Pittsburgh Area Residents Queue Two Miles for Drive Through Food Bank Distribution….

As more essential service outlets start to become overwhelmed at the stress upon their food delivery operations; and with more food store employees necessarily absent due to the coronavirus spread; regionally, the food supply chain will becoming more dependent on food bank distribution.

If the virus spread continues at current pace, some regional supermarkets with multiple locations will likely begin targeted shut-downs by retreating and disbursing available healthy (non-infected) employees on a store-by-store basis.  The potential for this issue is most likely to first originate within urban communities; and then outflow.

This reality is starting to become more evident in localized communities, and a distribution center in the greater Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, area gives a great example of what could become increasingly common across the nation.

Approximately 1,500 cars line up to receive essential food products from the Greater Pittsburgh Community Center.  The capacity was anticipated around 1,700 at the beginning of the three hour event. 1,500 cars were in line before it began.  [Video Story]

Depending on your location, and depending on your potential risk exposure to these types of impacts, it would be suggested to prepare yourself and your family accordingly.

This phase, the phase everyone is hoping to avoid, is not a total supply issue; there is no shortage of food products.  The issue becomes one of local distribution where diminished workforce capacity begins to have an impact on the local provider.

This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, CDC, Coronavirus, Economy, Infectious Disease, media bias, Transportation, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

282 Responses to Pittsburgh Area Residents Queue Two Miles for Drive Through Food Bank Distribution….

  1. ezgoer says:

    Anyone remember the show The Last Ship? Where a pandemic wiped out most of the population in the world except for isolated bands of depraved criminals or villages of survivors run by despots. Science fiction becomes reality??

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Sherri Young says:

    Suggestion for every manager in every business that does direct business with the public:

    Require that every employee wear a mask during business hours. It does not need to be the N95 grade, just a mask. Require the cashiers to wear gloves too. If the managers issue such edicts, the people who already wanted to take such precautions would be relieved of the stigma of being the dorky outlier.

    People in Venezuela are wearing masks in public. They know their healthcare system is deeply compromised. They are behaving in a way that makes sense. Why shouldn’t we?

    Liked by 4 people

    • Bolivar says:

      The people in Venezuela also have a destroyed economy and currency like we are installing here. We can learn from Venezuela – how to survive a government that hates its people.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Peoria Jones says:

      Except for medical folks and direct open food handlers, wearing gloves makes little sense. Gloves spread germs/virus just like hands do.

      When you wear gloves, you don’t wash your hands or sanitize them like you do when your hands are bare. You still have to touch everything, and can still touch your face. It’s a false sense of security.

      I can understand a customer wearing gloves into the store, and removing them upon exiting for their car. But one could also sanitize their hands. And does one don another pair of gloves for removing their groceries from the car and putting them up?

      Just wash your hands, folks – and realize that everything you buy at the store has been handled or breathed upon by God knows who. Cashiers can sanitize their hands between every customer, but the products have already been out in the open, touched by multiple people…and there’s no way cashiers at busy groceries can change gloves between every single customer.

      Like

      • Peoria Jones says:

        Oh, and as for masks – it’s the customers who should be wearing them. Masks are not meant for keeping one from getting the virus, they’re meant to stop you from spreading it when you breathe, cough, sneeze, or even talk. (It’s why they give YOU a mask when you’re diagnosed with the flu.)

        I work in a market with maybe 50 employees. We’re all cautious. But there are THOUSANDS of customers in-and-out daily, thanks to the “be prepared” fear-mongering.

        Trust me, we’re FAR more concerned about the general public bringing C-19 in and exposing us. I see people cough and hack, blow their noses, and even find used kleenex lying around.

        My wearing a mask would do nothing to keep me safe, and nothing to ensure the safety of others unless I had the virus myself.

        Like

        • Sherri Young says:

          The masks help both persons. Flu type diseases spread by droplet (wet) / contact (dried droplet) transmission. For information on droplet transmission and why masks are used by caregivers, what is laid out starting on page 18 of this document is pretty helpful.

          Click to access isolation-guidelines-H.pdf

          Like

        • Janie says:

          Wearing a mask at least keeps one from inadvertently touching their lower face. That alone helps. People might not realize how they might touch their face at least once in the course of a few hours.

          Like

          • Peoria Jones says:

            I’m glad to see customers wearing them. They can remove them when they leave.

            As for people in the very physically-demanding positions, trying to breathe through one of those while lifting heavy boxes and pushing multi-hundred-lb. carts around all day is not recommended. It’s hard enough to catch one’s breath, as it is.

            Like

      • Sherri Young says:

        The glove suggestion is for the cashier’s sake. Their hands are busy touching items, and especially money, non-stop. Their work surface and everything from the basket are within six feet of their customers’ faces.

        Like

        • Peoria Jones says:

          As I said, I think the gloves provide a false sense of security for a lot of people. You’re STILL touching everything, and not washing or sanitizing your hands. And it doesn’t help to have gloves on, if you inadvertently touch your face.

          Our cashiers have been sanitizing their bare hands in between customers and keeping surfaces wiped down with bleach. It keeps them on their toes and aware. A protective shield (as provided at my friend’s grocery) would be helpful to them, but my cheap-ass store will never go for that. 😦

          Liked by 1 person

          • Sherri Young says:

            I’m glad to know y’all are diligent. It is all a lot of hassle but well worth it.

            I dropped by Sherwin-Williams today to try my luck to get masks. Of course, there were none. The front door is locked with notices of the number to call or instructions of how to order online for curbside delivery.

            A microwave ventahood I purchased for an investment house is defective. I wanted to have a mask for whomever the manufacturer sends to deal with the already installed appliance. Whoever comes likely will have been in and out of occupied homes. When (if) the appliance repairman calls to schedule an appointment, I’ll insist that he bring his own mask or bandana.

            Oh well.

            Like

            • Peoria Jones says:

              Well if they’ve been to a grocery store recently, then all bets are off anyway. You’re all doomed to the same virus. 😦

              It it what it is. Wash your hands, keep your surfaces clean, and practice common sense.

              Liked by 1 person

  3. Johnny Dollar says:

    The food bank is giving away free food to anyone who wants it.

    And there is a long line waiting to get some.

    Why is this news?

    Much less banner headline news?

    This “story” is uneccessary. And promotes nada, except it adds a little bit more to the current bloated MSM sensationalism.

    Liked by 3 people

    • adam says:

      ^^^^^^^^^^^ . T H I S ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

      More fear-mongering. Remember: They LOVE bread lines, so this feels like “home” to them. Keep us hungry and scared, now if only they could get those pesky guns, too.

      Liked by 3 people

    • rororojo says:

      I completely agree. I live in Pittsburgh. I know of no grocery stores shut down. I was at the grocery store today and yesterday. They were fully staffed and there was plenty of food in all of the aisles. Those ppl in the line must just be interested in free food. The article is indeed sensational.

      Liked by 8 people

      • Somebody says:

        The county where I live has a higher than average income. I believe the last time I saw a chart we were in the top 10%. That’s not to say there are no poor people here, there are. The eastern side of the county has a much higher income average than the western side and is more densely populated.

        There is a huge mega-church right up the road from me. One of their big outreach missions is to provide a free Thanksgiving meal in a box for all takers. Recipients drive through and get a box containing a frozen turkey and all the trimmings. This church works on this, plans it all year.

        The line for their Thanksgiving give away is unreal. It causes a massive traffic jam every year, cops have to direct traffic, they temporarily turn the roads one way……I absolutely HATE it.

        I have had the misfortune of having to take my granddaughters to pre-k right across the street from this mega-church two years (a different year for each). I end up being stuck for what seems an eternity until the cop working traffic lets cross traffic through. I’ve watched the cars, Mercedes, fancy SUV’s, BMW’s, etc.

        These are NOT needy people, they are GREEDY people. I live in a golf course community, last year I followed 3 luxury cars into my neighborhood that came from the give away line, GREEDY people, not needy.

        There may be some people in that line that are needy, but the vast majority are just greedy. That’s not to say there may not be disruptions in the supply chain, but I don’t think this is a sign. Most truly poor and needy people in Pittsburgh probably don’t have cars, they rely on public transportation. Zoom in and I bet you’ll see a lot of expensive cars in the que

        Liked by 1 person

    • yucki says:

      I’ve NEVER seen “sensationalism” in articles written by Sundance.
      Years. Never. Ever.
      You don’t like his scare-quotes “story”?
      – – Fly off to another Treehouse more to your liking.

      Liked by 1 person

      • lbprouddeplorable says:

        This isnt a Supply Chain OR Grocery Shortage issue–this is an Issue of People who have run out of MONEY. They cant afford to go shopping because they are BROKE.
        This was never considered it seems when this BS “shutdown” started. The Rescue is a good idea but by then, a LOT of Americans will have been out of MONEY for at LEAST THREE WEEKS.
        These Eggheads with their graphs and curves and that nonsense dont have to worry about it. MOST hourly people DO and that is happening. This is a BAD BAD sign and someone BETTER pay attention to it. Shutting down for another MONTH? You are in for a very bad reaction at that point all over!

        Liked by 5 people

        • AustinHoldout says:

          I agree that the run on this food bank was probably largely driven by the same people who are crashing unemployment websites-the newly unemployed. Also, food banks normally require an application and proof of need which limits the crowd. This drive up/get food/no questions asked format probably brought out a lot of “free stuff” enthusiasts.

          Liked by 1 person

    • pattyloo says:

      I’m sure some in the line need the help, but I think many are the same people who cleaned out the toilet paper and hand sanitizer from stores in early March. I heard some are trying to sell those items at a profit.

      if they even charged $1 for a bag of groceries, that would deter a lot of the people. If they’re driving up in cars, they can buy gas, insurance, etc, so $1 should be no problem. and if they showed need (however that is done through other agencies), then the $1 would be waived.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Todd says:

    Big Problem with Wegmans in Western New York. My favorite place to shop just went stupid.

    Instead of letting their customers cash out as normal, they are corralling their customers in very long and close lines with waiting times of 30 minutes or more BEFORE getting cashed out.

    Picture 150-200 people with carts lined up past the freezer section and the empty paper aisle that leads back to the eggs and cheese dairy section waiting for over a half hour to buy bread, orange juice, eggs, cheese, and a case of beer.

    In other words, if you want to purchase a tube of tooth paste and a six pack of your favorite brew at Wegmans, you’re going to have to wait for over 30 minutes in a grocery store petri dish before being given the privilege to pay for your groceries.

    Dumb!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. John Doe says:

    I have a niece that bartends at a VFW on Saturday nights 3-9. She has a real job doing medical paperwork but she likes the club and the guys there. She should. She makes around $500 on a good night, never less that $300, and sometimes more. Easy work, good regular customers. It’s closed because of Corona. She’s fine with her other job, so she doesn’t need the money but it’s more her buying toys money. The other girls there, though, they depend on that big tip money and they are in a world of hurt. It’s those people who my heart breaks for. If we can, we all gotta tip and tip big when this is all over. God bless the US and her citizens.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Jan says:

      Seems to me there are plenty of jobs available in the delivery business. There are tons of jobs in the medical services business, hospitals….There are jobs out there if you need to work. Amazon, Walmart, et al., are hiring.

      If you’re a small business owner, you’ll be able to go to the Small Business Administration & FDIC banks and get loans that turn into grants if you keep your staff and pay their wages. There are ways around all of this mess if you just try.

      If you just support your local businesses, to the extent you can. If you think outside of the doomsday Media, including Faux News. We have manufacturing businesses changing to produce medical supplies and medicine. We’re probably a week away from producing enough masks to take care of our medical personnel and we can move on to getting masks out to others.

      Buckle up people. We Treepers are the best of the best. Stay safe and don’t congregate for a while.

      Liked by 3 people

  6. Raised on Reagan says:

    I feel like the US is on day 7 of a 30 day free trial subscription to Socialism.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Outerlimitsfan says:

      Yep. And not the “great” Scandinavian model the leftists always point to. We are deciding to try out the fantastic Venezuelan model. Hell, many of our mayors and Governors have decided to follow the Maduro model of stupidity and totalitarianism.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Somebody says:

      😂😂😂, about sums it up. Unfortunately it seems they have our credit card number, cancellation might be difficult.

      Like

  7. Bolivar says:

    And this is 100% self inflicted damage. It will get worse now that President Trump has extended the shutdown till May or June. As Rush said today, all the economic progress achieved in three years wiped out in three weeks by a socialist coup done by various governors working hand in hand with the President to kill the virus by attacking the American worker. The attacks are working and the American worker, and his employer, are definitely going down.

    Liked by 4 people

    • modspell says:

      So true. The perfectly healthy are treated like vectors, all because the bug CAN be transmitted without us feeling ill. What kind of precedent is this? Trump is stuck–he can’t defy his MAGA-hating health staff or they’ll bet a path to CNN and scream how he’s guilty of killing thousands. So he goes along with it, until there’s nothing left to protect.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. wtd says:

    New York food banks have become inundated with newcomers deprived of income since the near-total halt of business in the United States’ economic capital http://u.afp.com/3qX4

    Liked by 1 person

    • wtd says:

      Roughly 50% of NYC supermarkets visited were closed.

      Like

      • Carrie says:

        Now THAT is going to cause trouble. My friends in London really struggle to get enough vegetables already, let alone bread in their area. It was estimated that 50% of Londoners get their weekly food from restaurants. Well, London shut down all of their restaurants- no take out or drive thru either. So now the supermarkets have to deal with 50% more product demand, plus hoarders, plus people buying to hawk on amazon and eBay.
        The parallel between DeBlasio and Sadiq Khan are just amazing. They are in a virtual competition to see who is more inept. It’s a tight race.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. RJ says:

    I live 20 miles east of Pittsburgh. Route 22 goes thru my hometown with a traffic count of 23,000 vehicles per day. Our three hometown supermarkets are well-stocked except for TP. People must be coming from points unknown because I don’t recognize anybody in the stores except for an occasional local face.

    Wasn’t aware of the 2 mile backup for the free food but that highway Route 837 is a bottleneck on a good day.

    Liked by 3 people

    • rororojo says:

      The grocery stores in and around Pittsburgh are open, well-stocked and have lots of working employees. There is no waiting to check out. And the employees wear gloves and there are plastic partitions in place to protect workers. It is possible that the long line for free food is due to restaurant and food service employees being laid off as well as workers in service professions. But it NOT related to food availability.

      Liked by 2 people

    • spren says:

      Murrysville, I suppose. I lived in Harrison City for 10 years before moving to the People’s Republic of Connecticut.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Right to reply says:

    Is this why some states have closed gun stores?

    Like

    • auntiefran413 says:

      Gun stores are closed because the governor involved — or mayor or whatever — is anti-2nd Amendment! It’s a big power play and gun manufacturers and stores have been declared as essential.

      Liked by 3 people

      • 1stgoblyn says:

        The gun manufacturers and gun stores have been declared as NON-essential. As the anti-2A governors/mayors release ‘non-violent’ prisoners into the public, they close gun stores so the law-abiding residents cannot get protection. If you don’t already own a gun/ammo, you are SOL when that weed-smoker decides he doesn’t have enough money in his pocket to give his druggist for a new supply and comes busting thru your back door. In addition, those released are the ones who live by the motto ‘rules for thee, not for me’ and will NOT abide by the physical-distancing (social distancing is just a wrong misnomer) and continue to spread COVID-19. God help us all!

        Like

  11. Outerlimitsfan says:

    lockdown with no end in sight for months creates a slew of problems which may be worse than even a 1% to 2% death rate of the virus. If this were the Spanish flu Of 1918 that had a greater than 10% mortality rate and was equally deadly to all age groups then I could understand the extreme measures of lockdown everywhere.

    My main concern is that while fortunately children largely escape the dangers so far from this virus, they won’t escape the death and hardship from complete economic collapse.

    What’s the endgame here? The virus will likely be around(even if only seasonal) until an effective vaccine is made which could be years frankly. Will the politicians in May and June say, “Sorry lockdown continues all summer”. At what point do they realize we have to accept the virus is here to stay and we have to resume life regardless of the virus?

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Right to reply says:

    Get ready for martial law! The Democrats have found themselves a new insurance policy.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. spren says:

    Back in the 70s and 80s I worked on a railroad in a steel mill directly across the river from this site in McKeesport. The bottom dropped out in 1982 and many people began losing their jobs. I was a manager making what I thought was a very good income which supported a stay-at-home mom and two children. I had a co-worker who was a brakeman. He had a wife working in management at a close by steel mill who probably was making the same income as me. When the brakeman was laid off he immediately started going to the food bank for his free food. They had no children.

    I was sickened that somebody could be so callous and greedy. In 1986 our struggling mill finally laid everyone off and I lost my job. My wife and I, despite living on one salary, anticipating this day would likely arrive, had saved two years of expenses so we could survive. I was offered all manners of benefits such as the WIC program (women, infants, and children), help with utility bills, and access to the food bank. My wife and I decided that since we were in decent shape, we would forgo any of those freebees so they would be available for those truly in need. What we did wasn’t being virtuous but was only commonsense courtesy.

    Many comments on this thread indicate that not many people feel like this anymore and really will take anything they can get for free regardless of need. It is very distressing to realize that with the pervasive economic illiteracy of our public, people will clamor for socialism and free stuff and are too stupid to realize that all that free stuff will quickly disappear.

    Liked by 7 people

    • sticknca says:

      I worked at Edgar Thompson Works in the early 80s and was ultimately let go somewhere around ’84. I remember the union reps were always telling us to get every single benefit “owed” to us and that included food stamps and the old government cheese. The anti-company/ pro-union sentiment in that town held it back for many years afterward.

      Idle minds are the devil’s workshop and all, I wound up in a bit of trouble, did a short amount of time then got completely retrained in robotics in ’86-87.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Missy says:

      Great observation. The entitlement to an abundant, stress-free life is what most of AMERICA now expects . I keep asking why the people and gov’t of Puerto Rico had NO HURRICANE INSURANCE, and yet expects the US taxpayer to pick up 100% of their post-Maria expenses, including rebuilding the entire power grid! Wasn’t there any insurance on that grid? Did Florida ever do that? Or Houston? Or even New Orleans? No. Just PR.

      Neither did they have ANY post hurricane supplies put aside, buried or stored in a cement bunker? Even a roof tarp? No. No prep at all.

      Only 15% of those living on a flood plain in Houston had flood insurance, and then they want the rest of us to pay for house repair thru FEMA?! Many had no regular home insurance. Why should I pay for them?

      I have enough longterm food set aside for feed me for 6 months, a butane stove, battery-run small fans. I had to buy a little food each paycheck. I am prepared. Why can’t others do that, SAVE MONEY, for a rainy day. And I am on a modest retirement income. SMH.

      Like

  14. MNcarrypermitholder says:

    I don’t buy the theory that there is a large mass of people who are broke because they bought toilet paper.

    A few people bought huge amounts of TP – truckloads. More people, but still not a huge number, bought what I would consider to be a lot of TP. Most people bought slightly more than usual – 1 or 2 bulk/club packs (30-90 rolls).

    What fraction of the population buying 3 months worth of TP (instead of their usual weekly supply) do you think it would take to wipe out local story inventory and regional warehouse supply? My guess is 25% or less.

    Too much of the country lives paycheck to paycheck. A big chunk of those people have been in crisis mode for close to a month now.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Jase says:

      Living paycheque to paycheque means you are in perpetual crisis mode.
      Sadly, as Spren outlined, many people just want free stuff, even if they don’t need it.
      The organisation my wife runs has food vans for the needy. She was visiting one evening just to talk to the volunteers and the people coming to eat and who should turn up but a lawyer she knew and his wife.
      When she pointed out that the food was for the needy or homeless, they just shrugged, said ‘free is free’, got their meal AND took a food parcel.
      It is taught every day in schools and universities: society owes you.

      Liked by 7 people

      • Jan says:

        My father-in-law is a hoarder who will pursue every option to get something for free. Unfortunately, he doesn’t cook & barely runs a microwave and his wife is in full-blown dimentia and no longer can be trusted to cook, so every week all of these food bank stuff took over all the shelves and cabinets in the kitchen. Some even went to the basement.

        So we have them in an almost assisted living arrangement and are trying to get the canned stuff back to food banks. My conclusion: “free isn’t really free” if you don’t use/consume it because someone is going to have to deal with it and get it out of the house eventually.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. auntiefran413 says:

    I stopped at the local food bank this afternoon to offer donations of food and paper grocery bags. They were more excited about the bags than the food. That said a lot!

    i was dumbfounded by the security. Two doors — both locked! A lady who got there before me had to shout her name through one door, then go to another door to pick up her goodies. Then it was my turn and I was told to go to the name-shouting door before I had a chance to tell her I was there with donations rather than need, and needed someone to come out to the car to load them up (mostly bags). I was actually asked to step back from the door! Do people rob food banks?

    Liked by 2 people

    • jello333 says:

      You were told to step back so your virus couldn’t jump on the other person. It’s a known fact that those things, though quite agile, can’t jump more than six feet. One came at me today but I saw him just in time. As it fell to the ground between me and the other person, you could hear its sad lament… “I iz Carona, I wuz ALMOST there, I coulda been a condendah…” 😦

      Liked by 4 people

  16. Retired IG says:

    I live approx. 70 miles north of Pittsburgh, but the caption and pix on this post is identical to what was on the front page of my local newspaper – but applicable to the Shenango Valley. People lining up at the Salvation Army giving out food to people in need.
    What was once a thriving industrial area, now called the Rust Belt, this place has been turned into a place of strip malls filled with chain restaurants, mattress factories and the like. The Lordstown plant in Ohio is less than 20 miles away. It is no wonder people are living from paycheck to paycheck. Are we going to begrudge anyone for needing food? AS if they had a magic ball that would show them what our Governor was about to do?
    I think my day got off to a bad start when I read what Fauci just wrote just four days ago in the New England Journal of Medicine (courtesy of Jon Rappaport at nomorefakenews.com):
    “Dr. Anthony Fauci, the US front man for managing the “pandemic,” has just written an article that ought to be titled: I WAS WRONG AND THIS IS MY CONFESSION.

    Fauci, New England Journal of Medicine, March 26, “Covid-19 — Navigating the Uncharted”:

    “If one assumes that the number of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic cases is several times as high as the number of reported cases, the case fatality rate may be considerably less than 1%. This suggests that the overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968)…”

    Still trying to wrap my axle around that. Haven’t quite managed that 12 hours later.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Retired IG says:

      Would love to see an analysis by a more adroit mind than mine show an analysis state by state run by a Demrat vs Republican Governor and what they are doing to SUBDUE their people. How much you want to bet on the odds its the Demrat governors pushing this agenda?

      Liked by 2 people

    • jello333 says:

      I’m FAR more afraid of the hysterical reaction to this virus than I am of the virus itself. Not even a close call.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Jan says:

      This prediction was based on a report coming out of the UK. The authors concluded the UK would lose 500,000 people and America, up to 2 million people. The authors of the report revised their numbers late last week, concluding the UK would lose 20,000 and America would lose 100,000-200,000.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. wodiej says:

    It’s called personal responsibility.

    Like

  18. sticknca says:

    Combination of low funds due to job loss and the majority of restaurants closed has the food banks doing a hell of a business out here in NorCal.

    Like

  19. A Call for Honesty says:

    All these people manage to purchase and maintain a car but not a pantry with two weeks supply of food?

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Brenda Purington says:

    Why didn’t they just go to a grocery store?

    Liked by 1 person

  21. JmkNY says:

    I heard a clip of an interview with Birx on the radio today and it was of a snarky reporterette asking what it’s like in the briefs with President Trump. And her response was -I’m paraphrasing- she was “surprised at how well President Trump worked with numerical data. That it must be his business experience”
    To me it was a little tell. I believe Fauci and Birx are making stuff up as they go at this point. Figuring they’ll dazzle President Trump with lots of big numbers in n their bogus, complicated models. They may have been surprised it was harder to dazzle him with bull$**t than they thought.
    But apparently they can do enough bull$**t to still sink our economy.

    Liked by 2 people

    • tucker10 says:

      Do not use the word bull$**t in your posts. Change the word to Pelosi as in, “they may have been surprised it was harder to dazzle him with Pelosi than they thought. But apparently they can do enough Pelosi to still sink our economy “. Much better use of words and if we all started using it, might become commonly used enough to make the dictionary. Just a thought. Old guys rule!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  22. BigTalkers says:

    While it’s wise to be extra-cautious during these odd times, I’m going to chalk up this anecdote to our “hoarding mentality” for now. We’ll see…

    Like

  23. Brian says:

    Sheeple always line up for “free” anything. Supply chain is fine. Have a payment method at the entrance and see how fast the line gets real short.

    Liked by 1 person

    • namberak says:

      You stole my post. 🙂 Seeing the picture I immediately thought of a preacher in the Indianapolis area who, for many years, had a Thanksgiving dinner at a Christian mission downtown. Most years, there would in the neighborhood of 30 or so people there. Then, it got some publicity. Within in five years, he ended it and was interviewed on TV about it. He said that the event was being overrun by, well, deadbeats and that when the number exceeded 300, they just couldn’t do it any longer. As a great many economists have observed, when the price is zero, the demand is infinite.

      Liked by 2 people

  24. BigTalkers says:

    As always, our outcomes will be dependent upon our ability to.. “Keep your head, while those all about you are losing theirs.” (Kipling)

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Deplorable Texan says:

    Still don’t think this was intentional? Look at the 180 we’ve done in three weeks, from the best jobs numbers, best economy, unemployment, wages……..all wiped out, and reversed, now we will stand in line for bread and milk. This to will fail, but look at the lengths they will go to. Remember, there are trillions at stake.

    Liked by 2 people

    • 1stgoblyn says:

      Yes, and VSPGPDJT had already beaten the Steele Dossier, Mueller and shampeachment. The dims said (to their base) not to worry b/c they had plenty more to charge him with and lo and behold, here we are. Nanzi even said this past Sunday that the President’s actions to coronavirus should be later reviewed. To me that sounds like she is saying we will have another ‘shampeachment’ hearing to charge him with manslaughter or some such nonsense. Just wait.

      Like

  26. flatlandgoober says:

    It’s hard to maintain social distancing in a bread line. Being in a car helps with that, and if you get bored you can always go to the grocery store.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. kleen says:

    Too many fancy cars… The rest of the world will not understand that.

    Having a car period is a sign of wealth in most countries. People in their cars for free food is as funny as fat people “starving and needing assistance”

    Fat people are not poor by the world’s standards. If they are fat they have TOO MUCH food.
    Real poverty people are malnourished, skin and bones and eating out of trash cans.

    American “poor” are wealthy and they have no idea. See images of poverty in Africa and compare the 2.

    Like

  28. unconqueredone says:

    I also live in the Pittsburgh region and have extensive contacts there. I have not heard of any substantial shortages after the first insane run on TP a few weeks ago. Yes, some things are gone or not fully re-stocked, but this scenario strikes me as induced panic. Not meaning SD, but rather the originators of the reporting.

    Like

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