Trumponomics – Yes, Manufacturing Can and Will Return – And Wages Are Going Up, Bigly…

Yesterday President Trump met with the National Association of Manufacturers group in the White House to discuss the outlook for manufacturing jobs gains and the larger increase in actual manufacturing sector gains.

The results of surveys conducted with current manufacturing companies is stunning with 93% holding an optimistic outlook.

However, beyond the optimism there’s additional data which is annoying the media and professional-left who are determined not to focus on successful Trumponomic strategy.

As a direct result of President Trump’s multifaceted economic strategy, manufacturing companies are having to look at TCO which is “Total Cost of Ownership”.  You see, President Trump is not only approaching manufacturing growth policy from the investment side, his policies also approach the larger impacts on raw material, energy and labor.

This multi-pronged policy approach forces companies to look at transportation and location costs of manufacturing.   If domestic costs of material and energy drop, in addition to drops in regulatory and compliance costs of operating the business, the operating cost differences drop dramatically.

This means labor and transportation costs become a larger part of the consideration in “where” to manufacture.   All of these costs contribute to the TCO.   Transportation costs are very expensive on durable goods imported.  If the durable goods are made domestically, the transportation costs per unit shipped drop significantly.  The TCO analysis then further reduces to looking at labor.

U.S. Labor is more expensive, yes.  However, if material costs, energy costs, regulatory costs and transportation costs are part of the TCO equation – then higher labor costs can be offset by the previously mentioned savings.

For two years CTH has repeatedly stated that under Trump’s proposals “total costs” drop so dramatically, that off-shored manufacturing is no longer the best play.   We are seeing that shake out right now.  For the first time in 30 years companies are reviewing the TCO of products and finding less and less financial reasons for off-shore manufacturing.

The first well framed article on that new Trumponomic analysis appeared last week in Market Watch:

For decades, U.S. companies have been chasing cheap labor offshore and then importing products to sell in the U.S. market.

Now, Trumponomics, a broader focus on Total Cost of Ownership (TCO quantifies all relevant costs, risks and strategic factors) and advanced manufacturing together have the potential to end the manufacturing stagnation of the past 30 years and create millions of manufacturing jobs in the U.S.

Over the past 20 years, the boom in offshoring drove our goods trade deficit up by about $640 billion a year, costing us three to four million manufacturing jobs.

The most direct way to reduce the trade deficit, as President Trump has said he wants to do, is to substitute domestic production for imports, i.e. via reshoring and foreign direct investment (FDI) in the U.S. The result of eliminating the trade deficit would be a rapidly growing manufacturing workforce for the first time in 40 years, a rise in average wages and a 25% to 30% increase in manufacturing output and jobs.

Many companies that offshored manufacturing didn’t really do the math. An Archstone study revealed that 60% of offshoring decisions used only rudimentary cost calculations, typically just price or labor costs and ignored other costs such as freight, duty, carrying cost of inventory, delivery and impact on innovation. Most of the true risks and cost of offshoring were being ignored.

Now is a good time to re-evaluate the cost of domestic vs. offshore production, and not just because of the risk of an angry tweet from the president.

Chinese wages have been rising by about 15% a year since 2000. As a result, the Chinese labor cost in dollars per unit of output is now about four times what it was in 2000. We estimate that about 25% of what is now offshored would come back if companies quantified the total cost. These products would generally have characteristics such as high freight cost vs. labor cost, frequent design changes, volatility in demand, intellectual property risk, and regulatory and compliance requirements.

For these most-reshorable products, such as large appliances with high freight costs, medical devices requiring high technology and quality standards, and plastic products that are getting cheaper thanks to declining natural gas and oil prices, the offshore manufacturing cost gap vs. the U.S. is now smaller than the offshoring “hidden costs” mentioned earlier. (read more)

I am beyond excited to see economic and manufacturing analytics’ focusing on the Total Cost of goods.   Donald Trump, now President Trump, has been making this economic policy argument for over three decades; and there are a bunch of us who have held similar views but frustratingly only found them falling on deaf ears.

We already have the raw materials: iron ore, steel, mineral deposits, and we have abundant energy resources, these are immediate cost advantages.  The area of disagreement I have with forecasts is in the area of wage growth.

The fed, and as a consequence most economists, are projecting 2% wage growth year-over-year.  However, they (all of them) are not factoring in the speed with which Main Street economy can/is restarting when uncoupled from Wall Street policy.  The demand for labor is already increasing dramatically.   I would not be surprised to see micro-level (regional) 6-8% wage growth by the end of Trumponomics year #1.

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172 Responses to Trumponomics – Yes, Manufacturing Can and Will Return – And Wages Are Going Up, Bigly…

  1. Ocean freight costs from Asia to N America have dropped considerably due recent over tunnage in the market. It is cheaper to ship from Asian port of exit to the west coast than domestically from east coast via truck.

    Liked by 1 person

    • waltherppk says:

      Rail has been greatly under utilized for domestic freight long haul transport.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Southern Son says:

        As I have posted before, Rail Traffic is up noticeably since the Election.
        I have only first hand knowledge.
        But OT is called for Every Shift, Every Day now.
        Our Line has called back Hundreds of Transportation Workers that were laid off over three years ago.
        New jobs are also posted, for anyone interested.
        It’s tough though!
        Very Rewarding, but Very Difficult!
        High Stress, and Dangerous.

        Liked by 23 people

        • QuestGirl says:

          If only I were young, again. I love trains, they speak romance to me. .

          Liked by 5 people

          • Hollywood Bungalow says:

            QuestGirl – if you get Netflix, you might enjoy the show Hell on Wheels. A rough n tumble look at the making of the western railroad. All aboard!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Southern Son says:

            Ain’t nothin’ Romantic about Workin’ for the RailRoad.
            It’s a b!t(h…

            Liked by 1 person

          • When I was in my teens I used to take the trains all the time into the City, never understood why towns outside of the cities stopped having them. When I lived in Europe I used to take the trains and trams everywhere. Matter of fact for a less expensive ticket I would fly into a Country such as France or Italy and then take a train up to Denmark to visit relatives and friends, great way to see the Country and make friends as well as saving me several hundred dollars on the flight. Trains made this Country great, and then we stopped, It sure would have helped with traffic jams that are so outrageous. Our poor roads right now, my gosh, I live in a state where tax has been raised (on top of the other taxes that are put on per gallon)up to 58 cents a gallon of gas to improve the roads (instituted just 4 years ago), well if you came to North East PA, you would not believe how seriously bad they are, never in my long life do I remember roads as bad as this. And although I feel for the truckers (they pay heavy heavy amounts for use of the roads). They are the ones that kinda killed the train industry, stating that they could get your products from “door to door”, but if you see the road damage, the daily accidents (not all the time fault of the truckers) but DAILY serious truck accidents costing goods, lives, suits for damages etc, we really did not save much by having the truck industry take over the job of the trains. We could always still use trucks…but, as you, I do miss the convince of trains and miss having good roads to drive on.

            Like

        • carterzest says:

          What company Southern On? I’m recently unemployed…shopping hard. Lots of transportation experience. My TH name at iCloud.com. 😉

          And He’ll on Wheels is an excellent series!

          Like

          • Southern Son says:

            Go to all the RR Homepages.
            Norfolk Southern, CSX, and Canadian National are Hiring.
            I heard CN has over a thousand jobs posted!
            But unless you have RR experience, Transportation prolly won’t help unless in Management.
            I speak only for Hourly Positions.
            It took me Five yrs to get on with Short Line RR experience.
            But it’s about to bust off right now.
            Many gettin called back, won’t take it.
            Furloughs were to be expected in the
            oboMao Slump.

            Liked by 3 people

        • Fe says:

          I recently saw a train of COAL, cars after cars filled coal going through Geneva, IL. We happened to have one our granddaughters with us. I got so excited, I yelled out there goes CLEAN COAL, coal keeps the lights on baby. My granddaughters know how much I adore President Trump and why…seeing that coal train made my day. 😁

          Liked by 14 people

          • Maquis says:

            That coal could well be that which passes daily through the heart of downtown here, on it’s way to China.

            We got the World by the tail! Well, feels that way today, so proud of PDJT, and CTH, and the folks that make this the best croud-sourcing…I can’t say blog, it’s so much more, agency?… CTH is actually in the action, solving problems, crimes, building unassailable timelines of facts that will be part of History forever, and we like each each, least we show proper respect.

            When I encounter someone I’ve not seen before badmouthing Sundance or his/our research, I know I’m likely up against a troll here to distract. They get nice for a while after being called out, but they’re still going back to their shameful antics… and we don’t have many of those. Most Treepers won’t even respond to aggressive strange comments, and the admin gods do a remarkable job of dealing with incivility in a calm quiet near invisible way, but very, very, effective.

            I’m not sucking up! I’m sincerely felling what we said in the military when dropped in a new job with new peeps, after introducing ourselves, Rank and Name, then “Damn glad to be here!”

            That’s where I’m at, and telling folks in passing about the treehouse left and right.

            Sorry for being so verbose, I suspect/fear I am on a watch list, when I post and see how huge it really is, I worry I’m on thin ice. 😉 ? Apologies, sincerely. This is my home, my “Unit.” Never want to lose this privilege.

            When I get my new command center built, with a great PC, I think I’ll be able to better see things in proper scale, android gives me a nice tiny box that masks how far I’ve gone…

            Liked by 2 people

          • COLibertyBelle says:

            Fe, the same is happening g here in western Colorado — the coal mines are re-opening, hiring again and sending coal out again by rail!!! Happy days are here again, and we sooooo need this again in our part of the West! Thank you, Mr President – we love you!

            Liked by 4 people

          • jackphatz says:

            We recently saw a barge on the Ohio pushing coal. Rarely saw that anymore, not much barge traffic like it used to be.

            Like

    • sundance says:

      Yeah, but West Coast port costs have gone through the roof. Doesn’t make a difference if you can ship cheap if it cost an arm-n-leg to offload. 😦

      Liked by 29 people

      • wheatietoo says:

        Aren’t a lot of our West Coast ports foreign-owned now?

        Liked by 3 people

        • A2 says:

          About 30% of US port terminals are owned or managed by foreign based companies and rising to 80% of the L.A. port terminals. Chinese SOEs control port terminals in L. A. and other west coast ports as well as both ends of the Panama Canal.

          Liked by 7 people

          • mopar2016 says:

            Carter should never have given away the Panama Canal.
            Can you imagine the positive things that would happen if both parties loved America?
            Unfortunately it’s obvious that neither party loves America.
            https://s3.amazonaws.com/lowres.cartoonstock.com/business-commerce-globalism-globalist-manufacturing-global_econ

            Liked by 6 people

          • QuestGirl says:

            I read in one article awhile ago that Iran, I think, has some kind of connection to a port in Florida.

            Like

          • Athena the Warrior says:

            How in the world did that happen? Who OKed such a stupid and dangerous thing not just economically, but also for national security? Who knows what’s been smuggled in or out especially to China via industrial espionage?

            Liked by 1 person

            • Dennis Leonard says:

              Athena,

              According to Mr. Jones and Ms. Fanning’s paper, entitled “What Could Possibly Go Wrong?” Secret Deal Allows Company Tied to Saddam’s Nuclear Bombmaker, Iran and U.A.E. to Manage Key Florida Port Facilities, Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew unilaterally approved the lease for Gulftainer – a Middle Eastern ports company owned by the Emir of Sharjah of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Iraqi businessman Hamid Dhia Jafar – following two years of secret talks.

              Like

          • Actually I think then President Bush gave over control of one of our ports I forget if it was in Texas or Maryland to the Saudi’s there was a big stink about it, also Obama gave many of our roads over to China, in the management of them, Like the “Suncoast highway” in FL that is run by China (hence the tolls) but from what I understand (and barely remember-ahh that short term memory again-darn). But there were several roads turned over to China for maintenance and toll taking.

            Like

        • we have 20 container ports in the US and I know Port of Tacoma and Port of Seattle which merged 2 years ago they are municipal run so not foreign owned at all.

          Liked by 1 person

        • frank field says:

          Carter gave the Panama canal to the Chinese.

          Clinton gave management of the Long Beach, Calif port to the Chinese.

          Under God…we NEED Trump.

          Liked by 1 person

      • muffyroberts says:

        Never even thought of that.

        They get us any which way but Trump.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Coldeadhands says:

        Then add in the cumulative costs of the union work slow downs and stoppages that we’ve seen at west coast ports in the last few years.

        Like

      • bertdilbert says:

        Yeah they overpaid longshoremen. Last casual call in 2005 they had something like 1000 jobs and got over a million applications. Those are basically part time jobs with no benefits but a lottery ticket to down the road.

        Then they like to tax everything and basically bought the terminals all new environmentally approved trucks. It is basically a tax on the rest of the nation that is forced to subsidize CA.

        I have not followed it but I think they installed power for the ships to plug in and not use the ships generators for power which cost a fortune to put power on the docks and modifications to the ships.

        Somebody has to pay for CA craziness but if they can pass the cost off to the rest of the nation, they can bolster their economies with ineficancy.

        Liked by 7 people

        • dbcaldave says:

          Yes it’s the California air resources board. I work as an engineer on container ships between CA and Hawaii. CARB imposed new regulation in 2013 so now we can’t run a generator while we are in port and we have to plug into Shore power when we’re at the dock in a West Coast port. Matson has a small fleet, only 8 ships, they did a retrofit on all of them at a cost of about $1.5- 2 million per ship. Plus Long Beach spent $200 million on the port facilities for shore power. Plus we have to burn low sulfer fuel within 200 miles and straight diesel oil within 24 MI CARB zone. Plus all the Xtra OT for changeover and plugging in. That’s expensive stuff and all those costs get passed to the customer . The regulatory boot is heavy in California. And they will shut you Down. The worst.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Maquis says:

            Like Dwight Yokum called it; The Late Great Golden State. Great song. Sad truth.

            Like

          • bertdilbert says:

            How do the injectors handle going from diesel #4 to diesel #2? Do the heads have to have another set of injectors or does the filtering and heating of the #4 make it equivalent?

            The problem with the ports and longshoremen is you are dealing with monopolies and they can demand whatever they want. The problem with CA politicians is they are hungry to add Green stuff that they voted on so when election comes around they have a list of “accomplishments”. In business, political accomplishments are our setbacks.

            Thanks for the ships power update crazyness.

            Like

      • Still ocean freight I/B from China etc is much less expensive and there are all water services via Panama Canal to US EC ports. Ocean freight economics are vastly different than rail and truck. Rail isn’t for everything even intermodal. Bottom line, due to the gigantic new ctr vessels which now dominate the Asia / N America lane, the freight costs have been cut considerably and really aren’t much of a factor. I’m not trying to be a downer but them’s the facts.

        Liked by 2 people

        • big bad mike says:

          Doesn’t matter how cheap China government transport is, they’re still importing junk. And you are incorrect, as a full truck load from Chicago to CA is still averaging $2500.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Last time I shipped from Charleston to Shanghai the freight was more from Greenville SC to Charleston ($550) than Charleston to Shanghai ($385) the steamship line told me that the other way… Shanghai to Charleston was $3800 a can.

            Liked by 2 people

            • Vince says:

              The difference between shipping from Shanghai to Charleston ($3800) and from Charleston to Shanghai ($380) is a good illustration of the trade deficit between China and the U.S.

              There are a lot of factories in Shanghai, and so shippers charge a premium for their services that originate at Shanghai. Goods are loaded into a steel container and shipped to Charleston. The goods are unloaded in Charleston, where they belong. But now the steel container is in Charleston, not Shanghai, and there is not as much demand for goods going from Charleston to Shanghai. So how do the containers get back to a place where the shippers can use them again?

              Shippers incur repositioning costs in order to put their containers where they are needed. They either offer steep discounts to shippers going the other way, which is the difference in price that you see. They also are sometimes forced to send back empty containers. Containers leaving the U.S. going to China carry things like used cardboard for recycling, old electronics for recycling, scrap metal, or air. The only way shipping scrap across the world can be profitable is that the shipping companies need the containers back and will accept low rates to get them back.

              If President Trump is successful at rebalancing manufacturing, then the shipping rates between China and the U.S. will equalize.

              Liked by 14 people

              • A2 says:

                Great comment Vince. Liked.

                Like

              • lfhbrave says:

                One major reason for the steep different rate for cargo going back to Far East is the fact most Asian countries impose 50% – >100% tariffs on the U.S. manufacturing products. For the past 30 years or so China basically forced U.S. companies to form joint ventures with Chinese companies and produce goods in China if they wanted to sell their products in the Chinese market. By so doing, they also stole big time the intellectual property and trade secrets from the U.S. companies. Now, adding insult to injury, these U.S. companies ship back their products made in Far East back to the U.S. market. Other European manufacturers are doing the same. A case in point, Volvo used to make cars in Sweden and shipped to the U.S. Now, I was told by a Volvo dealer recently, after China bought Volvo, they make some Volvo cars (e.g., S60s) in China, and ship them to the U.S. market. In this very competitive U.S. market, it will be difficult to reverse this trend if the cost of producing and shipping of the foreign made manufactured goods is not substantially increased by either tariffs or other means in a bilateral trade agreements.

                Liked by 1 person

                • Maquis says:

                  Enter Trump. He gets this. He will do tariffs as required, pretty much a case by case situation. Tough to do, lots of energy and smarts needed to balance that act.

                  As PDJT said, his visit with Xi this coming week will be very difficult.

                  Liked by 1 person

          • Junk is correct, between lead plaint in children’s toys, or rat meat sold as chicken, toys, furniture that falls apart and worst of all the electric wires, never and I mean never purchase extension cords or any electric item from your local dollar store that is from China-has created more house fires and shortages (yes, I am a firefighter/Paramedic). So great point. China’s industries are not on “quality” but quantity is the point and rule of law there, remember they are not regulated as we are here, Mind you we are over-over regulated, but some regulations make sense. So it is a point of the pendulum that swings to the extremes, do you wish to save money-or do you wish to be safe??? One thing great about Americans is the “Pride” that they take in their work.

            Like

        • xyzlatin says:

          Please people, spell out all those initials. The Treehouse comments section should be readable for the rest of us and in a way, using initials is a way of showing off your superiority and talking down to us rubes. Most people are too shy to complain.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Southern Son says:

            I think Ca. is for California, and SC. is for South Carolina, as it follows Charleston. Which they spelled, Thank Goodness.
            Hope that helps.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Shirley32 says:

            Amen to that, xyzlatin. Have been reading here for a long time and still cannot figure out all the darn letters. It only takes a few more key strokes to make it readable to all of us. Thank you.

            Like

      • Vince says:

        The Panama Canal has been widened recently, and it is now more economical to ship from Asia to east coast ports. The canal still can’t take in the largest ships though, they have to go to the west coast.

        Like

      • bertdilbert says:

        One thing Trump should do is eliminate the Longshorman and Harborworkers act. It would cut down on cost of government construction where it applies and it basically pays double what a State Act workers comp pays. There is a lot of water work in Florida that falls under this act.

        IMO one workers comp program for all workers.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Maquis says:

          Every good idea should be sent to PDJT. He has asked for our input. I’ve not heard him say “enough!” yet, so I believe he essentially has an open door policy on ideas.

          I know I’m overdue a message myself, something I picked up recently about filibusters that blew my mind. There is an option between the extremes of the Nuclear Option and this being essentially the Schumer administration. The Founder’s intents are clear and were abrogated in the Seventies, inviting chaos, if not granting minority rule.

          https://imprimis.hillsdale.edu/senate-must-reform-filibuster/2/

          This isn’t Nuclear, it’s, Tectonic! Irrefutable as well.

          Liked by 1 person

          • JoAnn Leichliter says:

            I read this excellent article in January (I get Imprimis in print). I remember clearly when filibusters were the real deal–and rare. I highly recommend this to anyone frustrated by the Senate’s practice of allowing every bill to be held hostage by the minority.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Maquis says:

              I sent the link and my input to PDJT last night vis the whitehouse.gov site.

              Very east to do. I think I’ll send it to some Senators, Dead Turtle McConnell included, but, as I told our President, it will require twisting his arm to get him to pursue these changes because Uniparty. President Trump can be quite persuasive though!

              It would be really great it a bunch if us sent the link to the White House and elsewhere, just not to Dems! Don’t give them a heads up so they can prepare obstructions.

              Can you imagine we this being the first order of business at the start of the next session of the Senate, with sufficient votes already primed, no committee required, just pass it and make sure you have video rolling of the Dems puking in trashcans before they can even get out of the Chamber!

              Reform is our game, and this one is beyond a two-fer. We restore the Senate to it’s proper funxtion. We get the Agenda passed without Schumer demanding scalps and buckets of blood for every move. In fact, I suspect his crying game would be a regular and glorious show.

              MAGA!

              🖖

              Like

      • progpoker says:

        It seems a more locally sourced manufacturing supply chain would take care of any problems the Longshoreman could do to the TCO of a business. I would think the center of the country would do well being close to both coasts. Need to populate the Flyover Red States with American manufacturers!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Rip Tide says:

        Is that because of the unions cost?

        Like

    • we have much bigger container ships coming into ports now then before. Recent article from a couple days ago said they are trying different systems to get trucks moved in and out of ports quicker.
      https://www.trucks.com/2017/03/28/ports-truck-drivers-shipping-container-appointments/

      Like

  2. lelanddiaz says:

    I cannot understand how anyone can dislike Trump as President. I actually think he will go down as one of the greatest we ever had. I thank GOD everyday he beat hillary.

    Liked by 42 people

    • Sharon says:

      An old saying:

      “When a man’s heart is turned against a man, everything that man does becomes further cause to hate him.”

      Their dislike is not based on Trump’s person or performance. It was a decision of the heart.

      Liked by 17 people

      • vinchenzer says:

        That old saying explains the mindset of the the Trump-hate Zombies perfectly.

        Liked by 4 people

      • Maquis says:

        Or lack thereof…

        Liked by 2 people

      • the right phoenix says:

        I actually just wanted to say that I love your Meadowlark avatar, Sharon! 🙂

        Liked by 4 people

      • kate says:

        You have got that right, I know people like that and if you ask them why the answer is stricly what the press reported from the womans liberal groups or any other far left group
        or else they can’t answer.

        Liked by 4 people

      • Yes, true as I was kinda hit an Epiphany moment while watching Judge Jeannine last night, where she had on someone that went on CNN and was hollered and screamed at to such a point that the “white man’s view simply could not be heard. He was being shushed down with hate from a Black man because a :white person could never understand so therefore should never talk about a certain subject. I am being kinda plain here. If you notice what the left is doing, what they are saying, it is not all hate against Trump, it is hate because of race, because of feminism, because of rich versus poor, it is democrat versus republican, it is lamestream versus-well, truth. The hate is so large on the left and has been growing and right now President Trump is the scapegoat for most of it. Since ex-president Obama came into office he fed into more divides than is possible to count, and he gave righteousness to that divide, for example calling TPDJT anti gay, when he was the one that mentioned them in his acceptance speech at the convention where he was accepted as his nominee, he is called anti-female, when he had one of the first female engineers building his namesake tower in Manhattan, as well as has many, many female employees even high up and with “equal pay” I could go on and on about the lunacy left accusing President D.J.Trump of so many heinous things that simply are not true, and why, because of the “Divides” that were created, the hate grew when they lost the election, even ignoring basic facts that 1)besides being just plain evil Hillary did NOT work for her campaign, she simply was not present, she had everyone else do the lifting, talking, rallying for her…2)She appeared very sickly..3)She had no true platform other than more name calling,,,, hate,,rhetoric, nothing substantive to give or promises to the “forgotten man” other than to raise your taxes by ANOTHER 1.3 trillion, to increase immigration, and to kill coal,,,anyone else know what her platform was??? Besides all that, the hate monster was fed over and over again for 8 years, we had more shootings, more times a “black person getting killed and it was the white guy’s/cops fault. So that IS why we are here with all this terr able terrible hate being festered daily and with the help of the lamestream feeds the narrative for the left-so that many on the left believe all those horrible lies and name calling, but they do not give YOU a chance to speak, so they cannot hear your side, so compromise has been killed, and our so called intelligence agencies are not helping, they are feeding this as well as evidenced how they are planting stuff against PDJT. Remember too, PDJT wants to do away with the lobbyists, how do you think DC gets so darn rich? Have a Senator go in new worth-oh-approx $250,000 and within a year or 2 is a multi million are, so the spigot is getting turned off in that aspect, and no one likes his wallet getting attacked especially for those that think they are our betters. So yes, our President is under heavy, heavy attack, and I think D.C. was being run on two counts before him and that is 1)Blackmail (remember no one is perfect) and 2)money and promises. One of the main reasons I was so mad at Senator Cruz was when I found out how much money he got just for voting Yea for the TTP which was against American Sovereignty, even Paul Ryan (the dirty dirty guy) got something like 1.2 million just for his “tea vote”. So….we pray for our President, yes, he is a good guy, hence the powers of the dark are many against him. Pray daily! I do! (sorry guys rant over now…whew!)

        Like

  3. p'odwats says:

    This is the biggest reason the Dems, the NeverTrumper Republicans, the MSM and all of the their globalist sponsors are trying to take out President Trump with the false Russia narrative. They know once the president implements his economic plan the country will take off big time, and the last thing these globalists want to see an America being successful through infrastructure building and job creation strictly made and done in this country!

    Liked by 27 people

  4. bertdilbert says:

    The good news is Truponomics will totally bypass California and population will move eastward as job prospects increase. This will leave California with an eroding tax base and financial Armageddon.

    Keep in mind that “World Trade” is California’s largest employer and as world trade decreases, so will jobs associated with it.

    It is not Trump’s fault that California earned the worst business climate for over a decade running.

    Liked by 27 people

    • redtreesquirrel says:

      bertdilbert, thank you. You’ve explained to me for the first time, what I’m sure a lot of people don’t realize. The reason CA hates American manufacturing and loves foreign countries’ imports so much – and thus, President Trump! Great explanation.

      Liked by 7 people

    • You must be reading select papers (like the OC Register, always negative on CA futures), bertdilbert. I lived and worked there for 25 years, and my experience was of a climate of almost unstoppable, energetic economic growth, hampered by uneven government, overspending and problems caused by overpopulation in a few specific major metros.

      Here are California’s five largest employers as of 2015, the latest complete data set. None of them are world trade-related companies.

      University of California, Davis (20,295 employees) …
      Disneyland (26,001) …
      University of California, Los Angeles (27,489) …
      UCLA Health System (35,543) …
      Naval Base San Diego (42,951)

      California’s economy is huge, larger than many whole nations, and very, very diversified. The population is so immense, and the mix of cultures and industries so varied that changing regulation does impact some kinds of business, while at the same time benefitting other kinds. It also matters where companies are located. Some counties are better for business than others. Like most of the US, it’s more of a service than manufacturing-based economy. But if Trumponomics makes more manufacturing feasible, you can bet California will benefit by it, rather than be bypassed.

      Overall, California is ranked 32nd of 50 states for business, on the basis of a broad combination of relevant factors (cost of doing business, infrastructure, workforce quality, access to capital etc.):
      http://www.cnbc.com/2016/07/12/americas-top-states-for-business-2016-map-of-state-rankings.html

      Liked by 1 person

      • redtreesquirrel says:

        I notice the 5 largest CA employers are all Fed and/or State Govt subsidized.

        Liked by 3 people

        • IMO, in CA they will take, adopt and thrive on whatever funding source is available, without much caring if it’s public or private. I’ve only lived in five states, but CA just always seemed the most innovative and adaptive by a wide margin. They have the highest highs and the lowest lows. Maybe a genetic after-effect left over from the Gold Rush?

          Like

          • Fe says:

            My brother is a nurse and so is my sister in law. They’re going to California in September on a nursing traveling assignment. They will work 13 weeks, then get 2 weeks off, and the money is phenomenal. I’m told that they can choose to go to any region they want, and their expenses are paid, such as an apartment and airfare. I said pick an area near the beaches. I’ll fly in and visit 😀

            Like

          • bertdilbert says:

            “IMO, in CA they will take, adopt and thrive on whatever funding source is available, without much caring if it’s public or private.”

            The funding is public, they are raising taxes again because they do not have enough money. California was built on debt and rising house prices (more debt), but the problem with debt is that there is a hole in the future at some point. California is approaching the hole. Interest rates are in an upswing.

            Trump can fix CA after the legislature amends the constitution saying that state pensions must be paid is omitted and all legislative powers are turned over to a Trump appointed economic committee. They will still have elected officials, they will just be powerless to commit any further damage to the state.

            California is so lucky to have Trump as president due to his experience in bankruptcy. Post recovery, Trump will likely be awarded the Nobel prize in economics.

            Like

        • Rox says:

          That was what jumped out at me, as well.

          Like

      • bertdilbert says:

        “California trade and exports translate into high-paying jobs for over one million Californians. According to the US Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA)”

        That would be over 38 Disneylands, you must read the LA Times.

        When I looked into it a few years back, World trade related jobs was the number one in employment of people, while finance was cited as the number one industry in wages paid.

        Should world trade fall, it would stand to reason that a significant number of Californians would be affected.

        Like

  5. soozword says:

    This will stimulate the housing market bigly — a major side effect of getting people jobs instead of welfare. My CA home is going up for sale next month so the faster this happens, the better. I’m having lots of problems getting skilled labor to work on my new home in SW UT, but then this little corner of the state is one of the fastest growing in the nation. Everybody is getting busy! Winning!!!!

    Liked by 10 people

    • oldschool64 says:

      ……We already have the raw materials: iron ore, steel, mineral deposits, and we have abundant energy resources, these are immediate cost advantages…..

      And we have plenty of wood up here in Oregon when housing starts finally wake up. A revived timber industry up here would do wonders for this state!

      Liked by 7 people

      • Maquis says:

        So would ending the State Religion of Radical Leftism in Oregon.

        I know, not all are such, I grew up my last half of childhood in my semi-historical home of Oregon myself. I love Oregon, except the Left, which is why I am not there, and even Eastern Washington is too liberal for my tastes, so I am planning a move further East when I can arrange it.

        I do hope to see Oregon in the timber business again. I used to enjoy watching a lumber train on a daily run not far from our place, same little valley.

        Liked by 9 people

        • M33 says:

          Make Timber Great Again!

          Liked by 5 people

        • lizzieintexas says:

          I left in 85, just as the lumber industry was crashing and before the computer/electronic industries moved in. When I went home to visit I was shocked at the clear-cut private land. Individuals were selling the lumber on their land trying to make ends meet. Where I grew up was rural, just outside Eugene and it was pretty conservative and libertarian. It was a great childhood/youth.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Maquis says:

            I loved it. Crashing through creekbeds, floating cold rivers on tubes and exploring everywhere. Any weekend we decided to take a break it was either the Coast or the Desert. 65 degrees is still my favorite temperature, and rain? What rain? We worked or played, just the same. We were the other side of the odd-couple Eugene-Springfield, out in the Mohawk Valley, but not as far as Marcola.

            Miss it, but just can’t do it. I love Coeur d’Alene and Pend Oreille, hope to go there soon, and no impending Cascadia Subduction Zone Event to worry about!

            Liked by 1 person

      • Orygun says:

        Most of the timber access roads will have to be rebuilt since they quit doing maintenance and just let the trees grow up in the middle. Our Federal timber lands have been sorely neglected and have become just a giant fire hazard. The engineers, surveyors and foresters have all been replaced by “ologists.

        Liked by 9 people

        • Maquis says:

          Those fools ruin everything they touch. Lots of jobs right there just catching up on removing the underbrush/tinder, and the roads. I’m surprised exploring four-wheelers haven’t kept the stray seedlings down on the roads, but, ‘ologists, I suspect they messed that up too?

          Like

          • lizzieintexas says:

            How’s the spotted owl doing? It was the leftist from CA that were all concerned about it and it loosing its habitat without realizing the timber industry, which had been managing the lands for a very long time, actually knew what they were doing. The timber industry couldn’t fight the $$ of the environmental whackos so the just shut it down and ORs economy crashed and it was then overrun by the CA looking for better, cheaper land and houses. Which has now backfired. I just that g-d I was able to see it coming at age 19 and got my a $$ to Texas. I go back occasionally to visit. Love to drive up the coast and into the mountains but Texas is home.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Orygun says:

              As soon as they stopped the logging the owl was no longer a problem. They later realized it was another predator species killing the owl. Gee, that was a tough one to figure out.
              Son went in the Air Force and I visited Texas twice in 2010. Really liked it but my wife is stuck like glue here.

              Liked by 1 person

  6. Ryan Gittings says:

    Love that picture of him in the hard hat.

    Liked by 5 people

    • belle819 says:

      I think when President Trump put on the hard hat, wore it well and was comfortable in it, he won over a lot of working class folks, he could have looked ridiculous, but it just fit & what a man.

      Liked by 1 person

      • QuestGirl says:

        I have not seen that picture. I’m sure he has one of his own, in Gold.

        Did you see the pictures of OUR PDJT behind the wheel in the cab of an 8-wheeler? Breitbart ran it a week or two ago. He had FUN. I think the man has fun with every breath he takes.

        Liked by 3 people

      • lizzieintexas says:

        Like

  7. waltherppk says:

    Hope there is a solid turnaround for Sears Roebuck.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. sundance says:

    Liked by 20 people

    • M33 says:

      As a retail business owner myself, Sundance, I can totally attest to these facts, too.
      This first quarter is the best we have ever seen and it is VERY exciting!

      Liked by 10 people

      • I am in oil and it is a savage business at the best of times but even for us, Trump has definitely changed things. For starters the word on high is very much that all the artificial barriers and retarded penalties for mining and oil are gone, we’re back to standard regulations. Also the move to locally is US source fuel is fantastic, there are hundreds of local depots and that means thousands of local jobs, not all of which are in Texas by any means 🙂

        I would love him to get rid of the EPA – but we will see.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Rox says:

          Our experience, too. Husband is working 80 hours a week in the oil and gas industry right now and they have a Help Wanted sign out for the first time in almost 2 years.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Yeah the job openings really tell the story. First time in years there’s a FIFO flight to where I am working. Hasn’t been enough FIFO workers for years but now all at once since Trump the plane is filling up with young guys. Good to see.

            Liked by 2 people

      • Rip Tide says:

        M33, that’s great for you!
        My business was down 20% last year, but like you fist quarter this year has been great!
        Hoping that will continue moving forward for all of us🏆🏆🏆

        Liked by 4 people

  9. A2 says:

    Love me some Trumponomics. The data on China is correct and only a few voices in the economics wilderness were ringing that bell. The Chinese government knows the data and is seriously worried.

    Liked by 8 people

  10. duchess01 says:

    This is absolutely phenomenal in its simplicity! President Trump has the knowledge and the wherewithal to see the Big Picture – and Sundance has the knowledge and skill to present Trumponomics so succinctly that the average man can understand and be encouraged –

    Because of the greed of Wall Street, Main Street has suffered – but, not irreparably – President Trump not only has the wisdom of years of experience, but he has a vision for America that no president before him has had – oh, yes – they all pretended to care – but, they did not – after all, they were only politicians – and unfortunately, globalists, too – they did not serve; they used.

    Every day, we hear President Trump talking but more importantly, doing! When, in your lifetime, have you seen a president work so hard? I am just astounded at this man’s energy and tenacity. I thank God every day for giving us a leader we can respect and emulate!

    Liked by 20 people

    • M33 says:

      I agree 100%!

      Liked by 2 people

      • OTOH, I disagree, Duchessse. I blame business schools and public K-12 schools. Their constant mantra was “Go to college! Earn more money! Foreget retail – that is so yesterday, jump on the high-tech bandwagon!”

        These “educationists are nothing but second-handers, feeding off of other people’s work. They believed the days of Mom-and-Pop and Main Street were going, going, gone! They believed that big business was good and small business was bad.

        I could go on, but you get the picture. I got my Bus Admin degree in 1972 – I know whereof I speak. And thanks to Supermarket Fool – that is good data you are giving us. Also, Southern Son. THIS is why I love CTH!

        Liked by 2 people

        • Southern Son says:

          Thanks IVO!
          But I forgot to reemphasize the Materials being hauled.
          Lumber (Boards, Plywood), Steel (Thick Flat Plate, I-Beams, Big ReBar ).
          This indicates to me, that Construction is about to Boom!
          I said before, it was headed South to Florida.
          But it’s goin’ everywhere.
          I posted this a few weeks ago, but it’s picked up some since then.

          Liked by 1 person

        • TheLastDemocrat says:

          when you ask elitist intellectuals how to succeed in life, they tell you

          get ready for this

          that you should be an elitist intellectual.

          Elitist intellectuals are in charge of K-12, and have great influence in government, where the idea is that the Small Business Administration should hassle anyone with a good game plan, but should give a low-interest, super-long-term loan to anyone willing to warm a college seat for any reason, or for no reason.

          Like

  11. fleporeblog says:

    Folks please take the time to read our fellow Treeper’s (the blacksmith) response to the incredible polling data presented above. It is these types of stories that will never get to the MSM but needs to be shared and read. We are absolutely winning and like Charles Payne on FBN points out each night, we are on the cusp of an economic explosion. SD has been telling us as well. It is so easy to get caught up in the day-to-day nonsense and I am one of the biggest victim’s of that.

    the blacksmith wrote the following

    for what it’s worth…..
    i’ve run a minor “manufacturing” company for most of my adult life. esoteric little niche – blacksmiths making historic and upscale contemporary hardware. ’74-83 learning and doing lots of restoration for the national park service/bi-centennial stuff. then jimmy carter’s economy drove me to employment with a start-up software company.

    fifteen years later, with all the buttons punched (systems analyst, database engineer, compiler programming, platinum travelers’ card, options & IPO, two heart attacks) i came back to the blacksmith shop (i’d saved my original tools and machines and added dramatically with NAFTA-driven domestic factory liquidation pickups). focused on wholesaling hardware to shutter makers, built up good volume and seven/eight employees. ’07 our biggest customer (timberlane) shopped my stuff to chinese manufacturers and whacked our wholesale volume back to near zero. shifted focus to internet and started to build a retail base.

    and then along came obama. past seven years we been hanging on, three guys (two part-time) and a lady on the phones – we rarely had more than a week, ten days of work on the books.
    things started picking up last june to a steady drip.

    on nov 9th (literally) our phones started ringing off the hooks. projects from all over the country. big jobs that have been on the books for two-three years. everybody pulled the trigger as soon as trump won.

    our phones are still ringing. we’re booked with big projects through november and we got lots more out on bid. hired two full-time 30 year old disaffected millennials (who are great workers and desperate to get out of their parents’ homes) and brought in a part-time retired friend… and winter is our historic slow time. i’m gonna need to keep hiring if sales hold at this level.
    so yeah, this “manufacturer” is wildly optimistic about what’s happening – all over the country… and we ain’t seen nothin’ yet. thank God for my president and leader donnie john trump.
    MAGA – one small business at a time.

    Liked by 22 people

    • duchess01 says:

      Fabulous story, flep! From a small businessman’s point of view and experience – like reading a ‘history of small business struggles in the USA’ from the Carter years to the present – Thanks so much for sharing – 🙂

      Liked by 10 people

    • Maquis says:

      The Blacksmith Rocks! He’s definitely one of us, a good man. I’m thrilled for him and what it portends for our Nation.

      I’m jazzed! Read the entire article, folks! They actually have a Total Cost of Ownership calculator, letting businesses factor it all in. MarketWatch, article writers & site proprietors I believe, have a Reshoring Initiative. It’s fascinating, exciting, and the only fault I perceive is their estimation of the turn around time for the manufacturing industry growth and reshoring rates, and the degree of associated economic growth they project. I have much more faith in President Trump, and even these good folks are going to have their socks blown off.

      Yeeeeeeee Haaaaaaaw!

      Maquis

      Liked by 8 people

    • aqua says:

      Outstanding news…this is what I hope President Trump hears every day, signs of what he is doing are resonating. Instead of a daily “press” attack, there should be a daily business discussion. Nice people who work hard can chime in all they like. No whining allowed.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. labrat says:

    Ok – so for years you’ve been saying the “Wall street” PTB have trillions at stake and want to forward their agenda. It seems to me that now the “Main street” PTB will also have trillions at stake. No? When do we see them start putting their weight on the scale? How do they win the contest?

    Liked by 1 person

  13. JoD says:

    Just close your eyes and imagine a bustling economy with state of the art factories dotting the American landscape, turning out the finest products in the world.
    The pride and satisfaction of a day’s work.
    Well paying jobs that provide a better life for families all across the USA.
    Thank you President Trump for giving it a try.

    Liked by 13 people

    • America’s NEW and UPGRADED state-of-the factories will be the envy of the world, by eliminating low-skilled labor and adding high-value labor to build, run and maintain automated production, product-handling and packaging-warehousing-shipping operations.

      Soon to follow will be AI-infused “process-management systems” to replace low-skilled administrative, planning, coordination and supervision labor with high-performance decision-making and execution instructions.

      Nations that have dumbed-down and debt-loaded young generations, imported cheap low-skilled labor to support high labor-content factories, and Balkanized their communities into incompatible and combative groups of ethnic and religious minorities will enter the “Liberal Death Spiral” that America is now exiting. EU-controlled education, taxation, social spending, immigration, refugees, labor protection and economic regulation now prevents national economic reformation and smothers entrepreneurial rebirth. “National” dependencies on EU currency and trade, coupled with unaffordable EU exit penalties and unconscionable disentanglement periods, make it virtually impossible to escape the EU’s stranglehold. They’re screwed.

      Like

  14. paulraven1 says:

    Why do democrats want manufacturing jobs to leave America?
    Why do democrats want the inner cities to decay?
    Why do democrats not want single mothers living alone to defend themselves with guns?
    Why do democrats want illegal immigrants to take jobs away from minority citizens?
    Why do democrats not want to enforce immigration laws and so why do they want to endanger Americans?

    Simple questions. There are many more. Our side never asks them.

    Liked by 11 people

    • Maquis says:

      You have a point. Build a list for us slower folks, disseminate (that word just sounds so, Farksy, doesn’t it?) that list, and everyone pepper every Lib with question after question. Don’t respond to their questions or responses, just keep asking them “why Democrats want to kill babies?” then before they can get three words of their canned, never thought through responses, hit them with “why are Democrats promoting the murder of women?” which could be referencing abortion itself, one child policies, forced population control, eugenics, or Islam’s hatred and abuse of women, Muslim and non-Muslim.

      Of course, in victimization of non-Muslim women, Muslim women are right in the thick of that murderous behavior, think, cat-fights with Kalashnikovs and Sharia courts for all, even, if not especially, for the Christians and all Stripes of Uplifting Deity loving peoples not under the thrall of Islam, but certainly under it’s oppression. The Dems, Libs, Leftists, Commies, all the above, are vulnerable on thousands of issues and Inhuman practices.

      As you rightly point out, we don’t ask them. We expect Civilized discussions with essentially monsters, and are worse than fools for not pressing them on these questions, for we do know the true costs of their deeds in human suffering.

      We need to be Andrew Breitbart, and we need ammunition. Be prepared to pepper them until something clicks or they stray off the talking point reservation and you have your foot in the door for a potential injection of fact and humanity via a real conversation.

      DON’T be Mitt Romney, afraid to call out a lie right to his face that he knows is a lie but hadn’t the courage to say so and demand an accounting. Even when he had half the electorate believing only he could save us*, he didn’t try.

      (Treepers excepted, I hadn’t encountered the Red Pill yet, the Uniparty still behind the scales over my eyes. I’m so ashamed!)

      PaulRaven1, take it away, this was your thought, I’m not gonna steal it, just reacting and amplifying. I truly would download a well curated and regularly maintained list of this nature to contemplate and then venture where I/we aren’t wanted.

      We might move this to the Daily Thread? I haven’t ventured, can’t keep up, not on Android w/o WordPress account. However, this thread is Sundance’s, and is a remarkable thread on a remarkable Game-Changer that our Awesome President is facilitating, it deserves not being stomped on. (Sorry Sundance, the stompage factor slipped my mind until I wrote this, and I can’t cut and paste with one finger, new PC going up soon though! My apologies.)

      Do you know how to swap our comments here to the appropriate thread? I’ll look for you there soon, PaulRaven1.

      Maquis

      Liked by 4 people

    • xyzlatin says:

      Simple. Once the populace gets poor, the Dems will be in power for ever as they control the purse strings (Gov welfare). It’s why they don’t support intact marriages and families as these have been shown to be richer.

      Liked by 8 people

    • yakmaster2 says:

      Democrats/Liberals/Progressives answer all questions concerning their policies by invoking their supposed *higher moral authority.* Using the same ‘virtue’ tactics, they also respond to most challenges by arguing vague, but passionate, reiterations of “That’s not who we are as a country” or “We’re better than that.”
      Their Leadership knows the false superior morality of humanist utopian ‘social justice’ is just a useful trope to advance their Communist causes, but less sophisticated followers actually buy it as being moral, virtuous, right. These true believers get very wound up when challenged because the Left uses EMOTION as the basis of their arguments.
      I think Conservatives have long been loathe to argue publicly with Lefties because we know they are going to be indignant and very self-righteous. They have been dealt with as if they’re angry 2 yr. olds who will throw a tantrum and label those who disagree with them as racists, xenophobes, sexists, etc. Our timidity has given them the high ground.

      I’m glad those days are over now because Conservatives are finally refusing to be cowed by tactics like name-calling and virtue signaling, refusing to let the Left pretend that ‘feelings’ are facts!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. TheTorch says:

    The rally where that picture was taken. It is an absolute classic, one of my favorites.
    Also RSBN have a few little bits now and again on Lyin’ Ted before Trump arrives!

    Liked by 4 people

  16. Beenthere says:

    Manufacturing will be coming back but it will not be a 1 to 1 domestic to foreign employee replacement. How many of these returning companies are thinking of using robotics to replace persons on the assembly line? I like to think there will be new industries created to accommodate all those Americans who need decent paying jobs. As people much smarter than me have been preaching during the last 2 decades, we are at the cusp of entering into another industrial revolution. And Trump is going to bring that about.

    College majors in women, gender & Black studies will not be worth anything in this new world. (Sorry snowflakes.) The STEM majors will be extremely valuable in the near future. I’m wondering how many colleges or high schools realize this.

    Companies like IBM are looking all over for untapped potential employees. Recently they started paid internships for women who have STEM degrees & have been out of the market for years. IBM has also partnered with some high schools to train the students for STEM jobs or STEM majors in college.

    Liked by 5 people

    • We need to emphasize trade profession

      Liked by 4 people

      • Beenthere says:

        Agree. But these kids need to know the 3 Rs at least along with learning how to think which many high schools don’t teach that anymore. Trade schools assume one knows how to think.

        Like

      • soozword says:

        We are in so much need of vocational schooling in secondary school for training in plumbing, electrician, heating & air, welding, machining, etc. for those who are not so academically inclined. And provide such schooling with pride and without a smidgen of condescension! College is so way, way overrated.

        Liked by 5 people

    • Great comment, beenthere! STEM is just the latest buzz word among the intelligentsia. But very few of these people have a clue what that means. Women, gender and and Black study degrees have NEVER been worth anything.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Maquis says:

      Yep, most of this is in the full article linked above.

      As far as the properly prepared labor pool, I’ve been thinking about that too. PDJT has already initiated a task-force on preparing what we need to run this new expansion of manufacturing, even including Angela Merkel in a listening session and workshop too I believe focusing on Apprenticeship Programs, big in Germany with salutary effects, as long as we keep out the Guild mentality of using the system to limit access to the field rather than to build it up.

      There were some good examples st the Event, found here on CTH, of course.

      I do agree that schools need to radically reform their fields of study including creating hands-on in real !businesses limited apprenticeshipping.

      This could be a grest jumping off point for a Countrywide Reformation of Education. Reform of curriculum, output goals in terms of quality and quantity. Elimination of now mandatory stultifying crap designed to unmoor their victims from the Faith of their Fathers and the Teachings of their Mothers. With little of value added.

      As you mentioned, many tech corps are doing apprenticeships, reaching into the schools to find them. Trump could oversee massive reforms that minimize underwaterbasketweavingforfunandracialanimus crap, and encourage the schools to seek partners to enable limited apprenticeship programs, or even to be anacademic ancillary to a full apprenticeship wjth a local company.

      We can’t rely only on corporations that cherrypick their apprentices at a high level in their education. There simply aren’t that many going to work for IBM anyway. Local manufacturers need local schools supporting the academic portion of an apprenticeship. They also need those schools to be teachi g kids before they have found an spprenticeship, or even truly found their passions and talents. Then the schools can facilitate apprenticeships, allowing employers an opportunity to see the limited, but focused, academic records of their prospects, essential in maming good matches.

      Cities that want to grow can look at what employers need, and what their schools can offer; being as much a necessary resource as infrastructure, energy, materials, and transportation and such.

      Obama took over the college financing business. PDJT may send it back out to private world, but NOT before eliminating Fedefal financing oc anythi g that does not suit the goals and needs of students, employers, and our country. Heck even the military has a stake in this, PDJT knows this well, our military needs well educated people too, disciplined as well. Military academies, even post “High” school, may become in vouge.

      Especially as we turn to face cyber-threats and innovative technological advances to counter ubiquitous dangers as simple, and deadly, as “toy” drones. The best ideas for these counters will most often come from the field, not someone’s desk.

      I could design and build a drone guaranteed to take down near any aircraft at least up to 10k. Now, who is going to create an effective inexpensive counter that can go world-wide quickly? I have ideas, I’m an idea man. Many many military men, and women, are idea people, can-do fix that right now idea people.

      Wanna bet what a smart kid would do to nail an apprenticeship with DARPA? Pre or Post Service?

      Paring out destructivr tripe, consultinf students and parents, listening, that’s what PDJT does, a lot of inane destructive drivel could be trimmed from curriculums. Via non-Fed-funding those elements, or? It’s a wide open field to ensure young people start their careers owing nearling a home mortgage.

      Educational reform, levels upon levels of administrators searching for shadows of penumbras of social injustices they must force upon our kids, gone. That’s half the cost of college right there. Half the life misery of kids unmoored from their upbringings by insane haters.

      Trump can do this. Academia IS where the Left creates their despairing hopeless drones intent on fixing what they’ve been taught to hate. Where our DR (?) Frakases come from. And a huve plnzi scheme on the level of unions and mafias. That needs to end. Lots of squealing to come.

      Maquis

      Liked by 1 person

      • Maquis says:

        Wow, spelling cleanup on Aisle 5. Sorry, fast fat finger, leeetle tiny phone, low blood sugar and more.

        Will return, that is a promise and a threat both!

        Ciao!
        Maquis

        Liked by 1 person

      • Beenthere says:

        The returning of manufacturing & the actual expansion of it may not be enough to hire all those not-employed & under-employed persons, trained or not. Robotics is the future & that will drastically lower labor costs. I am betting there will be side industries that will rise from the robotic technology.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Maquis says:

          Very likely. As you say, Robotics is a big part of being competitive. There will be jobs associated with that technology itself, and successful manufacturing will still need materials and other forms of support, no matter their level of automation.

          It will be fascinating.

          Just Watch!

          Like

        • graciegram says:

          I remember when some MSM fool challenged POTUS Trump, saying experts say manufacturing will never come back the same, that robots are taking over. POTUS Trump said “jobs will be created building, installing and maintaining the robots”. Just a different type of manufacturing.

          Liked by 1 person

  17. NJF says:

    He really is getting it done!

    Liked by 7 people

  18. Midnight Rambler says:

    He’s going to get his Supreme Court nominee, he’s going to build the wall, reduce drug trafficking, we’re going to get a healthcare plan, lower drug prices, ISIS will be defeated….throw in unions, coal, steel, transportation, construction and manufactoring and he’s going to be untouchable.

    Liked by 10 people

  19. It is amazing what happens with business when you’re no longer being extorted by the .gov and the Clinton Foundation.

    Liked by 9 people

  20. woohoowee says:

    “Buy American, Hire American” 🙂

    MAGA!

    Liked by 2 people

  21. Texian says:

    Yep, this is proof that corporate leadership are certainly no wizards of smart. Sir Trump has to school them in something so basic in business – TCO, man it is not rocket science – and yet corporate leadership has to be told how to look at the bottom line. They have no clue.. It’s become obvious they were placed in their positions just like Zero was, to be an empty suit figurehead.. corporate fascism..

    Liked by 1 person

  22. tomholsinger says:

    Good point. I also recommend demonstrating how much government action can affect the total cost of ownership, particularly the negatives of lefty policies.

    Like

  23. BG says:

    Hmmm….I believe the cultural marxist social engineers of the media, public service and general Democrat left deeply fear a yuge revival of manufacturing.
    A confident, employed working class is much less reliant on Statist money and the de facto ideological correctnesses that go with it.
    The employed working class will pour derision on their former, stunned, metrosexual left masters.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. SeekerOfTruth says:

    Here are the average growth rates for each president: Obama was the worst and he spent the most by far driving the debt up massively. If not for his constant and massive deficit spending boost each year it would have been much worse.

    Johnson (1964-68), 5.3 percent
    Kennedy (1961-63), 4.3 percent
    Clinton (1993-2000), 3.9 percent
    Reagan (1981-88), 3.5 percent
    Carter (1977-80), 3.3 percent
    Eisenhower (1953-60), 3 percent
    Nixon (1969-74), 2.8 percent
    Ford (1975-76), 2.6 percent
    G.H.W. Bush (1989-92), 2.3 percent
    G.W. Bush (2001-08), 2.1 percent
    Truman (1946-52), 1.7 percent
    Obama (2009-16), 1.6 percent

    Obama spent like a “drunken sailor” and managed money like them. Broke soon after each pay day. I was in the Navy for a while and I saw this first hand. Wild times. After each payday the locals of all types (and I mean all types) would line up to take their money. It was easy..

    Liked by 1 person

  25. JMScott says:

    When I move out of West Virginia in 2005 (after 4 years of having a business there), coal was selling for pennies a ton. Almost all of it being shipped to China.

    In that short time I live in WV, the price of electricity and natural gas went up by at least 5x.
    The reason, US and regulations the exporting of liquefied natural gas.

    People, we have been totally farkassed for well over a decade!

    Liked by 2 people

  26. ADD: Reshoring & Foreign Direct Investment in manufacturing will typically include higher levels of automation and robotics, which will (1) erode any low labor-cost advantages in China, India and Southeast Asia and (2) make it far more difficult for foreign countries to persuade American manufacturers to offshore in the future.

    Liked by 1 person

    • soozword says:

      Investing in robotics to replace a large proportion of our farm labor would be most welcome. Last I heard Europe and Australia were pulled ahead of us in farm robotics R&D because they did not have such a ready supply of slave labor like us so that forced them to look to technology. Apparently the Muslim invasion hasn’t produced lots of farm workers in Europe. So robotics in this area would be especially helpful with keeping our national sovereignty.

      Like

  27. Running Fast says:

    My primary business is b2b marketing services. 2016 was on track for our worst year ever until Nov 8. Since that time we have earned more in income than the last 3 years combined! It is coming back fast!

    Liked by 2 people

  28. jdvalk says:

    Here’s some nascent globalist thinking via Frederich March countered by Trumponomics via Bill Holden, circa 1954.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. rashamon says:

    Perhaps, from the volume and projections on this topic, TCTH needs a separate thread for ‘Trump Economics 101″? I find the input fascinating, but some enticed here by other and multiple issues might be bogged down by these details. However, many who claimed no interest in politics before TCTH have become avid about changing the political scene now.

    On this issue, I lived between two entrepreneurs back in 1978 through 1980s — at the time, one involved in a scrap metal operation, the other in a steel mini-mill. They met around my table (Charlie Rose style) for coffee every morning carrying all the nuts and bolts from their previous successes, which were many. Never, never, never did the two minds meet. Both had made fortunes by defining risk and pulling together the right people to get the job done. I learned much. The scrap metal guy continued to sell to S. Korea; the mini-mill guy (or his union) continued to fight pricing and the company went bankrupt. Duh.

    I consider the story telling on TCTH a leader among the life-long-learning now available through great Internet sites. SD and The Treepers set stages very accessible to all that help us start from Square One and work forward. Once upon a time…. Very effectual over the ages and more so now when stories are more complex.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Dennis Leonard says:

    This goes right along with this story,

    https://donsurber.blogspot.com/2017/04/media-misses-real-white-house.html#more

    What WH disclosures really showed
    President Trump threw some red tofu to the Fake News media by disclosing the 2016 earnings and net worth of his top aides and his daughter and son-in-law.

    In their haste to portray the White House as a rich man’s club in covering the disclosures, the fake news media missed the real story of the huge cuts in pay many took to work at the White House.

    For example, Reince Preibus earned $500,000 a year as chairman of the Republican Party. He will earn roughly one-third that as chief-of-staff.

    Gary Cohn left a top position at Goldman Sachs to become Trump’s chief economic adviser. His old salary was $40 million a year.

    Kellyanne Conway earned $800,000 as head of her own company last year.

    Don McGahn earned more than $2.4 million last year as a lawyer last year. He took a pay cut of 90 percent to become White House counsel.

    Jason Greenblatt earned $1 million with the Trump Organization last year. He took a pay cut of 80 percent to become the president’s adviser on Middle East policy.

    Not every official took a pay cut, and it is typical of lawyers who join an administration to give up million-dollar salaries.

    Regardless of their politics, their sacrifices are admirable.

    Leave it to fake newsers to make the decent seem indecent.

    “Together, 27 White House officials had assets worth at least $2.3 billion when they joined the administration,” according to the Washington Post.

    Cool. That shows they are competent.

    Sadly, the fake news media is not.

    From the New York Times:

    Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner Still Benefiting From Business Empire, Filings Show

    Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner, President Trump’s daughter and son-in-law, will remain the beneficiaries of a sprawling real estate and investment business still worth as much as $740 million, despite their new government responsibilities, according to ethics filings released by the White House Friday night.

    Ms. Trump will also maintain a stake in the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C. The hotel, just down the street from the White House, has drawn protests from ethics experts who worry that foreign governments or special interests could stay there in order to curry favor with the administration.

    That $740 million net worth is pretty good for people in their mid-30s. That shows they are to rich to be bought, as liberals said of John Kerry, Jay Rockefeller, and Jack Kennedy.

    I wonder though if it is a conflict-of-interest if liberals organize a boycott of your company that backfires and results in a sixfold increase in sales.

    That was one of at least four stories in the New York Times about this routine disclosure, as the newspaper flooded the zone. The others were “Bannon Made Millions in Shaping Right-Wing Thought,” “Trump Couple, Now White House Employees, Can’t Escape Conflict Laws,” and “Who’s Worth What at the White House: The Financial Disclosures.”

    From the Washington Post:

    The new disclosures — filed by about 180 members of the Trump administration and released by the White House starting late Friday — show how Trump has tapped members of the financial elite to serve as his closest aides.

    The White House on Friday held up the affluence of its staffers as a badge of honor.

    “The president has brought a lot of people into this administration, into this White House, in particular, who have been very blessed and very successful by this country and have given up a lot to come into the government by setting aside a lot of assets,” said White House press secretary Sean Spicer, who filings show had assets worth between $2.9 million and $6.6 million.

    The Washington Post is owned by the second-richest man in the world.

    NPR’s report included this:

    As Trump has appointed numerous hyper-wealthy individuals, the White House points out that its ethics lawyers have been working through highly complex financial arrangements. Estimates for the cumulative wealth of the Trump Cabinet by various media organizations have ranged from $6 billion to $14 billion.

    Voters elected a fellow worth $10 billion, so they have no problem — none — with successful people running the government.

    We prefer a country run by competent people than by hobos.

    Like

  31. aredtailblog says:

    I see the health insurance cost is slightly lower than the December projection.

    Not by much, but in tandem with the rest of these more positive projections, I’m not complaining.

    Like

  32. hippielouie says:

    morning everyone…I’ve been lurking here for a very loooong time n today, after reading these comments, i was moved to get my posting ability working.
    this article n ur comments have literally moved me to tears of joy. to hear from so many of u the upswings, changes etc that r REALLY going on ALREADY is truly amazing!! more people need to hear of this. i post Sundance articles all the time over at RSBN (which is an amazing chat w great people much like this chat).
    i just wanted all of u to know that i, as well as other lurkers i’m sure, r very grateful to have found the Treeper fam. hippielouie 😀

    Like

  33. Pam says:

    Like

  34. shadowcole says:

    It ticks me off when I get women’s clothing catalogs in the mail and the price of the clothing is above what I would pay unless they were manufactured here. I will not pay expensive prices for clothing made in sweat shops over seas for pennies on the dollar and these companies make out like bandits. If the clothing were made here, I would willing to pay the prices they charge.

    Like

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