Hurricane Matthew Update – Governor Rick Scott Declares State-Wide State of Emergency…

Hurricane Matthew is massive in scale and extremely powerful.  The forecast track of Hurricane Matthew has now shifted slightly Westward. This means it is forecast to come even closer to the state of Florida and the East coast.   Any further Westward shifts have the potential to be catastrophic.   EVERYONE MUST BE ALERT.

Once this storm exits Hispaniola, there will be little time left for preparation in the  Bahamas, and in the Florida Peninsula and the Florida Keys.  Keep a close eye.

hurricane-matthew-rick-scott

Florida Governor Rick Scott has issued EXECUTIVE ORDER #16-230 A state of emergency for every county in Florida effective immediately.   Every resident is urged to take immediate action to secure, at minimum, a 3 day supply of water, food and medicine.  Visit FloridaDisaster.Org for more preparatory information and assistance; also FLGetaPlan.Com

Additionally, all residents in the path of the potential storm are requested to notify their friends or family of their specific action plans.   The 5:00pm advisory from the National Hurricane Center is AVAILABLE HERE

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TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared Monday a state of emergency for every Florida county due to the severity of Hurricane Matthew.

Scott met Monday with emergency management officials at the city of Hialeah Emergency Operations Center as the state prepares for Matthew, which the National Hurricane Center reports is a major Category 4 hurricane with sustained winds of 140 mph.

“Hurricane Matthew is a life-threatening category four hurricane and we must all take it seriously. If Hurricane Matthew directly impacts Florida, there could be massive destruction which we haven’t seen since Hurricane Andrew devastated Miami-Dade County in 1992. That is why we cannot delay and must prepare for direct impact now,” Scott said. “We are preparing for the worst, but hoping for the best and we will not take any chances to ensure our state is prepared.”

Scott and the Florida Division of Emergency Management continue to actively monitor Hurricane Matthew and urge everyone in Florida to remain vigilant and take all necessary precautions as it moves through the Caribbean.

“As I said during Hurricane Hermine, we can rebuild a home or a business, but we cannot rebuild your life. The best way to prevent further loss is to get prepared now and take this storm seriously. Having a plan in place could mean the difference between life and death during severe weather, especially a major category four hurricane,” Scott said. “While there are no evacuation orders currently in place, this storm could threaten our state with very little notice and no one should be caught off guard. If an evacuation order is activated in your area, leave immediately.”

Scott said the state National Guard is standing ready to be deployed in needed.

“I am also in contact with the utilities across the state and will stay in communication with them regarding their plans if there are any power outages. We are taking steps to move additional fuel to the state’s east coast. On the Florida Turnpike, we also have extra fuel trucks on standby to get anywhere in our state,” Scott said.

The State Emergency Operations Center activated to Level 2.  (read more)

a-prayer-for-times-like-thesePray for the people of Haiti who are going to face this storm first, they are a very vulnerable population.

Additionally, if the storm track shifts a few degrees further Westward, don’t be surprised if the Sunday Presidential Debate is not cancelled – if the timing remains consistent in the forecast the U.S. Eastern Seaboard could potentially be impacted.

Florida SERT Twitter Feed

National Hurricane Center

Latest Advisory HERE

Florida Preparation Link – HERE

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135 Responses to Hurricane Matthew Update – Governor Rick Scott Declares State-Wide State of Emergency…

  1. Obama already promised NOT to help Florida because their governor is Republican.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pjcab says:

    FL east east coast resident here, glued to the tv….please keep us in your prayers. May this storm stay away and remain in the open waters…away from all….thanks

    Liked by 18 people

  3. sassymemphisbelle says:

    Hey Treepers in FLA, please pack up your precious babies (human & animal) and your belongings and have a safe place to retreat to now. Please stay safe, President Trump will help FLA rebuild but he can’t resurrect you if you know what i mean 🙂

    Liked by 8 people

  4. amwick says:

    My home in SC is exactly 2 miles from the ocean. Many of my friends are closer than that… Prayers for everyone in harms way. Right now I am in the Georgia mountains… no worries here, other than the house I left behind, and, more importantly, the people.

    Liked by 8 people

    • 7delta says:

      I’m on the inland cusp, but still worry about all of you in the path. One of son’s closest friends is getting married in Charleston this weekend. Uh oh. Praying Matthew turns east and heads out into the open ocean. Keeping everyone in my thoughts and prayers.

      And if you have someone to spare, get them out to Pawley’s to watch for the Gray Man. I’d take anybody’s help when a hurricane has us in its sights. Even a ghost. It’s October, after all.

      Like

    • I’m near you, amwick, I think the worst I remember getting was from Hugo, but it was rain and a LOT of wind. A few trees blew over, but nothing like the Carolinas. These Appalachian hills are a good place to be!

      Like

  5. AghastInFL says:

    Trees are trimmed. Loose garden items are stowed. Potable water for 14 days. Canned foods on the shelf. Batteries in various sizes, all fresh. Flashlights tested. Generator is tested & running, sta-bil in the tank. Gas tank in garaged classic car is filled.
    I did what I can and I’m on the fringe of the cone… preparation saves lives.

    Liked by 11 people

    • tampa2 says:

      Good plan, Aghast. I too am prepared for the worst (always, anyway).

      Liked by 4 people

    • amwick says:

      Hatchet/ax to break through roof in case of horrible flood???

      Liked by 5 people

      • AghastInFL says:

        You are so right! survival items are important, the hatchet has a hammer also; beside the regular tools at the ready, my hurricane kit also also includes several tarps, rope and a large roll of duct tape.

        Liked by 7 people

        • AghastInFL says:

          I will reveal one last item in my hurricane kit because I think it’s important to some individuals living here in FL or in similar climates.
          I mentioned above I have a generator, I also own a small portable window Air Conditioner which I keep in original pkg in storage, these are very low cost life insurance for those that cannot tolerate the FL heat and your generator will keep it going.
          If you have a generator make sure it runs… just because it did, does not mean it will when you need it most. As before, it pays to prepare.

          Liked by 9 people

          • lizzieintexas says:

            Agreed. We test our generator every spring. We also have a small window unit. You can do a lot but sleep and rest is important and being comfortable while trying to sleep is unbeatable. We also have my 85yo MIL that usually stays with us during emergencies.

            Liked by 4 people

        • a few years into my generator’s life it quit running. we’d used it a bit, lent it out to the kids during a long outtage – came back sputtering.
          inspection showed carb was clogged with white waxy buildup – mechanic said that’s from ethanol in the gas…. why aghast noted “sta-bil” in tank, it minimizes such deterioration. i feel a better solution is to keep non-ethanol gas in the tank – lowes, h/d sell cans of high octane pure gas called “tru-fuel”. expensive, but i use it in any small engines cause they always start right up.
          once running, ethanol gas no problem in the generator, you just don’t want it to sit in there. best to run generator, or chainsaw, or lawnmower totally out of gas if you know you won’t be starting it for a while… tanks’s dry, no ethanol problems, ever.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Rural NC says:

            My local Sunoco station sells Grade 87,,,pure gas/no ethanol.

            Like

          • MN carry holder says:

            Here is approximately everything I know about gasoline storage. I don’t face hurricanes, but we do have blizzards. My gas generator is dual-fuel, Gasoline + Propane, and I use a bulk propane tank to heat my house. Though I can use propane for my generator, I don’t want to because anything that makes me use the generator makes me question my next propane delivery. Thus, I try to keep gas on hand over the winter.

            If you can possibly avoid it, don’t use ethanol in your small engines/generator. If you are perfect and always shut off the fuel and run the carb empty, you’ll never have a problem. If you are perfect and always stabilize your gas, you’ll rarely have problems. If you aren’t perfect, you’ll mess up one or the other sooner or later. Using non-ethanol gas is good insurance for being human.

            Shop around. Most likely, some gas station in your area sells ultra-premium non-ethanol gas in bulk at the pump. There may even be websites to help you find these pumps. Expect to pay even more than premium gas, but less than the sealed bottles. Probably WAY less than the bottles.

            Best gasoline storage is clones of NATO gas cans. Quite expensive, but fantastic. Avoid the ones where the center seam sticks out. Cheap versions leave that seam projected from the can, which means that they don’t sit flat and they fail early because that seam wasn’t intended to be load bearing. Also, if they are too cheap to do that part right, what else did they mess up inside? Check the lid shape and mechanism, get matching accessories. Normal ones have an oddly shaped spout, some clones are round. Doesn’t seem to be a problem with the round ones, just as long as you get the matching spout, gaskets, etc.

            Second best is red plastic cans. WAY cheaper than metal NATO cans. Most likely, you’ll throw whatever spout it comes with in the trash. Figure out your size and threading and then hop on ebay to get 1 solid cap per can, and at least one flex spout with ring. Also order a hammer-in vent with cap. Before you put gas in it the first time, drill it for the vent on the back top corner near, but not on, the seam. Hammer the vent in. Shake the can upside down until all the plastic shavings fall out.

            There is no third best. Don’t use milk jugs, bleach bottles, etc. If your name is Max and you are living in a desert wasteland after WWIII, feel free to use whatever you can find. For the rest of you, just don’t do it. In a dire emergency where you need to transport (not store!) gasoline without a proper container, polyethylene (HDPE) won’t dissolve right away, but if it wasn’t made as a gas can, it isn’t lined, and will melt sooner than you think. It also probably won’t stand up to rough handling.

            If your area has seasons, fill your cans with summer gas. It has lower vapor pressure and puts less strain on the cans. Lower RVP also means that you may have a hard time starting some things when it is cold. Keep a spray can or two of starting fluid on hand, and know how to use it safely on your cold blooded gear. Even with summer gas, plastic cans will probably still bulge. Do not vent the pressure except when you have to open the can anyway to fill something. That pressure is caused by the most volatile parts of the gas, which are also the parts you need the most when starting a cold engine. If your can vents that gas, your gas will go bad quickly.

            Non-ethanol gas, when properly stored in a non-vented container, can last quite a while. Use Sta-bil or Pri-G too, and you can possibly use it 4 or 5 years later. But avoid that. (I’ve seen claims of 10+ years if the gas was also stored in a cool, dark place with a steady temperature, like underground.) Rotate your stocks. Keep 4 or 5 cans in a shed (not your house or garage if you can avoid it – keeps the insurance man happy), five or six gallons each. Use the oldest one to fill your lawn stuff, generator, snowblower, whatever. When one gets empty, refill it. If you don’t use it fast enough, dump the current partial can in your car when it gets to 12 months and refill. When you refill, measure a double dose of Sta-Bil into the can(s) before you leave for the gas station. Tag it with the date, and what you filled it with. I mark mine with “No-eth + S” because nothing I run really cares about the octane rating.

            Those bottles in the store might very well last forever if they are sealed properly. Might be a good idea to keep one or two on hand, but the bulk of your gasoline storage should be, well, bulk. If you’ve got money to burn, or can’t keep up with a rotation schedule, feel free to stock up.

            For those of you in Florida and in a rush, forget the NATO cans, just get some red gas cans. Skip the part about drilling it for a vent, skip the part about replacing the cap/spout. Just don’t get the cans with a pushbutton. They don’t seal well when you want it sealed, and they don’t dispense well when you want it unsealed. The spouts with an O-ring between the fixed end of the spout and a lockable sliding part with a hook are decent if you can find them.

            If you need to use an unmodified gas can, be very slow and careful when you do. They suck. You are about to get an education and you will quickly understand why you need to install a vent and put a decent spout on it when you get a chance. If you need to drill a can that had gas in it, use the remaining gas in your car (or whatever) and store it with the cap off for a month or two. Rinse with water until you can’t smell gas any more. Let it dry before drilling. To return to gas, store with the cap off for a few days until dry inside, then you can fill again.

            If using a parked car for gasoline storage, make sure you use a fully encapsulated momentary pushbutton switch for the remote control. Use a ratcheting crimper on the splices, and fully seal them in good heat-shrink. Ancor makes fantastic heat shrink tube that is glue lined and shrinks to a third of the original size. You can also get butt-splices that are jacketed in glue-lined heat-shrink. Just crimp them and hit with a heat gun. If filling something metal, use a grounding clip connected to the pump/car and the metal tank/recipient vehicle. If filling a plastic can, consider using a metal sheet or plate grounded to the car’s frame. You set the sheet/plate on the ground, attach the grounding clip, then put the can on the metal.

            With a car/tank, you usually can’t rotate it fully. Instead, pump 5 gallons out each month and use it, then Sta-bil the empty can, refill, and dump back into the car. If your hose can reach back to the filler, stick the hose in and run the pump for a while to circulate and mix.

            Your home owner’s insurance might be unhappy if you have a fire and they find out you’ve been using a garaged car as a fuel depot. They’ll certainly be upset if you have a gravity or pump-fed system that isn’t a car. Check your policy AND talk to your agent before you do anything that might give them an excuse to not pay. They will probably also insist that you not keep more than 5 gallons total in a garage attached to a dwelling.

            Good luck. Stay safe.

            Like

    • lizzieintexas says:

      Don’t forget to get cash (for after if no power). Put some jugs of water in your freezers.

      BTDT – Ike. Miserable 14 days with no power.

      Liked by 8 people

      • Pam says:

        That’s similar to what we went through with Diana over 30 years ago. I was just a kid then. Diana teased us for days before she finally made landfall. We were out of school and without power for at least a couple of weeks if not more. Hazel hit here 30 years prior to that.

        Liked by 8 people

        • AghastInFL says:

          Remember 2004? Hurricane after hurricane here in FL… what a year, virtually everything I have today I acquired at the time, I just keep them up to date.

          Liked by 7 people

          • singtune says:

            Yes we were in our Home in Punta Gorda, Florida, & right in the strongest winds of Hurricane Charley. Those Winds hit us at between 170-180 Miles an hour & they Never stated that on the TV/Radio~! We had fully prepared & came out better than anyone else on the block. However we were the Only one in our area with Hurricane Shutters & a garage door Post too. We still had $9000.00 damage, but much less than anyone else, in our Area. We also were out of Power for approx.10 days.

            Liked by 4 people

          • amwick says:

            One in 2004 was Charlie, it hit the small town of Punta Gorda,,,, I lost my town house…It was the week after I retired, August 13! Some things you just don’t forget.

            Liked by 3 people

            • AghastInFL says:

              Charlie continued up and was the only storm that took out our power here in NW Orlando… it was quite a storm. Did you rebuild or have to purchase a new home?

              Like

          • Arkindole says:

            Yep. Frances and Jeanne in the eye with 130+ helps you prepare. Ditto on everything plus about a kW of solar plus storage. Inverters the size of your car. Moved inland a few years ago, so regardless, shouldn’t get above 70 ish.

            Make sure you have extra brand news fuel line for those brittle Chinese/Mexican ones you’ll be using. BTDT.

            Like

          • justfactsplz says:

            I remember. I am prepared as I can be. It is a strong possibility that we will be among the first to be ordered to evacuate. Please keep us in your prayers. We have a disabled lady living with us and six pets.

            Liked by 6 people

          • maggiemoowho says:

            Yes😩, Hurricane Charlie pummeled us a few months after we moved to Florida and then Frances and Jeanne. Never knew palm trees could bend to the ground like they did, and the frogs, the frogs were everywhere. My husband and I waited them out in our closet with our 3 dogs and 2 cats, talk about an adventure.

            Like

          • donebydesign says:

            I could tell you were a storm veteran from your prep list….Francis and Jeanne survivor here….the window shaker stays in our master bedroom year round. And stabil very important. Best regards to all my fellow treepers in the potential path like I am….prepare well.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Katherine McCoun says:

      We used to live in hurricane country. Picking up prescriptions, vacuuming, catching up on laundry and ironing, all dishes done and baked and cooked a little extra. Last minute, extra dog walk (and would take her out again real quick during the eye) and pick up plenty of ice. Have keep extra tarps on hand, just in case of damage, and plenty of flaslights. But you all in Fla already know all of this

      Liked by 4 people

    • thetrain2016 says:

      Get a few extra boxes of ammo and make sure your guns are operational. Bad people is looking for homes that have running generators, food and water. You may need to deal with them appropriately. Don’t forget Andrew and the animals of Homestead…

      Like

  6. Pam says:

    As someone from SE NC who has gone through many of these storms over the years, the last really powerful hurricane we saw in this area was 20 years ago last month with Hurricane Fran. That was a direct hit for us. We’ve had some close scrapes and swipes since then and have been very fortunate. I’ve already been out today to begin making some preparations. We will have some food and a generator, if necessary, to get us through this one. It’s going to come awfully close to us even if it’s not a direct hit.

    https://www.facebook.com/GovOfficeNC/?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE&fref=nf

    Liked by 5 people

    • singtune says:

      Yes best to be prepared. I made sure my Daughter & Family know what they might need on the East Coast of Florida, as this will be the closest they have come to a Big Hurricane since they have lived here in Florida. I noticed they did Buy a Generator since I was there last. I was just over there in Port St. Lucie for a Week in September.

      It is Necessary to have your Generator BEFORE the storm, because IF there are any left after the storm, they will cost double. That happened to people after Charley hit here on the Gulf Coast, because that was a real surprise, since Charley was predicted to Hit up in the Big Bend Area, NOT in South West Florida~!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rural NC says:

      Thank you, Pam, for the link. I thought I was safe, but seeing Gov. McCrory’s list of the 66 NC counties under “Emergency,” mine is listed. I’m not too prepped but have learned much from all comments here. What a busy week for many of us! Good luck and blessings to all.

      Like

  7. dmacleo says:

    good luck to those in possible impact areas.
    here in maine looks like we won’t ge anything, was possible we would get 10″ or so if rain one day near end of week but now looking like just will be cloudy.

    Like

  8. Roamer says:

    We live in Orlando. I pulled the generator out and it started on the first pull. Been stored since hurricane Charley in 2004. Helped that I drained all the gas. But worse than the hurricane maybe coming is the news from my wife oncologist today that the cancer has spread after the three months of chemo and now they are going to put her on an immunotherapy drug. We need prayer.

    Liked by 12 people

  9. Deplorable cowwow says:

    Yes last update puts it on a more westwardly track. Please treepers pray that Almighty God would spare us all from this storm. We are on the coast of SC and the entire Fla to the Outer Banks area could be in the path.

    Liked by 4 people

  10. adoubledot says:

    Up here in Ellicott City, MD, we need to keep an eye on this storm’s track, too. This is the last thing our historic district needs after the yuge flood we had in July.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. Pam says:

    According to the feed I’m listening to (posted above in comment) the hurricane hunters are currently on their way into the system now. The next update (intermediate advisory) is scheduled for 8pm ET.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. zephyrbreeze says:

    I’d forgotten about this:

    “The last hurricane to strike Florida was Wilma, a powerful Category 3 storm that arrived on Oct. 24, 2005. It swept across the Everglades and struck heavily populated south Florida, causing five deaths in the state and an estimated $23 billion in damage.”

    http://www.deseretnews.com/article/765689135/Hermine-hits-Florida-coast-as-1st-hurricane-in-a-decade.html?pg=all

    Liked by 2 people

  13. tax2much says:

    Maybe now is a good time for my favorite hurricane story…

    Joe was finishing boarding up his beach house for the major hurricane headed his way, when his neighbor Bill stopped by and invited Joe to come along with him to his inland hunting lodge and assured him that he had plenty of room and that they would have a good time while riding out the storm.

    Joe told him no thanks, that he had great faith in the Lord to protect him. Bill gave him directions to the lodge just in case he changed his mind later.

    The next day, the police came to his house and knocked on the door. The policeman advised him there was an evacuation order and that he would transport him to an inland shelter. Joe refused and stated that he had great faith in the Lord to protect him. The policeman let him know that he couldn’t force him to go and merely asked for next of kin information just in case and then left.

    That evening as the storm approached the roads were flooded where a car could not get through, but the local fire department came through the streets on their big truck asking for those who had stayed to please reconsider and come get on the truck and they would be taken to an inland shelter. Joe once again stated that he was staying and that the Lord would protect him from harm.

    That night, the storm came ashore and the storm surge destroyed Joe’s home and Joe drowned in the flood waters.

    The next thing he knew was that he was standing at the gates of Heaven asking St. Peter to let him in. Joe cried out that he deserved entrance and that God had forsaken him even though he was a devout believer. The next thing Joe heard was a booming voice from beyond the gates.

    “FORSAKEN YOU?” “WHY I TRIED TO SAVE YOU THREE TIMES. FIRST I SENT YOUR NEIGHBOR, THEN THE POLICE AND FINALLY THE FIRE DEPARTMENT!”

    Joe fell to his knees and prayed for forgiveness.

    Liked by 5 people

    • zephyrbreeze says:

      Such a great reminder.

      My favorite story, true or apocryphal is of the emergency workers going door to door asking people to evacuate their homes. When people refused, the workers then asked the people to please write their social security numbers on their arms in permanent marker so they can identify the bodies. They got more takers to evacuate when they used that approach.

      Liked by 4 people

  14. Howie says:

    18z GFS is a monster just east of Palm Beach late Thu. Sustained hurricane force winds on the coast, 90+mph ~20 mi offshore #matthew

    Liked by 2 people

  15. lizzieintexas says:

    Scariest report from Ike (for me). I can’t even imagine.

    2 swept across bay tell how they survived Ike’s wrath

    http://www.chron.com/lavoz/hurricanes/article/2-swept-across-bay-tell-how-they-survived-Ike-s-1757255.php?forceWeb=1

    Like

    • Howie says:

      I am starting prep. DO NOT LIKE THE LOOK. Just in case.

      Liked by 7 people

      • lizzieintexas says:

        When we bought our house we started prepping that year. It took us about four years to get everything we needed/wanted. Plywood, butane stoves, ice chest, extention cords, window a/c, etc. The last was the generator. Then the expense of the actual hurricane. Gas storage for the generator is still an issue for us but we have four vehicles and a boat that we tank up fully and syphon out of them.

        Liked by 2 people

  16. Deb says:

    Prayers for all our Treepers in the path of this storm. Stay safe!

    Liked by 8 people

  17. NHVoter says:

    Prayers to everyone in this hurricane’s path.

    I’m supposed to fly to West Palm Beach on Thursday. What do you think the chances are that my flight gets canceled?

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Martin says:

    Not to be off topic or go all George Noory, but if you were to back through recent history and correlate natural disasters with politics, something befalls the US every time an American leader does something to/speaks against Israel. It’s not really coincidence, as it may seem.

    As “religious” as W was, he had a horrible record with Israel, doing what we now understand to be globalism. Every time “land for peace” was pushed, America felt it, in reality.

    And Obama recently declared Jerusalem is not in Israel.

    Just saying.

    http://www.nowtheendbegins.com/11-shocking-proofs-disaster-strikes-america-mistreats-israel/

    Liked by 4 people

  19. amwick says:

    On the phone with a neighbor. He has volunteered to stash our patio furniture inside, if it looks bad.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Howie says:

      If you are near the FL E Coast be ready just in case. PALM BEACH TO THE NORTH.

      Like

    • Katherine McCoun says:

      Remember to tuck away trash cans too. We used to park our car about a quarter mile away as there were tree that could fall across our driveway. A chainsaw is a good tool to have on hand if trees are around

      Liked by 3 people

  20. James F says:

    Poor Haiti still has not even recovered from their last major disaster – Clinton’s being put in charge of rebuilding but instead they stole the money to line their pockets as well as the pockets of their wealthy elite buddies.

    Liked by 7 people

  21. Bob W says:

    Don’t worry this storm is moving at a snail’s pace and the Russian storm directing weather pushers will direct it out to sea well away from Florida.

    Like

  22. MaryfromMarin says:

    Prayers for all I know who live in FL, and in the possible northward path of the hurricane.

    Liked by 4 people

  23. James O'Malley says:

    Remember folks, don’t mess with nature. Even if you think you can ride it out, don’t take the chance. Your life and that of your families is more important.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Howie says:

      If it landfalls around Palm Beach and heads for Orlando it will be the worst power outage in history. There is a good chance it can do that. The best hope is that it stays out to sea,

      Liked by 1 person

      • donebydesign says:

        Chatting with my next door neighbor this evening (Melbourne)….he lived through and took a direct hit from Andrew in Homestead 1992. He pointed out that if the path shifts westward enough, Matthew could run up the coast on the Gulf Stream. The high dollar property on the coast south of us would get all the insurance checks first…and could bankrupt smaller insurers leaving less money, if any, for those getting hit later on.
        Hadn’t thought about that. Fwiw, his war stories from Andrew are not pleasant. Prepare.

        Liked by 2 people

  24. zephyrbreeze says:

    I still remember Andrew. Worst hurricanes in US history.

    Rank Hurricane Season Landfall pressure
    1 “Labor Day” 1935 892 mbar (hPa)
    2 Camille 1969 900 mbar (hPa)
    3 Katrina 2005 920 mbar (hPa)
    4 Andrew 1992 922 mbar (hPa)
    5 “Indianola” 1886 925 mbar (hPa)
    6 “Florida Keys” 1919 927 mbar (hPa)
    7 “Okeechobee” 1928 929 mbar (hPa)
    8 “Great Miami” 1926 930 mbar (hPa)
    9 Donna 1960 930 mbar (hPa)
    10 Carla 1961 931 mbar (hPa)

    Like

  25. Dixie says:

    I wish I was living in Montana right about now.

    Liked by 4 people

  26. Howie says:

    Ice Ice Ice Ice Ice….

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Texian says:

    Everybody calm down, don’t panic. By the time it’s off the Florida coast it will probably just be a Cat 2. I have confidence in our fellow Floridians, this ain’t their first rodeo. For newbies, simple rule about being on or in the ocean – if you panic you die; See, it’s simple, so there are no worries.

    Like

    • just a Cat 2, you keep thinking that.. seriously..

      Like

      • Texian says:

        Yes sir, just a Cat 2.. I have been through Cat 2’s at sea and shore. They are reasonably survivable on shore, but very dangerous at sea. You have to be reasonably smart and reasonably competent. With that being said, every storm is different. It’s not an exact science; What’s happening way up in the air that the hurricane hunter reads isn’t exactly what’s happening down on the playing field. If you know you don’t have what it takes – like being in the drink and having the training, fortitude and confidence to survive – then be reasonably smart to yourself and retreat..

        Like

  28. Looking at the Latest Forecast tracks. We know for certain the track after it passes Haiti & Cuba…
    The South ATL ridge is a huge player pushing this Storm on a Westward track..
    CURRENT ANALOGS, are (1964) Cleo,,, Hugo, Floyd, Hazel…
    This bodes ILL will for ALOT of Us..
    I’m DEAD Center of the cone at Day 5..
    Honestly I’m looking at a Myrtle Beach, NC/SC Border Landfall…If not just right here in Wilm…
    This going to ride the Gulf Stream UNIMPEDED all the way along it’s track..
    Cat4/5 is very, VERY Possible..
    Coastal, Water temps are @ 82 currently, Higher still in the Gulf stream…
    remember I reside in Wilm,N.C.,, very close to the Coast, about 5 miles as the bird flies..
    The Cape Fear river about a Mile to my right, (state ports).. I’m about 10 ft above MSL..
    I’m starting Prep(s) Tomorrow…
    Prayers to all Treepers that will be affected..
    OH MY LORD, those Folks in Haiti Still living in tents, by the Thousands, Massive, Torrential rains & Mudslides, there’s going to be Massive loss of Lives there..

    Like

  29. maggiemoowho says:

    Just an FYI for any new Floridians who have an inground swimming pool and are worried about it overflowing during the hurricane.
    🚨DO NOT DRAIN YOUR POOL AND DO NOT EMPTY IT HALF WAY. IT CAN AND PROBABLY WILL POP OUT OF THE GROUND🚨
    Doesn’t matter what type of inground pool you have, gunite(concrete) or fiberglass, it can pop. When a gunite (concrete) swimming pool pops out of the ground, it is catastrophic and usually non-repairable.

    https://mgtvwfla.files.wordpress.com/2015/08/1-holiday-popped-pool-web_.jpg?w=151&h=85&crop=1

    Like

    • maggiemoowho says:

      Let me try that image one more time😊

      Liked by 1 person

    • sunnydaze says:

      That’s so weird. Why would it pop out of the ground ? Anyone here who can explain this?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Just Scott says:

        I have to share this story with you’all. My Grandma owned three lots, mainly because two were a swamp. Somebody bought the worst one, and built a house on it. Sure enough, two years later there was a big storm and the basement flooded completely.

        The owner, having connections to the local fire department, got them to bring a pump truck out and pump the basement dry. Of course, it became a boat, in a swamp. The whole house popped out of the foundation hole, broke in half, and fell back into the hole, as the hole filled back up with swamp.

        None of us every felt bad laughing while remembering it. Ya can’t fix stupid. The lot is empty today, and is swamp again.

        Liked by 1 person

        • maggiemoowho says:

          Wow, that’s nuts. I hope she had good homeowners insurance. I’ve seen photos of tornado shelters, old bomb shelters and caskets that have popped out of the ground during bad storms, but never a house.

          Like

      • maggiemoowho says:

        When the water table in the ground is high, ground water pushes the pool out, makes it float.(Hydrostatic Pressure) We just had our pool redone and our water table is high, so the pool company had to make another drain to use with the main drain. It was weird, even with the drains open, water from the ground came up through the main drain filling our pool about two to two and a half feet. If the drains weren’t in, our pool would have popped. The pool company we used carries insurance to cover pool popping. Many pool companies don’t cover the home owner’s pool if it pops while they are working on it.

        Like

        • sunnydaze says:

          Thanks, maggie. That makes sense, It’s the water table, not the wind that makes it pop up. So if the water is left in, the wgt. of the water can help anchor the pool in the ground? Am I close?

          I’m kind of use to EQ so this whole hurricane thing is new to me. I get the high wind thang, but the rain is fierce too. And I guess if you live in a place like FL. where the ground everywhere is pretty much 1/2 water even in “dry” season……..

          Liked by 1 person

          • maggiemoowho says:

            The weight is what keeps it in the ground. Even a pool that is half full can pop. I think fiberglass and vinyl pools can buckle inward also. We never owned a pool until we moved to Florida( it’s a pain in the azz and the weather is to hot to even use it) Hurricane Charlie hit a few months after we moved to here, so we learned real quick about what to do and what not to do with a pool. We almost drained ours some and I’m so glad we asked our neighbors first, they saved our behinds and pool.😃

            Like

      • Burnt Toast says:

        Soil water pressure is no different than water pressure in a lake.

        In the pic above you are looking at a boat.

        If the pool is left full the water pressure inside is equal to or exceeds the soil water pressure outside. (Technically, the water in the pool does not anchor the pool down.)

        Liked by 1 person

        • sunnydaze says:

          Thanks for the clarification, BT. It makes sense. (Altho, if you know nothing about the subject, my “weight” theory makes sense too-LOL.).

          Either way, I am very happy to hear this. Cuz it always seemed like a full pool in the neighborhood could be a great source of H2O if the water gets shut off cuz of a ‘cane.

          Like

          • maggiemoowho says:

            I’m wrong above, I thought it was the weight☺️.

            Like

          • Just Scott says:

            In the Great Lakes area, you will find something called a “stand pipe.” When I bought a house outside Chicago, I had no idea what it was, and stuck it in a corner. First time there was sewer backup, I realized it screws into the floor drain.

            It is a short chunk of pipe that is tall enough to stop minor flooding, but short enough to flood the basement if the upward water pressure on the foundation gets too high.

            If the house is more than a decade old,you block thefloor drain, and the pressure gets too high, the concrete usually cracks, letting the water in. Take away: a flooded basement can save the house. ( or pool)

            Had, I hate wicked storms. The WDC Derachio went right through my property. Two SUV’s squished by 100 yo oaks, plus a lawn tractor and a greenhouse. Stressing to much watching this storm taking the worst possible track and maybe coming through my backyard. Don’t know how you Floridians do it. Hoping and praying for the best for ya!

            Like

  30. Just Scott says:

    A different story for you, different storm, in Northern Illinois.

    Power was out for several days. My neighbor went to sleep with his generator running for some space heaters. He woke up because it was cold, the heaters and lights didn’t work, but he could hear the generator running. He went out to check why, and found an old lawn mower where his generator should have been.

    That is part of the reason why I have a 17,500 gasoline Generac that I roll into the garage at night, and a 24/2 Lister diesel in a shed that weighs over 2 tons. Nobody is going to steal either without making enough noise they experience Virginia’s “Castle Laws.” Also another good reason to run the small stuff off batteries and an inverter. If the grid is down, you have to think about OpSec.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Just Scott says:

    I am not going to post the pic, but this storm is probably going to be a really bad thang. If you are worried enough to follow this late in this thread, follow the link below. A lot of really good meteorologists are tracking the models there. The vernacular can be difficult, but the model captures say it enough. Note, push past page 33…

    https://www.americanwx.com/bb/topic/48848-2016-atlantic-hurricane-season-discussion-thread-iii-lol/?page=33

    Like

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