Pedophile Conviction Overturned Because Prosecutor Made Reference To A Dixie Song…

Kirk(Via MoonBattery)  If playing “Sweet Home Alabama” can get a cop in trouble for being a thought criminal, what do you suppose would happen if a prosecutor quoted Dixie? The answer: the conviction of a child molester of politically preferred pigmentation would be overturned to appease the twisted gods of political correctness.

The Idaho Court of Appeals has thrown out a black man’s sex crime convictions, saying the prosecutor interjected race in closing arguments by quoting lyrics from the Confederate anthem ‘Dixie’.

All three judges agreed that Canyon County Deputy Prosecutor Erica Kallin erred in citing a song praising what the judges called ‘pernicious racism’ that might have influenced the jury.

The beneficiary of this lunacy is a lowlife named Kirk:

In April 2013 James D. Kirk, then 45, was sentenced to 20 years in prison after the jury found him guilty of committing lewd conduct against a 17-year-old girl and sexually battering a 13-year-old girl. Both teenagers are white.

The prosecutor’s thought crime was to refer to “Dixie” as if it were a part of American culture — which it obviously is, but won’t be for long if progressive totalitarians are successful in eradicating all cultural references to the South. (read what happened)

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This entry was posted in BGI - Black Grievance Industry, Big Stupid Government, Conspiracy ?, CRS, Cultural Marxism, Dept Of Justice, Police action, Political correctness/cultural marxism, Professional Idiots, propaganda, Racism, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

61 Responses to Pedophile Conviction Overturned Because Prosecutor Made Reference To A Dixie Song…

  1. Deadhead says:

    Dixie was written by a Northerner wistfully looking back at the South. It was co opted by Southerners.

    Like

  2. partyzantski says:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dixie_%28song%29
    Yep, written by Yankees.

    So, this illustrates the principle that any thing may have a political agenda imposed upon it. At this point, white potatoes and snow will be deemed racist by executive fiat in the near future.

    Liked by 4 people

  3. benzy says:

    IF not one, but THREE judges all agreed on this ruling, I think that mere fact demands that an immediate check be completed on the water supply to the courthouse. It is obvious that some psychotropic drugs have been introduced into the water. /sarc

    Liked by 3 people

  4. PatrickSMcNally says:

    Perhaps more to the point, the reference to the song which the prosecutor made was not in support of the song’s message. He cited a passage “Look away” and implied that the defense was trying to get the jurors to look away from the evidence. Hence he gave a derogatory connotation to the song’s phrase “Look away!”

    It would be different if he had cited the song in an effort to tell the jurors that all true honest Confederates should want the defendant convicted and therefore the jury should rule “Guilty!” That would be an actual example of trying to sway a jury with a song’s message. That is not what he was doing here. It’s ridiculous.

    Like

  5. Bubba Johnson says:

    Sounds like a case for the Star Chamber

    Like

  6. John Galt says:

    “I always think of this one song. Some people know it. It’s the Dixie song. Right? ‘Oh I wish I was in the land of cotton. Good times not forgotten. Look away. Look away. Look away,” Kallin said during the state’s closing arguments.

    And isn’t that really what you’ve kind of been asked to do? Look away from the two eyewitnesses. Look away from the two victims. Look away from the nurse and her medical opinion. Look away. Look away. Look away.”

    The prosecutor started talking about the land of cotton and Dixie with a white jury, white victims and a black defendant. Seriously, fire this idiot and try the defendant again.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. doodahdaze says:

    Whacko Progs and their Social Justice and White Privilege nonsense are just Moonbats. It is the most elaborate concoction and collection of excuses for bad behavior ever devised by man.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. First of all, “Dixie” is a song about longing for home. For anyone who has lived in the Deep South, the traditions and customs here are very deeply ingrained. It is a beautiful place. A longing for “Dixie” is NOT equivalent to a longing for slavery. Not at all.

    What so many people do not realize is that only a small percentage of southerners actually owned slaves. Additionally, there were many blacks who owned slaves – particularly in Louisiana. In addition, almost every wealthy white man (most were of European heritage) kept mistresses who were free and some percentage black. These mistresses were given “slaves” to take care of them.

    Of the white southerners who owned slaves, most of them treated them well (other than the fact they “owned” them, which is despicable enough in and of itself.) They did not “beat” them or mistreat them. Quite the opposite – they were a HUGE investment and they were taken care of just like any other huge investment would be cared for. It IS disgusting but it is what it is.

    Finally, what blacks seem to completely lose sight of is the fact that they were FIRST enslaved by their own countrymen back in Africa. They were captured, enslaved and then sold to the slave traders where the ended up in Europe and the U.S.

    To tie the history of slavery in America (and the implied longing to go back to those days) to a song that merely celebrates the beauty of a region of the country and represents a deep homesickness to one far away, is ridiculous.

    I love the song Dixie and have found myself singing it many times in my life when I’ve moved away from the South. It could just as easily be Louis Armstrong singing another of my favorite “homesick for the south” songs:

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dixie Darling says:

      “For anyone who has lived in the Deep South, the traditions and customs here are very deeply ingrained. It is a beautiful place. A longing for “Dixie” is NOT equivalent to a longing for slavery. Not at all.”

      At this rate, it won’t be a “beautiful place” for long. PC is taking over. Surely there are more of us normal people out there somewhere. This just makes me feel sick…….

      (Sigh) Guess I’m gonna have to change my name.

      Liked by 3 people

      • taqiyyologist says:

        Oh, you better not.

        😉

        Liked by 2 people

      • joshua says:

        just make it “Darling Dixie”

        Like

      • insomniakat says:

        Awww, don’t change your name. My best friend’s name is Dixie!

        Like

      • For TxMom and Dixie
        I am a southerner to my very bones. We have moved to other states off and on down through the years. When I finally return to the old home place I cry. I am what I am and at this age don’t think I can change.

        I am in the deepest part of the south and have taken lots of verbal beatings because of where I am from. The verbal beatings occurred long before there was even a computer or a cell phone. Before PC the south was taken over in the 60’s and 70’s by activists from the north. All suffered. Blacks and whites suffered for a political agenda.
        All the people in my town were good people no matter what their color. All suffered.

        Took my home and my children elsewhere. Just for my children to have a life without fear.

        The South is not a popular place due to history (not all true) and Movies and Pop culture.
        Most people biased against the South should read a few history books.

        No matter what, I will hold to a “beautiful place”.

        Liked by 1 person

    • czarowniczy says:

      Re: ‘Do You Know What It Means to Miss New Orleans’….no

      BTW, a subject ignored as ‘too inconvenient’ by revisionist historians is that of black slave owners. As embarrassing as it is to the Feds who can’t seem to locate and scrub all copies of those pre-1865 census records, they list many blacks in the South who owned slaves. Whoopsies.
      One apologist excuse is that some owners were only partially black, a distinction that apparently can be selectively applied as the Feds or other apologists wish. How many ‘partially black’ participants in the Pigford decisions were refused due to not being fully black – and while we’re speaking of that how many truly black citizens (i.e. NO white genes) who are descendents of US slaves are there in the US? Black slave ownership (free blacks owning black slaves) is a touchy issue, especially in Louisiana history where, in New Orleans,’Duke University professor John Hope Franklin records that in New Orleans over 3,000 free Negroes owned slaves, or 28 percent of the free Negroes in that city’. Wonder how many black slave owners hummed, whistled or sang Dixie?

      Liked by 4 people

      • elvischupacabra says:

        There are quite a number of black members of the Sons of the Confederacy. Nobody but white northern liberals ever give it a passing glance or think anything about it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • czarowniczy says:

          Probably because they feel they are under the pernicious sway of that innate strain of racism that infects all. Quick! The historical bleach!

          Like

      • You crack me up, czar. I think ole Louis was speaking of a New Orleans of yesteryear, my friend. I’m with you, though. LOL

        Like

        • czarowniczy says:

          Ole Louis is a saint in NOLA – the winning kind of Saint. City created Armstrong Park right off of Ramparts and Basin, two of the most musical streets in town. For a long time it was more of a hunting grounds than a pleasure spot – did many a security detail there on the QT, they didn’t want to bother the celebrants by letting them know there were LEA there doing overwatch. City built city hall right over Louis’s childhood home – after they bulldozed it. Maybe he was making a rhetorical statement.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Right you are. I do NOT go down to the Quarter after dark. Actually, I’ve only been there a couple of times since Katrina, period. Just too dangerous.

            When I think of the foolish things we did in college I shudder and thank God we made it out alive.

            I remember one particular night when I was about 20, I had gone to N.O. with a group of girl friends. We were staying at one of the boutique hotels, The Dauphine Orleans, kind of off the beaten path – on Conti and Dauphine.

            We had been at Pat O’s (or course) and the group was heading somewhere else. I was semi-intoxicated and tired and so decided I was going back to the hotel. I ended up walking, by myself, to the hotel. I remember finding myself in a dark alley and lost. Somehow I wandered around and found the hotel.

            I would KILL my daughter if I ever learned of her doing something that foolish. God watches out for innocents and fools. I definitely fell into the latter category that night.

            Like

            • czarowniczy says:

              The Quarter was easy – try repossessing cars in the old Desire or Fischer Projects on the graveyard shift – one or two deputies and one or two private tow truck operators. Midnight basketball up n the ole Joe Brown park in New Orleans East or other equally icky places – just two of us and a guardian angel who wore a bulletproof vest. Worst was making a lone money drop on my old restaurant detail – 11:30 at night, bag o’money, all alone up on the 1200 block of South Carrollton. They gave me free drinks after the money drop while they closed to shop.

              Like

              • No, thanks, to all of those! You had a guardian angel watching over you.

                I personally know 3 people who were murdered in New Orleans. And this was years ago. And yet these tourists go down there blithely unaware of the clear and present danger lurking around every corner. It’s a wonder N.O. tourism survives.

                Like

                • czarowniczy says:

                  The very large number of churches in town probably have a lot to do with housing a large number of guardian angels who watch over the flocks of less-than-brilliant tourists.
                  BTW, people don’t realize that the huge Mardi Gras crowds are herded and protected 24/7 through the entire season by a group of NOPD and ‘loaner’ police that usually total (on the street) around 2500. That’s split over 24 hours, not all at once. That requires the PD to factor in the huge number of drunks (drinking on the streets is legal) and the bad guys. They do a fantastic job BUT the incessant politically motivated tinkering with the PD may just cause their traditional crowd and individual control measure to go all sideways, perhaps causing some traditional tourist activities to away, cause the city to find another source of fill-in police for the season or suffer higher tourist casualties. Wonder if the FTP folks are looking at disrupting Mardi Gras?

                  Liked by 1 person

                • They would certainly be in good company, wouldn’t they?

                  Liked by 1 person

                • czarowniczy says:

                  The guardian angels and stupid tourists or NOPD and the FTP folks? Or all the above.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • Well, I was referring to the FTP folks. I have to hand it to the NOPD. God bless them (at least the ones that aren’t corrupt.) Ahhh – the for halcyon days of Harry Lee, although he wasn’t NOPD. LOL

                  Like

                • czarowniczy says:

                  I did the Mardi Gras security for an unnamed but famous NOLA novelist at her St Charles ‘party house’ for some years. One year Harry Lee and an unnamed but then rather fluffy TV star drove up in one of Harry’s police cars to the house for a parade. When both of them exited the vehicle I swear that I heard the car breathe a huge sigh of relief. Harry was a character.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • LMAO – I can guess the author. Not sure of the fluffy star.

                  Like

                • czarowniczy says:

                  I don’t want to get zapped by mentioning her but she was a BIG star in those days…

                  Liked by 1 person

  9. partyzantski says:

    It may be useful then for prosecutors to use quotes from so-called “rap music”. That would be more culturally sensitive to the defendant and reflect an appropriate cultural lens of understanding upon the proceedings.

    Liked by 3 people

    • taqiyyologist says:

      No, that would be racist, too.

      “And, in closing, let me quote the sage wisdom of Young Jeezy….”

      Like

    • elvischupacabra says:

      There are number of rap lyrics about underage girls and more than one rapper has been in trouble with the law for his attraction to same.

      Like

  10. Attorney says:

    This is why I left the practice of law. This kind of politically correct, pigmentation preference infests the entire legal system. I wish people understood that there no longer is truly a rule of law. And God forbid a judge find out you are conservative. There are exceptions and even a few conservative judges, but they are indeed the exception.

    Liked by 1 person

    • czarowniczy says:

      I so desperately want to comment here but I’m afraid that I may have to come up in front of the New South Bench someday…
      Civil Court was sooooo entertaining, I particularly liked to watch the opposing attorneys in a moderately complicated civil trail (7th grade education level of understanding) argue in front of a jury. Wasn’t unusual to have jury members for whom butane lighters were akin to hi-tech or magic. People whose lives and possessions were in the hands of folks who couldn’t wait to get back to the jury pool room before the donuts ran out. Trial by their peers – and most of them don’t wash their hands after they peer.

      Liked by 2 people

    • taqiyyologist says:

      “I wish people understood that there no longer is truly a rule of law.”

      Ann Barnhardt has been screaming it from the rooftops since MF Global.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. czarowniczy says:

    Don’t have to wish it, i am in the Land of Cotton, one of the farmers just a ways down the road grows it. That in no way excuses the judges imbecilic decision to overturn a decision against this man just because a juror ‘might’. A prof told me once that we had two kinds of law in this country, that passed by empowered legislators and judge-made law which was the result of wild-assed interpretations by judges who think themselves latter day Gauleiter. I liked him.
    It seems to be a show for some of them, not the administration of justice but more like “Hey Rocky, watch me pull a verdict out of my….”, each one trying to out idiot the other.
    I’ve lived in areas where we have had elected judges and appointed judges and the systems seem to have the same problem: no discernible way to keep the idiots out of the chambers. I’ve seen one judge who’s family was devastated by a criminal some other judge had given a ‘bye’ to but that moved only the judge who was affected, his peers kept on coming up with reasons to let the idiocy continue. Now that we have the likes of the POtuS and Holder influencing the system I don’t see much of a hope of it getting any less idiotic any time soon.
    i agree with those who say this toad’s gonna be in a tight spot when he goes back to the hood, some mama or daddy’s gonna pop a 9 in his butt the first time he sees this guy hanging around his kids – if some gangster lookin’ to make points doesn’t do it on GP. I’m bettin’ the police won’t be able to find the perp either.

    Like

    • 2bn3mr says:

      Your prediction that he’ll experience conflict over this “when he goes back to the hood” may be optimistic. The victims were, after all, not persons of color and the general consensus might end up being that they deserved their fate, or even that they were not victims, at all.

      Like

      • czarowniczy says:

        It’s the crime and not the victims. I’ll bet some single mom puts a size .40 in his nether eye before some dad does, they have enough trouble keeping their daughters safe from regular trash never mind an active chicken hawk.

        Like

  12. Lars says:

    My Tennessee Home has the same offensive “Look Away” encoded in the song.

    Like

  13. Centinel2012 says:

    Reblogged this on Centinel2012 and commented:
    These Judges are really idiots.

    Like

  14. scaretactics says:

    So….this pedophile’s “right” to not be “offended” by this song is more important than getting this scumbag off the streets where he cannot sexually harm minors anymore??

    Liked by 3 people

  15. lovemygirl says:

    A Judge has the authority to decide whether to throw a piece of evidence out or not, It certainly does not mean they must or should toss a case if something minor occurs. The entire purpose is to use common sense and this Judge sure did not.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. chopp5 says:

    In context she was referring to the refrain “look away, look away” in relation to the defense arguing that the defense wanted the jury to look away from the evidence of guilt. Not worth a reversal especially in Idaho. Marcia Clark, who is an excellent atty, referred to the defendant as the beast who walks on two legs. The defense had kittens but even the Cal Sup Ct upheld the convictions.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Be Ge says:

    Somebody tell these lunatic judges karma is a b*tch.

    Like

  18. Chip Bennett says:

    These “judges” need to be hung by their balls.

    (And that’s the nicest, and least inappropriate, thing I can say.)

    Like

  19. James F says:

    Would an Italian American get a conviction overturned if prosecution mentioned Doo Wop?

    Would an Irish American get a conviction overturned if prosecution mentioned a paddy wagon?

    I have Irish and Italian ancestry so I can use these racist terms but nobody else can!

    Like

  20. Jim Brown says:

    I am reading Sharyl Atkissons’ book Stonewalled, and now I read this article about a scumbag rapist getting off; and see the story about the protesters interrupting people’s peaceful brunch; and witnessed the blatant NFL game fixing by referees in the Detroit vs Dallas game and I can no longer escape the conclusion that the entire country is nothing more than a cesspool of corruption and evil at every level of every institution. I know longer care about the political process, itis corrupt also; let the civil war begin. I am now convinced; to restore the Constitution and the Republic it founded, nothing less will ever work. I think it is now time to water the tree of Liberty as Jefferson advised.

    Like

  21. Sandra says:

    Stupid prosecutor blew it! It’s not about logic and reason or the meaning of the lyrics. It’s a game! When you have a black defendant, he and his attorneys will hunt for race-based reasons to overturn a conviction on top of the standard reasons. Prosecutors should know this!

    Like

  22. ShepherdDawg says:

    UN****INGBELIEVABLE!

    Like

  23. moe ham head says:

    maybe next time one of those judges daughters will be his victim
    and there will be a next time

    Like

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