 2d country, language, and culture. I have to say it greatly saddens me to hear my beloved France is in so much trouble. Here’s some hope and prayers for France to regain her sovereignty and pride.

        Like

    • grandmaintexas says:

      I read the transcript, too. It was stark. All there in black and white. Hating on the sell outs.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. FL_GUY says:

    Not having industry in the country is bad for National Security. The Globullists have gutted American manufacturing to the point that if there was a war, the USA would be SOL.

    WW2 was won because of our industrial base that allowed various industries to re-tool to make war materials. The skill was there. You had companies like Singer switching from sewing machines to rifles. Thanks to the lefty traitors, today, there is not enough skilled labor to do such things. I doubt that Singer even makes anything in the USA anymore.

    And, I still have roof problems from the two Mexicans that the local contractor sent out to replace the roof shingles after a hurricane. I was charged almost twice as much and got the crappiest job ever; the first time it rained, it leaked in places that never had leaks before. Bringing 3rd world country people in is NOT beneficial to the marketplace; they don’t have the skills and they have the work ethic of a quality job (the mess they left was awful all around the house). I imagine that contractor made an enormous profit on the roof job considering I’d accidentally gotten a quote for a re=shingle 2 weeks before the storm at 4,900. After the storm, they refused to honor the quote and raised the price to 8,500 (materials and labor didn’t go up that much in a few weeks) and sent a couple of men that could only speak 2 or 3 words of English. That was 14 years ago.

    I would like to see the CoC investigated and all these Senators and Congressmen investigated as to how much money the CoC and various corporations are “contributing” to their campaigns and possibly their personal bank accounts with insider trading, free vacations etc. I would like to expose them to We the People as to who they are REALLY working for in every detail. They are not only working against We the People, they are working against the security of the USA. Had it not been for our industrial might, Japan would rule the Pacific and Germany would have eventually taken over the USA.

    Liked by 8 people

    • Esperanza says:

      I got to the point in Paris where I wanted to apply the so-called “Moliere” clause. Nothing I did during the day, be it shops or work could I communicate with the people. Non spoke French. In Montmartre!

      Liked by 3 people

  19. Troublemaker10 says:

    There is also a sort of shift on the whole college vs trade thinking.

    ————-

    Fewer Americans value a college degree
    https://www.google.com/amp/www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2017/09/08/fewer-americans-value-college-degree.amp.html#ampshare=http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2017/09/08/fewer-americans-value-college-degree.html

    Excerpt:

    Jeff McKenna, a 32-year-old from Loveland, Colo., said he doesn’t believe college is worth the cost. Mr. McKenna went to a trade school, earning a certificate as a mechanic, and now earns a base salary of about $50,000 a year. He said he’s never gone three weeks without a job, including during the recession.

    “I have friends from high school that are making half what I’m making, and they went and got a four-year degree or better, and they’re still $50-, $60-, $70,000 dollars in debt,” Mr. McKenna said. “There’s a huge need for skilled labor in his country.”

    Liked by 12 people

    • Phooey says:

      It’s the worst time in history to go to college and only gets worse with each passing day, which is a shame for the people who legitimately should be there. It’s a bubble all around, too many loans –> too many students –> too expensive –> too much debt.

      The main winners are the schools, and not just the sleazy degree mills that advertise on TV. Your local State U is most likely “for-profit,” awash in cash, and building luxury on-campus apartments, nicer food courts than you see at major malls, and huge fitness centers with row after row of equipment and rock climbing walls — to compete with each other to get the next annual crop of suckers with guaranteed loans. Loans loans loans, they make the modern college world go round.

      Liked by 9 people

      • WesternWhere says:

        It is exactly as you describe. A travesty wrought by MBAs.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Esperanza says:

        Especially as all they “teach” you is SJW. As far as I can see no actual knowledge at all.

        Liked by 3 people

      • TheLastDemocrat says:

        When the legislators take a huge stream of economic activity, and divert it to be dedicated to paying for “college” for anyone able to graduate high school, two things happen:
        First, that economic force is shunted into doing something less productive than it would, left on its own.
        Second: when you build in an assured market, as is done by assuring student loans, you subsidize the education, which means you have guaranteed a market year after year. The end effect is prices RISE as potential buyers wander around with that $100,000 in pocket, to spend but only on “college.”

        This is like a gift card for one department store. I have some employees and one perk I give is gift cards – but I give the VISA or AmEx you can spend anywhere – versus tying the money to one store. The money gets deployed in the economy more productively – suiting the meeting of producer and customer more perfectly than if I forced the buyer into Outback Steakhouse or Target.

        My state school college tuition and fees was ONLY about $500 a year FULL TIME – at a great university. The steady, guaranteed income stream raised that an incredible amount.

        In the 1980s, they could deliver a college education for that cost. But with the steady stream, the university has to keep finding ways to claim they need to raise tuition, so they can grab their share of that dedicated stream of economic activity.

        Bottom line: we all need basic education in economics. When you subsidize something, the costs rise.

        Like

    • Jo says:

      There is a pretty decent Apprenticeship Program here in Australia, has been for decades, both my sons, now in their mid 40s used it, one as a Carpenter, then became a Builder & the other as an A Grade Mechanic, both 4 year courses.
      Their father before them, also did Carpentry & Joinery in a four year course, back in the late 60s.

      Like

    • brh82 says:

      $50,000 a year would be peanuts in many places. You certainly can’t own a home or feed a family on that.

      Like

  20. maiingankwe says:

    Ad rem,
    I think I’m in the bin again. I have no idea what’s going on, and my paranoia is about to go off the charts. Once I started watching Q videos and translations of what he’s been writing and poof all kinda of things going on with my phone. It doesn’t help that I’m not smart enough to fix it either. Now I know why people completely go off the grid. Don’t blame them, especially right now with my frustration.

    I will try a few more things on my end to see if it will work, but doubtful. My iPhone 6 is close to going in the bin itself. If so, just let it rot. Heck, stamp on it a few times for me, or take it out for target practice. Either way is good.

    Liked by 8 people

    • There’s a young man in my town that enjoys his life no matter what changes in the economy. His friends went to college after High School. He learned how to repair sewing machines. Hi friends laughed at him. But he’s his own boss. Works on his own schedule. Skateboards when he wants. A happy guy. I think he understands freedom more than a lot of his peers.

      Liked by 14 people

    • Ad rem says:

      I checked both of the bins, and I can’t find any missing posts. Sorry….perhaps it was in the spam bin, and it got deleted before I came on duty? Hey..you have an iPhone 6? I’m still making do with an old iPhone 4….LOL. Try not to be too frustrated….this bin stuff happens to everyone sooner or later. The problem is, once WordPress identifies your comment as spam, it will KEEP doing so unless we KEEP pulling them out. WordPress says their computers will eventually “learn” you are not spam. See…they’ve written an article about it. I know it’s long and boring…but just to show you that it’s for real….

      Akismet learns by those who mark comment spam as comment spam and legitimate spam is despammed. If your comments are being caught by Akismet, remove them from the Akismet Panel. It might take two or three times, but it will learn and automatically not designate your comments as spam.

      https://codex.wordpress.org/Combating_Comment_Spam

      Liked by 1 person

      • maiingankwe says:

        I had an iPhone 4, and did not want to give it up. I fought kicking and screaming and driving my Hubbie nuts to the point he said, fine, keep your 4 and I will give our daughter the 6. Get this, I said okay till we got to the store and I checked out the six. I figured what the heck, might as well.

        Thanks for the link. My paranoia also comes from almost every time I post something I get kicked out again, and if I want to post something else, I have to sign back in. Once in awhile it will keep me, so I can see if I have any replies, mostly no though. It’s frustrating having to sign in after each post, especially when I just have so much to say to the world. 🙃. It’s more than that though, I like to give a like to peoples comments, and I can’t do that unless I post something. If I try to sign in without a post, I disappear again and again and oh, bloody heck, it’s frustrsting as all get.

        I really appreciate you looking in both bins, now that was awesome. Let’s me know I’m in great hands here. I’ve been there more than once that’s for sure, and you always dig me back out, so thank you. As I tell the people I care about, have I told you how awesome you are lately? I cannot imagine what CTH would be like without you and our other fabulous moderators. Thank you for making this such a great place to be a part of. I really mean that. You so rock, Ad rem.
        Stay smiling, 😁
        Ma’iingankwe

        Liked by 1 person

  21. prenanny says:

    Poor useless junior casey. President TRUMP did not fall for his up-for-reelection-charade of caring about steel workers. Totally ZINGED him why didn’t the previous administration do anything ( about steel dumping your state your party ) ?
    LOU LOU LOU

    Liked by 3 people

  22. WesternWhere says:

    The jobs left by fiat.

    They can come back by fiat.

    Anyone who says otherwise is a liar or a fool.

    Liked by 8 people

  23. NewfTea says:

    The comments so far are right on.

    The lefties mock the sentiments on this page as primitive nativism. The so called conservatives slook down their noses at our lack of bipartisan sophistication.

    All have sold their souls to the devil, whether the spectre of “Social Justice” or the pseudo-con fantasy of “global economy.”

    Traitors and scum all of them. Bought and paid for, souls forfeit.

    Liked by 4 people

  24. Phooey says:

    Just a bunch of loud-mouth middle-men running their yaps while POTUS sizes them up and delivers a consistent message back to their bosses. Sadly, those bosses are not “we the people.”

    It sure is nice to have a builder in charge for a change. PDJT is building an economy, he’s building infrastructure, and he’s building a big beautiful Wall.

    Liked by 11 people

  25. georgiafl says:

    Sounds like Johnson just pocketed nice donations from the employers of the TPP and NAFTA lobbyists.

    As Sundance says, our Congress and Senate are just salesmen/women employed by their donors.

    Liked by 9 people

  26. fred5678 says:

    Too many lawyers (I have read that we have 70 times the ration of lawyers to population as Japan) and not enough welders.

    I am tutoring a 40 YO pipeline welder who is working 80 hours a week (!!) and is in line to get a promotion from a $19/hr to $30/hr if he passes the next welding test, which involves square-law equations, etc.

    And all the billboards are adds for personal injury lawyers.

    Liked by 13 people

    • fred5678 says:

      “ads” — it’s late

      Liked by 2 people

      • LafnH20 says:

        fred5678, would you happen to have a professional link or perhaps a company name for info on apprenticeshis, etc. Welding is an area of interest considering the President’s Infrastructure Plan.
        Business is going to be Booming once the weather warms in a couple months.
        Hope to get out in front of it..
        TY
        PS. Have MAGA, Will travel!!

        Liked by 4 people

        • prenanny says:

          Have you also looked into becoming a heavy machinery operator?
          Easier on your back in the long run 😉
          I would suggest calling and or visiting a few of your local firms and talk to their HR people, ask them where they hire from etc. Who knows they may hire you as a semi-skilled laborer and train you for better positions.
          Be sure to confirm cost of living prior to relocation a wage that sounds great where you live might be not so good in another location.
          Here is a link to pipeline jobs:
          http://atlanticsunriseexpansion.com/careers/

          Liked by 1 person

          • LafnH2O says:

            Thank You, prenanny, for the link.
            I have thought about heavy machinary. The trick for me is to position myself with a company “In the path” of progress”… Yet, be able to see the stars at night!!😁☄
            Definately, Agree, with the “Easier on your Back”😉
            ‘Preciate it!✌

            Like

        • fred5678 says:

          Sorry — no idea. I am just retired software engineer and now a part-time math tutor. He needs the math for his test. I know zilch about welding. Try Duckduckgo instead of google in your search

          Like

  27. georgiafl says:

    Sundance summarized the above article in a Twitter thread (and even included some cheesecake for the ladies!)

    Liked by 5 people

  28. LafnH20 says:

    SD, happened to see the last two pics in your post while rereading some of your past posts. (TY) Imho, the “Forgotten Men and Women” banner is the Best!

    With respect to the “first” pic above, and the comments from, Senator Johnson, Et al.,
    (About as Anti-MAGA/Tone Deaf as it gets!! Imho)
    If I may be so bold…

    (🦁) President Trump…

    banner.

    Because This…

    Have the Pachyderm(s)and the Donks(s) back to back.
    Perhaps tethered and pulling in opposite directions.
    Perhaps trying to pull…. MA GA apart

    …Isn’t Working

    Liked by 2 people

  29. fred5678 says:

    Is Johnson saying America can no longer compete by BUILDING STUFF and our citizens have to settle to be baristas??

    F U, Johnson.

    Liked by 10 people

  30. Texian says:

    Johnson listed the problems, and Sir Trump agreed wtih him “100%.”

    Sir Trump wants to fix the problems and restore America.

    Johnson doesn’t want it fixed, he has been selling out our Country and the People he is supposed to represent.. ‘Let them eat cake’ huh Johnson..

    Either way.. this situation is not going to last much longer..

    Liked by 3 people

  31. wheatietoo says:

    Pat Toomey was another one that showed his butt.
    His body language showed what a paid-off stooge he is.

    He was spouting useless, contrived statistics to support his position of “No we don’t need more steel production here.”
    He was saying that the demand for steel here is low, therefore we don’t need more production here.

    If we hadn’t lost our Heavy Industries to other countries…then our domestic demand for steel would be way higher than it is right now!

    I love our President.
    I love it that he said:
    “We cannot be without a steel industry. We cannot be without an aluminum industry.”

    I was also watching Wilburine during that meeting.
    He looked like he was getting teeth marks on his tongue and was wanting to tear into these weasels.

    Liked by 6 people

  32. I always thought the best dramatic portrayal of what scumbags these senators are is The Aviator. It depicts the interplay between Howard Hughes / Lockheed, Juan Trippe / Pan Am and Juan Trippe’s 25 cent you know what Senator Owen Brewster of Maine. SD is always talking about how senators never write the legislation, that it is written for them by lobbyists or multinationals. This is well depicted in The Aviator. Howard Hughes did an excellent job of exposing what a scumbag Brewster was; one can only hope that President Trump does the same thing to these senate fat cats.

    Liked by 2 people

    • RJ says:

      That movie is terrific. Smart example on your part, well done!

      Liked by 1 person

    • boogywstew says:

      Leonardo DiCaprio as Howard Hughes; Alec Baldwin as Juan Trippe; Alan Alda as Sen.Owen Brewster Great movie on every level! Howard Hughes showed a mastery over the talking heads during the portrayed Congressional hearings that will remind many of a Donald Trump. The dialog between Howard Hughes and Katherine Hepburn’s Socialist family is also fascinating. Cate Blanchett won one of the film’s 5 Oscars.

      Liked by 1 person

    • It is interesting to note that in The Aviator the dispute between Howard Hughes and Juan Trippe is not the archetypal financial capital (plutocrat) vs human capital (working man) situation. It is two rich guys having it out – but the result would have been Juan Trippe’s Pan Am having a monopoly on US-flagged trans-Atlantic passenger flight (bad news for consumers). The movie demonstrates with an historical example that even rich guys can be targeted for take-down by Washington – most treepers are well aware that Trump had been under permanent audit for the last fifteen years. Does anyone else here think Trump’s situation had to do with other well-known politicians that – like Senator Brewster – had connections with the state of Maine?

      Like

  33. Troublemaker10 says:

    Liked by 9 people

  34. andi lee says:

    It was very worthwhile watching the entire meeting.
    The US deficit to China, Mexico and Canada did catch me by surprise. $70B to Mexico?

    Liked by 3 people

  35. Joe says:

    This is one of the most important articles you will read on Conservative Treehouse. Thank you for this sundance. The globalist elites have been working overtime to tear down our country.

    Liked by 9 people

  36. scott467 says:

    Suppose you own and operate a hydroelectric dam. One day, hundreds of miles upstream, a previously dormant volcano erupts, or a mountain collapses, or an earthquake occurs, some natural event permanently alters the course of the flowing water, so that it is no longer directed to the reservoir behind your hydroelectric dam.

    The reservoir dries up. No more water flow means no more electricity, which means no more money.

    You have two options:

    1) spend hundreds of billions of dollars to dig a canal for hundreds of miles to re-route the water flow BACK to your reservoir, which includes purchasing land all along the way, from both private landowners (who may not sell) and the federal government. It could take decades to secure the rights to dig your multi-hundred mile canal.

    or

    2) you can spend a fraction of that amount (and finance it) and build a NEW hydroelectric dam at the new location where the water flows to NOW. You can build it in under two years and transport most of the power generating equipment to the new site.

    Which one makes more sense? Which one is going to generate revenue faster?

    .

    Suppose you are a farmer, and your fields are in a great plain between two mountain ranges. One day, the earth’s axis tilts a different direction, and now the sun rises in the north and sets in the south, blocking the sunlight to your field for roughly 2/3rds of the day.

    Are you going to waste hundreds of billions of dollars trying to fix the tilt of the earth’s axis back to the way it used to be?

    Or are you going to adapt to the new conditions, and purchase a new field to grow crops, where the sunlight isn’t blocked by the mountain ranges?

    These multinational corporations and the CoC are trying to put toothpaste back in the tube. The paradigm has already changed. The best thing they can do, both time and money-wise, is to reorient their business plans to take advantage of the new landscape, instead of trying to go back in time to the way things used to be.

    Things change.

    Yeah, it’s a pain, and it happens to everybody, you’re not special.

    Welcome to the world.

    Liked by 5 people

  37. anthony earl says:

    think Trump just secured his position in 2020 with this setup and just put a big hurt on those who disagreed. are any of those guys up for reelection in 2018?

    Like

  38. georgiafl says:

    American Citizen Workers would like a word with the Senators.

    Liked by 10 people

  39. ADDgolfer says:

    Johnson’s statement: “…For a host of reasons, we tell our kids you have to get a four-year degree. We pay people not to work. So we do need to be concerned about, in such a tight labor market, do we have enough workers in manufacturing…”

    Is actually true, Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs fame (the guy is actually quite smart) has been working his part in front of Congress, speaking at manufacturing meetings etc. He claims we are near 5 million workers short of what is needed. This before the recent headline of more companies building plants here.
    President Trump has mentioned it occasionally but I have yet to see or hear any serious push on broadening vocational schools and training.

    Liked by 1 person

    • CirclinTheDrain says:

      Of course it’s true. We either push kids to go to college for useless degrees (daughter of a friend is graduating this year with a degree in American Studies!! whatever that is) or we put the ones who would excel in a trade on Ritalin/Adderal and they learn to love self-medicating, so they become unemployable.

      We need to make vocational/trade schools great again !

      Like

  40. Atticus says:

    Having spent 40 years in Aerospace, I can assure America’s youth that they can make a very good living in “the trades”.

    Liked by 6 people

  41. KBR says:

    As of yet, nobody is mentioning textiles.
    I guess we will have new infrastructure, new weapons, new Made in USA everything, but no clothing, blankets, towels, sheets, coats that are Made in USA.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      I hope your are wrong. I would like to buy real Made in USA clothing again. It is such an adventure to buy something like, oh let’s say a new blouse. I get one in the size I wear, and look for the same blouse in a couple sizes up and a couple sizes down because hey, size seems to be what is that lefty expression? Oh, a social construct. Meaningless, in other words.

      When stuff was Made in the USA I could pretty well depend that if I picked something in my size, it was going to actually BE in my size with very little variation. Now it is a crap shoot.

      Liked by 3 people

  42. Jim says:

    Enjoyed this in its entirety. Every Repub Sen here opposed what Trump is proposing. Blunt, Lee, Portman but notably Toomey, former head of COC I believe? Was squirming and rolling his eyes the whole time Trump spoke. I got the sense they were pissed off their lobbyists were unsuccessful at getting to the President on economic nationalism. This is an issue he’s well versed in having spoken about this for 40 years. I found myself agreeing with Wyden and Casey as well. Also note when Trudope came to the US to lobby on NAFTA he met with COC controlled Repub Senators exclusively.

    Liked by 2 people

  43. TAS says:

    Johnson says,
    “For a host of reasons, we tell our kids you have to get a four-year degree. We pay people not to work. So we do need to be concerned about, in such a tight labor market, do we have enough workers in manufacturing.”

    Does this brainwashed moron not understand that he was once one of those kids? Does he not understand that he was also pushed to get a degree instead of a JOB? Ironically, he also is paid not to work!

    I remember the first time I heard the term “service economy”. What’s the root word of service? It’s SERVE. I understood then the plan was to make servants of the US population.

    Johnson is a product of that plan and was placed in a position to see that it continues. President Trump has opened a lot of eyes to what the globalist were doing to our country. Time to stop this crime!

    Liked by 4 people

  44. David Goodspeed says:

    Good bye Ron….seeeeeeya…..!

    (In hell preferably)

    Liked by 1 person

  45. RJ says:

    Pay close attention to the wording, sentence structure and overall directions these politicians take in taking with the President. Note how some “play” to the cameras and in essence bloviate. What I took away is how many of these “lawyer schooled” pols know very little on business demonstrated by their lack of “business language” in the remarks.

    Business people, real business leaders, cut to the chase and talk numbers with relationships wherein they then put forth proposals to move in the direction they seek.

    Too many lawyers have been elected to powerful political stations in our government.

    Liked by 1 person

  46. These are difficult issues. Protectionism is a poor substitute for addressing the real problems that have made it uneconomical to manufacture here, or to hire a lot of people here, as opposed to overseas. We probably don’t want to relax pollution standards to resemble those of China, because we like clean air, but we could get rid of the dumbest regulations (as Trump is apparently doing). We could stop mandating health insurance on employers. And we could end discrimination lawsuits. And every state could become a right-to-work state. Lowering corporate taxes (which Trump has done), also helps. There are social costs for giving up on the things that have driven up the expense/risk of employing Americans, but the absence of those kinds of risks/expenses is part of why poor countries get all of the manufacturing jobs under free trade. As things stand now, it is like a competitive sport in which the foreign team gets to wear light uniforms and the American players have to wear a backpack full of heavy stones. Removing our own stones, to the extent feasible, is a better than adding stones to the other team. One alternative is to even things up with tariffs, but that is doomed to failure because consumers can’t pay $1500 for a simple lawnmower, and nobody hires to make things that consumers won’t buy. Plus you get retaliatory tariffs that kill exports. On the other hand, the threat of tariffs, if used wisely, might encourage other countries to go easier on us.
    One final point on $1500 lawnmowers, though. I wouldn’t mind paying an extra $100 for an average lawnmower if I could get one with decent wheels. The cheap garbage plastic wheels found on all of the box-store imports are very bothersome. I’m not sure why the quality of materials found in so many manufactured goods has been sacrificed, or why we’ve switched from quality goods that are worth repairing to cheaper items that one simply replaces every few years. I wish that wasn’t so, but suspect that we can’t legislate a solution.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Madison Grant says:

      What do lawnmowers cost where you live? They already cost $1500 in Georgia and have for quite some time. That’s the thing about globalist free trade. It was sold to us on the promise that it would make things cheaper, but it hasn’t. Whatever advantages in overhead it gives to corporations, they just stick in the pockets of their executives or use to lobby politicians to make their deal even sweeter. Globalism has never been a good faith operation with the American people. Its goal has always been to widen the wealth gap, concentrate power in fewer hands, and end with a two class society, essentially feudalism. It may be working well for corporations, but the common man is sick of it, and is no longer willing to sacrifice his freedom and national sovereignty to just be a good sheep, trust our superiors, and go along.

      Liked by 3 people

      • georgiafl says:

        Needs repeating – “Globalism has never been a good faith operation with the American people.”

        Like

      • boogywstew says:

        I bought a gasoline powered 20 inch push mower from Walmart in 2004 for $99 + tx. and before I ever started it I filled it with synthetic oil. It spends every winter underneath an outside set of stairs. I replaced the wheels with bigger ones from a lawn mower waiting for the trash truck. I’ve since replaced 1 of the “borrowed” wheels and put used handle bars on it and aside from routine service it’s still running strong. The engine is a Briggs and Stratton 4HP.

        Liked by 1 person

      • snarkybeach says:

        in the globalist view, America pays more to subsidize the rest of the world.

        Like

    • TheLastDemocrat says:

      Kent – good rant.
      I agree about employer-sponsored health care.
      The pre-tax deal should be ended.
      The pre-tax deal means that large employers get a great deal, and smaller employers, and the self-employed, get a very bad deal.
      Also, the pre-tax deal means that there is a huge pot of money sitting there for each employee, dedicated to ONLY health care spending – AND the employee has almost no knowledge of how and when to spend it, and spending it is a wink-and-a-nod deal between provider and insurance plan – those two parties decide how to grab as much of that pile of money without pissing off the employee – THIS is why health care costs keep rising.

      If we ended pre-tax employer-sponsored health plan, health plans would have to compete for business individual by individual, family by family, as is done with home insurance, auto insurance. Each of us would see/feel our rates, versus the one-size-fits all rate applied across all employees.

      Then, let us enter our premium payments into a single line in our tax reform, and drop that expense from our taxable income. Viola! Pre-tax health insurance premiums!

      The pre-tax health insurance deal was established circa WWII – fed government locked wages, but large employers got this perk in order to compete for labor by offering health insurance as part of the compensation package. Plus, it drew female workers into the labor force, when more laborers were needed for war effort.

      That law thus has nothing to do with getting people to be covered by health care. Wage Stabilization Act of 1942, plus a couple other fed actions.

      Like

    • georgiafl says:

      Wheels can be a problem with all equipment.

      I have had to replace wheels on a several of pieces of equipment with skateboard acrylic wheels. So far, my mower’s wheels look OK – they look like rubber, not plastic.

      Our Hoyer lift wheels degraded – and fell apart – and that was indoors and the original wheels also marked the floors. So did the Schwinn AirDyne wheels. I replaced both of those with clear acrylic skater wheels which are great, quiet and don’t mark floors.

      I had to replace the wheels on my convertible dolly with wheels from Home Depot.

      Some of my older office chairs have black wheels that marked the tile floors. I’d like to replace all those wheels with acrylic.

      Maybe we could check the wheels on items and make them replace them before we buy if we don’t think they will hold up or will mark your floors.

      Citizens arise – demand quality wheels!

      Like

  47. Teacherofenglish says:

    It’s pretty rich that so many are concerned about Russian interference in the elections. It’s effect is minuscule when compared to the harm these business-first Republicans are doing to their own chances of holding office.

    Like

  48. Madison Grant says:

    You know what makes no sense? Running up $100,000 in student debt only to find out you can’t get paid anymore with the useless degree you got than if you just entered the fulltime workforce out of high school. This is why millenials all over the country are falling for the Bernie kool aid.

    Like

  49. Pat Frederick says:

    here’s my 2 cents: when i graduated high school, i did so at the top of my class–i turned down a merit scholarship because college did not really interest me. I got a job at a factory 2 days later–sewing (one of my passions) children’s robes and pajamas. In the 70’s-80’s I made $12.75 an hour doing piece rate and I LOVED it. (that was awesome money back then). I even decided to go to evening college to earn a degree–still sewing during the day. Then NAFTA was enacted and Mexico began flooding the markets with less expensive garments. Our little factory closed.

    I was eligible for “retraining” and I took computer classes and got work in accounting. And guess what? I never made more than $12.75 an hour. And I still sew.

    There is something very satisfying about making something with your hands–it’s not for everyone, sure, but it can be so rewarding.

    Liked by 9 people

    • KittyKat says:

      like

      I liked it when the USA produced its own textiles. Even garments Made in the USA are today manufactured with cloth woven in China — and don’t get me started on “buggy” cloth. I have seen bedbugs in clothing stores and also in shoe stores.

      Trade with India will bring a whole new level of garments disintegrating after three washes.

      Like

      • Pat Frederick says:

        so glad I sew…I made my own wedding gown, made a three piece for my first husband and continue to make a lot of my shirts and blouses today…at a fraction of what you’ll find in stores and they fit.

        Like

        • KittyKat says:

          Sewing takes a lot a patience. My mother was a sewer, not only clothes for herself and me, but also curtains, drapes, cushions, bedspreads , etc. When she downsized from her house to an apartment in her eighties, she made all the drapes.

          Do you order your fabrics online?

          Like

          • Pat Frederick says:

            I do not order on line because I like to see the true colors of what i’m buying. I shop at the fabric store an hour away from us. I prefer cottons for my clothes and quilts and as such I rarely throw anything away–i repurpose them into quilts, crafts, costumes. I once made seat covers for my cousin’s old Reliant…

            Like

      • Bendix says:

        Yes, when a GAP store in NYC has a bedbug infestation, in a place where NOBODY LIVES, that should tell people where the problem is coming from.
        The MSM likes to pretend it’s a mystery.
        BTW, there is an entire unit of law enforcement devoted to looking for counterfeit designer merchandise coming in, but as far as looking for the buggy or toxic, naw, we can’t afford that.

        Like

  50. KittyKat says:

    Another group that’s been abused by regressive global manufacturing is the consumer. There’s high end luxury and low end crap and nothing in between.

    The consumer mindset has regressed — people who grew up being able to buy moderately priced quality merchandise now live with the expectation that they are buying garbage — every buy is a risk: appliances, clothing, textiles, furniture , etc.

    I am so over wanting to spend money on crap.

    Liked by 26 people

    • obamaclaus says:

      Agree, and I have saved a ton of money due to lack of quality merchandise.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Fe -- y Esperanza says:

      You nailed it. In manufacturing, “Made in China” = “You’ve been betrayed by your elected representatives, sucker.” Buy it, install it, and wait for it to fail. In software, the high tech traitors (Bug Gates, Jeff Bugos, Mark Zuckerbug, et al) bribed Congress to allow them to replace American workers with obsequious Indians (the H1BeGones). Even if you don’t work in software, try buying a house when you’re competing with an extra hundred thousand non-citizen home buyers in your market. The consumer and the worker have been betrayed by the Uniparty. That these SOBs are so *arrogant* and out of it they go on camera and tell the voters to enjoy the privilege of being a slave to their machinations must just amaze Trump. God bless the President and keep him safe from harm. May his enemies and ours wail and nash their teeth as they watch their ill-gotten gains vanish.

      Liked by 11 people

    • Daniel says:

      When times were harder, I had to make more careful choices. I learned useful lessons such as knowing what I can do without and actually be happier without. I cut the cord on TV long ago and that included NFL. I am definitely happier without them.

      Liked by 5 people

    • NC Nana says:

      Sen. Johnson we are more than ready to buy products made in the USA if they can bring the quality back. Bring in the “high paid” American worker. Our experience is they are the best.

      We had our Maytag washer 20 some years. We only bought a new washer because I was tired of the avocado green color. We gave the avocado green washer to my brother-in-law and he used it until he got tired of the color.

      I learned a valuable lesson though. We bought a washer with a computer panel to replace the Maytag. It was a “high end” washer with a big price tag. The computer panel failed in a little over a year. It cost more to replace the computer panel than to buy a new washer. So we bought a machine with a manual control. It was still running well when we sold the washer with the house.

      In the last 15 years we have had 3 washers. The last tale of woe was a Samsung washer that we paid top price for. It has been recalled by Samsung. There have been instances where the top flies off in the spin cycle. We close the door and stay out of the room when it running.

      Bring the American worker back with the American work ethic. We’ll get quality again.

      Liked by 8 people

      • Mk10108 says:

        I’ve replaced 5 toilet seats in as many years however get this. They were from an American company name but made in China. All door knobs in my new constructed house have failed, why…plastic internal parts made in China. Just bought a retractable sink faucet, internal plastic molded seam failed. Company sent a completely new unit, not the part that failed. When a company sends you an entire faucet to replace a small part that means the cost is so low they can afford to do it.

        What Johnson is saying to Trump is they do not want to do the heavy lift bringing jobs backs. Why is the entire education system gear for four years of college, reason it benefits education sector that claims a value which doesn’t exist. It loads students with debt, then government polices allowing H1B’s to lower wages. The money drain on the individual is complete. Just as low quality parts drain the consumers wallet. Think if your washer fails every three years and buying a new one keeps repeating the sales cycle.

        Liked by 6 people

        • KittyKat says:

          I bought a very comfortable Lane recliner that didn’t look like a recliner, but the most vital part of the reclining mechanism, which I could not replace, was made of plastic and it broke after about a year of use. For the sake of one little part, the whole chair had to be sacrificed. If that part had been metal the chair would have lasted forever, but its life was short. I used to enjoy shopping, now I hate it. It’s no fun any more, just stress and worry about the merchandise.

          Like

          • Bendix says:

            L.L. Bean has tightened up its perhaps overly generous return policies. People were returning too much overly worn merchandise, they say.
            That may be true, but if they didn’t have to deal with people exchanging the new merchandise so frequently, as it wears out so much faster than it used to, this change would not be necessary.
            There goes that reputation.

            Like

      • hoghead says:

        My brother worked for a financial subsidiary of General Electric; as such, he was allowed to purchase a GE refrigerator with an employee discount. Within five years he needed to replace the door hinges…they were made of plastic! Really? Are we cutting costs by cutting the essential? What does that do to your good reputation? So stupid.

        Liked by 1 person

        • KittyKat says:

          Stupid is the word. Especially since it is going backward to lower standards.

          Like

        • kaste668 says:

          Just today……My Samsung Refrigerator is 9 years old, it was a top line model, now it is going to be $300+ dollars to replace a fan, which was also replaced when it was under warranty, which means in less than 9 years 2 fans…. . when we called the appliance guy, he said “this is known to be a problem with this model”. Everything is disposable and they truly want you to junk it and buy new. If a company is “made in America” all the parts need to be made in America.

          Liked by 1 person

      • 7delta says:

        NC Nana, I identify with your washer woes. Maytag to Samsung. Also had electronic panels issues. When the Samsungs went wacky…again…the repair guy we normally call was on vacation. He kindly returned our call and suggested another guy.

        This guy was an experience unto himself. He strode in like a banty rooster, wearing a red “Make America Great Again” hat. Nice guy, informative and very entertaining. He asked about the age and history of repairs on both machines, then said, “If it was me, I’d go git new ‘uns. My friends ask me why I tell people that, ’cause it’s money outta my pocket, but I tell people ’cause it’s the truth. It don’t matter if you pay 3 thousand dollars for a set or 300.  They ain’t gonna last but around 7 years now. I’ll do what you want, but I’d go buy cheap ones, then when they start having trouble…throw ’em out, git new ‘uns.”   

        He had a lot to say about “things.” Progressives would think him an ignorant, redneck bitter clinger, but I’d put his knowledge of how things really work, his ability to quote straight from verifiable sources (very well read) and his common sense up against them any day. He’d run rings around them. Most interesting and entertaining repair job I’ve ever had.

        We ended up buying Speed Queen. Not the cheapest, but made in the U.S., internal parts are all metal, the control panel is push button, but not electronic, and has a very good warranty. To replace the control panel is less a 100 bucks and covered for 5 years under the warranty. So far, so good.

        We’re remodeling the kitchen now and some other areas. It was past time. After having un-repairable electronic panel problems with the GE frig and Kitchen Aid oven panels, because they can’t be repaired, due to design, our priority in picking new appliances was made in the U.S., no plastic parts (as possible) and no electronics. 

        Liked by 1 person

        • Those counter top toaster ovens last 2 years…that’s it. My last one, an Oster, lasted 2.5 years, but it had a five year warranty on it. They sent me a new oven, but they only have 1 year warranties on them now…gee, I wonder why? I do all of my baking on these as I am a one person household, big oven wastes too much energy, not needed. I can cook half a turkey in the size I buy.

          Liked by 1 person

          • 7delta says:

            My mother-in-law used a counter top toaster oven. It worked well for her too. Now that you mention it, every few years, that was what she wanted for Christmas.

            Like

        • Pat Frederick says:

          My husband had a Maytag washer when we married, and he’d had it for a few years before that. We’re married 27 years and we still have it! Dryers? OMG…every 4-5 years they need replacing.

          Liked by 1 person

          • 7delta says:

            If my repairman is accurate about current washer/dryer longevity, and from my experience, I’d say he’s pretty darn close, then you couldn’t replace your old Maytag with anything near its quality. That shouldn’t be the case. It’s not like long-lasting appliances can’t be made, but quality is apparently far less important than quantity. I hope your old washer keeps on going for another 27 years. 

            Like

        • corimari2013 says:

          Yes, 7delta, Speed Queen is a solid and durable choice.
          A few years ago, our daughter purchased a new front-loading high-efficiency washer. She had to run each load through two wash cycles to get things clean.
          Something else broke on it early on, and she was so fed up and wanted the piece of junk out of her sight quickly, that she had it hauled out to the curb to be picked up by whoever wanted it.
          She purchased a Speed Queen washer, and has been happy and trouble-free for over ten years now.

          Liked by 1 person

          • 7delta says:

            We bought the Speed Queen washer and dryer late summer of 2016, right before the election. They’ve been great. Right now, they’re stored and we’re using the ones in the rental we’re in while our house is undergoing remodeling.  The rental house ones work, but that’s about the best thing I can say for them.  I’m encouraged to hear your daughter’s washer has lasted so long. I hope I last long enough in this rental to get home to compete with her record. 

            Like

        • pacnwbel says:

          7Delta, good to read about your experiences. The showroom manager advised us to get the Speed Queen washer to replace our long time old faithful Maytag when it finally seized up. So far so good with the SQ.

          Liked by 1 person

          • 7delta says:

            We’ve been very pleased with ours so far. We got ours from friends who own an appliance store. They sell different lines, but the sales guy who showed me what they had was really positive about Speed Queen. He said they rarely, if ever, had anyone who had trouble with them and couldn’t recall anyone ever being dissatisfied with either the washer or dryer. That, and Speed Queen’s features, helped me decide.

            I’m glad to hear your experience has been good so far too. We may need to start a Speed Queen Club. I’m already competing with Corimari’s daughter for how long those babies will run.

            Like

      • Do not buy Samsung anything except phones; they have serious issues with many appliances and their customer service is almost none existent. I would not buy any appliance with an electronic control panel; go knobs. Hard to find a washer that actually washes clothes…go high end, at least they use water.

        I bought a down pillow at Target; their brand is Fieldcrest. I did not realize it was made in China or I would not have bought it. I used it for about 3 weeks before I realized it was poisoning me…they must spray it with some kind of chemical. My eyes were hurting and my muscles were weakening…I hike a lot and I am in good shape. One time I went out for a hike and the muscle in my leg started to give out while going up hill…freaked me out. I knew something was wrong. Removed the pillow; threw in trash…I am now back to perfect health. Just a warning….

        Like

      • NC Mom says:

        Nana…truer words were never spoken! When I bought my condo from the 93 y.o. original owner…she left behind her FORTY TWO year old Maytag washer and dryer!! I had used the same model when my grown daughter was a baby for diapers. I did not have time to shop to replace them so I started using them. THAT WAS FOUR YEARS AGO. First thing I noticed…my clothes come out WHITER…gray gone. Meanwhile my daughter bought Samsung w/d with all the bells and whistles…awful! The clothes DO NOT GET CLEAN. Using every kind of prewash cleaner….spots do NOT come out. However one cycle through the Maytags…and presto…spic and span. BTW out of curiosity I did an online search for my Maytags…and they have a FAN CLUB. They have been lovingly dubbed “The Tank” and folks ACTIVELY look to buy them! That repair guy is still the loneliest man in town!!

        Liked by 1 person

    • mopar2016 says:

      Ron Johnson is a RINO just like Juan McCain.
      And together they’re pushing for a bill (S.140) that would bring 500 thousand foreign workers into our country EVERY YEAR ongoing. They don’t really work for us, they’re obviously owned by other interests.

      https://thenewantifederalist.com/2017/06/senators-mccain-johnson-introduce-unconstitutional-treasonous-immigration-bill/

      Liked by 3 people

    • Victoire2020 says:

      Agree! We’ve been through 3 refrigerators and 2 washing machines in 10 years! And there are many more examples of smaller electronics & goods!

      Liked by 1 person

    • doit4atlas says:

      It’s ALL disposable…nothing lasts, absolutely nothing.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Bendix says:

      Clothing is another area – oh how wonderful, we don’t have to enter the “bricks and mortar” stores.
      Yes you do, if you want to know whether what you order actually fits, and looks like what it is represented as, even if you are buying the same garment in the same brand and even the same color you bought before.
      Then it’s a trip back to the store anyway, unless you want to pay to return the junk.
      Stores like Macy’s have removed the petite sizes from their stores. As we get more and more “diverse”, even the mid-range clothing stores are selling overpriced, S-M-L junk that fits no one.

      Like

      • Somebody says:

        The clothes we get these days are so thin too. The tee shirts get holes in no time, denim jeans are nowhere near the weight and quality they once were. Everything is made of such poor quality and thin material it doesn’t last. There will be no vintage clothing stores in the future, nothing will last that long!

        Liked by 1 person

    • dbethd says:

      My husband installed some outdoor lights and after two weeks the lights burned out. Grandma came over to visit and asked why. My 4yr old said “It was made in China.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • flova says:

        Lol.

        Don’t get me started on how many vacuum cleaners we’ve been through. I now scour the thrift stores in my area for old ones. I make sure they work as the owners don’t mind me fiddling with them. We have an old electrolux now from thrift store, paid 5 bucks and it’s great. And I don’t feel ripped off.

        Liked by 1 person

    • PS says:

      Just had a dinner table discussion on this topic last night, on L L Bean discontinuing their lifetime replacement policy. My mother-in-law remarked, well, that’s because they know that their quality isn’t what it used to be, so the product is simply not going to last. And that’s the same with Craftsman, Levi’s, you name it American brands. I’ve noticed it in shoes, the heals wear faster or they come apart at the sides. Why stitch 3 times when you can save money on fewer stitches, a thinner thread, cheaper fabric, etc. Everything is a race to the bottom. We have it in our mindset that cheaper means getting more for our money. But what good is it when you save 25% to give up 50% of the lifespan?

      Don’t get me wrong, low cost goods have allowed more people in this country to access more *stuff* than previous generations have ever imagined. Our poor in the USA “get by” with what would be luxuries in India. But all this low-cost crap has really changed the way that we shop. Low cost lets you carry more inventory, which makes it easier for online stores to have a “wider selection”, but what are you really getting? 100 copies of the same spatula, all from India and China. But that’s what the customer wants, or is told they want.

      Maybe it’s masking a problem. Wages have not really increased, and unless you had a 401k, you aren’t really accessing this stock market run-up over the last year. People think that buying short-term gets more stuff, when we should all be thinking long-term. But the system hasn’t been thinking long-term for 20 years. We’re all trying to extend our current dollar, so logically that means try to get a comparable good at a lower price. But lowest price does not equal lowest total cost.

      Like

    • corimari2013 says:

      You are exactly right, KittyKat, and I thank you for your post.

      The places I used to purchase clothing for myself and for our grandchildren have been steadily reducing the quality of their once nicely-made and durable merchandise.
      If you purchase a new refrigerator, the salesperson will openly admit to you that the appliance is not expected to last more than 10 years.
      We have a refrigerator we purchased in 1993. It is still doing the job.
      We have a washer and dryer set we purchased in 1977. They are still doing the job. My husband has been able to make simple repairs and replace parts on them a few times because their mechanisms are basic, simple, and accessible.

      Many of you will remember Marshall Field & Company. The man that began that wholesale and retail business insisted on bringing good quality merchandise to people of ALL socioeconomic levels. He refused to sell inferior products at inflated prices, just to make a buck. He passed on this philosophy to the men who ran Field’s after his death.
      I have just finished reading this book, and I highly recommend it to you:
      Marshall Field’s: The Store that Helped Build Chicago by Gayle Soucek

      America needs merchants and wares like this again.
      We do not have to settle for crap at high prices–crap that won’t last.

      Liked by 1 person

      • pacnwbel says:

        Just remembering our Bakerator freezer we purchased in 1971 at a used appliance store. It was not a thing of beauty but it functioned well. It had a generous capacity, never once needed a service call. We parted company with it in 2003 when we moved house. It went on to yet another life on a farm.Goodness only knows how old it was.

        Liked by 1 person

    • dawndoe says:

      Exactly, Kitty Kat. When I look at reviews for small and major appliances I am looking to purchase, i see reviews like, “well I got at least four years out of it!” And they are happy with that. Sorry but I can’t afford to be buying a new fridge or washer and dryer or have major repairs done every 4-6 years. My dryer is 30 years old! I’m on my 3rd washer. My first one lasted 18 years. I’m on my 3rd fridge in 32 years. The first one lasted about 15-18 years (can’t remember exactly). These are brands like Maytag, GE, Samsung, etc.

      Liked by 1 person

      • steph_gray says:

        This thread has me thinking about what they call “sustainability.” What the leftists mean by it is of course its opposite, as most of their Orwellian newspeak is.

        My own example is actually dental. I have several metal fillings that have been in my teeth and doing their jobs since they were installed by dental students at a Saturday morning college clinic for $7 each (I remember my dad bringing me to a big room full of dental chairs to get the fillings). This would have been oh, about 55 years ago.

        I got a new composite filling a few years ago and it popped out on its own in 6 months. It was fixed, and is working now, but – come on!!

        The comments above about the use of metal in products with high stress points seem related!

        Liked by 1 person

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