WSJ Report: “U.S. Spies on Millions of Cars” – Aligns With Our 2013/2014 Maryland MCAC Hub Research…

This is one of those stories when we really wish we had been wrong in our 2013, 2014 research.  [Previously outlined HERE and HERE and HERE and HERE and HERE]

Over a year ago we brought you the story of Mr. Filippidis and his family, a Florida Driver who was pulled over by law enforcement in Maryland.  The traffic stop would have been typical except for the fact the responding officer demanded, at random, Mr. Filippidis’s firearm.

Mr. Filippidis did not have his legally owned -CCW permitted- hand gun, it was home in Florida.  Nor did Mr. Filippidis ever say he had a firearm – yet the officer was insistent Mr. Filippidis owned one, handcuffed Mr. Filippidis, and strip searched his vehicle on the side of the road.

Numerous Maryland state police arrived to assist in the search.  They found nothing, because Mr. F was telling the truth.   After two hours Mr. Filippidis and his family were allowed to continue their travels, but the entire process was unnerving.

Which prompted Mr. Filippidis to ask “how did a Maryland officer know I was a gun owner”?  Which led to a severely awkward litany of obfuscations and explanations from Maryland that did not make sense.

Sensing more to the story, we began an official public records request inquiry to get to the bottom of the issue(s).  What we found was a network of federally funded, but state operated, Maryland APLR (automatic license plate readers) which were tied into an intelligence hub (ie database) called MCAC (Maryland Coordination and Analysis Center).

The information within the MCAC database contains a litany of information, including CCW permits, which are data-mined from cooperative state/local/county agency LEO and alternate state controlled governmental databases throughout the country.

The data, essentially a portfolio of all contact a person has with any governmental regulatory agency, is then cross referenced into the vehicle registration (tag) of every licensed car in the system.

What made Mr. Filippidis’s case all the more interesting is that Florida’s CCW permit and registration records are not held in LEO databases; by statute they are kept inside the Florida Dept. of Agriculture database.  However, we found out that Maryland, and any state who would so desire, would be able to use the EPIC and NCIC authorization process to assemble the data, regardless of who houses it, if they so desired:

[…] both Maryland and Florida [(850)245-6687] admit there is indeed a way for an authorized central LEO agency to gather, assign, and track CCW with identifying characteristics of the CCW holder (license, tag, name, registration id, etc) IF SUCH AN ENTERPRISE, OR AGENCY, WERE TO CONSTRUCT AN ADDITIONAL DATABASE SPECIFICALLY FOR THAT PURPOSE

Our very specific and continual inquiries made Maryland authorities extremely twitchy because the data hub was, apparently, only a few months active.  We could only assume they did not want the general public to be aware of the system and/or its capability.

Research indicated that apparently Maryland was “the test market” for their system, and elements of a larger overall federal tracking system, which had/has bigger objectives in mind.

Maryland Public Records Request Response - MDTAP

 

After numerous conversations, delays and bureaucratic doublespeak we eventually hit a dead end as they officially refused to discuss the APLR and MCAC Data Hub.  [And we ran out of money to continue legal proceedings against their avoidance].  Remember, this is Maryland we were going up against – one of the most liberal and litigious states in the union.

However, apparently at least part of the federal program has indeed rolled out, and now the Wall Street Journal has investigated the federal system as outlined in this article.

 “DEA Uses License-Plate Readers to Build Database for Federal, Local Authorities”

traffic shot

WASHINGTON—The Justice Department has been building a national database to track in real time the movement of vehicles around the U.S., a secret domestic intelligence-gathering program that scans and stores hundreds of millions of records about motorists, according to current and former officials and government documents.

The primary goal of the license-plate tracking program, run by the Drug Enforcement Administration, is to seize cars, cash and other assets to combat drug trafficking, according to one government document. But the database’s use has expanded to hunt for vehicles associated with numerous other potential crimes, from kidnappings to killings to rape suspects, say people familiar with the matter.

Officials have publicly said that they track vehicles near the border with Mexico to help fight drug cartels. What hasn’t been previously disclosed is that the DEA has spent years working to expand the database “throughout the United States,’’ according to one email reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.

Many state and local law-enforcement agencies are accessing the database for a variety of investigations, according to people familiar with the program, putting a wealth of information in the hands of local officials who can track vehicles in real time on major roadways.

CameraThe database raises new questions about privacy and the scope of government surveillance. The existence of the program and its expansion were described in interviews with current and former government officials, and in documents obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union through a Freedom of Information Act request and reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.

It is unclear if any court oversees or approves the intelligence-gathering.

A spokesman for Justice Department, which includes the DEA, said the program complies with federal law. “It is not new that the DEA uses the license-plate reader program to arrest criminals and stop the flow of drugs in areas of high trafficking intensity,’’ the spokesman said.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, senior Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, said the government’s use of license-plate readers “raises significant privacy concerns. The fact that this intrusive technology is potentially being used to expand the reach of the government’s asset-forfeiture efforts is of even greater concern.’’

The senator called for “additional accountability’’ and said Americans shouldn’t have to fear ”their locations and movements are constantly being tracked and stored in a massive government database.’’

The DEA program collects data about vehicle movements, including time, direction and location, from high-tech cameras placed strategically on major highways. Many devices also record visual images of drivers and passengers, which are sometimes clear enough for investigators to confirm identities, according to DEA documents and people familiar with the program.

The documents show that the DEA also uses license-plate readers operated by state, local and federal law-enforcement agencies to feed into its own network and create a far-reaching, constantly updating database of electronic eyes scanning traffic on the roads to steer police toward suspects.

The law-enforcement scanners are different from those used to collect tolls.

By 2011, the DEA had about 100 cameras feeding into the database, the documents show. On Interstate 95 in New Jersey, license-plate readers feed data to the DEA—giving law-enforcement personnel around the country the ability to search for a suspect vehicle on one of the country’s busiest highways. One undated internal document shows the program also gathers data from license-plate readers in Florida and Georgia.

“Any database that collects detailed location information about Americans not suspected of crimes raises very serious privacy questions,’’ said Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst at the ACLU. “It’s unconscionable that technology with such far-reaching potential would be deployed in such secrecy. People might disagree about exactly how we should use such powerful surveillance technologies, but it should be democratically decided, it shouldn’t be done in secret.’’

License-plate readers are already used in the U.S. by companies to collect debts and repossess vehicles, and by local police departments to solve crimes.

In 2010, the DEA said in internal documents that the database aided in the seizure of 98 kilograms of cocaine, 8,336 kilograms of marijuana and the collection of $866,380. It also has been connected to the Amber Alert system, to help authorities find abducted children, according to people familiar with the program.

One email written in 2010 said the primary purpose of the program was asset forfeiture—a controversial practice in which law-enforcement agencies seize cars, cash and other valuables from suspected criminals. The practice is increasingly coming under attack because of instances when law-enforcement officers take such assets without evidence of a crime.

The document said, “…DEA has designed this program to assist with locating, identifying, and seizing bulk currency, guns, and other illicit contraband moving along the southwest border and throughout the United States. With that said, we want to insure we can collect and manage all the data and IT responsibilities that will come with the work to insure the program meets its goals, of which asset forfeiture is primary.’

[…]  The data are also shared with U.S. border officials, according to an undated memorandum of understanding between the DEA and Customs and Border Protection officials. That document shows the two agencies specifically said that lawmakers might never specifically fund the work, stating: “this in no way implies that Congress will appropriate funds for such expenditures.’’

The disclosure of the DEA’s license-plate reader database comes on the heels of other revelations in recent months about the Justice Department, as well as the agencies it runs, gathering data about innocent Americans as it searches for criminals.

In November, The Wall Street Journal reported that the U.S. Marshals Service flies planes carrying devices that mimic cellphone towers in order to scan the identifying information of Americans’ phones as it searches for criminal suspects and fugitives. Justice Department officials have said the program is legal.

Earlier this month, the DEA filed court documents indicating that for more than a decade it had gathered the phone records of Americans calling foreign countries, without judicial oversight, to sift through that data looking for drug suspects. That program was canceled in 2013.  (read more – WSJ paywall)

drone 2

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104 Responses to WSJ Report: “U.S. Spies on Millions of Cars” – Aligns With Our 2013/2014 Maryland MCAC Hub Research…

  1. Pingback: WSJ Report: “U.S. Spies on Millions of Cars” – Aligns With Our 2013/2014 Maryland MCAC Hub Research… | RINO Blog Watch

  2. justfactsplz says:

    This is too much spying on and snooping about law abiding American citizens. So much information is gathered that when the time comes for confiscation they will know exactly where to go. I have heard some of those cameras can zoom in on you while you are in your car and actually see your eyelashes.

    Liked by 10 people

  3. elvischupacabra says:

    Maybe we need to do this:

    Drive up to the Maryland border with a car loaded with air-tight suitcases filled with clothes soaked in a viscous mixture of catsh!t, sour milk and rancid chicken. Inside the clothing, we could hide several real-looking, but very legal, airsoft pistols. Drive up and down the interstate until they profile us, pull us over and search our stuff. We get out, along with our lawyers, and watch the fun begin.

    “Come on there, five-oh. Just hold your nose and look inside that reeking cardigan. You might’ve missed the MAC-10!”

    Meanwhile, my youngest son films the whole thing from afar with a couple of drones!

    Maryland is one of those states full of politicians and elites who cannot understand why some of us don’t support universal, reciprocal recognition of gay marriage. Why should we, when so many states won’t do the same for something guaranteed under the Second Amendment and carried out by trained, law-abiding citizens with a clean record? I’ll only consider respecting your SCOTUS-constructed Constitutional “right” to gay marriage when you start recognizing my enumerated right under the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution to legally bear arms!

    Liked by 8 people

    • Col.(R) Ken says:

      Elvis, I have been driving thru, Marry-Land since the Fla driver was pulled over. Yes, CCW, PA issued. As to Marry-Land intent to transport weapons, pistol disassembled, ammo locked in glove box, magazines locked in another part of the vehicle. Driving the speed limit, or a few mile below. Waiting for a “terry stop”. Will be driving thru this weekend, I’ll start my lawsuit at 20 million, settle for 15 million. I’ll keep you informed.

      Liked by 5 people

  4. Sentient says:

    But I thought that NICS checks were supposed to be immediately purged! Lol. This is why any call for “universal background checks” must be opposed. The “gun show loophole” and old, unregistered guns are all that’s stopping the government from possessing a complete database of all gun owners. “Universal background checks” means an eventual gun owner database, and gun registration is a prelude to confiscation.

    Liked by 6 people

    • waltherppk says:

      They are following Hitler’s model to the letter.

      Liked by 1 person

      • smiley says:

        brave new world, isn’t it.
        and I’m sure you’ve also heard of “Fusion Centers” ?
        and “Justice Information Sharing “.
        sends chills up the spine.
        just google : justice information sharing.
        heil.

        Liked by 1 person

    • The thing of it is, too, you have to have an NCIS/FBI check even to purchase COMPONENTS of a system, for instance, a lower receiver. And the serial number must be logged in the FFL dealers books.

      There are all kinds of ways they are going after guns. This is one of them. The other is the “mental health” exception they have been floating. What conditions would preclude you from owning a weapon? Now that the government has control over the medical system, they will know everything. “Mental health” is a slippery slope. You mention to your doctor you are feeling blue? Perhaps have a bad case of PMS one month? Maybe go talk to your Pastor with your spouse about some marital issues? Will these things be coded “mental health”? See where this is going? No where good.

      Liked by 5 people

      • AnyaArisohn says:

        A few months before Obamacare officially rolled out, the VA began to ask a NEW, very specific, question during the triage/check-in/vitals portion at ANY major OR minor clinic/hosp visit, in order: Weight, BP & pulse, then asked the standard ‘are you feeling suicidal, thoughts of hurting yourself and/or others?’, then this…
        “DO YOU OWN A FIREARM?”,
        and the last standard question, ‘Do you smoke/use tobacco products, interested in any smoking secession products or services?’
        …all answers typed & recorded–first time, every time, for any and all veterans, regardless of visit.

        Like

        • rdenisw says:

          I am glad to report that, so far at least, this does not happen at the VA in La Jolla, CA. I am prepared for any such questioning, but so far have not been subjected to any. Although I do believe that this happens in some (maybe a lot of) places, it fortunately is not universal. We must all be vigilant though, these things are seldom advertised in advance!

          Like

      • John Smith Jones says:

        The gubmint has a data base of every drug prescription written and filled and any anti-depressant is automatically flagged and cross referenced with any weapon database, drivers licenses, auto licenses, scanned by the plate readers and bingo, you get stopped for a “broken tail light or an expired “safety inspection” sticker etc., etc., etc.

        Like

      • Attorney says:

        Brilliant points. The public has no idea of the demon that Obamacare has unleashed with regard to our privacy rights. No freaking idea!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rurik says:

      Will there be “universal back ally checks”?

      Like

  5. PatriotUSA says:

    Immediately purged to this regime means in say maybe in 50 years? Yep, UBC are the gateway to gun confiscation and hell as far as I am concerned though FDR might clear up my logic or illogic on this one as far as hell is concerned. They want the guns, all of them. Washington state was duped into passing i594 and the same Nazis are coming to Nevada and Oregon next. My cold dead fingers will have something to say before I suck me last breathe.

    Liked by 2 people

    • waltherppk says:

      Nazis is precisely the correct identifier for what is afoot

      Liked by 2 people

      • smiley says:

        “..unless the world learns the lessons…night will fall.”
        Auschwitz Remembrance Day today, BTW.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Roy says:

          I would encourage those who believe anything negative about Hitler to please have an open mind and do some further study. We are lied to about almost everything these days. Carolyn Yeager is a good source for this topic.

          Like

          • auscitizenmom says:

            “I would encourage those who believe anything negative about Hitler to please have an open mind and do some further study.” Ha, ha. That is a joke. Right. Right??

            Like

          • stella says:

            This person? I don’t think you are kidding, but you won’t get much traction here:

            http://archive.adl.org/main_extremism/carolyn_yeager_holocaust_denial.html#.VMpJwh3fX7k

            Like

            • Roy says:

              A person either loves the truth and defends it; or they are just part of the system’s problem. Ironic that this site would defend “freedom of speech” unto death; but as a History teacher, if I wanted to teach Revisionist History in regards to ww2, I’d be fired.

              Truth does not fear Investigation.

              Voltaire said, “To learn who rules over you, simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize.”

              Like

              • stella says:

                I believe you are teaching a false “truth” – one of hate – and I will never stop pointing it out. Freedom of speech is important, because it restrains our government from silencing speech. It doesn’t stop a private blog owner from doing so, or constrain us from pointing out lies. I will NOT allow what you are saying to go uncontested here.

                Revisionist history is fine, as long as it is true. Believing that the Holocaust did not occur is NOT true, I am sorry to say. I can say this because I know (or I should say knew) people personally who witnessed the Nazi concentration camps, and the murder of innocent persons, many of whom were not the Jews that you, and people you admire, despise. The people I knew were not liars. I have no problem telling you that I will not defend Hitler or anyone who followed him. Because they were/are evil, and for no other reason.

                Do you deny what is shown in the movies made at the end of WWII in Germany and Poland? I suppose you think that was faked in Hollywood. It makes me sick.

                Just in case any doubt remains, if you tried to teach a child of mine that the Holocaust was fake, I would lobby to have you fired.

                Liked by 3 people

          • stella says:

            For any who might believe what “Roy” is preaching, I suggest you begin reading here:

            http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007147

            And watching this

            And this:

            Liked by 1 person

            • Roy says:

              “…I suppose you think that was faked in Hollywood. …

              Not faked in Hollywood, but Hollywood was involved.

              From their own lips — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyOOuRn2li8

              Like

              • stella says:

                The lameness of your twisted hatred is difficult to understand.

                ADD: Perhaps you missed what I said, above, so I’ll repeat it for you:

                “I know (or I should say knew) people personally who witnessed the Nazi concentration camps, and the murder of innocent persons, many of whom were not the Jews that you, and people you admire, despise. The people I knew were not liars.”

                Like

              • stella says:

                Interesting that they take the first part of the one-hour film produced by the U.S. government, then add footage from other sources as if they were part of the one-hour film (hint: they aren’t).

                ADD: If anyone is interested, here is the original footage from the National Archives. It is also linked on YouTube (see my comment, above).

                https://archive.org/details/nazi_concentration_camps_mp4

                Like

  6. The data, essentially a portfolio of all contact a person has with any governmental regulatory agency, is then cross referenced into the vehicle registration (tag) of every licensed car in the system.

    Who has NOT had any contact with some governmental regulatory agency, or will not in the future? Add health info and I’d say they’ve got everything pretty locked down. No problem sending tiny drones to watch you, hear you, or blow you to smithereens no matter where you are. We’re looking Minority Report in the face. Of course, to say this does not bode well is a monumental understatement. Little wonder the Emperor is so bold and blatant of late.

    I’m emailing this out. I want to make sure as many people as possible know about this so they can tuck the info away for future reference.

    Like

    • doodahdaze says:

      The car is tagged as belonging to a gun owner, but to perform a stop the cop would have to know the driver is the car owner or have another excuse. They have readers on the cop cars that scan every tag the cop car passes and alert the cop on his onboard computer. Someone needs to file charges in order to stop this “profiling.”

      Liked by 4 people

      • 2x4x8 says:

        Drivers Lives Matter

        Liked by 5 people

      • 2+2 says:

        freedom from unlawful search and seizure, right to bear arms, security in personal effects, freedom from warrants issued without probable cause. More than one of his constitutional rights was violated. Mr. F needs to sue the police department until they squeal, they didn’t have a warrant to search his vehicle. Get the ACLU involved.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Akela says:

          Georgia has already established a condition known as “Inevitable Discovery” meaning that the item or evidence in question would have been found anyway. These people will nuance the Constitution right out of existence and feel good about doing so.

          Liked by 1 person

      • lovemygirl says:

        But that is the exact type of profiling the left wants. Bitter clingers profiling.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Right. Remember Janet Napolitano’s report on who is likely to be a terrorist? Returning war vets, pro-life, Ron Paul supporters, tea party Christians, pro gun ownership. They basically labeled all Patriots terrorists.

          Liked by 1 person

          • waltherppk says:

            Anyone who is not a Marxist Communist New World Order Collectivist Hive Utopianist or advocate for a “mark of the beast” variant that is the Muslim Global Caliphate partner / conspirator would include any actual Christian who would refuse to sell their soul to Satan and Satan’s minions, would be what those subversive actors would classify deceptively as being a “security threat” simply for their opposing the evil which evil servants of Satan are doing.

            Liked by 2 people

          • smiley says:

            libertarian…..evangelical Christians are at the top of that list, IIRC.
            speaks volumes.

            Liked by 1 person

  7. waltherppk says:

    I’m sure somebody will invoke Godwin’s Law to say the comparison is gratuitous, However the comparison is entirely valid that there is a tyrannical aspect about nationalizing and centralizing of police intelligence operations which follows the model and practices of the Gestapo. The analogy is accurate and perplexing because of its truly evil implications. Police are operating according to the playbook of the Gestapo so what does that make them?

    Liked by 2 people

    • If anyone says the comparison is gratuitous I already know they’re idiots and it’s a waste of time using logic with them. Other than that, I agree entirely with you. Purely, truly evil.

      Like

  8. BertDilbert says:

    Naw, do suitcases of old porn magazines and have a high zoom camera. See how many officers have to come by and involve themselves. That would actually make a story. If you did cat poo you may be charged with interstate transportation of hazardous waste or whatever they come up with. With the porn they might actually try asset forfeiture.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. F.D.R. in Hell says:

    Hat and sunglasses while behind the wheel. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  10. gulfbreeze says:

    So you take the initiative for universal electronic health records started by GWB in 2004, and continually championed by BO since before he took office, add the $25 billion in federal funds already spread throughout the U.S. healthcare system to get those systems off the ground (as reported by the Washington Post last year), add in a good dose of “national security” agencies doing electronic snooping on the electronic communication between those health care providers’ electronic records systems and Obamacare insurance companies identifying “at risk” individuals (e.g. anyone that’s ever talked to their doctor about some particular stress or depression they’re going through), have those same agencies cross-referencing those “at risk” individuals against the firearm records they’re already snooping on, and bingo, you’ve got your “pre-crime” authorization to seize those firearms. Minority Report indeed, Sound crazy? Don’t think that conversation hasn’t happened in the federal government somewhere. If before 9/11 one would have suggested the current snooping that’s been revealed over the past few years, most would have called it crazy conspiracy theories. With today’s revelations, it’s hard to even be surprised at anything anymore.

    Liked by 3 people

    • 2+2 says:

      Patriot Act had nothing to do with Patriotism or protecting American citizens. It was all about snooping and control, and it was passed on GWB watch. Doesn’t matter which party you vote for, the disconnected elite running this country just want to control every aspect of our lives. They no longer represent their constitutents, it’s all about power.

      Liked by 4 people

      • smiley says:

        way too much “data collecting” that isn’t being used effectively.

        Like

      • bleep21k says:

        @2+2 i agree. The continued signing of the NDAA and the authority of the Patriot Act is the reason I cite most to support my contention that we, as Americans have already LOST any “War on Terrorism” we are waging. Forget “boots on the ground” in foreign countries, forget bombing “ISIS (ISIL, whatever…), forget “I am Charlie Hebdo”, this ALL pales in comparison to my personal loss of “Liberties” and “Freedoms”.

        I don’t believe it takes dismantling the greatest document that has ever existed – our US Constitution – in order to protect our nation from those that want to destroy us BECAUSE of this very document.

        It only takes a strong will of the American people to want to engage whatever enemy thinks they want to try us. We fight, we die if necessary for our children to live the American dream. We simply become “Patriots” again.

        Yet for some reason our own government is systematically eroding our liberties under a false banner of national security “protectionism” – not patriotism. Unfortunately it appears the enemy may be within.

        Liked by 3 people

        • auscitizenmom says:

          I would just leave out the word “appears.” I think it is pretty certain at this point. 😦

          Like

        • 2+2 says:

          The propaganda about the Patrior Act was citizens were willing to give up “some” personal freedoms in return for greater security from terrorist threats. I didn’t agree to this, nobody I know agreed to this, and nobody I know got to vote on it either. It was rammed through Congress. We need to get it on referendum to be repealed.

          Liked by 1 person

  11. LRay says:

    It would be interesting to find out if the database has the capacity to filter Tea Party members or NRA donors…

    Liked by 1 person

  12. benzy says:

    Sundance, I understand what you meant, but what you wrote had me laughing. It must have been a true sight to behold for those passers by who witnessed the police “strip search his vehicle”. Did they remove the fenders, hood and trunk lid? Just how does one “strip search” a vehicle?

    Liked by 1 person

  13. LetJusticePrevail" says:

    Maybe it’s time to get one of these:

    Or one of these:

    Liked by 2 people

    • 2+2 says:

      it just hit me. I’ve been puzzled about the purpose when I read “black rag around license plates” in police reports of drug busts. Now I know why. duh.

      Like

  14. Paul H. Lemmen says:

    Reblogged this on A Conservative Christian Man.

    Like

  15. francesmuldoon says:

    How this intrusion on innocent Americans is not a violation of the 4th Amendment to the US Constitution is inexplicable to me.

    To wit:
    “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

    I know this type of intrusion is happening in MI where I live and apparently has been for some time.
    http://www.michigan.gov/documents/msp/Automated_License_Plate_Reader_File_431434_7.pdf

    Thanks for bringing this back to the forefront.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. lovemygirl says:

    As with most advances in technology the good things that can be done are amazing but there is just that human nature problem involved. There is always somebody who wants to take it a step beyond what they should. These types view everyone as the enemy.

    Like

  17. As for the Black Boxes — I’ve also heard politicians floating the idea of these trackers in the cars that log the miles you drive and then you pay a tax based on the data in the trackers. It seemed like it died in the water a couple years back, but now seems to be rearing its ugly head again.

    Like

    • lovemygirl says:

      They bring up tracking and taxing “bad behavior” from time to time but quickly fall silent if you suggest going after their own vices like sexual proclivities.

      Liked by 2 people

    • czarowniczy says:

      Yep, some progressive states have floated the idea the use of mechanisms alreday in place in many cars to monitor the length of time the vehicle’s driven versus the car’s weigh and other factors to tax the vehicle. Problems like getting a standard so that Detroit can outfit all cars to match the individual state needs, dealing with cars such as ours that cross another state’s borders almost daily and getting cars that are not fitted with them actually fitted are causing delays. That said, never underestimate the abilities of a bureaucrat to find a way to separate the working people from their hard earned cash.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Roy says:

      I read a report of a pilot program for recording mileage via volunteers. It may have been in Oregon. Yes, it was. I just searched for it and here are a couple of links to PDF’s from the State of Oregon’s website. It was in 2012.

      “Oregon’s New Mileage Tax System Concept and Initial Demonstration System for a Road Usage Charge Pilot Program
      Background and Additional Details
      The Oregon Mileage Tax System Concept and the Initial Demonstration System for the Road Usage Charge Pilot Program (RUCPP) are efforts underway at the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to develop a sustainable revenue source for transportation funding. The state of Oregon and the nation need a new paradigm for transportation revenues in light of ongoing vehicle fleet trends that have eroded and continue to erode fuel tax revenues. This paper explains the background for the Road Usage Charge (RUC) System Concept and the initial RUCPP Demonstration System, and summarizes ODOT’s ongoing and planned activities in support of this concept and program.”
      http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/HWY/RUFPP/docs/RUCCP_Summary-GAO.pdf

      PDF form for volunteers.
      http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/HWY/RUFPP/docs/ItemB1_DRAFTRUCPPVolunteerParticipantAgreement.pdf

      Like

    • 2+2 says:

      some auto insurance companies promote them, get one in your car and you get a discount. I’ve seen it advertised on tv, Progressive is one company.

      Like

  18. crazy says:

    The only way to really stop this is to stop expecting the govt to PREVENT crime. The ever-intrusive government is a direct result of our expectation that government can do more to stop crimes before they occur. We can rollback or stop these ever-intrusive interconnected databases but we the people have to be willing to live with the higher level of risk that brings. The legislature has to do this. Depending on the courts to reign in the executive is like expecting the police to eliminate speeding or rolling stops. This should be an area for bipartisan cooperation but it’s likely to politicized to be done easily.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. czarowniczy says:

    One of the things being bandied about while I still occupied a chair 9-to-5 was the Fed’s ability to remotely and secretly turn on your cell phone and listen in on what you were saying. At that time only a few cell makers were putting that capability in but with the new smart phones I’m sure that the capability’s there and it can be accessed along with the various GPS-based apps to show where you are too – all without your knowing it. Might I add that turning on the camera in your lap top, communications devices, home flat-screen entertainment center, desk top, whatever you have connected to the net/wi-fi with or without the mic to see/hear what’s going on where/when was another topic that’s undoubtedly now a capability. Oh yeah, about that land line phone you still may have…
    Now there are nets of private citizens/business owners who allow a 3rd non-user/non-police party to gather the net-linked pictures from their self-owned surveillance and security cameras into a database where the police can access the data in case of a crime. Now in some places the system is supposed to be access only when needed and juts for the ‘footage’ around the area and time of the crime but in reality you can’t be sure who has what data or what they’re doing with it – remember that little hooded 60’s figure with his ‘Trust me” line?
    The license plate readers the police carry in their vehicles that vacuum up plate data, the private systems the police have access to, the systems like Lowjack and OnStar, and now so many cars with built-in wi-fi/Bluetooth guarantee that someone knows where you are, if you’re moving, in what direction and how fast 24/7. With the new Federal ‘criminal intelligence databases’ coming on line that will meld states data (wanna keep your Federal monies? Then comply and meld) bases for the snooper’s convenience your mama will have yet another reason to tell you to always wear clean undies.
    The new autos coming out with the integrated wi-fi and cell systems provide not only the perfect link for government snooping but a new and upcoming fertile field for hackers as those little computers tucked away in the recesses of your vehicles control everything from gas feed to breaking to steering. The Feds, or someone with a desire, can hack into your auto and do anything from steer it into oncoming traffic to stop it dead in the road while you frantically try to figure out what’s going on. The Feds are promising new legislation to mandate a more hack-proof system but they will also have to have a backdoor that will allow them in when and if, so rather than hack-proof it will be a bit more hack resistant – like the DoD and other ‘secure’ Fed systems that have been hacked. Makes our old ’34 Chevy runabout seem that much more convenient about now.
    As we older impediments to progress fade out and the new generations become enured to the almost total lack of privacy, the coming years will ensure the complaints that Federal Bureau of Underwear Freshness and Proper Foot Hygiene is intrusive will slowly fade into a silence of the lambs. More Kool-Aid anyone?

    Liked by 1 person

  20. CrankyinAZ says:

    Nothing to do with law enforcement – everything to do with control.

    Like

    • czarowniczy says:

      911 was the Golden Ticket for Federal intrusion. The goal is to have a massive database of real-time or almost real-time data on every American and tourist that tracks everything from where you are to where you go to what you buy and when you do it. Your med records are in the mix too, expect gun and some other purchases to require an automated med record check – easily done now. Algorithms will sort through the data creating a file that’s constantly updated for each individual and scanned for target ‘tells’ that will cause your record to be flagged for further review by a highly skilled and trained government analyst who, just moths before, was dealing with the complexities of the auto ketchup dispenser at a fast food shop (don’t laugh, I’ve seen it). The high-speed and complex computer system that can do this exists as does the massive storage capacity needed to run the algorithms. Just a few short decades ago there were supercomputers with lesser capabilities dedicated to modelling the effectiveness of nuclear bomb designs, now their grandchildren are sifting through your credit card purchases.
      Fear not, Citizen, an innocent person should have no fear of a benign and servile government sifting through your laundry – unless, of course Citizen, you have something to hide…

      Liked by 1 person

  21. archer52 says:

    Look up Map21 and the Congress requiring all cars made from 2015 to carry black boxes. That way your car can be used to rat you out in crashes or for insurance rates. They say it has to be accessed by police only under subpoena and for a reason.

    However, as we have seen with Onstar and others, once in place linking it to a satellite would be easy. Thus they can monitor your phone, your car and by that- you.

    All “for the good of the people.”

    From a former detective who spent time in the intel unit, I say this, we have forgotten in police work the rule “Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should.”

    Only bad things will happen to good people.

    Like

  22. Roy says:

    Shocking, in that it’s come so far, so seemingly fast. I suppose the rental car agencies will benefit as people stop using their own vehicles for long distance travel.

    On an unrelated note, I cannot understand why these types of cameras and red light cameras are so stunningly clear when video from bank robberies look as though it came from a 1.2 megapixel device.

    Like

  23. chick20112011 says:

    as usual, databases aren’t used for criminals nor illegal immigrants. they don’t obey the laws nor held accountable.

    Like

  24. The Shadow says:

    Ray: Because most gas stations, 7/11 stores and banks have to pay for those cameras with their own money so odds are they are 1.2-3 megapixel CCD cams. State and Federal Agencies use your tax money to purchase nothing but the best. We just priced out a license plate reading camera to use in our in house NVR system. Over 4 grand a piece.

    2 megapixel Cams 5-600 bucks.

    Like

  25. This should be great fun in New Jersey when they get it, since they don’t believe in the Second Amendment here and having a gun in your car for any reason other than transporting it to or from an approved use (primarily a hunting or shooting range), and even then it must be unloaded and inaccessible from the passenger compartment, will get you arrested. So basically anyone driving through New Jersey with a gun in their car could be arrested if it isn’t unloaded and locked up and they aren’t transporting it for an acceptable legal purpose. It might be best to follow the advice found on the map in the crashed car of drug traffickers years ago showing a route around New Jersey. Do not enter New Jersey. Do not travel through New Jersey for any reason if you have a gun. Go around it through Pennsylvania and New York.

    Like

  26. Attorney says:

    Used to be a prosecutor, so I know a bit about law enforcement culture. Consider, e.g., a cop who is considering whether to pull a speeder over. Now, that individual is going to have tons of heretofore personal information in deciding how to proceed. This is insanity.

    Like

  27. Deserttrek says:

    they are all traitors .. and that means all, from the clerks who work the info, to the it guys, to the cops who harass citizens, the politicians who allow it and the chiefs and other police authoritarians who want it to start with

    Like

  28. Pingback: Confirmed: Justice Department has an operational database of guns and cars

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