It’s A Political Trap – Outgoing Atlanta DA Sets-Up Successor For Problems – Charges Police Officer With 11 Counts Including Felony Murder in Shooting Death of Rayshard Brooks…

Fulton County, Georgia, District Attorney Paul Howard Jr., held a press conference earlier this afternoon to announce eleven charges against police officer Garrett Wolfe for the shooting death of Rayshard Brooks.  The shooting took place at a local Atlanta Wendys.

In what appears to be a decision heavily influenced by local politics, DA Howard is charging officer Garrett Wolfe with felony murder; an unlawful killing with malice, forethought and specific intent.  It looks like Howard is purposefully making a mess.

During his press remarks the district attorney stated Mr. Rayshard Brooks was “calm, cordial and really displayed a cooperative nature – he was almost jovial” after he was found “peacefully sleeping” in his car outside the Wendy’s Friday night and subjected to a sobriety test.  According to the DA “for 41 minutes and 17 seconds, [Brooks] followed their instructions, he answered the questions,” Howard said. “Mr. Brooks was never informed that he was under arrest for driving under the influence.”

There is something rather unusual about the way DA Paul Howard framed the encounter between the police and Rayshard Brooks, because CCTV video and body-cam footage do not support the district attorney’s version of events.  Obviously in a courtroom the defense is going to replay the DA statements while they run simultaneous footage of Mr. Rayshard Brooks resisting arrest, fighting with police and ultimately taking one of the officers’ tasers to use as a weapon.

The highly coordinated press conference narrative, as outlined by what seems like a not very astute district attorney, is very much at odds with what most people have already seen in the videos of the encounter.  The purposeful disconnect gives the impression that DA Brooks is intentionally trying to throw the court case in advance.

There’s something very sketchy going on in the political background…. and I cannot help but wonder if Paul Howard Jr. is planning to be defeated in the next election (he seems in trouble) and is, as an intentional and self-centered plan, trying to set-up his political successor with a lose/lose scenario.

The eleven charges which include felony murder seem positioned from a district attorney who knows he won’t be around to deal with the case details.  Howard can present himself as the community hero today and force his successor into the role of legal villain. That scenario is exactly what this looks like. Recently:

ATLANTA — Fulton County’s long-time district attorney faces two separate state investigations, but it could be voters who remove him from office.

District Attorney Paul Howard came in second in the primary election for his seat on Tuesday, the worst election showing he’s had since taking office in 1997. He now advances to a runoff with Democratic challenger Fani Willis.

“What you will overwhelmingly see, is that the people of Fulton County, Georgia, they desperately want a change,” Willis said on Wednesday. (June 10, 2020)

The lead investigative agency, The Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI), didn’t even know the press conference was going to be held today [LINK] and they have not completed their investigation.  They had no idea the DA was going to file charges:

It is brutally obvious DA Paul Howard Jr. is setting a political trap for the next Fulton County District Attorney.   The weird press conference and charges are ridiculous.

Regardless of internal Atlanta politics, the message to police is chilling.  I would not want to be living anywhere around Fulton county, Georgia; because I suspect there is going to be a massive drop in law enforcement.  Crime will likely rise, violence will likely escalate, and the suffering community will be the same black neighborhoods who might currently be thanking DA Howard without realizing what consequences are looming.

Here’s the press conference.  It is cognitively disjointed all the way through; and seemingly run by people who have no clue what they are doing as they put a seemingly rushed media presentation together on the fly.

The representative image of Atlanta, Georgia, is really quite bad.  WATCH:

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Also, here’s the Body-Cam footage (incident takes place at 41:00).

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Also here’s the CCTV video from Wendy’s (shooting at 28:30)

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Eye Witness video of the fight with police:

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649 Responses to It’s A Political Trap – Outgoing Atlanta DA Sets-Up Successor For Problems – Charges Police Officer With 11 Counts Including Felony Murder in Shooting Death of Rayshard Brooks…

  1. SithMystery says:

    I’m thinking the DA here is playing this to boost his chances for re-election. He’s basically trying to give a shout-out to the protestors, “See! I’ve got your back! Vote for me!”

    Same with that useless mayor in Atlanta who immediately called for charges before the investigation even began.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Phil McCoxwell says:

    At some point, the hunters become the hunted. I believe the looters and rioter are hiding BEHIND the law. If they effectively eliminate policing and the millions of armed citizens are left to fend for themselves, that is what they will do. Add to that the vigilantism that will undoubtedly rise up. Free people are patient people. We wait for the law to do its job so matters can be settled peacefully. Once these idiot looters and rioters lose that this line between society and the law, they will in the end be way outnumbered. November will be the test. If the democrats take office there will be outrage. We will have lost our country. My heart tells me that will not happen. Meanwhile, these pieces of shit will continue to destroy us. To vote democrat is to vote against America.

    Liked by 3 people

    • More Bore says:

      “Free people are patient people. ”

      With all due respect, right now the free people, the ones who are hiding or trying to stay out of the way because we have so much more to lose – are the LOSING people right now.

      Cultural revolutions rarely occur with a majority consent. They occur because a very vocal minority is allowed to run roughshod long enough that the rest of the people wait too long to take care of the problem.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jimmy Jack says:

        To your point, less than a third of colonists were patriots at the onset of the American Revolution.

        Like

        • TarsTarkas says:

          And to the other 70% of the colonists, the ‘patriots’ were the thugs terrorizing the loyalists and those who just wanted to mind their business.

          Liked by 1 person

      • DaveK says:

        You’re right… All it takes is a dedicated 20%, with around another 60% who are go-along, get-along folks who just want to live their lives in peace , and who don’t believe in getting involved to speak out (or, heaven forbid!! act) against the extreme actions of that dedicated 20%. The American Revolution was something like that, as was the rise of Nazi Germany.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Bigly says:

    Liked by 8 people

    • Rileytrips says:

      Ok, so I guess that saying my family is CAUCASIAN is good with them?! Can I get TShirts that say, “ CAUCASIAN LIVES MATTER”?

      Like

    • Rileytrips says:

      That’s what the Democrats plan is – to send us into another cycle of riots and protests right as the November election occurs.
      Now we know the plan, what to do about it?

      Liked by 2 people

      • mike says:

        You riot, don’t have reliable results, no votes reported.
        Oh, btw. Be sure that all surpervisors reporting are recorded.
        So their voter fraud trials can see….

        Like

        • sturmudgeon says:

          I do NOT understand why a Patriotic site such as TRUE THE VOTE, which has been ‘fighting the good fight’ for YEARS! on behalf of the U.S.A. citizens… has not millions of viewers/watchers/upvotes, etc… than it has. Donations should be ‘through the roof’ for this Woman and her efforts… under obama, she had DOJ, IRS, FBI, hassles forever, and yet, she fights on.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Jimmy Jack says:

        We’ve known this plan since the violence directed at Trump voters in 2016. Some just chose to deny that was what was coming believing instead that people would be reasonable and see the positives Trump brought to the country. But we’re not dealing with reasonable people, they’re emotional, intentionally male educated and being encouraged by the cultural
        Marxist media, Hollywood and Uniparty politicians.

        Liked by 1 person

    • mac says:

      That Gavrilo David article is an extraordinarily good piece of investigative reporting. He beat the NY Slimes all hollow, including pointing out where they deliberately refused to report critical facts in this incident. While G. David is clearly a man with leftist political sympathies, his analysis was objective enough that after reading this article I am absolutely certain that Officer Chauvin and his colleagues are going to walk away scot-free from these charges. If anyone is at fault here other than Floyd, it is the Minneapolis Police Department for their use-of-force-continuum policies.

      Incidentally, if you are not familiar with the medical condition of “excited delirium,” you will be when you finish the article. I almost never suggest this, but I would strongly recommend reading this article if you wish to be really well-informed about the Floyd death.

      Liked by 1 person

      • FH says:

        The only problem is that he attributes to “excited delirium” what is more likely a result of Floyd tweaking on meth, characterized by paranoia, a feeling of invincibility and in some cases abnormally high pain tolerance. Cocaine and fentanyl ruined his body while the tweak had him out of his mind. While I’m sure they suspected he was out of his mind on something, those officers wouldn’t have known what specifically he was on, which is why they referred to excited delirium.

        Like

  4. EggsX1 says:

    Reason #45 to never vote for democrats – They are sore losers!!! They would rather burn down the place on their way out than allow a peaceful transition of power.

    Like

  5. jay says:

    Too many public people doing things that don’t make sense.
    He made contradictory statements on a taser being a deadly weapon.

    He got a call from RATS- was told what was needed.
    Someone Threaten him and he put on his clown show with pictures.

    They must have threatened with a BIG bag of shit because this DA made outrageous statements.

    This goes back to what Maxi Water said about the Hammer. New game, new rules- take the knee or else.

    Grow cojones for God’s sake.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Rileytrips says:

      Laura Ingraham had the police officer’s lawyer on last night. He said it was all untrue- the assisting officer is NOT selling out his co-worker. Garrett Rolfe did NOT kick the dying Brooks, instead he gave him CPR, called the EMT’s and begged him to keep breathing. This is all so awful.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Kaco says:

        I tried looking for this supposed kick, I don’t see it. And if he did “kick” it might have been to see if he was conscious without stooping down to jostle him, making the officer vulnerable.

        Like

    • Winston says:

      “Just listen to the Fulton County DA, Paul Howard. He called a taser a deadly weapon when Atlanta officers used it against two college students, thus charging them with aggravated assault. Now apparently it’s not, when it’s used AGAINST police officers. It’s double talk.”

      Doubletalk based upon Orwell’s 1984 Doublethink.

      Liked by 4 people

    • mickjt says:

      Yep that’s the main part of this sordid tale…He also assaulted two cops. As for the Taser, this crooked DA is now saying the Taser is NOT a Lethal Weapon when a short time ago he prosecuted other cops saying it was…WTF?

      Liked by 1 person

      • FH says:

        The guy was retreating. The perp had fired the taser, and missed badly. It wasn’t available for use as a deadly weapon again. They already knew the perp didn’t have any other weapons on his person. They could have chased him down and/or called in for more people to chase him down as typically happens where you have a fleeing person. As a last resort, as Joepedo says [in perhaps the only instance of him ever being right about anything], they could have shot him in the leg.

        If we’re being on honest about the facts and circumstances of this situation, a life was taken needlessly. The cop certainly doesn’t deserve to be charged with murder, but there have to be consequences in situations like this.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Amy2 says:

          Just out of the academy are you?

          Liked by 3 people

        • supersix_seven says:

          You are incorrect here.
          1. Taser has a second charge stored in the grip.
          2. Lethality of a taser is wholly dependent on context, being tasered when running over asphalt is one of the most dangerous. If Brooks had hit his mark there is strong likelihood the officer would have suffered severe bodily injury.
          3. The ‘just shoot the leg’ trope is equivalent to ‘real socialism hasn’t been tried yet’. It is complete fantasy. Anyone mentioning this reveals they have never received any self-defense training and are ignorant regarding fundamental LE practice.

          Liked by 6 people

          • gabytango says:

            If he was “shot in the leg,” you can bet your last dollar that vile perp would have SUED the cops.

            Liked by 2 people

          • FH says:

            “You are incorrect here”. In terms of established police procedure? Perhaps. You might consider that current established procedures are not always correct. As I said at the outset, facts and circumstances should determine the best tactics in a given situation and so-called “professionals” have a duty to exercise proper judgment based on facts and circumstances.

            Consider: in 2015 a black man of excellent standing in his community with no criminal record was broken down on the shoulder of a South Florida highway some time after midnight. A plain-clothed police officer in a nondescript vehicle set upon him in the dark after leaving a nearby surveillance detail while the disabled motorist was on the phone with AAA. Seeing a legally owned handgun on the motorist’s seat, the officer pulled his own weapon on the frightened motorist. Never identifying himself as a police officer and not wearing a uniform, a badge, or any garb that would indicate he actually was one [and not driving a police car], the motorist brandished his weapon. He was then shot dead. You very likely never heard much beyond a blurb in the national media about it because the individual in question wasn’t a lifelong criminal lowlife engaged in petty crime and the cop who shot him was also a minority. At numerous points, that officer, as a professional, was tasked with exercising good judgment knowing that his actions might result in a life or lives being lost. He failed at every step of the engagement, starting with leaving his post on a nearby surveillance detail for reasons that have never made any sense rather than radioing for a market unit to check into the matter.

            Now, to this situation… You say, ” [a] Taser has a second charge stored in the grip”. Irrelevant due to the fact that the prongs missed the officer by about a light year. Unless he planned to grab them with his bare hands, the weapon was effectively useless at that point.

            “Lethality of a taser is wholly dependent on context”. You’re absolutely right. In this context, the prongs of the taser had been released and came nowhere near hitting either of the officers.

            “If Brooks had hit his mark…”. He didn’t. Not even close.

            “The ‘just shoot the leg’ trope is equivalent to ‘real socialism hasn’t been tried yet’. It is complete fantasy.” I’ve seen really insane apples-to-orange-bowling-balls comparisons before, but that one is out there. I noticed that you ignored the part about first attempting to chase the suspect down – Usain Bolt he wasn’t, and the officers in question didn’t appear to be members of Meal-Team-Six – and/or calling in additional units [which were already en route] to track down a fleeing suspect. You’ve undoubtedly heard that there are millions of engagements of this sort between police and the public every year; very few of them end with a person dead, while most end up with the suspect being apprehended after a brief chase. Sure, chasing a guy down is a bit more work that simply shooting them in the back. As to the actual part of the body you aim for… Again, one assumes that a professional law enforcement operative has some degree of proficiency when it comes to discharging a firearm.

            Beyond that, some of the coverage I’ve seen has suggested that there were innocent members of the community in and around the parking lot during this event, and that the fleeing suspect was a danger to them. While that’s a distinct possibly, how much more dangerous is someone discharging a firearm in the same area? From what I understand, Mr. Brooks took two rounds in the back, while if I heard it correctly, the officer expended at least three rounds – so there was at least one errant shot that could have injured or killed a bystander.

            “Anyone mentioning this reveals they have never received any self-defense training…” There’s a world of difference between casual self-defense training you might learn at your local “dojo” and that professional law enforcement officers do and should receive.

            “…and are ignorant regarding fundamental LE practice.” I wasn’t aware that such things were carved in stone and in some what precluded from changing. Also, you again dismiss that the fact that these situations typically follow a different pattern – one that ends with the suspect being apprehended in a foot-chase rather than simply gunned down while fleeing. If the experience of, among others, Michael Slager doesn’t provide an example for the use of judgment rather than lethal force, perhaps the current state of relations between the police and segments of the population should have led the officers in question to exercise a bit more restraint.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Gary says:

              Enough,

              What is a law enforcement officers threshold for the use of force ..deadly or otherwise?

              Does the perp present an imminent danger to the officer, or the public at large if not stopped.

              Please pontificate.

              Like

              • FH says:

                “Please pontificate”… LOL… sometimes nuanced discussion of a matter takes more than a few short sentences.

                What degree of force is necessary to deal with a threat is, as I said above, dependent on the facts and circumstances of an individual situation, and may not always clear in the heat of the moment. That said, what were the facts and circumstances in THIS case? The offender was, allegedly, drunk. He seemed pretty in control of his faculties to me when he tried to fight the cops off as they moved to arrest him and when he took off. But, he also missed when he used the taser, and it wasn’t even close. In fact it was an embarrassing misfire. Whether that’s because he was drunk and couldn’t see straight or because he was “hesitating” [he may not have had any firearms experience; he certainly didn’t know how to use a taser] I can’t say.

                They knew he didn’t posses a gun or any other offensive weapons. They also knew that there were bystanders in the area, which might speak to your point about danger to the public at large; one would think the police are trained to consider the sort of damage a stray bullet can do.

                Also, his violent past keeps being mentioned, but what they knew of that past going into the encounter we don’t know. I don’t know the circumstances of his convictions so how dangerous he was to, “the public at large” due to the actions that led to those convictions I can’t say. Did they believe he presented a danger to the public which informed their use of deadly force? Hopefully they can articulate that if the charges stick. I, personally, hope they don’t as they’re not appropriate to the situation. Did they truly believe they had no other option – like chasing him down without using their weapons and/or radioing for backup units already en route that a suspect was fleeing? Did they even consider the option of chasing him and attempting to subdue him? Were they concerned with the possibility that he’d try to grab one of their guns next time? That could very well have been a consideration, which might have led them to believe their use of force was justified.

                That brings us back to why it was necessary to shoot him in the back while retreating.

                Was that the goal? Was the officer just that good of a shot? Or was it just dumb luck that he put two of three [at least] rounds in his back? And, if he truly was that good of a shot, why is it not a possibility to shoot him in a way that incapacitates him but that isn’t immediately deadly? Or, why not the other guy’s taser? Also, they gave the guy plenty of time to cooperate without force; why did both guys move to suddenly arrest him without making it clear that that’s what they were going to do? Why was he in a position to take hold of one officer’s weapon during a struggle anyway? Why did one officer not draw his taser while informing Brooks that they’re now going to arrest him, let the other guy attempt to cuff him and make it clear that he’ll be tased if he resists?

                Liked by 2 people

                • Kaco says:

                  As if the running officers could tell in spit seconds if it was “an embarrassing misfire”. Any suspect brandishing and firing a weapon needs to be put down, period. Join LE and find out for yourself instead of being an armchair quarterback. This guy’s mistake was not only resisting arrest, but taking a weapon, and then firing it. It’s never the fault of these idiots.

                  Like

                • DaveK says:

                  I think that “shoot to wound” was discarded as a use of lethal force measure sometime in the 1960’s. You won’t find a law enforcement agency anywhere in the USA that includes that measure in their training of officers on the use of lethal force.

                  Like

                • DaveK says:

                  Why didn’t he use his taser?
                  Well, he tried once and it didn’t work. He had one shot left in his taser and the perp was preparing to fire a taser (or maybe something else? Did he know for sure that he hadn’t also stolen the other officer’s gun) at an already impared (due to being slugged and hitting his head on the curb/pavement, and also, possibly tazed) police officer.

                  There were a lot of things that went wrong in a short period of time. Perhaps the officer didn’t follow department policy and training, but perhaps he did. Perhaps the officers actually deserved being fired, but not charged criminally. We have to wait to find out when GBI finishes its investigation, and may also have to wait for an FBI/DOJ investigation.

                  If the case goes to a jury trial in Atlanta, the worst case outcome is a hung jury and a mistrial. Far more likely is either a bench trial or change-of-venue jury trial, with acquittal (at least on Felony Murder) being the most likely outcome. Any criminal conviction is unlikely to hold up on appeal.

                  Like

            • Marc says:

              One of the errant rounds did strike a parked vehicle with passengers inside. It was a bad shooting but when some are inclined to run to their corner and defend even the poorest of decisions you won’t get anywhere with them.

              Some would call it enjoyably tasting leather footwear IYTWIM.

              Like

              • FH says:

                “One of the errant rounds did strike a parked vehicle with passengers inside.” Which is exactly why attempting to run him down [knowing he had no other weapons on him] was the better play in the moment, and why having a taser trained on him earlier in the engagement may have yielded a better result.

                “It was a bad shooting…” It was bad insofar as it wasn’t necessary to resolve the situation and served to throw fire on an already bad situation. It’s probably justifiable within the law and while Sundance makes it clear that this is an entirely political prosecution, it’s hard to see the charges sticking as they are, let alone a conviction in court.

                As for fault, does it mostly lay with the perpetrator for resisting arrest? Absolutely. One of the above made a remark about it never being the fault of the criminal. Yes, resisting arrest is always the fault of the criminal. And there is no “right” to resist arrest and it’s generally a dumb thing to do. But as was pointed out, this was a “three strikes” offender. Allegedly he was also drunk, but he didn’t come off as drunk in the resisting or the attempted escape. If he was drunk, he likely wasn’t making the best decisions. That said, it’s up to the officers in question to determine the best way to resolve such a situation. Lethal force can be necessary. But plenty of similar [and worse] situations are resolved without a police killing. It’s hard to look at THIS situation objectively and say that their only option was to gun the guy down.

                “…enjoyably tasting leather footwear…” LOL… See, even in dark times a comment here can make me smile.

                Liked by 2 people

                • Gary says:

                  Maybe the two of you have heard this expression,

                  When you have the facts on your side you pound the facts, when you don’t you pound the table. I won’t do your homework for you and the answers you seek aren’t on youtube so man up. Seems you do an awful lot of table pounding.

                  Like

            • 4sure says:

              You and all the other dunces talking about police procedures and policies are talking out of your azz because you don’t know squat about them. Police department policies and procedures are not crafted in a vaccum. They are drafted by and reviewed by constitutional attorneys, lawyers of every type, district attorneys, training professionals and scholars, the FBI academy, state training and standards commissions, CALEA, the IACP, and many more LEO professionals.

              Police officers, supervisors, police chiefs, mayors, cities, states and sheriffs do not want to be sued, or criminally prosecuted for using excessive force or denying civil rights. The policies and procedures have to also allow police to perform their duties in a timely fashion and within the budget allocated for personnel and equipment.

              Police do not operate in a vacuum. Unlike the private sector which does not share information with its competitors, police agencies will share any of their information with any other police agency. It’s not unusual for police departments to exchange their policy and procedure manuals with other departments and to allow their officers and supervisors having expertise in a certain area to be loaned on special assignment to other police departments to train their officers or help write policies and procedures.

              Too many ignorant know nothings are commenting on something they know nothing about.

              The two Atlanta police officers were following departmental policies and procedures and acted based on those policies as well as their departmental training. As a police officer, you follow those departmental policies and procedures and training because you know they will save your life, save your career, and save you from law suits. And you know the policies are based on proven results and you trust the professionals who drafted them. And you expect your supervisors and chief and DA to support you when you follow those policies and procedures. If you didn’t, you would never don the uniform.

              Like

              • FH says:

                Good grief… Do you guys realize how moronic you come off as with some of these responses? You are almost indistinguishable from the lefties on pretty much any site that uses Disqus for comments.

                “You and all the other dunces talking about police procedures and policies are talking out of your azz because you don’t know squat about them.” The issue is not specifically policies, but effective use of professional judgment.

                “Police department policies and procedures are not crafted in a vaccum.” I don’t recall saying they were. In fact I don’t recall any other poster suggesting such a thing.

                “They are drafted by and reviewed by constitutional attorneys, lawyers of every type, district attorneys, training professionals and scholars, the FBI academy, state training
                and standards commissions, CALEA, the IACP, and many more LEO professionals.” You come off as Kevin Bacon’s character in A Few Good Men speaking of procedures, seemingly ignorant of the idea that the best written procedural manual in existence won’t cover every situation and that a PROFESSIONAL is expected to exercise judgment in an ethical way, regardless of what may or may not be allowed for in a manual.

                But please, tell me more about how the “Code Red” section isn’t in the manual.

                “Police officers, supervisors, police chiefs, mayors, cities, states and sheriffs do not want to be sued, or criminally prosecuted for using excessive force or denying civil rights.” You’re right. Which is why those relative few failings, some of which have been discussed here lately, are so egregious. You’d think that the last thing a police officer would do in the current climate is draw his weapon unless he absolutely had to, and yet the officer in this case – pursuing a fleeing suspect – chose to shift the less-lethal taser in his right hand to his left hand so he could draw his lethal weapon on a person he didn’t even attempt to take down with less lethal force.

                “The two Atlanta police officers were following departmental policies and procedures…” They may or may not have been. Your argument comes dangerously close to, “I was just following… procedures”. “Procedures” may “allow” for lethal force to be used in a variety of situations. It may be that the facts and circumstances in a specific situation don’t warrant lethal force even if it may be allowed based on an individual’s understanding of “procedures”. It’s becoming more apparent with regard to THIS specific case that lethal force was not necessary.

                In point of fact, it might be THIS case that far better illustrates a legitimate case of negligence than the one in MN.

                Like

            • Charlie says:

              You left out the part related to the gentleman exercising long time poor judgment in his life choices and attacking and fleeing from the officers in order to keep from going to jail, again since he had a lengthy record and knew that he would be sent to jail since his last problem with leaving the state without telling his probation officer. He lied to these police several times throughout the process. Do you think they realized who they were talking to and were suspicious of his behavior. He endangered anyone nearby by his actions. I find it interesting that no media referred to his previous charges as related to his wife and children and is being portrayed as a wonderful saint of a parent who just fell asleep in his automobile. You do not know this neighborhood where this occurred. Many people who must travel or live for college in this area are very hesitant to go out at night or to patronize the businesses there due to high crime in a once safe area. Unfortunately it is a scary environment for anyone there. Police would be wise to be wary in these situations. If this had been black officers, then you would never have heard about it. More social unrest compliments of the socialist agenda predicted long ago playing out before our eyes.

              Like

        • southernmom19 says:

          The guy was on parole. Georgia is a three strike state. This was his third strike. Further, if the officer let him go and he then went to hurt someone else, who do you think would be fired? He’s already proven that he’s a violent criminal.

          Like

          • FH says:

            “…if the officer let him go…” I don’t recall suggesting that they, “let him go”.

            People run from police all the time. Typically they’re caught in short order, even if it takes a bit more effort than just shooting them in the back. You’d have a hard time making a case that an individual officer should be fired simply because they weren’t able to apprehend a fleeing suspect without using lethal force. Moreover, the police department can’t be held liable civilly for the actions of a dangerous criminal simply for the fact that the police weren’t able to apprehend them without using lethal force. If you’re aware of a specific case where such a thing has happened, please cite it.

            As for the idea that they could be sued for shooting a fleeing perpetrator in the leg… Maybe. It would be a tough sell. But it would be better to be sued – and lose – a wrongful death suit, which undoubtedly will be the result in the killing of Mr. Brooks.

            Also, when was the last time you heard of civil insurrection due to a lawsuit, successful or not, over a non-lethal gunshot wound?

            Liked by 1 person

            • MustangBlues says:

              fh: Are you paid by the word, or number of responses? Lots of babble, excellent example of communist democrat trolling.

              Like

            • southernmom19 says:

              You’re surprised that taking a weapon off an officer and turning it on him got a convicted felon who was only out of prison because of Covid shot. Seek help. You’re arguments a intellectually dishonest. I didn’t realize you were a troll. Our conversation doesn’t need to continue. Your have made your intentions clear.

              Liked by 1 person

              • FH says:

                I am not a troll. That you don’t like what I have to say doesn’t make me a troll and, of more import, doesn’t make me wrong. My intention was to have nuanced conversation on the topic of what appears to be an unnecessary police killing in a time of heightened tensions and unrest in the nation. We’ll simply agree to disagree on the subject. I’d leave you with this final thought: your moniker indicates that you’re a mother; I do hope that your child never makes a mistake, gets drunk and has a negative encounter with the police where, because they may not be in control of their faculties, does something dumb and ends up getting killed needlessly. I suspect in such a situation, your stance on the matter would be different.

                Liked by 1 person

                • southernmom19 says:

                  You spend a lot of time writing about what the officer could have done differently, while not questioning what the violent felon could have done differently.

                  Like

                • 4sure says:

                  Why don’t you become a police officer and change the system? You would change your mind quickly or die trying.

                  Like

                • ontoiran says:

                  the only reason there is and unrest is because for the last 4 years the media has been pushing for it. do you ever wonder how it is we went from electing the first black president in 2008 to being a nation of white supremacists in 2016?

                  Like

          • Esperanza says:

            How about the offers let him take the taser home so he could use it on his children, the ones he should have been in prison for molesting.

            Liked by 1 person

        • FriedApplePie says:

          What would you do if you were the arresting officer and a multiple felon who was drunk(released because of Covid19, doing a 7 year stint for beating his kids unconscious), fought you back, grabbed your weapon and tried to shoot you with it? Do you even own a gun? The officer was completely justified. That is why a 61% Black Atlanta Police Force just quit because the DA is a lying piece of human excrement. Thanks to Democratic maggot scum along with BLM, Antifa and the lying presstitute media. Looks like you’re getting your wish of a civil war.

          Liked by 1 person

        • mimbler says:

          If we are being honest, we would say that the gun was fired less than a second after the the taser was fired, so the trigger was already being pressed. At the time the cop made the mental decision to fire the taser had not fired its second shot. Totally bogus to say the officer knew the taser was depleted when he fired his pistol.

          Like

          • Jimmy Jack says:

            You’re not accounting for the fact the cop saw the taser seconds before it was deployed. Intellectual dishonesty.

            Like

          • FH says:

            “Totally bogus to say the officer knew the taser was depleted when he fired his pistol.” Whether the taser had a second charge was irrelevant; the prongs of the taser can’t actually do any damage when they’re not affixed to body.

            “What would you do if you were the arresting officer and a multiple felon who was drunk(released because of Covid19, doing a 7 year stint for beating his kids unconscious)…” While fine enough evidence of the perp being a scumbag, his prior offenses were hardly relevant to the situation on the evening in question.

            “…fought you back, grabbed your weapon and tried to shoot you with it?” There were two cops, one offender. The keyword in your statement is “tried”. Add to it, “failed”. Also throw in the adverb, “miserably”.

            “Do you even own a gun?” I do. I’m also a very good shot. Neither thing is relevant to the matter at hand.

            “The officer was completely justified.” Within the law, perhaps. In the context of doing the right thing, regardless of the law, it’s questionable.

            “That is why a 61% Black Atlanta Police Force just quit because the DA is a lying piece of human excrement.” The DA is almost as much of a scumbag as the perpetrator, it’s true. But if the officers had exercised restraint and better judgment, he might not be in a position to pander to the mob.

            “Thanks to Democratic maggot scum along with BLM, Antifa and the lying presstitute media.” Cutting loose with a whole bunch of pejoratives on the internet obviously might make you feel good, but it doesn’t speak to the issue. Despicable though the mob may be, I don’t want police just shooting or otherwise killing people needlessly. I suspect you don’t either.

            “Looks like you’re getting your wish of a civil war.” Ugh… I don’t “wish” for civil war. While the last couple weeks have been unpleasant, our collective bellies are still full, we still go to sleep in comfortable beds, have heat to warm our bathing water and electricity to run our air conditioning units. We’ve got our cable TV, our internet and our streaming services. We might not have the sports far too many of us live vicariously through [which might explain some of the frustration] and we might be concerned over our employment situation, but right now most of us still don’t want for much. If you believe there’s a civil war coming, you’ll need to take all of that away, along with hope for a quick “return to normal” before you’ll see either the left’s vapid NPCs or the “silent majority” of Joe and Jane Sixpacks upping the ante.

            “Civil war” is easy to banter about on the internet; it’s not so easy of a thing to engage in IRL.

            Like

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      I would really like to hear the police report and see the court record on this abuse charge. It’s very hard to lock up a parent for that long for abuse. It must have been horrific.

      Now there’s conveniently an interview he did from a Craigslist where he says he wants to go straight but has no support, prison was hard yada yada. And he diminishes his crimes. Now I want to know who is behind those Craigslist project? How many interviews did they gather and were they holding onto them for just this purpose?

      Like

  6. Mariposa323 says:

    Had to have my house tented , so came to a local hotel in Miami in upscale suburban area , broad daylight two black guys fairly young , one with dreads , hanging out by the pool smoking weed . They are hotel guests , 100.00 bucks a night . Two thoughts : why the weed in open area?No concern for other guests ? There is no fear . Second thought , is my tax dollars funding this , or is Soros money paying these guys to chill for a while . I could be wrong on both these assumptions , but something just feels off .

    Like

    • gabytango says:

      We’re going to have to do the same thing with the Termites in a couple weeks here in Miami, mariposa! Going to look for an Airbnb.

      Like

      • Mariposa323 says:

        I’m seriously thinking cities are going to be the battleground soon . These evil Demonrats have unlimited money keep the insurgency going . We need a free media quickly to counter all these narratives that they keep bringing , Miami may be the next Venezuela. I don’t see the regular freedom loving Hispanics going against this Covid scam and standing up , and I don’t see them standing up either to the BLM scam , as evidenced by whole hospital staffs coming out to protest with BLM . Disgusting . Mask = Masonic veil of submission . Who needs Sharia anymore .

        Like

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      DEMs and UniParty right want weed smoking legs everywhere and they’ll get it. Get used to pot smoke everywhere all the time. It’s awhile. It will be promoted even more so as a tax revenue source when the coffers are empty from this hoax shutdown.

      Like

      • TarsTarkas says:

        But no CiGARETTE Smoke! ‘Cuz that’s BAAAD!’

        Joint smoke is far more carcinogenic per joint than cigarettes per cigarettes

        And I won’t even discuss the strong possibility of psychosis caused by the uber-strong MJ that’s now out there.

        Like

    • TreeClimber says:

      Where are you living that you don’t have a pall of marijuana wherever you go? I want to move there! 😛

      Like

  7. California Joe says:

    Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 because she pandered to Blacks and Hispanics while forgetting that White people still had the right to vote in the United States. I hope President Trump doesn’t make the same mistake!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Marc says:

      Difference is he actually cares about ALL Americans and isn’t pandering. He understands that ignoring the concerns of minorities is why the Republicans never get much of their vote. You make it a black vs. white issue if you believe that false voting dichotomy of black issues turning off white voters and visa versa. Besides, Trump has already lost many white upper income voters via his America First policies on immigration and trade. It’s a class war he’s fighting in, not a race war.

      Like

      • California Joe says:

        Republicans will never get much of the minority vote because most minorities are only interested in free stuff and get out of jail free court decisions that Democrats give them!

        Like

  8. 335blues says:

    Paul Howard is a typical marxist scumbag.
    A Black man who should know better selling out to the marxist democrat party,
    the party of racism, slavery, lynching and Jim Crow.
    The new DA should just cancel the case and start a new one if they think it is appropriate.

    Like

  9. Jive Pawnbroker says:

    I just tuned in to the Atlanta police scanner about a half hour ago and during that time heard exactly two dispatches. Just now hearing a third one. The Blue Flu is going around big time there.

    Like

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      Good. They’d be wise to keep it up through the weekend at the lesser bc there are “protests” scheduled al over Friday for Juneteenth. Then they’ll be some sort of reaction to the Trump rally Saturday on top of the usual high crime Saturday summer night.

      Like

  10. Lulu says:

    Personally, I’m hoping the cops walk out and the city collapses. Atlanta is a pit and goodness knows they voted for this and the local media has been begging for it.

    Like

  11. Eaglet says:

    The DA was sweating in and AC environment. He got his marching orders from who? If anything all this mess brings out the rats. IMO

    Like

  12. farmerren says:

    Tonight a group of locals in our county is taking thank you goody bags up to the sheriff’s department. While there, if I can I’ll ask a deputy why people think they can run from police and or resist.

    I wonder if it’s a ‘flight or fight’ thing for some yet have a suspicion that many kids are taught to run or fight…and this is what I’d like to understand. If kids are taught that somehow, why and how to change that teaching.

    I’d love to see an open conversation.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gabytango says:

      I’d love to hear the response to your question, farm. Been wondering that myself. It’s an act of futility to resist arrest, yet they keep doing it. Why?

      Like

      • FH says:

        Because of problems that legislation will never fix and that never come up in all the “honest” conversations people always want to have about race; fatherlessness, immorality in the “black church” [the black “liberation” theology-spouting AME or the Nation of Islam, take your pick], lack of respect for authority, lack of respect for society, lack of responsibility for ones actions and the gangsta rap/sports culture with its toxic objectification and mistreatment of women, glorification of drug culture, “mafia” life and expectation that to be a “real” man you have to resist and antagonize police.

        Like

      • farmerren says:

        We made some well deserving county LEOs smile a few nights ago with the goody bags.
        I asked the sheriff our question about why people run and physically resist.

        First he used the term ‘excitement delirium’ or ‘excited delirium’. I’d never heard of it before. He associated the behavior w/drug use. I looked it up and if you do, you may find it being referenced in the George Floyd case. Interesting.

        He also stated that people learned (as kids) not to respect any authority and they got away with it at home and at school. Not held responsible for their actions.
        He said kids today are taught they are owed something.
        So it’s what is often said about the need for (good and present) parenting.

        Next week it’s the local police department receiving our goody bags.
        I’ll as their opinion.

        Have a nice weekend.

        Like

  13. southernmom19 says:

    The officer will be acquitted. Riots will ensue, Atlanta will burn again. I’m from Atlanta, born and raised. My family goes back for hundreds of years in Georgia. I live in a red county north of Atlanta now. This will drive all of those people north and they’ll bring their voting habits with them. A mass exodus from democrat run cities is about to turn the red suburbs and country parts of this nation blue. California to Texas type exodus on a national scale.

    Liked by 2 people

    • SherryS says:

      Mom, it has already happened in Cobb County.. I live in Smyrna, GA, and you should see all of the businesses with signs saying, “We are listening. Black Lives Matter”. They are so afraid of being targeted or just virtue-signaling. Well, at least it makes it easier for me to know where to spend my hard-earned dollars. And I wear my Trump gear all over town.

      Liked by 1 person

    • The Akh says:

      I’m in Dekalb. Ask me how I feel right now? The poor Indian dudes at the corner gas station look terrified every time I go in there. I can’t even tell you what its like a the Kroger where I shop (used to, that is). My girlfriends sister got in an accident with a black couple that pulled out in front of her. They got out of the car and started screaming at her, then all the neighborhood thugs started approaching. They literally dared her to call the police. She didn’t because she was too scared to do so. This stuff is gonna get people killed. My girlfriend and I are struggling to put money together to buy handguns. We don’t even want to leave the house.

      Liked by 3 people

      • southernmom19 says:

        That’s awful.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Peppurr says:

        O M G Terrifying !! Hopefully there wasn’t much damage to her car………..but, under those circumstances, sadly, I probably would have done the same thing as the sister..

        Liked by 1 person

      • nimrodman says:

        I advise my sisters and nieces that if they’re in a situation like that to pull out, drive away, and go to the nearest police station

        Tell the police you left the scene of a fender-bender accident with no one injured because your vehicle was surrounded by hostiles and you feared for your life

        Then call your lawyer and refuse to answer any police interrogatories until your lawyer is present

        You may well be charged for leaving the scene of an accident. You can mount a legal defense to that through your attorney

        Like

  14. mainecoonman says:

    This same DA* has within the past 2 weeks labelled tasers as lethal weapons when used by officers on a disruptive subject in a police car.

    Now that the decreased is clearly shown as pointing and discharging a taser, which he stole from the officer, it’s suddenly no big deal.

    Normally this would be treated as fully justifiable police action. Now, even though the charges don’t have a change of sticking the narrative has been set and frankly that’s all that matters.

    * who is currently under investigation for misappropriating nearly $200k of federal funds intended for a charitable initiative. Diversion tactic anyone?

    Like

    • DaveK says:

      The DA is also running for reelection, and he came in a long second in the primary. He’s likely to loose in the August run-off election. This is just a giant FU to the people of Fulton County, setting the stage for the next DA to be forced to either drop the criminal charges or lose in court.

      Like

  15. California Joe says:

    …and RINO GOV KEMP, another Republican Surrender Monkey is hiding under his desk instead of firing the Black DA and giving the case to the Georgia Attorney General! Where’s Kemp?

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Pegon Zellschmidt says:

    DA Says Brooks Wasn’t ‘Threat’ Toward Cop He Shot Taser At, Said Two Weeks Ago Taser Is ‘Considered’ A ‘Deadly Weapon’
    https://www.dailywire.com/news/da-says-brooks-wasnt-threat-toward-cop-he-shot-taser-at-said-two-weeks-ago-taser-is-considered-a-deadly-weapon?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=benshapiro

    Like

    • gabytango says:

      This kind of lunacy leaves my soul in tatters; when the police use it, it’s a deadly weapon, when the criminal uses it, it’s not a threat. The dismantling of the police. Pandering of the highest order, nothing based on the “rule of law” anymore. Emotional concepts that are completely backasswards. Like everything else that has happened in these apocalyptic past four months.

      Like

    • sync says:

      A plastic spoon can be a deadly weapon if utilized correctly

      What’s coming out of the DA’s mouth is nothing but verbal garbage. He can argue anything he wants. It’s meaningless right now. How many times have we been down this road?

      Like

    • paulashley says:

      In that same incident, in which two black policemen tasered two black youths, the DA accused the black police of “participating in white supremacy culture”.

      Get that? Black police officers, by resorting to force, are essentially white supremacists. You can’t make this stuff up.

      Like

  17. thedoc00 says:

    This slug is daring the GBI to find the shooting justified. The real target is the GBI investigation and riots he knows will be fomented if GBI renders a fair judgement. This is a CYA move for himself and mayor.

    Have already seen too many “Black” and “White” LEO comments that agreed with my assessment that the perp in this case made himself a danger to the Public and put the officers in a tough but justifiable shooting situation.

    Intoxicated.
    Record of violence and violence vs kids and family.
    Fleeing with a weapon that would make him a danger to anybody encountered in Public.

    Somebody on social media or in the media needs to ask the grieving family is they wanted daddy to reappear at the birthday party with a TASER. I do believe he went to the party, as he stated, but the family did not let him in the door and he went to another party to get intoxicated.

    Liked by 1 person

    • deborah foster says:

      The family of this perp will be paid off while they turn this dirtbag into another saint!

      Like

    • thedoc00 says:

      As noted in other article on this case, the DA skipped the Grand Jury which likely indicates an empaneled Grand Jury that is honest.

      Like

      • Charlie says:

        From what I know about that area of Atlanta, an impartial jury would be extremely difficult to find. Change of venue is a must if he is to receive a fair trial. Have you ever been on a jury where a black man was charged for anything and noticed that all the blacks don’t think he did anything wrong? A black teacher I once knew said that black boys shouldn’t be held accountable for anything they did, such as hitting or bullying others on the playground, because it was not their fault they were doing those things. That was years ago, so here we are now.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Shan Gill says:

    Sheriff Henry Plumber and the “Innocents”.
    Plundered and murdered the miners Alder Gulch in early Montana history.
    Plumber is a prime example of a thug with a badge.
    He seems a good candidate for avatar of the antifa Democrat party.

    Like

  19. dbobway says:

    Zimmerman was a trap charge. That is always the plan. Ferguson and Baltimore didn’t keep candidate Trump out of the White House.
    Derek Chauvin did not murder George Floyd. Did the officer contribute to his death? probably.
    He was one of a number of factors, contributing to Floyd’s death. Mr. Floyd provided the rest of them. Chauvin was over charged.
    Law enforcement is under trained, under paid and badly managed.
    So the Federal Government gives funds to the police departments around the nation.
    The Feds also tell them how to spend it. Military equipment is what they make them spend the money on.
    90% of police departments job is collecting revenue. My county social services moved in a new building a couple of years ago. It was put in a short cut route, I use to a back way into town.
    Every since it opened, the police are all around it, hiding . Poor people drive around with expired places, no license, signal lights out and so on. ‘Revenue’
    Why do we have 8,000 no knock raids a year in this country?
    Revenue collected from drug dealers assets.
    Cops need to be cops. Well trained, well paid and completely vetted.
    Same with teachers, postmen, TSA, FBI, DOJ.
    Don’t get me started.

    Like

    • Gary says:

      You have to ask yourself one question:

      Exactly what has transpired over the last 30 years that would inspire any well meaning, clear headed, committed individual to join the force? But we have to have them so standards continue to drop just at they do for firemen as well when color make up of the dept is a municipal concern. I’m not painting all PD’s with the same brush, just the larger cities and surrounding areas.

      It’s a lot like Med school vs. Veterinary school these days, animals don’t sue.

      Liked by 1 person

      • sturmudgeon says:

        Treepers Search for Paul Harvey’s “The Policeman”

        Like

      • dbobway says:

        I got put in the hospital by 3 policeman in 1971.
        I won’t say I didn’t deserve some of it, but not 30 some odd stitches on my face. This unnamed police department was awful,
        It started at the top, including elected officials.

        To answer your question, a good one.
        Money and a change of culture.
        We don’t need more cops, but less, better trained, with a more defined scope of ‘to serve and protect’ our citizens. The government always throws quantity instead of quality at everything they legislate.
        A simple yet a perfect example is policing drivers. What is the best way to lower the speed limit in a specific area. A police car riding around that area instead of hiding behind a bush.
        Well to a police budget, there is no money wasting gas and slowing people down by their presence.
        Drunk driving arrests have increased by a 1,000% while drunk driving deaths have dropped 10%. We don’t don’t catch drunks driving we trap them, with roadside stops. For a big trap, takes as many as 20 officers to man it. 2 blocks away, some drunk is blacked out bouncing off cars. 20 officers can cover a lot of ground. But there is no money in it.
        Who would go home a prouder officer, the one who helped arrest 20 people parked on the road, waiting to get arrested, or saving property and someones life by stopping that drunk, playing bumper cars.
        You’re right, some police departments are run better than others.
        One more thing. Animals owners will sue, and they do.
        To bad we can’t sue teachers that suck, we can’t even get them fired.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. paulashley says:

    I’m not that enamored with Erick Erickson, but I continue to get email from him and every once in a while he writes something decent. He lives in Atlanta from what I gather and he’s been on top of what’s going on there. Regarding this DA, he had this interesting tidbit:

    “Two weeks ago, two black police officers smashed the windows of a vehicle and tasered the black college students in the vehicle. The students did not obey orders to stop during the Atlanta protests that had turned violent. The Mayor of Atlanta fired the officers and Paul Howard charged them on the grounds that they had discharged “deadly weapons.” I intentionally mention the races of the parties involved because one of the allegations made against the officers is that they participated in white supremacy culture.”

    Get that? Black police officers, by resorting to force, are essentially white supremacists. You can’t make this stuff up.

    https://ewerickson.substack.com/p/the-atlanta-police-arrest-is-a-political

    P.S. As I was typing this I got a call from my 91-year-ol mom in Minnesota and she wanted to know if I’d heard about the SCOTUS DACA lawlessness. She’s extremely depressed at what’s going on in the country she loves and worries that Barr and Durham won’t do anything in time for the elections and that, if Trump is defeated, it will all be buried. Now I’m really depressed, too. Thanks, mom 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  21. revarmegeddontthunderbird says:

    When these charges are dismissed in court, thanks to this idiot DA, Atlanta will be so afire some will think General Sherman rose from the dead.

    Like

    • thedoc00 says:

      Invoking General Sherman is a nice thought but he burned down the ENTIRE city. I doubt the rioters will be allowed to burn down “essential” and “important” locations.

      Like

  22. Jimmy Jack says:

    Atlanta is a very high crime city and I say that from personal experience living there. APD has been beleaguered with retention rates for years, well over a decade. They’re overworked, outgunned and not supported by their own brass. When I asked a police officer on horse to help me escape my street that was totally shut down by Black celebrants of Freaknik I was told they were undermanned, there was nothing he could do and to contact the state police and politicians to ask for help. Demoralization has been an issue there for a long time. I can’t even imagine what it’s like now.

    Fulton County and DeKalb County will absolutely feel this as will Gwinnett and Cobb. Seeing what the police are going though I don’t blame them for the walk out last night (confirmed by numerous sources despite APD & the mayor denying it).

    The DA has been accused of not only sexual shenanigans but money laundering campaign donations. IIRC the mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms was accuses of something similar and won with only a plurality of votes at 26%. These types of crimes and corruption are synonymous with Atlanta politics and it tends to be ignored bc of fears of charges being racist for holding them responsible. Shirley Franklin was corrupt as all get out. And don’t forget Bill Campbell who was brought up on federal charges.

    That said, I’m guessing anything that exposes this DAs crimes and corruption will also bring sunlight into Keisha Lance Bottoms and even Stacy Abrams.

    This could get vey interesting.

    Meanwhile I pray for these police officers whose safety is at risk and whose lives are now in turmoil.

    Liked by 3 people

    • thedoc00 says:

      Sounds like a FULL Baltimore redux … fake charges, corrupt Family seeking pay day for deadbeat dad they hated and corrupt DA who may face charges.

      Like

    • The Akh says:

      Fulton and Dekalb county have long histories of absolute incompetence and corruption. Anybody that has lived in either, knows it all too well. Dekalb county couldn’t even bill their water and sewage properly for years. Some people were getting $2000 bills while others didn’t see a bill at all. I didn’t see a water bill for almost 10 months. They suddenly slapped me with one out of the blue for $700 and expected me to pay by the due date. Bunch of corrupt <70 IQ morons. Trying to get a drivers license a few years back was a nightmarish process.

      Like

  23. jay says:

    Our complacency to communist invaders is being tested.
    (Think French, Nazis invasion 1930s)
    We are failing miserably if businesses are raising BLM support signs.
    I am going down with the resistance. Take a knee – my ass.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I like to think of some of this as a re-focusing for police.
    For about 10 years or so, police culture has gone off the rails as it applies to excessive force applied towards non-compliant citizens.
    If any of us shot a fleeing adversary three times who was pointing a tazer, we would be charged with murder.
    Chronic excessive force is usually a sign of mental illness. This individual cop is probably a pretty okay guy and if he was the only one, I doubt there would be an issue. The problem of excessive force by the police is a chronic problem. This is the ONE time that the screaming protesters have a point that I can truly recognize as relevant.
    This will all work out eventually and hopefully for the better.

    Like

    • California Joe says:

      Wrong! The problem is that Black males who make up less than 6% of America account for 70% of the violent crime! Don’t give us that crap about the police here.

      Like

    • lakelurelife1 says:

      Respectfully, please check out the stats on police force. The facts do not support a “chronic” problem with excessive force.

      Liked by 2 people

      • DaveK says:

        Agreed… but the stats have shown that a handful of LEOs are responsible for almost all the excess force/brutality complaints, and they are not removed from the force until they do something beyond the pale. Worse, their brother LEOs know exactly who the bad apples are and let it slide because if they drop a dime on a bad one, their own career is likely to be flushed long before the bad cop is shown the door.

        Reforms are needed, including the power of police unions, and some kind of reform of qualified immunity. Trump’s EO is a starting point.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Gary says:

      “For about 10 years or so, police culture has gone off the rails as it applies to excessive force applied towards non-compliant citizens”.

      Can you cite a source for this statement?

      Like

      • Youtube is an excellent resource.
        A full Saturday can be spent watching cops behaving outside of the constitution.
        Not against cops. Just recognizing a problem that some evidence will insist exists..
        I have no pony in the race. Just a slightly different voice in an echo chamber.

        Like

        • Gary says:

          How about the The Dept Of Justice? They keep rather accurate crime statistics, including but not limited to Officer involved shootings broken down rather nicely. If you are a citizen on the United States your pony is in this race. A handful of video’s on youtube in no way an accurate microcosm of national law enforcement’s collective behavior. There are millions of peaceful encounters every year.

          You claim “the of excessive force by the police is a chronic problem”, I’m asking you to prove it. Freedom of speech doesn’t mean you can’t or won’t be held to some degree, even if just by peers…accountable for what you say.

          Liked by 1 person

          • How about the The Dept Of Justice? They keep rather accurate crime statistics,
            .
            Yes… How about the Dept. Of Justice….
            Still. We ARE on the same team.

            Like

            • Seems like we have just suffered through 4 years of ACCURATE dept. of justice action.
              A problem is a problem. Rioting and political BS is a less than optimal prism through which to examine the problem but it is the prism that is being used.
              Maybe the problem isn’t even big enough to justify this examination. Yet, here we are!

              Like

        • Penner says:

          Oh … I see. There were 300 million police encounters last year and 10 million arrests. How many videos did you watch on a full Saturday?

          Liked by 1 person

          • rvsueandcrew says:

            Excellent point, Penner!

            Like

          • OK. I’m with you…
            Let’s say 300 million drivers text while driving with 10 million close calls or minor accidents. It is still a problem. It only takes a few drivers having a head-on collision with an Amish family’s horse-and-buggy before it becomes obvious that there is a problem.
            Hopefully President Trump will make a difference with his EO.
            Great point though.

            Like

        • 4sure says:

          You tube. As your source? LOL. You have zero credibility. Millions of arrests by police happen every yr., and you watch how many YouTube vids. to draw your conclusion?
          Real deep thinking.

          Liked by 1 person

    • jay says:

      A GOOD place to study what REAL ‘excessive force” looks like is to view the enforcement of laws in COMMUNIST countries. A quick search leads to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mass_killings_under_communist_regimes where one finds that millions upon millions have perished at the hands of communist’s excessive force. Your statement “Chronic excessive force is usually a sign of mental illness” cannot be more true when one considers the force used in these ‘communist utopias.’ Here in the USA, the claim that we have systematic abuses is not supported by evidence. History can teach so much about communism and what TRUE EVIL looks like. Sadly, these lessons are being ignored by the youth of the world.

      Soviet Union
      Political repression in the Soviet Union
      Red Terror
      Main articles: Decossackization, Lenin’s Hanging Order, and Red Terror
      Joseph Stalin[edit]
      See also: Excess mortality in the Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin
      Mass deportations of ethnic minorities[edit]
      Main article: Population transfer in the Soviet Union
      Soviet famine of 1932–1933[edit]
      Main articles: Dekulakization, Holodomor, Holodomor genocide question, and Soviet famine of 1932–33
      Great Purge (Yezhovshchina)[edit]
      Main article: Great Purge
      See also: National operations of the NKVD, Stalinist repressions in Mongolia, and Mass graves from Soviet mass executions
      Soviet killings during World War II[edit]
      Main articles: Katyn Massacre, NKVD prisoner massacres, and Soviet war crimes
      China
      Main article: History of the People’s Republic of China (1949–1976)
      See also: Mass killings of landlords under Mao Zedong and List of massacres in China
      A large portrait of Mao Zedong at Tiananmen
      Campaign to Suppress Counterrevolutionaries[edit]
      Main article: Campaign to Suppress Counterrevolutionaries
      Great Leap Forward and the Great Chinese Famine[edit]
      Main articles: Great Leap Forward and Great Chinese Famine
      Cultural Revolution[edit]
      Main article: Cultural Revolution
      Tibet
      Main article: History of Tibet (1950–present)
      Tiananmen Square
      Main article: 1989 Tiananmen Square protests
      Cambodia
      Main article: Cambodian genocide
      See also: Khmer Rouge Killing Fields and Khmer Rouge rule of Cambodia
      Other states
      People’s Republic of Bulgaria
      East Germany
      Further information: NKVD special camps in Germany 1945–49
      Socialist Republic of Romania
      Further information: Danube-Black Sea Canal § Construction of the canal in 1949-1953
      Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia
      Further information: Barbara Pit massacre, Bleiburg repatriations, Communist purges in Serbia in 1944–45, Foibe massacres, Goli Otok Macelj massacre, Leftist errors (Yugoslavia), Kočevski Rog massacre, and Tezno massacre
      North Korea
      Further information: Human Rights in North Korea, Prisons in North Korea, Kwalliso, and North Korean famine
      Vietnam
      Main articles: Land reform in North Vietnam and Land reform in Vietnam
      See also: Boat People; Persecution of Degar Peoples in Vietnam; Re-education camp (Vietnam); and Viet Cong and PAVN strategy, organization and structure § VC/NVA use of terror
      Cuba Main article: Human rights in Cuba
      Democratic Republic of Afghanistan Main article: Democratic Republic of Afghanistan
      People’s Democratic Republic of Ethiopia Main articles: Qey Shibir and 1983–1985 famine in Ethiopia

      Liked by 1 person

      • FH says:

        This issue is the police in these United States of America, not the police in collectivist, shitholes.

        No one here is comparing American police to the SS or the Stasi.

        The vast majority of American police officers do an exceptional job under less than ideal circumstances. That doesn’t excuse situations wherein an individual was, effectively, murdered in cold blood by police – Daniel Shaver and Corey Jones, for instance.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Henry says:

          You cannot reason with a feral mob. This is where these mobs are heading – Islamic savagery and bloodlust. Deny all you want…..

          https://myislam.dk/articles/en/geller%20muslim-cannibalism.php

          Like

        • Gary says:

          You haven’t proven the “chronic” problem exists yet, it’s ok though. Some of us have been here just as long as you claim to have been so ……..we’ll wait.

          Like

        • jay says:

          And there’s the rub FH.

          Show me where it states the United States is immune from becoming a shit hole.

          It always “happens to someone else” not to us. I bet the Romans said the same thing, ‘can’t happen to us.’ I bet ever country that has fallen to communism has considered themselves immune to the communist plague.

          Humans are 99% similar to chimps. Humans are 100% similar to other humans irrespective of their country or origin. A few weeks ago in Los Angeles and NYC, in a matter of hours, we witnessed ‘our humans’ turned into BARBARIANS.

          Yes we have the finest, most trained, most honest police – possibly in the world. But they are humans. And not perfect. And civilians are humans and not perfect.

          The BLM’s aim is to have American Civilians turn against American police, create a vacuum, TURN US INTO A SHIT HOLE, take power and fill the vacuum with police brutality like few have imagined. Instead of being against our police, we should focus on the barbarians the live among us – figure ways to force THEM to follow the law. I

          Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you. I will take time to review this. A lot of thought and work went into your reply.

        Like

  25. California Joe says:

    What we are witnessing in Atlanta today is a glimpse of America under a Black Government like South Africa where White Europeans are facing a holocaust!

    Like

  26. Patrice says:

    The AG and the mayor are emotion-driven affirmative action success stories. Have we had our fill of that yet – Yes.

    Like

  27. Eaglet says:

    God Bless What’s Left Of America!

    Like

  28. JetLinkin says:

    This WARNING is directly from the TASER operating manual put out by the manufacturer:

    “Read, study, understand, and follow all instructions, warnings, information, training bulletins and relevant TASER training materials before using the TASER X2™ CEW. Failure to comply with the product instructions, warnings, information, training bulletins, and TASER training materials could result in death or serious injury to the user, force recipient, and others.”

    Also, people making an issue of the TASER already being fired should research the TASER’s drive-stun backup function.

    Like

    • TarsTarkas says:

      Also about one second passed between the firing of the TASER and the firing of Rolf’s gun. In the heat of a hand-to-hand combat situation, with the adrenaline flowing. I dare any keyboard hero to react differently under those circumstances unless they have a deathwish.

      Like

  29. TarsTarkas says:

    I’m starting to suspect the Democrats’ plan is to make it so unsafe to vote that (A) they require all voting be done by mail, ensuring a Democratic victory by losing as many red precinct ballots as possible in the mail system, or (b) ensure that the Presidential Election cannot be held, declare victory by rioters’ acclamation, and have the Obama millitary holdovers escort POTUS from the White House. I hope by predicting this that I haven’t donned a cast lead hat.

    Like

    • Gary says:

      We vote in person, in mass,armed if necessary.

      Liked by 1 person

    • 4sure says:

      I stick by my prediction that big ears Barack will be chosen as Dementia Joe’s VP. The fight over his eligibility and a SCOTUS ruling which might uphold his eligibility will be enough to keep the country in turmoil through the election.

      We have been in lawless territory for the past 4 yrs. And getting worse. If I was DNC, I would go for it. Put nothing past these commies.

      Like

  30. margarite1 says:

    In the last few weeks I have seen too many shocking videos of blacks beating white people – sucker punching them, kicking them when down, one of a big guy in a store stuffing a white girl into a little box while beating her, another of a young black girl pulling a white girl who was holding a child off a park bench by her hair and then beating the hell out of her while her friends watched. Another was a guy in a Sears store (according to the comment) and a big black guy just apparently randomly decided to beat him up in the store aisle. Young, old, minding your own business, trying to stand up for yourself or whatever – you aren’t safe because the left has given a lot of people an excuse to act like monsters.

    Of course most black people aren’t like this but when in public how are you supposed to know the difference? If I were black I’d be angrier than anyone at these uncivilized thugs for making life more difficult for all blacks.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. 4sure says:

    Those animals you describe are thug racists. They have nothing to lose. People who have nothing to lose are very dangerous. You don’t see that behavior from folks who have lots to lose, such as reputation, money, material possessions, careers. Most of the animals you describe live and were raised in a thuggery culture.

    Like

  32. Craig Northacker says:

    Corruption at its finest. Atlanta to be avoided at all costs.

    Like

  33. nimrodman says:

    re: the Wendys shooting

    I just watched the open of the Martha MacCallum show on Fox

    They opened with the short clip of the officers rising from the wrestling “scuffle” from one camera and then from another camera is the footage of the foot chase and the officer shooting the perp

    Here’s the thing: the chase-and-fire video was deceptively edited, much like ABC(?) did to the Trayvon Martin video

    The visual component of the video halts before showing the perp turning and firing the taser’
    While the audio component continues thru the time when 3 shots are fired, pow pow pow

    I’m on my way to email Fox about this blatantly deceptive audio

    They don’t have an excuse that they don’t want to shot “the violence” of the shooting
    … because they’re playing the full video 10 minutes into the show while she’s interviewing a guest

    The question is: Hey Fox – for what purpose was that deceptively edited video clip created?

    Like

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