Sunday Talks: White House Signals Support For Ted Cruz “Consumer Choice” Healthcare Amendment…

It’s challenging to see the sunlight at the end of this complex tunnel, but it’s there. More visible today than a week ago.

White House Legislative Affairs Director Marc Short appears on Fox News Sunday to discuss the ongoing efforts to reform ObamaCare.  In a very positive shift amid the overall discussion, for the first time the point of the cost on the individual insurance market is brought to the forefront.

CTH readers will note our continuing frustration that 99% of the entire healthcare discussion has centered around medicaid spending, or the state funded subsidy of low-income healthcare coverage.

The vast majority of the most severely impacted people within the discussion, middle-class workers/taxpayers who do not qualify for medicaid, have been essentially locked out of the legislative consideration. It is refreshing to see middle America finally being part of the equation.  Within the Senate bill, Ted Cruz and Mike Lee have finally advanced something of value.

The “Consumer Choice Amendment” would allow insurance companies to sell plans that do not follow regulations created under Obamacare, with the caveat that those insurers have to sell at least one plan that adheres to Obamacare’s mandates. The proposal would allow insurers to sell plans with tailored benefits.

(Video Below)

The Cruz amendment doesn’t impact those on medicare or medicaid (mandated types of coverage by government), and follows the basic premise we previously outlined in the parallel approach seemingly structured within the Trump Team’s overall outlook.

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This approach has the hallmarks of a compromise that can meet almost everyone’s needs.  Though the sticky parts are always in the details.

(Via Washington Times) […] Several conservative groups said that if they have to live with the Senate bill, it had better include Cruz’s amendment.

“If we insist on this half measure, then we should have the amendment,” said Jason Pye, director of public policy for the Koch-backed conservative group FreedomWorks during a call Friday.

Cruz had been meeting with GOP leadership on the amendment and said earlier this week he thinks the idea is gaining momentum.

But Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., said that there are concerns about sharing the risk between the plans that don’t have to meet Obamacare, which likely would be cheaper, with the plans that do.

The amendment would let insurers sell plans that don’t comply with Obamacare’s insurance mandates such as covering essential health benefits and community rating, which prevents insurers from charging sick people more money.

But insurers have to offer some plans that do comply with the requirements.

The amendment was sent to the Congressional Budget Office as part of the full Senate bill to determine the impact on premiums, the deficit and insurance coverage, according to sources familiar with the matter.

The amendment is a compromise between conservatives who want to repeal the law’s mandates and centrists worried about affordable coverage for people with pre-existing conditions.

It remains under “serious discussion” by Senate GOP leadership, said Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., in an interview with the Washington Examiner. Meadows is chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, a faction of about three dozen conservative lawmakers.

Senate lawmakers are not likely to use a provision sponsored by Rep. Tom MacArthur, R-N.J., a top member of the House moderate faction, that would have allowed the states to repeal many Obamacare mandates.

That’s okay, Meadows said, even though the MacArthur amendment was needed to attract enough GOP votes to pass the House.

“We have to have either the Cruz amendment or the MacArthur amendment, or something that does a similar thing in reducing premiums,” Meadows said.

In an interview with the Washington Examiner, MacArthur said he accepts the Senate approach, which would significantly loosen Obamacare’s existing state waiver requirements.

Meadows noted that the Senate bill isn’t likely to change in the House before a vote on final passage.

“There is 75 percent chance that whatever passes the Senate comes here for an up or down vote,” Meadows said. (link)

It is not my intention to debate the arguments or merit of legislation, only to point out the logical pathway if people hang tough, support President Trump and stay out of the traps laid by special interests (and their special-interest paid troll army).

There’s a parallel, comparative and representative example of what President Trump’s smart policy team is trying to do with healthcare; it lies within another set of economic policy objectives.  However, it takes elevation in thinking to understand the approach.

The comparative example is within the banking and finance industry.

For those who have read all the statements, watched the hearings, listened intently to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, you might have already noted their approach to working around the ridiculously burdensome Dodd Frank regulations within the banking and finance sector. – OUTLINED HERE

Essentially, instead of trying to untangle all the complexities of decades long DC constructs enmeshing and enlarging the bureaucracy around banking, Trump’s team is constructing a parallel system.  Cliff Noted for Brevity:

[…] The goal of a 21st Century “Glass Steagall”, ie. Commercial division -vs- Investment division, is created by generating an entirely new system of banks under different regulation. The currently remaining ten U.S. “big banks” operate as “investment division banks” per se’, and the lesser regulated community banks/credit unions (new), with under $10 billion in assets, operate as would be the “Commercial Side”.

Instead of firewalling an individual bank internally within its organization, the Trump/Mnuchin plan looks to be firewalling the banking ‘system’ within the U.S. internally. Hope that makes sense.  (read full outline)

Instead of trying to fix a mess of institutional bureaucracy, and nightmarish legislative complexity that might take years, Trump’s “America-First” economic empowerment financial mechanism works around the existing programs by leaving the existing burden of compliance upon the banking and financial entities that created the need for the bureaucracy in the first place; and simultaneously eliminates smaller financial enterprises from those regulations.

As a consequence the lower tier, middle-class financial system, is unleashed and free to operate.  This parallel, and much more efficient pathway, is the same approach Trump’s Healthcare Policy initiatives are taking toward the health insurance marketplace.

Stay with me….

Like the financial system, there are too many complex special interests enmeshed within the construct of ObamaCare to generate any reasonable consensus on a one-size-fits-all rebuild.  Right now there are legions of paid actors, paid interests, all trying to secure their own individual stake within the aggregate healthcare market.

Big Pharma, Big Labor (unions), Big Corporations (U.S. CoC) and Big Ed (finance and delivery) all have stakes in ObamaCare.  That’s a bazillion lobbying interests, representing massive institutional systems, containing trillions of dollars, all simultaneously dispatching their Big Gun Lawyer/Lobbyists to protect their financial position.

♦Unions don’t want health insurance back in/on their liabilities.  ♦U.S. CoC Multinational Corporations (Wall Street) don’t want the liability of worker health insurance back on their ledgers. ♦Big Pharma does not want limits to how much they can charge (profits) and they want a small group of decision-makers they can purchase and influence. ♦Big Ed doesn’t want government to lose control over college education subsidies. etc. etc.

{{{Yikes – Piranhas}}}

The initial goal of ObamaCare was manipulatively sold by controlling interests as a program to insure the uninsured, approximately 30 million people (2009).  However, that was a farce clearly visible in hindsight. The actual goal(s) were established by all of the aforementioned interests.

Unfortunately, the ObamaCare scheme enmeshed, became self-actual, and weaponized itself -as predicted- against the ordinary middle class American.  150+ million people  punished. Essentially, if you are not on medicare/medicaid, or eligible therein, you got screwed on the individual market scheme.

But that’s hindsight. Done is done. That horse has left the barn, rode out of town, and is long gone….  Previous healthcare insurance toothpaste is not only out of tube, but dried, encrusted and licked away by the horse that galloped by… Done is done.

So… understanding the system has self-actuated, Trump’s team has a new approach to reversing the damage to the individual healthcare market similar to the parallel track approach of the economic financial and banking market.

The medicare (federal health insurance) and medicaid (state health insurance) systems will remain the government safety nets for older and lower income populations.  [Medicaid income eligibility qualifications in a 0 to 30-50k range depending on dependents.]  This should have been the original approach all along; to cover the uninsured by giving them access to medicaid and the entire mess could have been avoided.  Alas, that wasn’t the intent of the takeover for all of the aforementioned reasons.

Under Trump’s long-term (3 step) approach – the non-government healthcare market, the majority of the population, will break free from almost all of the ObamaCare government regulations; and the insurance market will be empowered to provide an insurance product that fits the individual needs of the person purchasing the insurance.

The addition of the Senator Cruz “Consumer Choice Amendment” appears to be in line with this approach.

♦Dual System Approaches – Much like Secretary Mnuchin is proposing leaving government (via Dodd-Frank) attached to the “too-big-to-fail” group of banks and cutting all else loose from the regulations, so too is Secretary Price proposing to leave government attached to the “at risk population” (Medicare and Medicaid), the group 99% of all political talking points are structured around, and cut everyone else loose from the regulations.

•Step #1 establishes the ability (decouples ObamaCare) for a parallel market.  •Step #2 allows HHS to frame the parallel system (deregulation). •Step #3 establishes the broader parameters for the revised non-government health insurance market.

The House passed their Step 1 version.

The current Senate bill is their side of Step 1.

It’s challenging to see the sunlight at the end of this complex tunnel, but it’s there.  More visible today than a week ago.

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, Budget, Legislation, media bias, Obamacare, Paul Ryan, President Trump, propaganda, Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

230 Responses to Sunday Talks: White House Signals Support For Ted Cruz “Consumer Choice” Healthcare Amendment…

  1. saywhat64 says:

    If you want your obamacare you can keep your obamacare…

    Liked by 18 people

    • saywhat64 says:

      oops, I should have said If you LIKE your obamacare, you can keep your obamacare…

      Liked by 4 people

    • TPW says:

      My concern is that is Ocare is replaced would the insurance industry thugs consider everyone as newly insured thereby charging everyone with preexisting conditions the new inflated rate. I am an example of one who did not have a preexisting condition when my coverage started but now do. If my current coverage (policy) does no longer exist and I now must seek a new policy will I get screwed?…..No One is asking this question……

      Liked by 5 people

      • TheLastDemocrat says:

        TPW: I have asked that exact question amongst all of these wiser-than-me commenters.

        You conservatives have to figure out the sticky wicket of how we can be a HUMANE country and support health care for someone with Alzheimer’s, or diabetes, or cancer, when a TYPICAL wage-earner has NO WAY IN H E DOUBLE TOOTH PICKS of possibly covering costs out of his or her wages.

        Own it. Social Darwinism is not the correct answer here. You conservatives have to come up with quite a story to be all libertarian and about freedom, while making each individual or family gather money in the good days to cover serious, expensive illness DECADES later.

        And I get called a troll when I point out that Conservatives do not have a good answer.

        –Frankly, I see one viable answer with three levels:
        private health insurance bought family/individual-to-health plan – NO employer involved;
        high-risk riders for some;
        transfer-of-wealth publically funded insurance for the high-accuity/low money crowd.

        –Employer-sponsored, pre-tax health insurance is a relic, a vestige of a war time policy. It needs to go. THAT is what is responsible for super high “costs.” –There is a huge pile of money SITTING there – THOUSANDS of MY dollars per year dedicated to this pile, and I have NO information about what I am buying with those dollars – it is a treasure chest and when Doctor and Health Plan wink at each other and decide to mutually raid that pile of money, I smile as if I am getting good health care for low cost.

        Sucker!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

        Single Payer: same thing. Pile of money waiting for Docs and administrative staff to go through the motions and raid a HUGE pile of money – all the while locked in by the “Golden Handcuffs:” government gravy train sweet deal retirement that is far better than private market employment.

        We need price-sensitive competition, and we need a safety net. No two ways about it.

        Obamacare was the worst of all of this.

        Jesus said: “Its not the healthy who need a doctor; its the sick.” –Obamacare piled up unnecessary services as required services –

        Like saying you NEED to pay to get your wipers checked and battery checked and get a car wash EVERY time you get an oil change, OR even simply ask if you need an oil change. Ridiculous.

        Y’all go ahead and call me troll.

        Who is John Galt? In the early 1800s he published a novel – that was like a diary written by the local vicar – portraying the times a’changing in a Scottish village as the modern world encroached.

        It shows the shift from morality to pragmatism – everyone still holds a set of values, but they are no longer rooted in God and the Bible.

        A Death Panel, and Social Darwinsim let-them-suffer for their failure to plan or male a great nest egg is morally deprived social Darwinsim with a masque of morality.

        So, let’s hear what y’all got, Conservatives. A guy earns median income all his life, putting away a bit for retirement. He retires. Then, he gets Alzheimer’s, or some other problem that requires a great cost. What does he do? Wait for us to apply the Groningen Protocol? And tell him to smile because we will be donating his organs, after he crosses into our newly re-defined “death” criteria, and in his demise will be helping others?

        Liked by 1 person

        • fleporeblog says:

          If he is 65 or older he gets Medicaid which takes care of 80% of his costs and AARP for about $300 a month that takes care of the other 20%. Now take your nonsense out of here!

          Liked by 8 people

          • Wink says:

            I’m getting close to the magical 65 age, but when I moved to a new state I lost my Blue Cross. The state I now live in had horribly high prices. So I just signed up with Christian Heath Ministries till I forced into Medicare. CHM costs are very reasonable and it’s legal.

            Liked by 4 people

          • NebraskaFilly says:

            One correction – Medicare, not Medicaid. And NOT AARP, who supported O.B.A.M.A. and Obamacare!!!! AMAC is the conservative AARP. BTW, AMAC has filed a complaint with the FCC against CNN.

            Liked by 13 people

            • fleporeblog says:

              NebraskaFilly thanks for the info! I have an elderly aunt that lives with me that has Medicaid and we purchased AARP for her. I will look into AMAC. The only thing good about NY is the ability to have EPIC for her pills and insulin. She went from paying over a 1,000 a month down to $50 a month.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Hmmm…why is she on Medicaid and not Medicare? Sorry, but I truthfully don’t know a lot personally about these plans or health insurance since I have VA healthcare. I spent a few years w/no insurance when the company I worked for could no longer afford it. Before that, I always had health insurance through my employers.

                Like

                • Q&A says:

                  States are different in Medicaid qualifications and benefits. In a state like NY, it may be more beneficial to take Medicaid than stay on Medicare and you could qualify by transferring your wealth to your spouse. My NYC aunt actually did this pre-Obamacare when she became very ill which eventually did her in within the year. It was very common in the state of NY to do this at that time. But state Medicaid rules change all the time, so wealth transfer may now be restricted to a certain pre-illness time frame or other limits. When I asked a lawyer in my own state (not NY) about this situation regarding my dad, I was told my state’s Medicaid benefits would only cover a substandard level of care and not the higher level of care available in NY plus wealth transfer was 5 years before illness, probably to prevent this movement from Medicare to Medicaid from occurring without just cause, such as financial duress.

                  Liked by 3 people

            • viewmasterlady says:

              HumAnna here in Ohio has great rates for Medicare Supplement policy.

              Like

          • Orygun says:

            Social Security was supposed to be answer to all those problems when first realized but now it does everything but that. If you have a pile of money and some politicians nearby don’t expect to see the money still there the next day.

            The problem has always revolved around not allowing legislators the ability to legislate your money away.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Dixie says:

            I wish someone would explain how any of the insurances cover alzheimers…..I was unaware there was anything about the disease to cover unless a nursing home is involved. Anything else I’ve checked into, like paid caregivers to help with the 24/7 care requires one to have low income in order to qualify.

            Liked by 1 person

          • seekingthetruth2 says:

            Medicare

            Liked by 1 person

            • Sam says:

              Seekingtruth, Medicare only pays for short-term nursing home care, the kind someone would need after surgery. It does not pay for long-term nursing home care.

              The only answer for long-term care right now is to buy a long-term healthcare policy when you are healthy. This does not help anyone who needs it now or has an illness that prevents them from buying such a policy, even if they won’t need long-term care until 10 or 20 years from now.

              Some states have Medicaid for long-term home care or nursing home care. But many don’t have anything.

              Liked by 1 person

              • graciegram says:

                When we lived in Washington, my Mom was covered by Medicaid for nursing home care while Medicare covered her healthcare. Unfortunately, income needs to be pretty low before qualifying for Medicaid. Leaves most of us with no option but to burden family members.

                Like

          • RG says:

            AARP…well, I understand it works for many elders but they are a political enemy to conservatives and it gets hidden behind the scenes and glossed over in their cute advertising. No AARP for me.
            As for Medicare, it should have never been for everyone. I guess even ‘ole Warren Buffett get Medicare.

            Medicaid is another story. That is where the poor and those who never earned enough to sock away $500,000 to a million or two million in savings need help.

            I was never for universal health care and still believe that the government, our government who gives away money by the trillions to other countries should provide a stipend to hospitals to pay for economically disadvantaged care…file with the government Health Care office and call it a day. Hospitals and doctors bill you huge amounts and when the settlement statement arrives, they often get pennies on the dollar for services anyway. I guess the Insurance Companies get the most.

            Glad to see that Lee & Cruz (the Chip -n- Dale of Congress) have finally gotten up off their butts and put out something that might work. Now if Dr. Paul and the other RINOs in congress will do some heavy work and stop with the NO campaigns, we might get rid of Obamacare.
            Just yesterday, we remembered Lyndon Johnson who signed Civil Rights Legislation…haha…without Obamacare, little Barry Sorrento won’t have a legacy except for corruption.

            Liked by 1 person

          • HSA says:

            I think you meant to say Medicare 65 and older. Medicaid is for indigent, poor and end-stage renal disease.

            Liked by 1 person

        • spren says:

          You keep asking us to call you a troll. Okay, I’ll bite. You are a freaking troll. There are no guarantees in life and people who are prudent plan for adversity in the best manners they are capable. Why is it my problem that you didn’t plan appropriately, or that now your burden should become mine? And you keep saying “You conservatives…” Go jump in the lake. What answers do you have other than to criticize others for not having them. Go educate yourself on the basic principles of insurance and risk management. Very few of them show that health care can ever be considered as a true insurance product.

          Liked by 7 people

          • Lunatic Fringe, Phd. [undocumented] says:

            Yeah the poster starts off with the premise that to be “HUMANE” I guess we need to empty our pockets into other people’s healthcare. I’m not saying I agree with what I’m about to say but isn’t it HUMANE to put down a horse when it breaks it’s leg? In other words, TheLastDemocrat, be careful telling people what they should think is humane.

            Like

            • Marc says:

              But is it humane to refuse to treat your horse that could be cured with medicine but you figure it’s too costly? Maybe, but I’d like to think we value human life more than equines.

              Like

            • Esperanza says:

              Exactly what is happening to a baby in single payer Britain now. A family have raised the money to treat him and the hospital ( a children’s hospital) says he must die. They won’t even let him go home to do it.

              Like

          • sunnydaysall says:

            I and my children were taught the story of the “Grasshopper and the Ants” as a kid, and these types of stories were written to prepare children for adulthood! Now they send children to sex-ed and other sjw crap classes, and children grow up not understanding or wanting the freedom of taking care of themselves and making their own decisions… Sad…

            Liked by 3 people

          • My son is 20 years old. He has seizure disorder since he was 14. The doctors have no idea what caused them. I put him through every test my company provided ensurer would pay for and used my savings to pay for what was not covered. 10% never really know what causes it. I am now trying to recover my nest egg a little at a time but I am 52 and work for a company in NY that has not given out raises since 9/11. So it is very little but I am trying. he is in school full time right now. Our problem is that in 6 years he falls off my insurance or sooner depending on what they do in DC. He cannot take generics – the last time he had 3 seizures in one night and I ended up with a 1500 dollar bill (first 3000 of my company provided healthcare after a 1000 (500 each) HSA is NOT covered). His name brand medicine would be 800 per month without insurance.

            I put myself through college after I lost my student loans during the Reagan administration. They said my Dad a retired US Marine made too much as a NYS CO and a part time cop. The part time job was to put food on the table and heating oil in the oil burner —- he did go to school after he got out of the Marines to be a draftsman and worked in the Defense Industry until they pulled out of NYS. Then he fell back on his armed forces training to get jobs in NYS. We did not leave NYS because of family obligations.

            I worked 2 part time jobs (plus any babysitting house sitting, dog sitting, yard work I could find for extra $$$) in Comp Sci with a minor in Math, a Humanities Masters Certificate (the Marist Brothers talked me into it), and enough credits in psychology as well as Fine Arts to have picked one of those as a minor instead of Math. I thought Math would help me find a job over the other two. It did with a company in NY.

            At the age of 52, I am again trying to finish off a masters in Information Systems with course work in Computer Security and digital forensics.

            AM I A LOSER WHO HASN’T PLANNED WELL?
            AM I?
            I’ve taken every lemon handed to me and tried to make lemonade and then I read your post. I find it makes too many assumptions and I find those assumptions to be offensive because I know many people like me.

            Liked by 2 people

            • My apologies to the OTHER Treepers for the typos.

              Like

            • dutzie60 says:

              Conservativeinny do some searching on the Internet for a foundation,or possibly the drug company, to see if they have any programs that will supply your son’s drug free. I found out about one that supplies an expensive medication for my rheumatoid arthritis. It is a true blessing and I’m hoping there is something available that will help you.

              Like

            • Esperanza says:

              Where’s his father? Can’t he help?

              Liked by 3 people

            • Conservativeinny, have you and your son checked into cbd, the other ingredient in marijuana that doesn’t get you high? I have no experience with seizures or cbd but saw this video the other day and was blown away by the miracle it provided for the little girl featured in it!

              Like

              • P.S. My wife adds: CBD is legal in all 50 states.

                Like

              • dayallaxeded says:

                Michelle Malkin’s daughter has some sort of medical condition for which CBD is apparently one of the very few meds that works without bad side effects. Whatever anyone may think of her political/business positions, she’s a mother, aggressive researcher, and advocate for whatever she puts her mind to–check her site for additional information. Might even be worth trying a personal message to her.

                Liked by 2 people

            • dayallaxeded says:

              conservativeinny, restating this from a sub-reply down thread, in hopes that as a direct reply, you’ll be sure to get it: search Michelle Malkin’s site for posts about her daughter’s medical condition and CBD!

              May God bless you and your family and especially your son with peace, prosperity, and most of all health! In Jesus’ name, amen!

              Liked by 1 person

            • Rob says:

              Any mandated health insurance system like Obamacare is creating a legal responsibility for all Americans to help all other Americans. I may not think you are a loser who hasn’t planned well, but I also do not think that anybody else should be legally responsible for your bad luck. I know that sounds harsh, but I’m talking about legal responsibility and not moral responsibility.

              I think the people around you have a moral responsibility to help, and that responsibility tapers off as the people get farther away from you. For instance, your family has a greater moral responsibility to help your situation than I do. Just as you probably feel a fairly low level of moral responsibility to save a starving child in Africa. That child is just as important to his parents as your child is to you. But you put a higher priority on taking care of your own child, which is quite reasonable in my opinion.

              As for the seizure problem, you might want to look into diet options if nothing else is working. I recall reading about low carb, high fat diets being used to stop seizures in people who could not even be helped by medication. Good luck!

              Like

          • TheLastDemocrat says:

            My answer?
            Go read downthread at conservativeinny.

            “There are not guarantees in life” “people who are prudent” “why is it my problem”

            = Social Darwinism.

            Like

            • trialbytruth says:

              I am my brothers keeper .i got that but do I decide who my brother is ? Is that the collectives choice? Of is it the choice of the politician? You can neither abdicate nor legislate morality or mercy.

              A teller at my bank lost her husband to a 5 year bout with cancer after cancer. For the year after his death my wife and I supply the family with funds as we could. It helped her and her boys get through the worst of times.We will do it again.

              My nest egg? A paid for house 3 acres and wonderful adult children who love us. I will work until I stop breathing there never would have been another choice it is the way I am.

              Those who claim moral authority by demanding government spend other people’s money to appease their guilt, you ,or perhaps the embarrassment of not have any, should try direct human to human giving. Yes you may get rebuked or even taken advantage of but your soul will love it.

              Liked by 2 people

              • TheLastDemocrat says:

                TBT:
                ALL government is a matter of morality. We would all agree that government should be doing what is decent. Making things fair for the little guy by establishing the rule of law and access to courts, ensuring safe water supply, etc.

                TBT: I understand supporting others and giving money away. I give away several hundred each month out of my own pocket.

                When my neighbor cannot drive to the medical clinic, though, I don’t have the money to pave the road from his house to the clinic.

                I could set up my own toll road and extract money from him, and so cash flow it all, or we all could collectively have the government pave a planned set of roads.

                –I share many values and ideas with Conservatives. Because I am a regular American with common sense, and I am not a Communist. However, on some of these issues, it is clear where I split with Conservatives. And on some of these issues, frankly, Conservatives either begin sounding like they are in La La Land, not having thought things through, or are genuinely Social Darwinists, or want to have it both ways: be “self reliant” while enjoying the freeway, clean water, courts, police force, and fire department I paid for.

                Like

                • LEET says:

                  The problem is with greed and corruption of the middlemen, the government bureacracy, welfare state, politicians buying votes by GIVING away other peoples money. Most Americans are generous but they have their limit. My young, healthy family pays $800 a month for a “health insurance” policy with a $6,000 deductible, which we rarely use. Is that fair? Especially when I see people daily who game the system with their EBT cards, social security “disablity income”, and we have flooded our country with immigrants/ refugees who need everything provided for them (food, clothing, education, health care, housing) by the good ole American taxpayer! My beef is not with the examples I see on this thread who have seizures, Alzeheimers, other hard cases but that is not the majority of cases that make up the billions and billions and billions of dollars we spend every year on welfare and other subsidies.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • dayallaxeded says:

                  And here’s where the progzi in you comes out–no, goobermint MUST not even attempt to do what is “decent” or “moral” (search the Constitution for those terms, “humane,” “God,” “Christian,” “charity”–if you find them, you’re not reading an accurate copy, ’cause they ain’t there). No, that is not goobermint’s role. The Constitution was not written to institute a “decent” or “moral” goobermint. It instituted a “just” government, with divided, limited powers and internal checks and balances plainly intended to maintain limits on its power, as originally defined. The Constitution expressly denies to goobermint the authority to define for everyone what is “moral” or “decent”–see the Bill of Rights–you don’t even have to read beyond the 1st Amendment, but you should continue to better understand the concept.

                  USA goobermint is supposed to and must be re-disciplined to only provide the basic, objective, egalitarian framework within which the people can choose, work, strive (or not–i.e. fail) to be decent, moral, generous, humane, wealthy, poor, mendicant, bohemian, hermitic, trollish, or whatev-da-fuq. Churches and other free, independent charitable organizations, along with personal charity can play (and themselves succeed or fail) at morality, decency, and generosity, as they define those terms, all they want. The transfer of those private responsibilities and judgements to goobermint and the weaponization of “charity” by encumbent goobermint have absolutely and without any possible contradiction proven to be the most damaging developments in the life of the USA since the Civil War. The unintended negative consequences alone boggle the mind.

                  Now that we’ve cleared that up, please explain what’s wrong with allowing natural selection to work, at least to some extent (which is what I suppose you mean by the misnomer “social darwinism”). If one degenerate person declines to take care of himself and effectively commits slow suicide as a result, why should that be goobermint’s or anyone else’s problem? If a degenerate culture declines to take care of those living within it, shouldn’t it also be allowed to take itself out, without goobermint picking “winnahs & loozahs,” as it now does solely for the benefit of its own entrenched, encumbent establishment?

                  Like

                • testpointwp says:

                  For two thirds of my life, my greatest expense has been taxes. Taxes consume more of my income than housing, food, medical, clothing, and transportation combined.

                  The tax question that liberals cannot answer is, how much is enough? The answer seems to be, it’s never enough. It will never be enough.

                  I value freedom over freeways, my guns over the police department and my well and fire hose over the fire department. I served my country in the Army. Just get the damn government out of my life.

                  Like

            • trialbytruth says:

              I am my brothers keeper .i got that but do I decide who my brother is ? Is that the collectives choice? Of is it the choice of the politician? You can neither abdicate nor legislate morality or mercy.

              A teller at my bank lost her husband to a 5 year bout with cancer after cancer. For the year after his death my wife and I supply the family with funds as we could. It helped her and her boys get through the worst of times.We will do it again.

              My nest egg? A paid for house 3 acres and wonderful adult children who love us. I will work until I stop breathing there never would have been another choice it is the way I am.

              Those who claim moral authority by demanding government spend other people’s money to appease their guilt, you ,or perhaps the embarrassment of not have any, should try direct human to human giving. Yes you may get rebuked or even taken advantage of but your soul will love it.

              Like

        • deanbrh says:

          The Last Democrat, I’m anxious to hear why you think Alzheimers would cost a fortune. There is no therapy that has worked, no cure, and I suspect you don’t have any idea what the diagnosis means, beyond the panic you would feel if you got that diagnosis. I am a sole caregiver of one who has the diagnosis. It has zero impact on our health insurance!

          Liked by 3 people

          • Dixie says:

            That’s exactly what I thought. See my question above which you have just answered.

            Liked by 1 person

          • RC says:

            deanbrh — so sorry to hear about the Alzheimers in your family.

            Have you read about feeding your family member coconut oil? Dr Mary Newport’s husband contracted the illness and could not tie his shoelaces, draw a clock or report where he was. Then she discovered coconut oil, which is 60% Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT) and her husband woke up. He now works in a hospital pharmacy! Every couple of hours he drinks a small amount of broth with a spoonful of the oil.

            Apparently babies in the womb burn MCT as their brain fuel before switching to glucose once born. But the brain will happily switch back to MCT if it is available.

            Liked by 1 person

            • deanbrh says:

              RC, I’ve not heard about the coconut oil and will definitely look into it. The very best part about being as old as we are is that we know we are not long for this world and no one gets out of here alive. “God’s grace is sufficient for this”, and He gives me strength when I ask, which is OFTEN. There are worse situations than ours, so far. We are only 3 years into this journey.,.. just “celebrated” our 62nd wedding anniversary. Having been together so long makes it easier to anticipate wants and needs and threats, where as with toddlers there wasn’t that assist and we were both very young and scared. Now we’re old and scared but tons wiser and more reliant on God. RC, thanks for the oil suggestion!

              Liked by 1 person

              • Dixie says:

                Deanbrh, I’ve been using coconut oil to cook with for a very long time but have not noted any difference in my husband’s decline. Perhaps cooking with it is not the proper way to deliver it and it was too minimal to help. I would only caution that it could be a problem if the individual has a sensitive stomach which as you probably already know, in an alzheimers patient, complicates matters. I’ve read and researched extensively about it and apparently it works miracles for some. I hope your loved one experiences one of those miracles. I wish you all the luck in the world!

                Liked by 2 people

                • deanbrh says:

                  The clinical trials were abandoned for lack of participants, but the design of the trials was really a joke and I would be willing to bet was promoted by the company making the way-too-expensive beverage that contains the coconut oil. When there are people enthusiastic about a “miracle”, I am maybe too much a skeptic because I want to measure ALL the variables in their lives to see what REALLY made the miracle happen. I wish you God’s blessings and hope you live in a community that sponsors respite care for you.

                  Liked by 1 person

              • dayallaxeded says:

                deanbrh, I’ve heard about the coconut oil benefit, too, as well as the older one that may or may not be mere placebo, gingko. Daily vitamin E is hard to beat for general health benefits. I’ve seen some questions (but nothing authoritative) about possible adverse effects of coconut oil on colesterol levels and gingko and vitamin E are blood thinners (e.g. can result in slow clotting times, spontaneous bruising, bloodshot eyes), so use caution regarding those issues (I take gingko and E–initially had clotting issues, but my body adjusted after a couple months–had a messy carpentry accident and didn’t bleed out, so it’s all good). There is amazing research ongoing regarding alzheimers, so an effective treatment or at least a better understanding of what’s going on is coming. In the meantime. I pray for peace, strength, and healing for you and yours–sounds like you’ve got love well and truly covered! May God bless you, your DH, and all family! AMEN!

                Like

          • TheLastDemocrat says:

            Deanbrh:

            Do you want a serious discussion of the costs of Alzheimer’s?

            Who spends time with your loved one, instead of being at work, through the day, as your loved one with Alzheimer’s spies a set of keys and decides to drive off? Sees the knobs on the stove and decides to turn the burners on?

            Family, or medical staff?

            Does it cost little because Medicare covers that? –wealth transfer.

            Or, does it cost little because you bought long-term-care insurance, and are now reaping a dollar-value service beyond what you paid in? <–That sound like a situation where insurance would work.

            Except for Alzheimer's, my grandmother was very healthy, and lived for many years requiring someone to keep her from causing or stumbling into trouble – like watching a toddler. but less daily energy and far more knowledgeable about how to turn on a stove and get a car going down the street. It took a lot of manpower to manage.

            I guess we should have death-paneled her early on?

            Like

            • deanbrh says:

              “Like watching a toddler” is an apt description. It doesn’t require medical help or longterm care insurance we couldn’t afford or Medicare we pay for or the medi-gap insurance we also pay for, and the care takes no more or less energy to manage, but you wouldn’t know that unless you have been the sole caregiver of toddlers. Both toddlers and Alzheimer patients are totally 100% exhausting 100% of the time. We are both 82 and curious about how we could have been “death-paneled” early on. Or is that just your snarky coda?

              Like

              • TheLastDemocrat says:

                I seriously believe that if you allow the Communists and Elitist Intellectuals to carry on, they will find a way to death-panel someone with Alzheimer’s and otherwise in similar states. If you are not aware of this, you can read up on the “advances” in euthanasia policy in the Netherlands and other “progressive” places. They will get you with language about “suffering” and “quality of life.”

                Liked by 1 person

                • dayallaxeded says:

                  This is the most (perhaps only) insightful and accurate comment you’ve made. Interesting that it also provides objective proof of what I said up-thread–goobermint has no place fiddling with our healthcare, charity, or any other aspect of our personal lives. It’s sole job is to provide and maintain the framework, physically in infrastructure and legally, to allow us to take care of ourselves and each other as we, not encumbents in goobermint, see fit.

                  Like

                • deanbrh says:

                  We were part of the “Right to Die” Movement in the early 80’s, did several TV, Radio shows and lectured on the topic. Remember the “Hemlock society”? I am SOOOOOOO in favor of CHOICE. That being said, we would never choose to opt out of life by any means. God’s WILL be done, in our household. But we want EVERYONE to have the choice. We feel the same about abortion.

                  Like

                • deanbrh says:

                  Oldschool, I am really not a better person than you. I have sent countless nastygrams to Acosta because I want him to know he can FIX his resistant to his industry becoming a dinosaur, which is what he is REALLY fighting.

                  Like

                • deanbrh says:

                  OOPs, sent the response to TheLastDemocrat but was meant for OldSchool. Sorry!

                  Like

              • Dixie says:

                The LastDem is being just plain mean. Dems are all about feelings for themselves but nobody else.

                Liked by 1 person

                • Obamacare has the death panels – publicized by Sarah Palin and identified by Dr. McCaughey, former vice governor in New York. They were ridiculed and marginalized, but anyone could read the paragraphs where they were set up.
                  Don’t know what TLD is getting at, but he’s right about the existence of said panels. Also, the Netherlands is horrible, but predictable. When a government has responsibility for health care for all (single payer), increasing scarcity of doctors, hospitals, medications and nurses becomes the norm.

                  Like

                  • Dixie says:

                    Yes, I knew about the death panels and maybe there is no point in some people living much beyond 75 which is not a good shut off point imo, but I don’t want somebody else deciding that for me. Each person is different with different ideas about quality of life and so forth. Look at President Trump and how vibrant he is and I am the same age as him but no where near as sharp or vibrant because my husband’s illness has sucked me into the void with him. Not trying to solicit sympathy which does nobody any good but just stating a fact about what happens to the sole caregivers of those with a loved one who has alzheimers. It does something to one’s desire to continue. My big mouth will be the last thing to go….. 🙂

                    Like

        • Fe says:

          You are a blockhead Which is worse than being a troll. I find your comments to be insulting calling us ‘you conservatives’. Post your bs on a liberal board that way you will be seen as a hero and patted on the back.

          Liked by 4 people

          • TheLastDemocrat says:

            I am unaware of any liberal board where people want to seriously discuss real problems and real solutions. Maybe there is no conservative board, either.

            BTW: I don’t mind the criticisms and name-calling. Here, I see a great variety of positions here, which illustrates my view that conservatives – or call yourselves whatever you want – are not too unified in policies addressing the challenge of how to afford health care. If I am a blockhead, so are the commenters who have posted similar ideas.

            Like

        • vincent cuomo says:

          That is what Medicaid and Medicare are for; Trump has already said their needs to be a safety net. Feel foolish now don’t you. By the way, there were many cancer victims had their health insurance cancelled or changed under Obamacare:
          http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/medical/article/Loss-of-insurance-plans-could-devastate-cancer-6603232.php

          Liked by 1 person

      • setup2100 says:

        PUT the House & Congress and their staffs on the any BILL and see what happens. Why people are not demanding this is absurd. MAKE them live with the BS that want us to live with. By the way does anyone really believe PHASE 2 & 3 will ever happen. You get one shot at OBAMACARE and this is it! Repel and Replace NOT FIX.

        Liked by 3 people

        • vincent cuomo says:

          Than everyone would have the best coverage in the world and employers would be required to pay for it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • dayallaxeded says:

          This is the most fundamental issue in regard to all legislation, but especially in regard to any legislation involving intrusion into one’s personal life or private business–where in the Constitution does it say that goobermint is not to be subject to the same laws imposed on the people? Simple answer–nowhere. On the contrary, the Constitution mandates that all are entitled to equal protection of the law–ergo, no person or group should be carved out to be exempted, imposed upon, or benefited more than any other.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Aparition42 says:

        I have been pointing cases such as yours out to all the “no preexisting conditions” crowd I come across.

        We should not be turning our backs on those most hurt by Obama’s attempt to destroy healthcare.

        I think there should be a long grace period, say four years at least, before phasing out any mandates concerning preexisting conditions so that the many people in situations like yours have the opportunity to take advantage of the new plans that will eventually be offered once competition works it’s magic on the market.

        Like

      • Joshua2415 says:

        With all due respect, if you have an existing chronic medical condition you’re need for insurance has passed. What you need now is health care, not health insurance. The debate for people in your position should center around how you pay for your treatments, not how you pay your premiums.

        Liked by 3 people

        • TheLastDemocrat says:

          Exactly. So, let’s talk about how policies might be designed to get some genuine insurance effect, and how we might be able to cover the cost of good health care treatment.

          There are only so many ways to look at it. For the most part, each of us is healthy and low-cost early in life, then costly in later life. We can either shift earnings from earlier life to later life, or shift costs in the moment from younger, productive people to older people who may or may not be productive but may be outstripping the wealth they are generating.

          Another alternative would be long-term insurance policies, similar to my life insurance – the insurer bet on my health profile with a 20-year premium. A weakness there is that if I miss one payment, say, because I had six months of unemployment due to health problems, I would lose the coverage. So, one solution might be: I buy a health insurance plan, like term life insurance, and, like my home loan, once I pay the premium I own it and therefore am no longer at risk for being evicted by missing a monthly payment.

          Like

          • Bad analogy, sir. The bank owns your home until the day you make the final payment on the loan.

            Another way to look at this is to allow Health Savings Plans for all – to use as they see fit for any and all medical issues. Immediately some say,”What about…..?”

            For all the “what abouts,” I say, call it what it is – welfare and have the same onerous, bureaucratic torture that regular welfare recipients go through to get it. This is a disincentive for all but the most deserving and needy.

            Like

      • Rick says:

        The way I understood it was that if you don’t have lapse of coverage, (HIPPA I think passed in 1993?), then you cannot be denied health insurance coverage simply by switching insurers. Check me on that. HIPPA was one of the good things passed under Clinton.

        Like

        • Tom says:

          Total misunderstanding – yes, you are required to be OFFERED insurance, but there is no restriction on its COST. So, if your old insurance was $500/month but the new insurance is $1800/month, does that work for you ? Probably not for most people.

          Like

    • mark4trump says:

      LOLOLOLOL!!!!

      Like

    • whizzbang says:

      My biggest problem is the picture of McConnell with his hand in his pocket whilst addressing the President of the Untied States. That is disrespectful. I expect better from the GOP.

      Like

  2. ALEX says:

    Excellent. This would put some meat on the bone of the arguements about lowering premiums and genuine choice. It can work as a stopgap in many ways. I would still like a repeal and a thorough replace with it argued out in public, but something tangible is needed for now…

    Liked by 7 people

    • Yes Alex it is.

      If these guys won’t let us in their old guy club we will create a new club.

      If they will not let us play on their ball park we will build a new ball park.

      Etc…etc…etc.

      Let them keep their tired old health care system and better yet let them figure out how to pay for it.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Sherlock says:

    Cruz’s approach has merit if one accepts the fact that a full repeal isn’t in the cards.

    Liked by 4 people

    • mike devault says:

      I like the Cruz & Lee amendment and if we are going to have givernment sponsored healthinsurance, this could the winning ticket.

      Liked by 4 people

      • setup2100 says:

        THAT is what is wrong with it, GOV”T sponsored healthcare. What about that does people do not understand, it will not work with the GOV’t INVOLVED. WHAT has worked except the military and they are mostly hands off of that and that is why it works.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Aparition42 says:

          Sadly, the military is far from “working” after the last eight years. They’ve slashed Manning and shuffled us around so arbitrarily that the chain of competency has been broken in a lot of key places. Crazy budget rules leave us with no money for aircraft parts but forced to buy all new office furniture at the end of the fiscal year. We’re subjected to ridiculous social issue training and diversity appreciation at a cost of thousands of man-hours better spent doing our jobs, and that’s not even getting to the problems involved in actual war fighting.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Dixie says:

            I am not in the military nor associated with it, but I was just about to point out that obama “broke” the military and the 8 years under his unfortunate dominating destructive rule will take a long time to correct. Pulling all the poisonous quills out will be painful and take time. Even I understand that.

            I knew the damage was already done and only a time machine would put healthcare back together again. Obamacare has all the doctors asking too many unrelated suspicious questions and I want the government out of our lives!

            End of hissy fit……

            Liked by 2 people

          • Jon Ericson says:

            “slashed Manning”
            I think so,
            not sure,

            Liked by 1 person

    • oldschool64 says:

      Can a full repeal be done within the framework of reconciliation? There surely aren’t 60 votes to get this to an up or down. Hell, with all the Rino scum present in the Senate, I doubt there are even 50!

      Like

      • Sherlock says:

        I’ve read very conflicting reports on whether reconciliation can be used for a full, or at least near-full, repeal. Today I heard dem Joe Manchin say that, yes, it could be done through reconciliation, and nobody corrected him, but I just don’t know. I read one article that said that everything about Obamacare other than the “pre-existing conditions” part of that law could legally be done away with through reconciliation. Then, of course, they’d have to deal with dems and the normal 60 vote stuff if they wanted to enact any new legislation, however. Don’t know.

        Like

    • All I have to say is this: go over ANYTHING Lyin’ Canadian Ted puts forth with an exceedingly fine comb – he is a master at obfuscating his true purpose!!!!

      Liked by 5 people

  4. redtreesquirrel says:

    Wonderful! I want my old health insurance back. Looks like the Senate Conservatives are going to make it happen.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Wend says:

      Proud of Ted. He’s been pretty good since GE became POTUS.

      Like

      • fleporeblog says:

        Ted has and he realizes that he needs our President to back his reelection bid in 2018. So in this case it is a win win for both of them. He could also put himself in place to be Ruth’s replacement.

        Like

        • MaineCoon says:

          Agree with the first part, but I think President Trump will adhere to his campaign promise to select his USSC nominees from the list he presented. Cruz wasn’t on the list.

          Liked by 3 people

          • fleporeblog says:

            MaineCoon I agree for Kennedy’s replacement most likely next year. I am assuming Ruth will be around after Kennedy is replaced. By then the list will be revised because some of the Judge’s will be appointed on appellate courts.

            Liked by 1 person

        • It would be absolutely devastating to make such a huge mistake as putting Lyin’ Canadian Ted on SCOTUS – sheesh! Talk about a Trojan Horse!!!! And I would hope President Trump would NOT endorse his lyin’ butt but I am sure he will have to, politically. Personally, I still believe he is serving in the Senate fraudulently and nothing will change my mind about this until he takes the block off of ALL of his and his mother’s immigration documents. The absolute audacity of attempting to run for President when he is NOT a Natural Born Citizen!!!!

          Liked by 7 people

          • rashamon says:

            Yep. Nebraska! Cruz showed himself to be too, too, too flexible with The Law he vowed to uphold when he became an attorney and when trying to capture the hearts and minds of Americans for the highest office in the land, so now I do not trust him one iota.

            Liked by 6 people

            • You make a good point rashamon.

              “Cruz showed himself to be too too flexible with the law”.

              And millions and million of Americans will never ever forget that.

              There are quite a few more trustworthy Supreme Court candidates that are not as slimy and creepy.

              We all know this and Ted just does not have a chance.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Summer says:

                On top of everything, Ted’s latest “accidental fraud” involving his GS loan makes him completely ineligible for SCOTUS.

                Like

            • Esperanza says:

              Plus the little matter of not being an NBC.

              Like

  5. The Boss says:

    This news calls for a tweet about fake media and its special whores. No sense in letting the MSM focus on something substantive.

    Liked by 4 people

  6. mikebrezzze says:

    Let me sell my plan—– give me 1m families of four, $500/month payment, $1500 deductible, 80% of first $5k (stop loss) , $1m max , no preexisting for 1 year….we all win!

    Liked by 3 people

    • mikebrezzze says:

      No state boundaries *

      Liked by 5 people

      • TheLastDemocrat says:

        Sure. If there is another firm competing with you for that family’s $500/month, and there is some guarantee of what you will and will not be required to do under this retainer / prepaid legal.

        As a wise CCL, I have prepaid legal. But it is quite clear what they will and will not do, and when the “free” calls and prepaid representation runs out.

        Like

    • Esperanza says:

      This. We have a period where, if you’ve been uninsured, you aren’t covered for x amount of time for certain things. So that acts as a deterrent for free loading. Also if you are insured, just changing companies, it doesn’t apply.

      Also are you sure about pre existing conditions? It seems from outside that they prescribe them frankly to invalidate your insurance.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Chuck Finley says:

    I don’t care what passes at this point. Just get the mandates out. Everything else can be negotiated, but we can’t live in a “free” country while being forced at gunpoint to buy something we may decided we don’t want to buy.

    Kill them and make sure they never come back. Ever.

    Liked by 23 people

  8. Howie says:

    John Thune gotta go. He is afraid working man will get a break.

    Liked by 11 people

  9. PDQ says:

    “…at least one plan that adheres to Obamacare’s mandates.”

    A plane that keeps the communism alive and sucks the middle class dry?

    Liked by 3 people

  10. hugofitch1 says:

    The bill needed an amendment that allows insurers to sell plans that don’t adhere to 0care? I thought that was the whole point in the first place. Smh…guess I really haven’t been paying close enough attention.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. Shiggz says:

    Turn healthcare and education back to the states!!!

    Cut federal taxes to allow the states to raise taxes instead of the federal returns with strings attached crap we have going now.

    Texas will get free market healthcare, California will get single payer. Neither left or right will have to live in fear of next elections affect on our lives.

    Liked by 11 people

    • Oh, now I like that!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Joe says:

      The 4.4 million Californians who voted Trump would have to move to different states though. How is that fair to them? At least get the Feds to clean up the California elections process before completely abandoning the loyal residents.

      Like

      • rf121 says:

        There are more than enough reasons to leave CA. High utility bills, traffic, gun restrictions, housing costs, price of gas, lack of work. Etc, etc. 4.4 million wasted votes. Pack you bags and leave. I did. If you are conservative and stay you are just pissing in the wind.

        Went to an AR-15 class today. Enjoyed it a lot. Was even able to change magazines without needing a tool to remove the magazine. CA rule.

        Like

      • Esperanza says:

        Interestingly my old parliamentary district, solid Socialist, just went conservative, not Macron, CONSERVATIVE. Last time I voted, I was one of 3 people in my street who voted conservative. So there hope for Cali.

        Liked by 1 person

    • dayallaxeded says:

      This is exactly how the USA was always supposed to work–states and localities would have freedom to innovate, try new things, as decided by those who would have to live with them. Everyone got to vote on it locally, then if they really felt put upon or strongly opposed the direction that state or locality was going they could cast a more “deciding” vote with their feet–move to another state/locality that better suits. That kind of freedom quickly sorts the wheat from the chaff and without bailouts, states like California and NY either thrive, survive, or dive. That way, if their “innovation” turns out to be a poison pill, they can correct it sooner rather than later, when they see their neighboring states blowing their doors off with prosperity.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. fleporeblog says:

    This has been in the works for a while but Mitch the Globalist Bitch didn’t want to use it! Our President has smartly aligned himself with Rand Paul, Mike Lee and Ted Cruz. Mitch the Bitch wants a bill that would only help the moderates which would devastate the Forgotten Men and Women. Why? Because it would tear our Lion’s base away from him. By sending out that tweet on Friday, he has castratred that plan because Lee, Paul and Cruz wouldn’t vote for it. As you will see from Lee’s comments below, if they don’t enact what the 3 of them are proposing, you can kiss the repeal and replace goodbye. They will force Mitch and the other 49 morons to send the 2015 repeal bill to our President. That is called CHECKMATE!

    Mitch has two choices in front of him. Go forward with the revised bill which includes leaving the 3.8% tax + the 0.9% tax on the wealthy that earn $250,000 a year in investment funds which would be used to subsidize the folks that have to purchase BarryCare, additional billions for opioids (up from $2.5 billion to $40 billion) and some towards Medicaid sliding scale.

    Senator Mike Lee was on Deface the Nation earlier today. I found a transcript of the interview because I will never watch any of these POS. The only time I view their show is when SD post’s them here on a Sunday.

    The good news is that if the bill is passed, rates will plummet for those not needing the Obozocare policy with all the bells and whistles. The forgotten men and women will not be forgotten!

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/transcript-senator-mike-lee-on-face-the-nation-july-2-2017/?ftag=YHF4eb9d17&yptr=yahoo

    From the article linked above:

    MIKE LEE: Look this bill, the one we’ve been discussing in the Senate, has bailouts for insurance companies. It has hundreds of billions of dollars in tax relief for the affluent. It even has some provisions for the poor. Who it leaves out are the forgotten man and the forgotten woman. Those earning a combined household income of $75,000 or so who have been left behind. And these are the people who helped propel President Trump to victory last November. We need to do more to help them and to make sure they can purchase the kind of health care they want and the kind of health care that is affordable for their families.

    MIKE LEE: Well the death spiral is what we see with Obamacare right now and the fact is that by guaranteeing them at least one Obamacare compliant plan, we’re guaranteeing them exactly what they have now but giving them more options. Options that would inevitably unleash free market forces, that would in turn bring down the price of health care. That’s what we want to do. As to those who would be on the Obamacare compliant plan still, there are ways of funding those. There are ways of making sure that those don’t go down into a downward spiral.

    And look if we can’t get this done, I have made clear if we can bring free market forces to bear, we can bring down cost for middle Americans. But if politically, for some reason we can’t get that done what we ought to do is get back to what I’ve been suggesting for the last six months which is to push full repeal and then embark on an iterative step-by-step process to decide what comes next.

    Liked by 9 people

    • 2x4x8 says:

      it would be nice to have a free market price quote of insurance, then go check out what an ObamaCare Plan would cost, then run political tv commercials in each state:

      ” i saved $$$$$$ by switching from ObamaCare and you can too”

      that would be so effective

      you can boast; “i dumped Obama”

      i can see that legacy, drifting away

      Liked by 4 people

      • fleporeblog says:

        You are getting your wish!

        Folks we are inching closer and closer to this first major legislation passing and benefiting everyone involved! They will be shocked by the score in terms of healthcare costs for non Obozocare customers. They have opened Pandora’s box with no going back!!!

        http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/senate-asks-for-cbo-score-on-cruz’s-healthcare-proposal/ar-BBDxnRS?li=BBnb7Kz

        From the article linked above:

        Senate Republicans are asking the Congressional Budget Office to analyze a healthcare bill that includes changes proposed by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), Axios reported Saturday.

        They are also asking the independent scorekeeper to come out with an estimate on a healthcare bill without the proposed changes, in an effort to better understand the potential effects of Cruz’s plan.

        Liked by 4 people

      • armie says:

        It’ll be interesting to see how many Democrats elect to keep paying the hugely inflated cost of Obamacare policies just as a matter of principle. I mean, if they believe that’s the kind of coverage all of us need, surely they’ll put their money where their mouths are….

        Like

    • Angry Dumbo says:

      Love it. Don’t kill ObamaCare, let it die of natural causes. If you want your ObamaCare you can keep your ObamaCare.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Troublemaker10 says:

    Funny thing about that CBO score on 22 million losing coverage…

    Will “22 Million People” Lose Their Health Insurance If The Senate Health Bill Passes?
    http://politichicks.com/2017/07/will-22-million-people-lose-health-insurance-senate-health-bill-passes/

    Excerpt:

    “Further, as Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., has been pointing out, the CBO used an outdated estimate that’s more than a year old to determine the “loss” of coverage in the individual market from year to year under the Senate plan. When the most recent estimates from January are used, the number of Americans with individual health insurance would remain unchanged between 2017 and 2018. (It is these types of late-breaking revelations that buttressed Johnson’s successful argument to delay a vote on the bill.)”

    Liked by 3 people

    • fleporeblog says:

      Folks we are inching closer and closer to this first major legislation passing and benefiting everyone involved! They will be shocked by the score in terms of healthcare costs for non Obozocare customers. They have opened Pandora’s box with no going back!!!

      http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/senate-asks-for-cbo-score-on-cruz’s-healthcare-proposal/ar-BBDxnRS?li=BBnb7Kz

      From the article linked above:

      Senate Republicans are asking the Congressional Budget Office to analyze a healthcare bill that includes changes proposed by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), Axios reported Saturday.

      They are also asking the independent scorekeeper to come out with an estimate on a healthcare bill without the proposed changes, in an effort to better understand the potential effects of Cruz’s plan.

      Liked by 2 people

      • fleporeblog says:

        The House Freedom Caucus is putting their full weight behind the Cruz amendment! They are saying that if the Cruz amendment is part of the final bill, the House will go straight to an up and down vote saving a tremendous amount of time! This could be all wrapped up and signed by our President by the end of July!

        http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/ted-cruzs-obamacare-amendment-gains-momentum-after-trump-tweet/article/2627604

        From the article linked above:

        “We have to have either the Cruz amendment or the MacArthur amendment, or something that does a similar thing in reducing premiums,” Meadows said.

        In an interview with the Washington Examiner, MacArthur said he accepts the Senate approach, which would significantly loosen Obamacare’s existing state waiver requirements.

        Meadows noted that the Senate bill isn’t likely to change in the House before a vote on final passage.

        “There is 75 percent chance that whatever passes the Senate comes here for an up or down vote,” Meadows said.

        Liked by 3 people

  14. thesavvyinvester says:

    “If we insist on this half measure, then we should have the amendment,” said Jason Pye, director of public policy for the Koch-backed conservative group FreedomWorks during a call Friday.”

    I just knew the Koch’s were in on this up to their eyeballs…

    Liked by 6 people

  15. bulwarker says:

    “there are concerns about sharing the risk between the plans that don’t have to meet Obamacare, which likely would be cheaper, with the plans that do.”

    lol, “sharing the risk” – in other words they want that custom tailored plan you had prior to obamacare to be more expensive than before because someone has to pay for the remaining subsidized plans. Get government OUT of our healthcare.

    Liked by 13 people

  16. freddy says:

    Medicaid is the problem straight up. Yeah I want low income folks to have some form of care but medicaid is where all the fraud and abuse lies. That expansion is what kills healthcare eventually. Obvious everyone can’t get it free while working guys pay through the nose…..I have medicaire for retired and I pay 155 a month or a lot is not covered and it’s good care. They deny most everything but you learn to fight and write great letters. Illegals alone will crash the system soon along with SSI and disability also expanded under O……….All meant to crash the systems so socialism can take over your lives……

    Liked by 13 people

    • WeThePeople2016 says:

      I posted a similar remark about Medicaid yesterday. It will drain the states dry. It has already done it to Illinois, and Ohio is being hit hard. It is a back-door way of socialized medicine.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Janie M. says:

      Yup, freddy, the issue of illegals and refugees (receiving welfare) have to be dealt with sooner rather than later… billions funded by taxpayers who end up without basic healthcare. That fries my buns.

      Liked by 6 people

      • singingsoul says:

        I believe that illigels should not be on Medicare and need to pay for insurance.
        I am on Medicare and my sub is through my husbands university retirement. The sub seems to be above average and we feel fortunate. Young people pay through the nose.

        Like

    • Sam says:

      Yes, Medicaid is a problem. Many states are incompetent dealing with Medicaid and it will drain them dry. And don’t blame the disabled and call them freeloaders. Disability is not a moral failing and is not a choice for most disabled people. Medicaid isn’t just healthcare but also services that keep disabled people at home and out of more expensive nursing home care. Even if disabled people are old enough for Medicare, it does not pay for much home health care and it does not pay for nursing home care at all.

      No, I am not on Medicaid. I am old enough to have Medicare and a Medicare Cost insurance plan since Medicare doesn’t pay for many things.

      We are going to keep running into the problem of long term care in a nursing home facility because a huge generation of Baby Boomers is rapidly aging. I don’t have the answer but we and the policy makers and politicians had better start working on this now.

      All I can suggest now is a deregulation of health insurance aka repeal O-care and add protections for the disabled as well as coverage for pre-existing conditions. It is cheaper to give a patient high blood pressure pills than to admit him to a hospital for treatment of a stroke or cardiac event.

      Like

  17. First Last says:

    Liked by 3 people

  18. Donna in Oregon says:

    For the love of God and country just DO something Congress. Miscreants of dubious character….. Do Nothing–Know Nothing. Treasonous, lecherous, bottom-feeding parasitic NEOPHYTES.

    It’s been 8 YEARS…..how much TIME do ya need??!!!????? UGH!

    Liked by 6 people

  19. Timmy-the-Ute says:

    Problem is Mike Lee and to a lesser extent Cruz hate President Trump and are not going to support anything or do little that will make it look like the President is succeeding.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. deqwik2 says:

    In my state some people can’t get Obamacare because they don’t make enough. Lots of people are uninsured because the state didn’t do the medicaid expansion & Obamacare won’t accept them. There is nothing for them.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Um….you mean they made too much? If their earnings are low enough, they would have qualified for subsidies, if not regular Medicaid (vs. expanded). NE also did not expand Medicaid.

      Like

      • deqwik2 says:

        No. There is a coverage gap. Obamacare won’t accept you if you are below the poverty level.

        The majority of those 185,000 people currently have no realistic access to coverage at all; Kaiser Family Foundation data indicates that 139,000 people are in the coverage gap in Alabama. They aren’t eligible for Medicaid because the state has not yet accepted federal funding to expand Medicaid. And they also aren’t eligible for premium subsidies in the exchange, since those aren’t available to people with incomes below the poverty level (as the ACA was written, Medicaid would have been available to them instead, but a Supreme Court ruling in 2012 allowed states to opt out of Medicaid expansion; those that did have created the coverage gap).

        Source: https://www.healthinsurance.org/alabama-medicaid/
        Follow us: @EyeOnInsurance on Twitter | healthinsurance.org on Facebook

        Liked by 2 people

    • armie says:

      Does your state have Community Clinics? They’re the new version of the old Free Clinic, funded by Federal, State, Local, and Private money and intended to provide low or no-cost care for the uncovered.

      Like

      • deqwik2 says:

        Not really. You can go for birth control & disease testing but that’s about it as far as free clinics.

        There is a clinic that has medical & dental services on a sliding scale but the wait time for appts is long & care is not top notch. It’s not like your own doctor but at least you can get some help.

        Most people just go to the ER if it’s a one time thing like fever & sore throat. It defeats the whole purpose of what Obamacare was suppose to stop &
        just proves Obamacare didn’t help anybody except the people that received benefits from the medicaid expansion. (The clinic was here years before Obamacare too).

        Liked by 1 person

        • dayallaxeded says:

          While it’s tough to say, the bottom line is that those who’re in that coverage gap need to work harder and/or smarter to get out of that hole, just like anyone in poverty. FedGov must not be the year-round Santa who guarantees everyone enough to eat, housing, and healthcare. That has been a demonstrated recipe for disaster since the beginning of the American colonies. The only reason we’re a nation today and have had the strength to survive the depredations of half a century of misuse and abuse of FedGov power is because we started with and for a long time maintained the principle: “If you don’t work, you don’t eat.”

          Liked by 1 person

          • deqwik2 says:

            Exactly but this brings up another problem with Obamacare…. work hours.
            Most lower income folks work jobs in retail, food services etc. & a full time worker is now one classified as part time with 30 hours. Unless you go into management, you work 20-30 hours a week with no benefits until you’ve been there a year.

            For a female, it is just easier to get pregnant so you can get help. Our government is like the tail trying to wag the dog. It’s all backwards.

            People like Michael Moore who thinks Obamacare is the answer to our health system doesn’t know what is going on at ground level. It’s a disaster down here in the real world.

            I just don’t see any benefits to Obamacare. It has hurt us as a nation.

            Like

  21. TwoLaine says:

    One more time, tell Mr. President to END the ObamaCare Exemption for Congress. They should live under the SAME LAWS they expect us to live under. FRAUDS!

    JW to Trump Administration: End Congress’s Obamacare Exemption!

    Do you wonder why it’s so hard for your representatives in Congress to find a way to keep their promise to repeal Obamacare, which has proved a disaster for hundreds of thousands of Americans? Perhaps it’s because they have a sweetheart deal they don’t want to lose.

    Judicial Watch previously uncovered false applications filed by the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate with the D.C. Exchange Authority showing that the House and Senate claimed to have only 45 employees each. They also show that the House and Senate attested to having “50 or fewer full-time equivalent employees.” Congress employs upwards of 20,000 people. The applications also falsely state that the House and Senate are “local/state governments.”

    We are also leading the challenge to the unlawful Obamacare subsidies for Congress through a taxpayer lawsuit against the DC government agency that is helping Congress violate the law. The case is currently before the D.C. Court of Appeals.

    Now we are officially requesting that the Trump administration stop members of Congress and their staffs from unlawfully purchasing, with taxpayer subsidies, health insurance through the District of Columbia’s small business exchange. We made our request on June 14, 2017, to the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services (CMS) as part of a process set out by the Department of Health and Human Services to reform the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), otherwise known as Obamacare.

    We wrote:
    The ACA requires states to create at least two exchanges: a small business exchange (referred to as “SHOP” in the ACA) and an individual exchange. It also requires certain members of Congress and congressional employees to purchase insurance on an exchange created either by their state of residence (or by the District, if they are a D.C. resident) or by the federal government, if their state of residence did not establish an exchange. 42 U.S.C. § 18032(d)(3)(D)(i). Because the ACA limits the purchase of insurance on a small business exchange to employees of small businesses – and Congress is not a small business – the ACA unequivocally requires that certain members of Congress and congressional employees purchase insurance on an individual exchange created either by their state of residence (or by the District, if they are a D.C. resident) or by the federal government for that state.

    Nonetheless, OPM promulgated 5 C.F.R. § 890.102(c)(9), which purportedly authorized congressional employees to purchase health insurance offered by an appropriate small business exchange, and the OPM Director subsequently issued guidance stating, “OPM has determined that the DC SHOP . . . is the appropriate SHOP from which Members of Congress and designated congressional staff will purchase health insurance in order to receive a Government contribution.” Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Members of Congress and Congressional Staff, 78 Fed. Reg. 60653, 60654 (Oct. 2, 2013).

    Similarly, CMS issued guidance stating, “Consistent with the OPM rule, this guidance clarifies that offices of the Members of Congress are considered qualified employers eligible to offer coverage to Members and designated Congressional staff through the appropriate SHOP as determined by OPM. CMS clarifies that offices of the Members of Congress, as qualified employers, are eligible to participate in a SHOP regardless of the size and offering requirements set forth in the definition of “qualified employer” in the Exchange final rule, provided that the office offers coverage to those full-time employees who are determined by statute to purchase health insurance from an Exchange for the purpose of the government contribution.” CMS, Affordable Insurance Exchanges Guidance (September 30, 2013, available at [URL REMOVED].

    Because certain members of Congress and congressional employees are enrolled in a small business exchange, the government is contributing monies contrary to the ACA. If OPM’s and CMS’s regulation and guidance were revoked, the government would save monies being expended unlawfully to provide contributions to the approximately 20,000 members of Congress and congressional employees. In addition, the rule of law will be enforced.

    Congress is violating Obamacare to get taxpayers to pay for its health insurance. If the Trump administration required Congress to follow the law, taxpayers would be saving money, pure and simple. We hope the Trump administration will end this clear violation of law by Congress.

    Our Founding Fathers gave us a republican form of government designed to make sure no one is above the law. It is a stain the system bequeathed to us that one of the three branches is breaking the Obamacare law that every other citizen must follow.

    I respectfully suggest you celebrate Independence Day by reaching out to the White House to let the Trump administration know your views on Congress’s Obamacare exemption.

    And, of course, best wishes to you and yours for a wonderful Independence Day!

    Until next week,

    Tom Fitton
    President

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/write-or-call

    Liked by 8 people

    • TwoLaine says:

      And, IF you’re gonna’ contact the WH, why not also ask them to get the drug treatment $$$ from the drug companies, drug peddlers, and all of the for profit doctors who peddle these addictive drugs, NOT The poor citizens. They all get to retire with FAT pensions while we live to pay for their abuses.

      Just like in the days we went after the tobacco companies for all their lies, this is not a bill we should have to absorb!

      Liked by 2 people

  22. WeThePeople2016 says:

    I watched this interview this morning, and did you notice that Roberts couldn’t wait to ask Marc Short about Trump’s tweets. Roberts did the SAME thing to Rand Paul. They both gave really good responses to Roberts.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Wayne says:

    I kinda wish ACA would be repealed first then work to put the new bill in order without government between patients and dr relations / then reach out for input from reasonable Demorats. Not towards socialized medicine it’s not constitutional , I’m sick of trying to give non producers same as producers , this removes incentives towards self betterment. I only went to tenth grade. When I fell for Peggy , I wanted to get married and have a family. I learned pretty damn quick that I really didn’t have much of a future being a day laborer . I signed up with union ironworkers and started my apprenticeship program . Three years later I turned out as JIW . Worked all over on every kind of project you could name. Started out first period apprentice and topped out superintendent. I have a great union pension and social security . How else is a young guy gonna buy a house and raise a family. It’s true that Ironwork may not be for very many people nights and such . It seems to me there is a union for just about any trade maybe carpentry or electrician or boiler makers or mill rights or tin knockers there is something out there for every young man that’s not afraid of work and starting at the bottom and learning but don’t wait too long as it’s only your life that’s passing .

    Liked by 4 people

    • rashamon says:

      Any person over the age of twelve should have a job. I don’t care if they only work six hour a week and the wage is 50 cents an hour because that’s all they deserve, but a regular job with people who appreciate great work teaches skills no lecture by progressives will every accomplish.

      You, Wayne, should afford your perspective to middle and high schools for seminars to instill student with the attitude you have learned and earned. Kudos! What an interesting Q & A for future workers.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. thesavvyinvester says:

    I am flummoxed, and I wonder why no one is asking why are we even considering Cruz’ s alternative coverage. Correct me if I am wrong, but I thought “The Qualified Plan” i.e. the all bells and whistles plan that took away all our “contracts” was a creation of Siblius and her “Aministrator Shall” powers. By not totally gutting Ocare, If i read this right, Sec. Price retains these powers and will make massive changes to the internal architecture of Ocare, after the foundation is fixed. I wonder if allowing non-qualified plans is in his power, if not I am mistaken.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Matt says:

    Did Mr. Cruz come up with on his own? Or did he first speak with reps from insurance companies or President Trump’s administration to influence the legislation? It would be nice to know.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Bouchart says:

    Kudos to Cruz.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. triper57 says:

    Just repeal O’care and all its Regulations and Taxes. Leave nothing there.
    The government has no business in funding This mess. Just make it easy for NGO’s to set up Hospitals and Clinics using money from private sources.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. trapper says:

    The further all of this goes, the more I trust Pres Trump and the less I feel the need to monitor it all 24/7. I sleep easier each night.

    It didn’t really matter what the House passed. They just had to pass SOMETHING in order to get to the next step, which is the Senate bill. Then on to reconciliation, and then on to steps 2 and 3.

    So, was Cruz’s amendment all worked out with the White House and ready to go months ago? If the plan is a parallel health insurance system like the parallel banking system (which is brilliant in the simplicity of the solution) then I expect it probably was. For a man who can look at a building and visualize the skyscraper he will build in its place, and who knows the details of every single step that must take place, and the proper sequence of each one, in order to make that skyscraper a reality, this kind of legislative planning would be child’s play.

    Now, take this type of systematic approach and apply it to foreign policy, working with some countries and leaving others behind, the modern equivalent of “island hopping” that our military did in the S Pacific in WWII. Perhaps the same approach will result in running parallel foreign policies to leave some obsolete relationships in place while forging new 21st century relationships. Watching our 21st Century America First foreign policy take shape and come into view will be quite thrilling.

    New watchword: parallelism.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Esperanza says:

      I also love Trump’s capacity to “God give me the strength to change what can be changed, and the grace to accept what can’t”. He doesn’t do ideological, he does practical. Goal=everyone covered in the manner they want and need, how do we do that? i think it’s great, if you like your Obama care, you can keep it.

      Like

  29. Tonawanda says:

    Trump folks would be more persuasive if they stopped using the word “look.”

    It is a junk word used by almost everyone (but NOT Trump).

    “Look” is used to gather time to think, yes, and it is also used as a condescending punch word.

    Am I the only person annoyed? Maybe I am.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. nyetneetot says:

    “… (and their special-interest paid troll army).”

    !!! What am I accused of this time?!?

    Liked by 1 person

  31. TONYA PARNELL says:

    Any time the government is involved in anything, the taxpayers are screwed. Scrap the whole thing and let the market take care of itself. Nobody was left out in the cold before this mess started

    Like

    • That is not quite true – those with pre-existing conditions were left out in the cold; if they could find an insurance company that would cover them, they couldn’t afford the sky-high premiums. As an example, both my daughter and son-in-law had gastric bypass surgery, which is considered to be a “pre-existing condition,” and insurance companies didn’t want to or wouldn’t cover them.

      Like

      • yadent says:

        As long as the medical industry is politically ‘beyond’ US antitrust law, the need for the scam known as healthcare insurance will be present. And unfortunately, the cost of said healthcare insurance will continually rise, irregardless of which plans being considered, as there is NO rein on healthcare costs. Service/goods costs drive premium rates.

        Liked by 1 person

      • KJinCton says:

        My wife had gastric bypass as well, about 12+ years ago. She just wanted a quick fix and didn’t want to hear any reservations I had about it. She’s had issues pop up from it ever since, though thank God nothing life threatening. And, our insurance has always been through the roof ever since.

        Whose fault is that….mine and my wife’s. It’s not the fault of the insurance companies. It’s her fault for not believing that she had some control over her situation and mine for not being more adamant about my reservations.

        Since then she’s wanted additional cosmetic surgeries to which I told her once we divorce she’s more than happy to do whatever she wants.

        Any person who decides to embark on an elective surgery can’t whine once it results in higher premiums afterwards.

        Liked by 3 people

      • rf121 says:

        The problem with pre-existing conditions is your medical care is going to cost more and the insurance companies know that. Yet for some crazy reason, people with pre-existing conditions think they should not have to pay anymore than someone who is healthy.

        Instead of getting gastric bypass surgery fixing the diet would have taken care of it and would not have put them where they are now. Sort of the overall problem with medicine. Not addressing the underlying problem, just treating symptoms.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Esperanza says:

          Also leave you with money left over for the cosmetic surgery.

          Like

        • I agree and I tried over and over and over to get her off her butt and exercising. Her excuse was always it hurt her back and knees. Finally, the day of the surgery, she pleaded with me to support her in her decision and, as a parent, what else could I do? I mean, she was an adult and had the right to make her own decisions.

          Like

          • rf121 says:

            It is very similar to type II diabetes. Instead of basically going low carb and getting off the meds they figure I can just eat what I want because the meds will keep my blood sugars in check. For many of us, we know what we need to do. It is having the will power to actually do it. Normally takes a life changing event. Hopefully not too late.

            Liked by 1 person

      • Esperanza says:

        I can’t afford to be overweight. Can’t afford the food. Obesity is a mental illness, should be treated as such. Sorry to be harsh, but I get so sick of paying for other people’s problems and not being able to have access for mine. I have a frozen shoulder and despite my having two sets of insurance it costs about half out of pocket for the physio.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Linda says:

          You know, I read my news here every day. I don’t comment much because I am not up to date on political matters as I should have been all of these years so, I like to hear what others with more knowledge of the issues than I do have to contribute. I am 63 years old and I get so tired of hearing a blanket statement about weight. I needed to have a total hip replacement beginning in 2009. I could not get insurance because of the high premiums due to high BP which is a family trait. Although I was totally against Obamacare, my daughter talked me into enrolling because of the cost in penalties from not having it. My state was one of the states where it was impossible to get Medicaid. Thankfully, I was able to live on my husband’s social security because it got so bad I had to have someone do simple tasks such as buying my groceries, cleaning, etc. When I finally met my deductible, I was able to have the total hip replacement. My doctor said I had waited so long my bone in my leg had begun to deteriorate. I had my surgery this past December. Since then, I have lost 67 lbs. When I came out of recovery, they got me up and walking immediately and I started crying because for the first time in many years, I had no pain. Before, I wanted to die because I hurt so bad 24/7. I had no appetite because of the pain. When you can’t move, you will gain weight. My diet didn’t change afterwards but moving is causing the weight to fall off. So, please, the one size fits all statements do not apply to all of us.

          Like

        • dayallaxeded says:

          Feeling your pain–literally! Had a bad, purely accidental fall about 6 months ago, detaching humerous from rotator cuff. Got it repaired, but dayum, recovery is more than a be-otch! Fortunately, I’m not getting the locking I was warned about, but I can’t afford the time or $ for PT, so I’m partially hanging from pull-up bars, pushing against door frames, and trying to work into some yoga targeting the shoulders when I can. I’ve had a couple of other broken bones and some bad cuts and the shoulder has been the worst. One guy told me he’d been shot and had a torn rotator cuff–the latter was worse. So God bless and help us heal!

          Like

  32. Kjf says:

    I trust DJT, but when ever I see Freedomworks, Koch, or Cruz my skin shivers

    Liked by 3 people

    • I was unaware until now that Koch was behind FreedomWorks….now that I know that, I don’t think quite so highly of them. As for Cruz, he will forever be Lyin’ Canadian Ted to me – I have a deep, visceral disgust towards him, perhaps because I was taken in by him years ago, until I learned the facts about his citizenship (or lack thereof). After that, I started paying very close attention to the way he words things and discovered how truly devious he is!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  33. spaulj67 says:

    Any plan that doesn’t address the medical industries violation of the Clayton and Sherman acts will fail in the real world. Name any other industry that is not required to post prices prior to rendering services?

    Liked by 1 person

  34. psadie says:

    OK this makes my head hurt…so we still cannot buy insurance across state lines and Obamacare will not be repealed. Am I correct on this?

    Liked by 1 person

  35. G. Combs says:

    From one of President Trump’s books.

    The main causes of the high cost of healthcare.

    1. Doctor’s insurance for law suits… and WE pay for it.

    “Costs tend to vary among states. For example, malpractice costs in Minnesota could cost anywhere from $4,000 to $17,000 per year, depending on your specialty. But in California, a surgeon can expect to pay anywhere from $22,000 to $34,000 per year.”

    A new study reveals that the cost of medical malpractice in the United States is running at about $55.6 billion a year – $45.6 billion of which is spent on defensive medicine practiced by physicians seeking to stay clear of lawsuits according to Blue Cross and Blue Shield. Defensive medicine is unnecessary tests or surgery to protect the Doctor from claims.

    The answer to this high cost is tort reform laws aimed at limiting the cost of medical malpractice. Some of these are getting passed.

    2. Competition
    This includes MORE DOCTORS and more universities programs. The AMA restricts the number of doctors to keep prices high and hospital and doctor’s offices are consolidating.

    3. Regulations
    If a doctor fills out the forms wrong the forefieture laws can wipe him out. So how much time does a doctor spend filling out government required paperwork. Does he have to hire extra help or see less patients?

    What about other regulations? One doctor I talked to said the University (Duke) used to supply its own radioactive isotopes for X-rays and radiation therapy. Then regs were past and they now have to pay through the nose for the same material they got for 100th the price.

    This is a good article that explores the various factors going into the cost of healthcare.
    https://mises.org/blog/how-government-regulations-made-healthcare-so-expensive

    Like

  36. WSB says:

    This is all just a pile of BS. Repeal the bill amd enact two new ones. The first, tort reform. The second, allow all products to be sold over state lines. Try to kill insurance altogether.

    Like

    • Troublemaker10 says:

      That Marc Short interview was really good. I’m so impressed by the quality of people working in this Administration. I’m also starting to feel very upbeat and positive. So excited to see things moving. It’s gonna happen.

      Liked by 2 people

  37. keebler AC ovfefe says:

    Art of the Deal. PDJT doesn’t believe in unicorns. He works in reality and is perfectly aware that parties across the table are not friends, but mostly foes, when it comes to negotiations. He knows how to get a product approved and built. If it requires involving Cruz to win over the bots, so be it as long as he gets what he needs for Americans. If anyone can unravel Obama NoCare and win over both sides, it’s PDJT!

    Like

  38. armie says:

    Cool! With all the “bigs” at the table, Big America will finally get a seat.

    Liked by 2 people

  39. christina says:

    if your self employed/part-time landlord you are not allowed to contribute towards social security/medicare even when forced to do sf city own job like sidewalk/tree maintenance,but still forced to pay taxes for nothing, after all police no longer require to protect you….

    Like

  40. jstanley01 says:

    Good for Sen. Cruz.

    Like

  41. jeans2nd says:

    Once on the outside, conservative Koch network warms to Trump
    “Trump lumped the Kochs in with other special-interest groups, boasting that he did not need their money and that they could not influence him.”
    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-koch-idUSKBN19I137

    Pro-Trump groups take no prisoners in rush to help an embattled president
    “On Tuesday, one of the groups, America First Policies, launched an attack ad against a senator from Trump’s own Republican Party who had balked at a Senate plan to overhaul healthcare that would leave millions more Americans uninsured.”

    “America First Policies and the other pro-Trump groups were set up to promote Trump and his legislative agenda…They are not allied to the Republican Party”

    “they were not afraid to push House Republicans through grassroots and advertising to support the healthcare overhaul.”

    ““Our goal is to really get on the ground and fight back. Our supporters want to get out there and fight …”
    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-super-pacs-idUSKBN19J2GI

    All ur lobbyizs, and now the Koch Bros, r belong to us.

    That said, we of the Lunatic Fringe do not trust Lyin’ Ted as far as Lyin’ Ted could be thrown. We hope we are incorrect.
    “the sticky parts are always in the details.”

    Like

  42. Frank says:

    In the UK, socialized healthcare is available alongside private healthcare. One system does not totally overrun the other. If you’re willing to pay for private coverage, go ahead. What Cruz and Lee are proposing would create a similar system of choice here. Obamacare would remain a burden on the taxpayers to care for the welfare doleys, but it would no longer force the entire country into a single-payer system. At least for now, Cruz and Lee have hit upon a good solution.

    Like

  43. 6x47 says:

    The wonderful thing about the parallel track is opening an escape route so all the people can get out from under the monstrosity of Obamacare.

    Obamacare will still be there but nobody will be in it.

    Imagine the pitch: “Git yer health insurance! I gotta plan that actually covers you for the things you want at a reasonable premium with affordable co-pays and deductibles … or I got Obamacare! Obamacare is really REALLY expensive, it doesn’t cover ANYTHING until you you pays a HUGE deductible! FREE DEAD DOG WITH EVERY OBAMACARE POLICY!”

    Give the people a choice and nobody will choose Obamacare.

    Like

  44. KittyKat says:

    Getting rid of Medicaid is Paul Ryan’s brainchild, it was always part of his “Better Way”. Of course his own plan is gold plated.

    Like

  45. The Heretic says:

    Just repeal the damn thing. Make provisions for the people on it, and let it sunset. Let the free market do its work.

    Like

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