The Annual Best Of The Best Treeper Thanksgiving Recipe Thread

bacon_turkeyGreat Preference Given To Dishes Featuring Bacon and Jack, Super Foods!

It’s that time of year again! Pull up a log and sit a spell. We have snacks and drinks, a warm, toasty fire and fine friends gathered round. In two weeks we will celebrate our  wonderful American holiday, Thanksgiving. I know that it is a great favorite for almost all of us, and perhaps your family, like mine, has the best feast of the year on that day. Our family has four generations come together, sometimes forty or fifty people. We have been doing this for years, and we never even discuss the menu any more, haven’t for probably twenty years or more. We each bring two or three dishes that we do best, and it is the best meal of the year. We even have the specialties of loved ones long gone, recipes saved and lovingly prepared by granddaughters and even great granddaughters, and a few of the guys too! Although they sure do shirk cleanup!

However, it  makes a holiday special, that wonderful combination of old and new. In honor of that, here’s my new find for you guys. I cant wait to try it myself.

From Oasis in a Gastronomic Wasteland Blogspot I bring you Uncle Jack’s Whiskey Brined Turkey.

Brought to you (again) this year by popular demand. Mine.

Uncle Jack’s Whiskey Brined Turkey
BY: Samuel Parks
(November 2011)
Jack Daniels TurkeyAfter 5 years of trial, error, and a lot of tryptophan, I have finally perfected my recipe!  Thanks to all of my friends and family who have been “willing” volunteers.  This recipe may take some prep work, but believe me it’s totally worth it.
INGREDIENTS
Brine
·         1 cup Kosher salt
·         ½ cup white sugar
·         ½ cup molasses
·         ¼ cup clover honey
·         ½ gallon fresh apple cider
·         1 gallon chicken stock
·         ½ Tbs. dried thyme
·         4-6 fresh sage leaves
·         2 sprigs fresh rosemary
·         1 stick whole cinnamon
·         2 bay leaves
·         1 Tbs. whole peppercorns (slightly crushed)
·         1 Tbs. whole allspice berries (slightly crushed)
·         1 Tbs. candied ginger
·         1 cup Tennessee Whiskey (Jack Daniels)
·         Ice water
We hope you will consider contributing your favorite recipes while we still have time to go out and shop this week, or this weekend. Happy baking, Treepers. Remember, every recipe is enhanced by judicious applications of bacon and Jack.
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260 Responses to The Annual Best Of The Best Treeper Thanksgiving Recipe Thread

  1. RedBallExpress says:

    Yummy! I would eat all the bacon first.

    Liked by 9 people

  2. Tiffthis says:

    My family enjoys a Hennessy and warm apple cider cocktail. Served in a mug 👍🏼 We keep the Apple cider warm in a mini crock pot all day n night. Makes the house smell festive too 😇

    Liked by 10 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      Had a friend that was with Alcohol and Beverage Control. He showed up at my house with a bunch of boxes at the back door but I was checking in people at the front door. I looked for him when I was done but he was gone. Days later, I went into our bar. He brought me 6 gallons (12 mega bottles) of Hennessy, beautiful stuff, because the tax stamps were incorrect and he had ‘confiscated’ them. That was back in 1996. I just finished the Hennessy in our house.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Ronnie says:

      I’ll be doing Hennessy and cider this winter…..I can smell it already……divine!
      Thanks, Tiffthis!

      Like

  3. BAM says:

    Thank you for the early posting! This is my version of going fishing!

    Liked by 9 people

    • Iamcat says:

      Me too!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacaranda11816 says:

      Same here…love cooking.

      Like

    • Jacaranda11816 says:

      Cornbread Stuffing….with bacon and toasted pecans

      After years of just estimating my ingredient measures, I finally decided to write it all down. If you make the cornbread and stock from scratch, give yourself 2-3 FULL days to make this. If you go with store-bought stock and cornbread (Kitchens Basics and Whole Foods, respectively), start the day before Thanksgiving dinner. This recipe fills two 13×9 baking dishes. Serves 15-20 people.

      3lbs cornbread (cut into ½ cubes, toasted at 325 for about 25 mins)
      1¼ cups dried zante currants (boil in 1 ½ cups apple cider for 7 mins. Cool. Refrigerate until needed.)
      1.5lbs shallots, chopped
      8 large celery ribs, chopped
      ½ cup FRESH herbs (equal parts sage, thyme, marjoram plus 2T fresh rosemary, minced)
      3 ½ cups frozen corn, thawed
      4 granny smith apples, peeled, cored, chopped
      2 lbs sliced bacon (cut whole slab into ½” pieces, cook on medium-high, drain)
      2 cups pecan pieces (toasted at 325 for about 12 mins, then cooled)
      1½ cups PACKED grated sharp white cheddar cheese
      1 stick salted butter
      3-4 cups turkey or chicken broth (low salt version)
      2 eggs, well-beaten
      Salt and pepper to taste
      2 sticks unsalted butter, melted

      Sauté shallots in ½ stick salted butter over medium heat until soft (8-10 mins); add celery and sauté until soft (5 mins); add herbs and sauté for 2 mins. Cool. Refrigerate until ready to assemble stuffing.

      Sauté corn in ½ stick salted butter over medium-high heat until deep golden and slightly chewy. Add apples and sauté until soft. Cool. Refrigerate until ready to assemble.

      Assemble the first 11 ingredients in a very large container (two, if necessary). Mix well. Combine broth and eggs in a bowl; pour mixture over stuffing, mixing evenly. Generously salt and pepper to taste. Transfer to large baking dishes. Pour melted butter evenly over top of each dish.

      Bake uncovered at 325 on middle rack for until top is deep golden brown. (Pour more melted butter over top if it starts to look dry.) Serve warm but do NOT cover to keep warm.

      Liked by 7 people

      • law4lifeblog says:

        Jacaranda…..dang, that sounds good!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Plain Jane says:

        I never liked cornbread, but darn this sounds awesome. Unfortunately my big cooking days are over. Guess I’ll have to wait for heaven or an invitation to your home for turkey day.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Menagerie says:

          Many people in the South use only cornbread to make dressing. I use mostly cornbread and toss in a couple of stale biscuits and pieces of bread, preferably sourdough.

          Liked by 2 people

          • The Tundra PA says:

            From as far back as I can remember, Thanksgiving began with the smell of cornbread baking in the early morning, to make dressing. Breakfast consisted only of fresh cornbread with butter and honey poured over. Mother made at least 3 big iron skillets full. A great start to my favorite day.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Plain Jane says:

            I used to make dressing with tons of cooked, ground chicken giblets, onion, celery, seasonings, giblet broth, butter, and toasted white bread cubes, etc. Haven’t done it for years.

            I never ventured away from my mom’s recipe, although I always wanted to try oyster dressing. Our daughter in MO has taken to making cornbread dressing.

            Liked by 1 person

      • daughnworks247 says:

        Jacaranda, this is a winner. I’m stealing this one! Sounds wonderful.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jacaranda11816 says:

          Thanks, Daughnworks! My guests love it. fyi…I’ve never tried cooking it in the bird because it find the grayish appearance and “steamed” effect of in-bird stuffings undesirable; but done in a baking dish it browns beautifully.

          Like

  4. amwick says:

    This is not a show I watch, but for whatever reason, my husband was watching Dr. Oz, and he was doing a show that included bacon. They offered up this recipe for home made “bacon” if you want to start with fresh pork belly. His point is that is is bacony without all of the sodium etc… I tried it at home yesterday. It seemed pretty plain to me, but I did not use the celery seeds… It was also chewy and really fatty. So, here it is, worth a try,, and pretty simple.

    https://www.doctoroz.com/recipe/sweet-and-salty-pork-belly

    Like

  5. pgroup says:

    Does anybody have a recipe for serving crow? Jim AccostMe could sure use one.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. skeinster says:

    A blast from the 70s past. It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without:

    Broccoli Rice Casserole
    1 C. rice, cooked
    1 small onion, chopped
    1 stick (1/2 C.) butter or margarine
    1 can mushroom soup
    1 jar Cheez Whiz
    1 sack chopped frozen broccoli

    Cook broccoli according to package directions. Saute chopped onions in melted butter.
    Add broccoli, onions, Cheez Whiz and soup to rice. Heat until blended and hot.

    We double this for a side dish and bake it in a casserole. There should probably be some salt in there, as well,

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Iamcat says:

    Thank you! This will be so fun to read! I’m always looking for something new to add to our family traditions.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. VegGOP says:

    Menagerie, Please be aware that you have at least one vegetarian Republican Treeper (me).

    Liked by 3 people

    • H.R. says:

      Hope you like Green Bean Casserole with the French’s fried onions on top.

      And sweet potato casserole with marshmallows.

      And pumpkin pie.

      And mashed or scalloped potatoes.

      And the olive in a Bombay Sapphire martini is all vegetarian.

      You’ll be OK.
      😜

      Liked by 5 people

    • Ddanna says:

      Me too — vegetarian here!

      Like

      • Shelley Keith Childs says:

        Honestly I haven’t tried this yet, but I bookmarked it because it doesn’t have nightshades. I bet it could be formed into a loaf and baked, maybe at 350 for 45 minutes?

        GRILLABLE VEGGIE BURGERS

        1 cup cooked brown rice
        1 cup raw walnuts
        1/2 Tbsp avocado oil (plus more if frying)
        1/2 medium white onion, finely diced (1/2 onion yields 3/4 cup)
        1 Tbsp each garlic powder, turmeric powder, and cumin powder
        1/2 tsp each salt and black pepper
        2 Tbsp molasses, 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar
        2 15 oz. cans black beans (rinsed and drained)
        1/3 cup bread crumbs (if gluten-free, use coconut or garbanzo bean flour)

        – Toast the walnuts in a skillet for 5-7 minutes and then crush them. Sautée the onion in avocado oil until caramelized. In a large mixing bowl add the drained black beans and mash them. Add cooked rice, toasted walnuts, onion, seasonings, molasses, vinegar and bread crumbs (or GF flour) and mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon for 1-2 minutes, or until a moldable dough forms. If too crumbly add a little more molasses, if too wet add bread crumbs/GF flour. Shape into patties and grill, or fry in the skillet. (I think they could also be baked and frozen for quick microwaveable veggie burgers)

        Like

    • Menagerie says:

      I make a similar sweet potato casserole to this recipe. Mostly the difference is that I use a different topping. I don’t like flour in the topping, I like a crunchy topping. To get that I mix softened butter, brown sugar and nuts. I like pecans best.

      https://www.thespruceeats.com/sweet-potato-casserole-with-pecan-topping-3060932

      Liked by 3 people

    • Menagerie says:

      This is a really good salad. They call it slaw, but it’s more like a salad to me. And it’s healthy to boot!

      https://www.weightwatchers.com/us/recipe/no-cook-apple-and-fennel-slaw-1/56505eb2fbec5b3134745a1c

      Liked by 2 people

    • Tess from Philly says:

      I never know if I’ll have a vegetarian show up for a holiday dinner. I usually figure there are plenty of vegetarian sides they can eat and then for their main course I’ll make a few Black bean burgers that I cut out with a turkey shaped cookie cutter. One year I knew in advance and I went to Reading Terminal and I bought a tofurkey which was a big hit – tasted a lot like stuffing to me.

      I would like some low carb ideas for sides if anyone has any.

      Like

  9. Concerned says:

    I have been feeling a bit plucked recently. This looks good!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. BuckNutGuy says:

    1- 20 Gallon Cooler
    3- 10lbs bags of ice,
    2- Cases of a mix of Macro Brews, IPAs, and Oktoberfest/Bock Beer.

    Instructions: Start several hours before meal time. Clean and wipe out cooler from late summer lake/boat trip including a quick squirt with windex. Insert cans/bottles on bottom of cooler carefully grouping beer by brand/flavor to make targeting easier. Drop bags of ice on driveway to break-up and carefully pour over beer bottles/cans. Add one pitcher of water to create icey slush. Close cooler and let sit for an hour. Place bottle opener on string attached to side handle of cooler. Allow the chef first pull from the cooler with the toast: Beer is God’s way of telling us, he loves us! Enjoy

    Liked by 10 people

  11. Dena says:

    Great Grandma Ruth’s Stuffing
    2 pkgs. corn bread, add a little sugar, cubed
    1 loaf whole wheat bread, cubed
    15 boiled eggs, chopped
    4 cans cream of chicken soup
    2 cans cream of celery
    1 big sweat onion
    3 groups of green onion, chopped
    4 tsp poultry season
    2 tsp sage
    pepper and salt to taste
    4 cans turkey broth
    you will need 2 big glass pans
    cook 350 for about 1 half or so
    you also can add pecans on top
    SO GOOD
    We also make her home made rolls and we just can’t get enough!

    Liked by 3 people

  12. jhynds says:

    TurBacon! I just want to know when to add the bacon to the already cooking turkey. One hour left, 30 min?

    Like

  13. Ackman420 says:

    Heres one that doesn’t really need a recipe. The name is self-explanatory.
    Bacon-Wrapped Jalepenos Stuffed w/ Cream Cheese and LOBSTER.
    It’s just a twist on the old recipe. Use the small slipper tails (4 oz.), cut into quarters. Prawns work well too. I make this every year for an appetizer. Oven is fine, but Use the BBQ if possible.
    They’re awesome as is, but a mango salsa works well if you must dip.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. cliffaheadwolvesbehind says:

    My secret joy on Thanksgiving Day is after the delicious turkey with extra creamy mashed potatoes,sweet potatoes,and gravy is eaten,the pumpkin,chocolate cream and coconut pies with root bear floats have been served and devoured,and the men collapse on the couch to rest before board games,my daughter and I sneak off to the basement to start stacking up the wonderful Christmas decorations!😀

    Liked by 7 people

  15. skeinster says:

    it’s not Jack, but

    Bourbon Brown Sugar Cheese Ball

    1 pkg cream cheese
    1 C. shredded cheddar cheese
    1 pkg. Ranch Style dip seasoning
    2 T. sour cream or mayonnaise
    1 jar Bourbon Brown Sugar Seasoning

    Mix first four ingredients until well-blended.
    Shape into a ball. Roll in Bourbon Brown Sugar seasoning to coat.
    Chill until firm.
    Serve with your choice of crackers.

    The original for this called for Red/Black Pepper mix – also good…

    Liked by 4 people

  16. Dena says:

    The most moist Turkey I have ever made
    wash turkey
    chop up onion, cranberry’s and apples place inside of turkey
    Mix paste, butter, sage, poultry season, salt and pepper in a bowl
    lift of the skin of the Turkey and put the paste on heavy, also put a little inside
    put it in at midnight Thanksgiving eve at 250
    turn it up to 350 for about an hour before serving or when the stick pops
    melt in your mouth!

    Liked by 4 people

    • Menagerie says:

      I used to cook my turkey on low overnight before I started brining them. I did one very similar to this but I put in at least two cups of water and covered the turkey with heavy duty foil, really crimped down to seal in the steam.

      That made a very tasty bird, but it falls off the bone so it’s not one you can use a centerpiece.

      Liked by 3 people

      • WSB says:

        Then there is always this substitute…

        Liked by 10 people

        • Lanna says:

          That’s really cute! I make one that serves 40, combo of meats, shrimp, baby corn, veggies, olives and pickles, on skewers for the feathers. Body is a heavy oval loaf of multi-grain bread (homemade so I can shape it the way I want), neck is cut from a baguette. Body is covered with folded slices of deli meat, comb and wattle carved of red pepper. Bird sits on a bed of vermicelli noodle nests. PITA to make, spectacular to serve.

          Liked by 1 person

      • law4lifeblog says:

        Menagerie, I discovered spatchcocking a few years ago. If you’re not wedded to the visual of placing a perfect whole turkey on the table, it’s fast and easy and makes turkey a viable alternative all year round. There are many YouTube videos, but essentially you cut the entire backbone out of the turkey, spread it flat on the pan and push down to break the breast bones. Add butter/shortening and seasoning as desired and it cooks in about 2 hours, even a large turkey. ALL the skin browns beautifully without tearing, and there’s no turning. Just cook stuffing separately.

        Liked by 3 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      I always lift the skin, pour in 1/2 bottle of good white wine, then stuff under the skin with butter/basil/sage/rosemary/salt/pepper + lemon and orange slices. I put a apple and an onion in the cavity. Have not had a dry turkey in 30 years.

      Like

  17. Nigella says:

    My suggestion… Brine your turkey overnight and deep fry…. Delicious!

    Liked by 4 people

  18. candyman says:

    Coincidentally, last night for the first time I bought one of those little 7 Lb Jennie-O turkey breast only turkeys in the little green bag. 35 minutes in a Instant Pot with a bag of herbs, garlic, onions, celery and chicken stock and it came out unbelievably tender. Don’t think I will ever buy sliced turkey again.

    Liked by 5 people

  19. candyman says:

    Coincidentally, last night for the first time I bought one of those little 7 Lb Jennie-O turkey breast only turkeys in the little green bag. 35 minutes in a Instant Pot with a bag of herbs, garlic, onions, celery and chicken stock and it came out unbelievably tender. Don’t think I will ever buy sliced turkey again.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. yy4u says:

    I always love the Thanksgiving and Christmas recipes I get from the Treepers. Thanks to the Treepers for the good food I’ve enjoyed because of them and for keeping me sane since 2015.

    Here’s mine: (A local chef who is one of the best cooks in the area printed this up and left it for those of us who ate there to take home if we wanted. I wanted and it has become a family favorite).

    Damned Good Stuffing

    1 lb Country sausage
    2 cups yellow onion, finely diced
    2 cups celery, finely diced
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    4 Oz. butter
    2 Oz. olive oil
    1 Tbs thyme
    1 Tbs oregano
    1 tsp basil
    1 tsp sage
    1 tsp marjoram
    3 C. chicken stock
    1 Tbs ground black pepper
    14 oz. Pepperidge Farm stuffing cubes
    3 eggs

    Cook sausage — drain
    In large pan, saute onion, celery, garlic in butter and olive oil until soft
    Add herbs, pepper, sausage and toss until combined
    In large bowl filed with stuffing cubes, add the hot items and chicken stock. Let stand 30 minutes. Stir in eggs

    Bake in ovenproof dish at 350 degrees for approximately one hour.

    ENJOY. This from Amy who was then the chef and owner of “The Lucky Star” restaurant.

    Liked by 9 people

    • This is my recipe which I developed over the past 49 years of marriage!
      I grate an apple and make my homemade bread cubes; otherwise all ingredients are the same.
      Sometimes I will put part of the stuffing/dressing in the bird and the remainder in the casserole to bake.
      It’s my son’s favorite and if I make one adjustment he will tell me: “That’s not your recipe for stuffing, Mom….what did you do to it?”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Grandma Covfefe says:

      yy4u,
      Your recipe is very similar to my recipe except for two ingredients.

      I do half Pepperridge stuffing and half homemade cornbread, dried and crumbled for the stuffing….and the best part….instead of sauage I use 1 LB bacon (sometime I do 1 1/2 lb. bacon), cooked and crumbled before mixing it in..

      Sshhhh..don’t tell the other Treepers here about the bacon as there are more bacon lovers than one knows 😉

      I have enjoyed these recipe threads over the years. Thank you, dear Treepers!

      Like

  21. scrap1ron says:

    I think I gained 5 lbs. just reading these recipes.

    Liked by 8 people

    • Grandma Covfefe says:

      It happens to me every time they put up these threads every year. By the time I lose the pounds, another holiday recipe thread comes up.

      Like

  22. TPW says:

    Wish I had an exact Recipe but always made according to how many guest. My Family Loves Southern Cornbread Dressing. I make my cornbread in 12 inch iron skillet. 2.5 C. self rising cornmeal 1/4 C oil 2 large eggs enough half and half to make thick pancake like batter. Mix pour into heated skillet I always put 3T oil in skillet. Bake 350… 20 to 25 minutes..Cool and crumble in large mixing container I use turkey roaster easier to mix. Add to cornbread, 2 boxes of stove top chicken stuffing mix……like it better than other packaged mixes. Chop 1and half large yellow onions, 2 small green bell peppers, 4 long stalks celery.Try to chop fine, kids don’t like chunky. Cook chopped veggies in a stick of melted butter on low till tender. About 20 minutes. Mix veggies in with bread mixture. I let this sit in frig overnight covered. Secret to good dressing is rich turkey and chicken stock and 5 large eggs. Brown eggs are richer in flavor. I get stock off of baked turkey and to make sure there is enough cook chicken thighs with water on stove top for extra. Remove breading mixture from frig ….get to room temp. Add eggs mix well then enough stock to make dressing somewhat soupy….not too soupy but pours easily into greased casserole dish 9 by 12 may have enough to make extra 8 by 8 pan. Bake 350 around 35 minutes or until set and firm in the middle.. Remember the stock is what gives it a rich flavor. I modified my Granny’s recipe ….she actually used toasted bread instead of stove top and added her seasonings but i like the hint of seasoning in stove top. Not a huge fan of sage so stove top works well. She also used pork stock sometimes because of the added fat. She was Southern to the bone. Her favorite way to use left overs was to make turkey and dressing sandwiches.

    Liked by 3 people

    • skeinster says:

      This is almost exactly like my mom’s, but we use toasted bread, celery and onions only and mashed hard-cooked eggs. When she was younger and made her own stock, she sauteed the diced onions and celery in the chicken fat. We believe there’s no such thing as too much sage, though…
      The goal was a smooth, moist dressing with no discernible “chunks”. So yummy.
      Then we’d make cranberry sauce and eat about a third of it arguing over the sugar, since we never corrected the recipe.
      Good times…

      Liked by 2 people

  23. Yaya says:

    I was inspired by this thread and photo and made this bacon wrapped turkey last year. It was sooo good I am making it again this year. And as a side dish whill serve it with roasted prosciutto wrapped asparagus…can’t have too much bacon!

    Liked by 4 people

  24. WSB says:

    I thought there might be a Sundance Fish recipe thread…

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Kate says:

    I really like a good oyster dressing but no one else in my family does, I do fix it for company if they love oysters too.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. bosscook says:

    Speaking of delicious food, I HIGHLY recommend “The Best Cook in the World” by Rick Bragg…it’s about his Alabama Mom and recipes for every southern (real southern food…not chef stuff done in Nashville) dish you’d ever want to stuff in your pie hole! And funny!!! If you haven’t read Rick Bragg, you’re in for treat and start here.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Ronnie says:

      Thanks for the recommendation, bosscook. I love Rick Braggs’ stories of growing up in AL.

      Like

    • sobriquet3 says:

      I have all of Ricks books and he is a treasure, My great grandma was from around that Piedmont area so “them women folks know their cookin. “ Just a “handful and a pinch” is how we were learned to cook.

      Like

  27. Menagerie says:

    I always make these pies. They are a great favorite. And yes, I know there is a restaurant in Kentucky that claims the original and doesn’t allow the name usage. This comes out of an old, old cookbook, so sue me.

    Derby Pie

    1 cup sugar
    1/2 cup flour
    1TBS vanilla
    1stick margarine ( I use butter!)
    2 beaten eggs
    1/2 cup chocolate chips
    1/2 cup pecans

    Melt butter and pour into flour and sugar: add eggs, vanilla and stir well. Add pecan pieces. Place chocolate chips on bottom of unbaked pied shell and pour mixture over. Bake at 325 for 50 minutes.

    Note: I have found the baking time varies a lot from oven to oven. I like it best if the middle part is gooey like caramel filling but if you bake it longer it tastes like a big chocolate chip cookie, which is also good.

    Liked by 11 people

    • WSB says:

      That sounds GREAT! And not too complicated for the non-bakers here!

      Liked by 1 person

    • antiqueiron says:

      Sounds like a real winner! I’m going to try this one for sure.

      Liked by 1 person

    • 17CatsInTN says:

      All right. Ok. You’ve talked me into it. I HAVE to try this recipe!!!! Thank ya! My mouth is already watering….. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • BAM says:

      It’s similar to the Fudge Pie recipe I have. I agree that it’s best if the middle part is a little gooey, but if this one’s overcooked, it’s like a brownie pie.
      Fudge Pie
      1/4 c margarine (Yes, butter is better!)
      2 tsp instant coffee
      3/4 c brown sugar
      1 tsp rum flavoring
      3 eggs
      1/4 c flour
      12 oz semi sweet choc chips, melted.
      1 c walnuts (I prefer pecans)
      1 unbaked pie shell
      garnish if desired:
      1 c whip cream
      2 TBS chopped maraschino cherries
      2 TBS sugar if desired
      Melt chocolate, let cool. Cream butter and sugar, add eggs. Add chocolate and flavorings. Stir in flour and nuts. Put in pie shell. Bake at 375 25 minutes. (Do not cook convection.) Let cool. If garnishing whip the cream and add cherries. It “garnishes” quite well with ice cream too!

      Liked by 1 person

    • lydia00 says:

      This pie was developed in a small restaurant on the outskirts of Louisville
      , The Melrose Inn in 1950’s. It’s pretty much a thanksgiving staple here —along side pumpkin. The trademark pie is sold frozen here and best at a coolish room temp. You are so right about not serving it warm. Just Don’t!

      It’s basically a pecan pie the restaurant added choc chips to but they swear there are secret ingredients they guard like Colonel Sanders safe. . Lol. Became an instant hit.

      There is also a confectioners here that has been around 100 years called Mueths— in the same family. How great is that? My dad took us as kids. Bourbon balls are a specialty but their peanut brittle is hands down the best. Light and airy. We always have it for holidays. I mention them because I have tried Bourbon balls for the holidays starting thanksgiving and it’s always a disaster getting the chocolate to stick on the filling! My respect for confectioners grows!

      Liked by 1 person

  28. L. Gee says:

    I find it fascinating what people put in stuffing–or dressing, as we call it. It’s cornbread, onions, celery, eggs, and broth for me and my family, though!! HOWEVER, with all the rains in Texas lately and with several of our lakes filling up (YAY!!!!), we did quite a bit of fishing–or rather CATCHING–recently and have a bunch of fish in the freezer. So it’s catfish and shrimp for us this year (not real healthy since both will be fried, but, hey, it’s Thanksgiving).

    Some recommendations for cooking: We tried pecan-encrusted catfish a while back, and it was pretty darn good. A cousin tried rolling the catfish in potato flakes once, too, and that was also good. If you want fried shrimp similar to what’s served in restaurants, roll them in crushed up Saltine crackers after a quick dip in milk/egg mixture. A chef at a popular Corpus Christi restaurant suggested this to my husband, and it’s fantastic!!!

    And lastly, should I bother to include the family hush puppy recipe? Anyone interested?

    Liked by 5 people

    • WSB says:

      Hush puppies? Sure!

      Liked by 2 people

      • L. Gee says:

        Okay, here ’tis:

        Hush Puppies

        1 1/2 c. corn meal
        1/2 c. flour
        2 tsp. baking powder
        1 tsp. salt
        2 Tbsp. sugar
        1 egg
        1 Tbsp. oil
        3/4 c. milk
        4 (or more) Tbsp. chopped onions

        optional: 6 (or more) Tbsp. chopped jalapenos (or other hot pepper); 1-2 Tbsp. horse radish

        Mix all ingredients well. Batter should be very thick, more like a paste than a liquid. Add cornmeal as needed to thicken. Drop by spoonful into hot grease and cook until done brown and cooked through.

        We always pull one hush puppy out when the first batch is cooking and crack it open to make sure it’s cooked through!

        Sorry for the uncertain amounts for onions, peppers, and horse radish, but it’s based on preference.

        Liked by 8 people

        • L. Gee says:

          Also, ya’ll probably already know this, but to save time, mix the milk and the unchopped onions and peppers in a chopper (or Ninja) and “chop” those veggies super fast!!! Just make sure you don’t have any large chunks floating around!!

          Liked by 2 people

        • WSB says:

          This is also a nice, fairly simple recipe! Will try! Thank you!

          I keep a large folder on computer of recipes that are not on the flash card!!

          Like

    • WeeWeed says:

      Hush puppies?? You betcha!

      Liked by 2 people

    • JTR says:

      I was taught in the UK that instead of dipping in egg, smear your fish with mayonnaise. The crumbs stick just as well, and it’s tasty!

      Like

  29. tonyE says:

    Wow… Thanksgiving already. I just put away the Halloween skeletons and fog machines… 😉

    It just so happens that I got three pounds of American Wagyu beef (from Costco) aging for about three months, dry rubbed in a vacuum bag, out in the garage’s fridge.
    Right next to it, in another vacuum bag, I got these four pounds of pork belly rubbed with the bacon making pink salt.
    On the shelf, next to the fridge, I got a small smoker. With cherry wood chips.
    Would it be too much to cut the beef into medallions, wrap it in home made smoked bacon, put it in the sous vide and then sear it on the grill? Rear inside, golden bacon on the outside.

    Raid the wine closet for a nice Big Red Wine….. low carbo meal.

    We’ve had a good year, time to give thanks. Lock the front door, turn off the porch lights, kitchen is at the back of the house. ;-D

    Liked by 4 people

  30. donnyvee says:

    Bacon is meat candy!

    Liked by 2 people

  31. missilemom says:

    Our Thanksgiving must haves are Granny’s rice dressing; Paul Prudhomme’s cornbread dressing and Justin Wilson’s Sweet Potato Sweet.
    Granny’s Rice Dressing
    (So simple but good)
    3 pounds ground meat
    3 cans of french onion soup
    3 cans of cream of chicken soup
    green onions
    Rice
    Brown the ground meat thoroughly and add a half cup of water and simmer/low at least three times after adding water.
    Add the soups and turn up to medium; let it bible and then just simmer for 30 minutes..
    When finished, just add cooked rice.

    Hope everyone has a great Thanksgiving. We have a lot to be grateful for. Headed to the Beach to spend holiday with my girls. (Hate cooking on an electric stove but will make do.)

    Liked by 3 people

  32. LtColAuburn says:

    Thanks so much SD for doing this thread! My absolute favorite day (week) of the year. I even fast pretty much for days leading up this day because I know how many crazy calories I am going to take in all at once. For those who have never had a fried turkey, you MUST try it at least once. First, get a NON frozen turkey at least two days before and prep by injecting with a mixture of butter, garlic, cumin, cinnamon, and tons of Cajun spices. You will need at least 6 sticks of butter if a 12 pound turkey. After injecting (about 15 key places throughout the bird) take the same formula of your ‘goo’ and slather the entire bird in a pan. Seal with tin foil and wrap with many layers to allow the outside of the bird to soak in even more of the butter. Place in the fridge for at least two days before cooking.
    Second, on the day of the cooking prepare your oil. You need to use coconut oil (more expensive and harder to cook with as it has a higher burn rate but oh so worth it after) and ensure the temp is ready well before placing the bird in the oil. Normally it takes at least an hour on high heat depending on what size of bird you plan on frying. Remove the bird and place a very light coat of a mixture of flour and olive oil to allow to stick. Remember you have a layer of butter hardened already but this will fall off as well as much of the flour and the olive oil once it hits the hot oil. But enough will stick as it cooks.
    Keep in mind, 15 min per pound so keep an eye on the temps of the oil and the bird as it cooks. Trust me the bird when removed will look like a crispy big piece of bacon on the edges and the skin should be a dark roasted brown. Let rest for at least 30 min. Cut and serve. THIS will be the most incredible moist and buttery with a mix of sweet and spice turkey you will ever eat. Even my mother who hates turkey LOVES this bird. Gravy for the bird is as easy is taking the previous ‘goo’ left in the pan as it leaked out from your punctures two days previous and then combining with some organic gravy stock and then boiling for at least 30 min. Simmer down and cover your turkey. I will blow your mind and I can guarantee you will never go back to oven baked!

    Liked by 1 person

  33. JTR says:

    This year is one of those years that as we celebrate Thanksgiving, we also have a birthday cake for my dear Husband! It’s also our 29th wedding anniversary! He married me on his birthday, so he has no excuse to ever forget!

    I’m going to try to cook my turkey this year outside in my electric smoker. I’m not going to smoke it, but just use it as an oven, so I have more room in the kitchen for cooking the rest! The smoker is really good for using as an extra oven.

    Liked by 4 people

  34. qzy says:

    This is kind of a non-traditional Thanksgiving side dish. But, my relatives and their friends want me to cook it every time. Here is the original recipe:
    https://www.familycookbookproject.com/recipe/3031348/outrigger-rice.html

    I don’t really follow that, though. I don’t use raisins, I use diced, dried apricots. I cook bacon until I have enough fat to saute the onions. I sautee the onions, then I add all the non-rice ingredients to the pan to warm them up before putting them in the oven. Then, I put everything, including the rice, into a baking dish, stir until blended, and pop it into the oven at 325F until it’s hot.

    You need the rice, bacon, and pineapple. Everything else is customizable to your tastes.

    Liked by 3 people

  35. Mrs. E says:

    We always brine the turkey overnight, and then put it into a 400 degree table roaster oven, unstuffed, and now matter how large, it is usually done on 2-3.5 hours. And so tender and flavorful. I like my stuffing done in a dish in the oven, because I like it not so wet, and a bit crunchy on the top.

    Liked by 2 people

  36. bour3 says:

    Pastry puffs with bacon and cheese chipotle in adobo.

    You make a fast cheater’s puff pastry. Roll out buttery dough to a rectangle then fold it in thirds.

    Here’s where you use the best butter available. Because it’s a primary ingredient and it does make a difference.

    Chill the rectangle and do that again. Chill then again. Then roll out to a larger rectangle.

    This is to keep the butter separate from the flour. If the butter melts and absorbs into the flour then the dough will not puff. Chill just to harden the butter. The freezer works well, for just a few minutes. You want the dough to be a bit difficult to roll. If the dough become too easy to roll then your butter is melting, just stop, and chill the dough immediately.

    Spread with 2 or 3 chipotle chiles in adobo diced finely and its hot red liquid.

    Sprinkle bacon bits that you made from the best bacon you can find. Thick cut applewood bacon is very nice for this sort of thin.

    Sprinkle with the best cheese you can spare. I really really really (3 reallies) like the Prairie Breeze made by Amish in Iowa. But you don’t have to be this particular.

    Roll up like a cinnamon roll. Cut into slices. Bake as little car tires. They expand upward and outward and they are irresistible.

    Wanna see ’em? They belong in a puff pastry museum.

    https://thingsimadethenate.blogspot.com/search?q=puff+pastry

    Liked by 4 people

  37. IMO says:

    Tamale cornbread dressing | Homesick Texan
    https://www.homesicktexan.com/2011/11/tamale-cornbread-dressing.html

    Last year for T-Day a family member made this and it was a hit.

    Liked by 3 people

  38. Jane in Florida says:

    Ingredients for one 15 pound turkey
    16 cups bread cubes (bread is dried on oven rack the night before)
    1 cup butter
    2 cups chopped onion
    2 cups diced celery with leaves
    1 tsp Tabasco Sauce
    4 tbs. chopped dried parsley
    1/2 cup chicken bouillon
    1 or 2 pint(s) oysters, drained and coarsely chopped
    1 cup Vermouth ~ dry Martini and Rossi

    Melt butter. Add onion, Tabasco Sauce and salt, cook until onion is tender but not brown, about 10 minutes. combine with bread cubes and parsley. Add bouillon, mix lightly. Add 1 or 2 pints oysters, drained and coarsely chopped to the basic recipe.

    While cooking turkey, add 1 cup Vermouth ~ dry Martini and Rossi

    Liked by 2 people

  39. Jacaranda11816 says:

    My go-to cranberry sauce recipe is from Epicurious.com: It has port and dried figs…and 130 4-star ratings (the highest) and a “94% would make it again” rating!

    https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/cranberry-sauce-with-port-and-dried-figs-105836

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Right to reply says:

    Cut raw turkey breast into strips like tenders. Beat with meat hammer to thin out. Put blue cheese crumbles and cranberry sauce along center. Roll up, and wrap in bacon. Put them tight together so they can’t unroll in a baking dish. Roast for 1 hour on 350

    Liked by 4 people

  41. dbethd says:

    Gluten-free and can be made dairy free
    I am going to try this, this year as we just bought a deep fat fryer.
    Fried Chicken KFC-Style
    Prep time: 10 minutes
    Cook time: 20 to 25 minutes
    Yield: 8 to 10 pieces fried chicken
    INGREDIENTS
    • About 4 pounds bone-in skin-on chicken parts (I used 2 split chicken breasts and 4 drumsticks)*
    • 2 ½ cups (12 fluid ounces) buttermilk (can be substituted to make dairy-free see below)
    o 2 ½ cups dairy-free milk
    o 2 ½ tsp lemon juice OR vinegar
    o Let sit room temperature for 10 minutes
    • 2 cups (280 g) basic gum-free gluten free flour blend (yes, you do have to use this blend below!)**
    o 184 g superfine white rice flour
    o 62 g potato starch
    o 34 g tapioca starch/flour
    • 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
    • 1 1/2 tsp kosher salt
    • 1 1/2 tsp smoked Spanish paprika
    • 1/2 tsp dried oregano
    • 1/2 tsp dried thyme
    • 1/2 tsp dried parsley
    • 1/4 tsp ground cumin
    • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
    • 1/2 tsp onion powder
    • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
    • 1/4 tsp chili powder
    • 3 tbsp (36 g) sugar
    DIRECTIONS
    1. In a large, zip-top bag or large bowl, place the chicken parts, buttermilk and yogurt, and stir to coat the chicken parts fully. Squeeze out the air if using a zip-top bag before sealing the bag. If using a bowl, cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap. Place the chicken in the refrigerator to marinate for at least 4 and up to 16 hours.
    2. Once the chicken has finished marinating, in a medium-size bowl, mix all the dry ingredients, and whisk to combine well. Pour dry ingredients into a large, zip-top bag.
    3. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper and set it aside. Remove the chicken parts from the marinade, about 2 at a time, and place in the bag of dry ingredients, seal the bag and shake to coat the chicken parts fully.
    4. Remove the chicken from the dry ingredients and place on the prepared baking sheet. Allow the coated chicken to sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes*** to allow the dry ingredients to form a thick paste on the chicken. This will help the coating stick to the chicken during frying.
    5. While the chicken is sitting, prepare the frying oil. Place about 3-inches of frying oil in a large, heavy-bottom pot or fryer. Clip a deep-fry/candy thermometer to the side of the pot or fryer, and place the oil over medium-high heat. Bring the oil temperature to 350°F. Place the coated chicken parts in the hot oil, taking care not to crowd the oil. ‘
    6. To prevent the chicken from sticking to the bottom of the pot, hold each piece with tongs or a spider in the hot oil just above the bottom for about a minute to allow the bottom skin of the chicken to seal. Fry until golden brown all over, about 7 minutes on each side.
    7. Turn the heat down to bring the oil temperature to 325°F and allow the chicken to continue to cook until the internal temperature of each piece reaches nearly 165°F (about 10 minutes more). Place the chicken on a wire rack placed over paper towels to drain and cool before serving.
    Notes
    • *For easier frying, and easier eating, try slicing each split chicken breast in half while it’s still on the bone. A large sharp knife and a swift motion will do the trick.
    • **And yes—you do have to use a basic gum-free gluten free flour blend. If you use an all-purpose gluten free flour blend with xanthan gum, you’ll be very, very sorry with the gummy mess that you have on your hands (and on your chicken).
    • ***Allowing the flour blend and spices coating to soak into the chicken for about half an hour before frying really helps the coating stick to the skin, rather than slide right off in the frying oil.
    • Neutral oil, for frying (peanut oil is ideal, but a mixture of half canola oil and half nonhydrogenated vegetable shortening works very well, too)

    Liked by 1 person

  42. southernmom19 says:

    My mom is insisting on cooking the thanksgiving meal this year. If you knew what my mom’s cooking tastes like, you would feel bad for us. I tried to reason with her, then I begged, then I argued. Looks like I’ll be spending Wednesday night at my mom’s. I diet all year long, she’s not ruining this meal.

    Liked by 6 people

  43. Lanna says:

    I don’t know how Thanksgiving snuck up on me this year. I made a rash promise last Thanksgiving to make herbed marinated turkey. Hope there’s enough in the piggy bank to buy the ridiculous amount of herbs needed. Will have to dig out the recipe later and share it here.

    Was just taking a short break, finished baking 200 cupcakes which are cooling now. I need to frost them and deliver along with 600 little nibbles (cheese wafers, gougeres, palmiers) this afternoon, got distracted by this thread!

    Liked by 2 people

  44. bour3 says:

    Light as air breadsticks.

    These breadsticks won the admiration of my peers at Tony’s Market, an upscale specialty store nearby. I bragged as I do and the dudes there challenged me. How rude! I told them the breadsticks are so light they float off as helium balloons. And when you eat them they explode in your mouth with flavor then dissolve to nothing. And they’re all, “Yea right. Prove it.” So I did. And the breadstick blew their minds. I took them a batch and gave them to the first guy at the counter upon entering. By the time I walked to the deli (I walk very slowly) they had already been shared throughout and a guy from the back came forward to interrogate me on the details of making them.

    “Here’s the thing, Mate. We get a LOT of people come in here talking a good game about the things that they cook. But Y-o-o-O-O-o-o delivahd!” *poke,* *grab,* *embrace,* *crush.*

    He squeezed me like I’m a tube of toothpaste. And he’s STRONG!

    The idea is to take the outstanding intense flavor of top quality smoked applewood bacon such as sold at Tony’s and disperse it through a batch of cracker dough.

    Make an oily yeast dough.

    The dough is extremely oily. From the bacon and from cheese. This is what makes them so light.

    Fry the bacon chopped as bacon bits. Turn the bacon to dust by processing with flour. Cuisinart, a small blender that comes with emersion blender, coffee bean grinder, all work for this.

    Use the oil from the bacon in the dough.

    Same thing with grated cheese. Grate the cheese then process with flour. Top quality Parmigiano-Reggiano such as sold at Tony’s Market.

    If you feel the bacon grease and the cheese is insufficient fat, then add butter.

    Chipotle powder to desired intensity.

    There you have it. Bacon, cheese, chipotle powder.

    Roll out the dough without bothering to wait for first proof as you do with bread.

    My new technique is roll out the dough then slice strips with a pizza cutting wheel.

    Before that I was rolling 1 teaspoon into a long thin snake shape. That does take a bit of time.

    Proof.

    Overproof if you like.

    Bake. Now they’re like bread.

    Bake again at lower heat. Now they’re like crackers.

    Bake again at lower heat and now they’re so dry and light they float off to the ceiling. (Not really, but I’m making a point over here, a’ight? )

    https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/proxy/kkKVjJ33YHFttxy4fKsJr5Xa8zvo_CPNRCf6pAJJ_mt4r_Pe6si8oRCYoTkW3-NCKFSW0hRPIvrHgVMALRPiQGJEQukjdpR71vfk9EoTeeuIvUNW1Md6ERKGuuFAL13e=s0-d

    https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/proxy/5bY4jG_xF-SDFltGTj0yyrjheb99HqrxzBYhzABsHRz9snvTbKofB93bubeMQHhBbyoSNmnqhRyfv45gW2r4mCqFyJndBs3WxNxcqhycZmhx-pVVh3E7EYvAMgLIwuZaufw=s0-d

    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/s9SqHGwWO71Bd9DiFqAoz_Cb-Syxolk4wlFAgMGelH40WYQfPtaSYb4hqVqQbhjwx3QTuRQjJ0O-W3pVEgF7gQVwwpzSPqSkm6IStysynAj0apJD9Cd3VCTt7hSqa1ED=s0-d

    This site has several posts about these breadsticks with photos. Search “breadsticks” in top left corner if you care to see them.

    https://thingsimadethenate.blogspot.com/2015/11/bloody-mary-bacon-and-cheese-chipotle.html

    Liked by 3 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      Totally convinced, I’m in. Good project. Thank you!

      Like

    • The Tundra PA says:

      What does “proof” mean?

      Like

      • Menagerie says:

        “In bread baking, the word proofing most commonly refers to the final rise dough undergoes, which takes place after being shaped into a loaf, and before it is baked. In practice, however, the words proof and fermentation are sometimes used interchangeably.” IOW, just letting it rise. Also the term can be used to just the yeast part mixed with warm water, before you make bread.

        Liked by 1 person

  45. Zimbalistjunior says:

    Just needs to be said again. Love this website love SD love treepers. I don’t agree with everything here but love the bonhomie, the good-naturedness, the values and morality.

    And of course, the rational thought and analysis.

    Thanks again.

    Liked by 3 people

  46. Maggie Main says:

    I’m a Thanksgiving kitchen veteran so listen up:
    Brine the turkey. Convection roast it the next day. Follow the directions for your recipe and don’t screw around with it. Tip: outside surface of meat should be dry for crispy skin.
    Butter roasted pecans are delicious. Easy, elegant, satisfying. I think it’s Southern. Recipe is online.
    This year, I’m going to order dinner from Cracker Barrel. It looks like a true bargain with lots of leftovers.
    God bless you Treepers and your love ones!
    Thank you President Trump and VP Pence. MAGA!

    Liked by 3 people

    • yy4u says:

      We have gone out to Thanksgiving dinner since 2013. The first year was a gourmet restaurant and had the best dinner we’ve ever had with lots of leftovers for the next day. The next year we went back and it was awful. So in 2015, we started going to Cracker Barrel. Yes, we stand in line for a looooooooong time, but the food is delicious. We also order a second meal each to take home for leftovers the next day. We’re going back this year. I always cook turkey, dressing, all the fixin’s for the two of us on Christmas, but Thanksgiving is my day off to just enjoy.

      Liked by 2 people

  47. bour3 says:

    Shrimp and grits

    Another use of that outstanding smoked Applewood bacon as bacon bits combined with cheese and jalapeño in grits that you mill yourself from popcorn kernels or dry pozole.

    One time I milled popcorn kernels in a coffee mill, made grits and compared them with boxed cornmeal. No comparison. Milled kernels are qualitatively better.

    Then I broke three coffee bean mills doing this.

    Finally I realized soaking the kernels overnight softens them sufficiently to spare the coffee bean mill.

    1/4 cup corn kernels = 1 large serving.

    The powder absorbs 3x its volume of water.

    Stir constantly while cooking. If microwaved then stop and stir at least 3 times.

    Flavor the heck out of these grits however you like.

    I like bacon, cheese, fresh jalapeño.

    Sometimes I’ll add shrimp.

    Sometimes I’ll add egg, either fried on top or blended in at the end.

    I make this all the time. In fact, had it for dinner last night.

    The same idea makes the best cornbread you’ve ever tasted. No brag, just fact. Absolutely LOADED with flavor. Just add baking powder to the mixture and bake in a pre-heated (preferably cast iron) pan. Drop in some butter and roll it around so it veritably burns then pour in the batter and bake.

    Liked by 3 people

  48. WeeWeed says:

    Not a Thanksgiving recipe per se, but something the day before to keep nonessential personnel out of your face while you work on other things! 😀 Quick, easy and makes a bunch to keep the kids and football crowds fed.
    Easy Taco Soup

    1 Lb. ground beef (optional for the vegetarians)
    Diced onion (however much you want)
    1 can Pinto beans
    1 can Kidney or Chili beans
    1 can diced tomatoes
    1 can Hominy
    1 can regular corn
    1 can beef or vegetable broth, 1 can water
    1 small can diced green chilis
    Optional: 1 pkg. taco seasoning and ½ pkg. of Hidden Valley Ranch seasoning

    Saute onion in good size pan (I use my pressure cooker pan,) add ground beef to onions, continue cooking. When done, dump in all the cans WITH the juices. Simmer at least 30-45 minutes, I go an hour or so. Serve with Tostito type chips on the side, grated cheese on top of each bowl if you wish. This recipe is easy to adapt to your own tastes.

    I do NOT use the pkg. seasoning because (to me) it makes it too salty. Instead of the taco seasoning I use those Bush Chili beans, Kidney beans and Pinto beans in a mild chili sauce. (Watch the “mild” part – they also have “hot.”) Very easy to double the recipe if you’ve got a bunch of people or a few starving teenage boys. 😉

    Liked by 4 people

    • I just made this Monday. It’s almost the same as the recipe I have. I do use the whole package of taco seasoning, but it is a less sodium option. I got the recipe from a friend who had two teen age boys at the time. They loved it, too. It’s a good way to fill them up with healthy stuff.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Menagerie says:

      Anything to keep people out of the way! One year my husband and oldest son sat at the bar in the kitchen and bitched all day about how hungry they were and why couldn’t they eat? I told them to get food and leave me alone but did they listen?

      That year sticks in my mind, although it was Christmas Eve. I don’t wanna be messed with when I am cooking a huge dinner.

      Liked by 4 people

    • WeeWeed says:

      Another good day-before recipe (requested by Deplorable Infidel!) is red beans and rice. The following is one of Emeril Lagasse’s called New Orleans style red beans and rice.

      READY IN:
      3hrs 20mins
      SERVES:
      8

      UNITS:
      US

      Ingredients Nutrition
      2 tablespoons vegetable oil
      1 cup onion, chopped
      1 bell pepper, chopped
      1⁄2cup celery, chopped
      1 teaspoon salt
      1⁄2teaspoon cayenne pepper
      1⁄4teaspoon fresh ground pepper
      1 teaspoon dried thyme
      2 bay leaves
      1 smoked ham hock
      12 ounces smoked sausage, cut cross-wise into 1/4 thick slices
      1 lb dried red beans or 1 lb red kidney beans, rinsed, sorted, soaked overnight and drained
      3 tablespoons garlic, chopped
      10 cups water
      steamed rice

      Directions
      Heat the oil in a large saucepan over med-high heat. Sauté the onions, bell pepper, celery, salt, cayenne, black pepper and thyme for about 5 minutes. Add the bay leaves, ham and sausage and sauté for 5 to 6 minutes
      Add the beans, garlic and 10 cups water to the pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to medium, and simmered uncovered, stirring occasionally for about 2 hours.
      Add more water if the mixture becomes dry and thick.
      After about 2 hours of initial cooking use a wooden spoon to mash about half of the mixture against the side of pot.
      Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, for about another hour or until the mixture is creamy and the beans are soft.
      Add more water if it becomes too thick. The mixture should be soupy but not watery. Remove the bay leaves, serve over rice.

      Like everything else, adjust your ingredients to taste and how many peeps to shut up. I don’t use the ham, only a local sausage here because it’s spicy. Nor do I use the cayenne, just a little bit of thyme and only 1 bay leaf. No celery – that’s for next day, and maybe 1/2 tsp. of chopped garlic and instead of the bell pepper I use a couple of jalapenos which I know is Cajun blasphemy. I don’t have to soak the beans, but we’re close to sea-level ( you know, different altitudes ‘n all that.) Nor do I mash any of the beans. EVERYONE uses different ingredients and amounts adjusted over time so you basically cannot mess it up!

      Like

  49. 6x47 says:

    Fresh cranberry sauce is super easy to make and so much better than the canned stuff (although who can resist that perfect cylinder of rubbery purple goodness, still in the shape of the can it came out of?)

    Buy 2 bags of fresh cranberries
    Pour into a saucepan
    Cover with water
    Add sugar (lots of it – at least 1 cup per bag – to taste)
    Add orange zest and a few orange slices
    Nutmeg (to taste)

    Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer until the berries burst. Presto! Fresh cranberry sauce. Takes no more than 20-30 minutes.

    Liked by 3 people

  50. andyocoregon says:

    Time for my annual Thanksgiving Day proclamation once again:

    “We are what we eat. Gobble Gobble.”

    Liked by 1 person

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