President Trump Delivers Remarks During Prison Reform Summit…

Earlier today President Trump delivered remarks during a White House summit discussing prison reform.

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[Transcript] 11:41 A.M. EDT – THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. Thank you very much. Unfortunately, I have to begin by expressing our sadness and heartbreak over the deadly shooting at Santa Fe High School in Texas. Just took place moments ago. We’re closely monitoring the situation, and federal authorities are coordinating with local officials. This has been going on too long in our country. Too many years. Too many decades now.

We grieve for the terrible loss of life, and send our support and love to everyone affected by this absolutely horrific attack. To the students, families, teachers, and personnel at Santa Fe High: We’re with you in this tragic hour, and we will be with you forever.

My administration is determined to do everything in our power to protect our students, secure our schools, and to keep weapons out of the hands of those who pose a threat to themselves and to others. Everyone must work together, at every level of government, to keep our children safe. May God heal the injured and may God comfort the wounded, and may God be with the victims and with the victims’ families. Very sad day. Very, very sad.

On another note — a very positive note — I’m honored to be here today with so many leaders from across the nation who are committed to the crucial issue of prison reform.

Joining us today are several members of my Cabinet who are working diligently on this issue: Attorney General Sessions, Secretary Zinke, Secretary Acosta, Secretary Perry, Secretary DeVos, and Acting Secretary Wilkie, who, by the way, has done an incredible job at the VA, and I’ll be informing him in a little while — he doesn’t know this yet — that we’re going to be putting his name up for nomination to be Secretary of the Veterans Administration. (Applause.) Fantastic.

I’m sorry that I ruined the surprise. (Laughter.) I’ll see you anyway. We’re very close to getting Choice approved, and we had just approved VA Accountability, which, for almost 40 years, they could not get approved. And now, as you know, we just had — the House just passed Choice, and it’s the finer level of choice. We had different levels of choice: good, bad, okay, and really good. And I think this falls into the “really good” category. (Applause.) It’s going to be a little more expensive, but that’s okay. So important.

So we are really — we have so many terrific partners working on what we’re doing and the reason we’re here — prison reform at the state level — including two who are with us today, who have really been active, feel so strongly about it: Governor Mary Fallin and Governor Susana Martinez. You’ve been fantastic. (Applause.) Thank you.

I also want to thank Van Jones, primarily because he constantly says such nice things about me. (Laughter.) He did. He did. Every once and a while, right? Every once and a while he did. He’s — hey. He actually has on occasion. Not too often, but — (laughter) — I’ll tell you what, though, it does feel good. (Laughter.)

And I also want to thank, Van — I have to say, Jared Kushner, who has worked so hard on this issue. (Applause.) Really has. Thank you. We’re proud of you. We’re proud of you.

Prison reform is an issue that unites people from across the political spectrum. It’s an amazing thing. Our whole nation benefits if former inmates are able to reenter society as productive, law-abiding citizens.

Every year, over 620,000 inmates — primarily from state prisons — are released after completing their sentences. For many, really, life outside of the prison is a tremendous struggle — I see it — to find a job, to stay off drugs, to avoid old habits that lead them back to a life of crime, back to prison.

Unfortunately, more than one-third of former federal prison inmates and more than three-quarters of state prisoners will be rearrested again within five years. Nobody wins when former prisoners fail to adjust to life outside, or worse, end up back behind bars. We want former inmates to find a path to success so they can support their families and support their communities.

Crucial to this effort is helping former prisoners find jobs. As many as three in four individuals released from prison have difficulty finding work. It is not merely a waste of money, but a waste of human capital — some incredible people — to put former inmates on public assistance instead of placing them into a steady job where they can pay taxes, contribute to their country, gain dignity and pride that comes with a career, love waking up in the morning and going to a job, making a lot more money than anything they can do. Just really enjoying their life.

When we talk about our national program to hire American, this must include helping millions of former inmates get back into the workforce as gainfully employed citizens. (Applause.)

At the heart of our prison reform agenda is expanding prison work and the programs so that inmates can reenter society with the skills to get a job. We also want more mental health services so released inmates can cope with the challenges of life on the outside. And some of those challenges are not easy.

We’re developing more effective drug treatment so that former prisoners can remain drug-free. Drugs are playing a tremendously big role in our lives — in so many lives — not only having to do with prisoners, but having to do with people that never thought they’d be addicted, that never thought they’d have a problem like this, that are having a really hard time coping — drugs. We’re doing a big, big job on drugs. It is a scourge in this country. (Applause.)

In this effort, we are not just absolving prisoners of their central role in their own rehabilitation. There is no substitute for personal accountability, and there is no tolerance for those who take advantage of society’s generosity to prey upon the innocent.

However, if we want more prisoners to take charge of their own lives, then we should work to give them the tools to stand on their own two feet. They’re going to love it. They’re going to be great at it. By the way, I have a friend; he hired three people. They were prisoners, pretty hardline people. I can tell you, two of the three, he said, are unbelievably outstanding. It’s been four, five years now. One, he said, is good. But that’s life. Right? (Laughter.) That’s life. Some are okay. He’s okay. Not the greatest. But he said two are superstars. They would have never gotten the chance.

And one of the things that we are doing is we have created a great economy. The economy is doing fantastically well, even better than you think in the stock market. And the stock market is only being held back a little bit for one reason, although it’s up almost 40 percent since Election Day. But they’re waiting to see the trade deals. And I can tell you they’re going to be great trade deals. It’s going to be great for our country. Our country has been ripped off long enough. And we are making great deals.

We’re meeting with China today, right after this. We’re going to another meeting with China. They’ve been taking out hundreds of billions of dollars. That’s not good for people that get out of prison, and that’s not good for people that have never been in prison. That’s bad for our country. And we’re changing it around. We’re changing a lot of those horrible trade deals where they take our jobs, they take our money. We end up with no money, no taxes, no employment. Not a good combination.

So the greatest thing we can do — the greatest thing I can do, aside from our programs that they’re working so hard on, is create a good work environment where it’s hard to get people. Because then you take people that come out, you give them a chance, and then, like my friend said, they turn out to be outstanding. Jobs are so important. A great economy is so important. And that’s what we have. So it makes your job that much easier.

As we speak, legislation is working through Congress to reform our federal prisons. My administration strongly supports these efforts, and I urge the House and Senate to get together — and there are a lot of senators, a lot of Congress people that want to get this passed — to work out their differences. Get a bill to my desk. I will sign it, and it’s going to be strong, it’s going to be good, it’s going to be what everybody wants. You’re all in line, I think. You’re all looking for the same thing. So we’re going to have something that’s going to make you very proud. Really, very proud. We want — like we do with veterans choice, we want the finest — the finest prison reform that you can have anywhere. The finest. That’s very important. You make sure you both agree. Okay? (Applause.)

And, Van, if we’re going to go through the process, it’s just as hard to go through the process and get a good bill as it is a bad bill. So let’s get it right. Will you please make sure? Okay? (Laughter.) And if you see something you don’t like, call me. We’ll get it changed before we sign it and have to go through the whole process again. (Applause.) All right? We’ll do that. You all know what I mean, right?

Working together, we can restore the rule of law, keep dangerous criminals off our streets, and help former inmates get a second chance at life — and a second chance that many of them will really succeed at, if only given the chance.

America is a nation that believes in the power of redemption. America is a nation that believes in second chances, and third chances, in some cases. And, I don’t know, I guess even fourth chances. I don’t know about that. (Laughter.)

That’s where I think you and I may differ. You know, we’ll go two or three, but maybe we won’t go that extra length. Okay? It’s a little more liberal in that way, but that’s okay. (Laughter.) But we’re both well intentioned, I can tell you that.

And America is a nation that believes that the best is always yet to come. I want to again thank everyone here today. Very special people. Very important thing that we’re doing. This has never been done in our country. It’s never been done. We’re going to give people that chance, and we’re going to give people a chance at great success.

A friend of mine told me that when people get out of prison, they’re all excited. And then they go and they have that stigma; they can’t get a job. People don’t want to hire them. They can’t get that chance. And when they do, in many cases — not in all cases, but in many cases, they just turn out to be outstanding. Better than other people.

So we’re going to make our communities more secure, and we’re going to make our country more prosperous. And together, we will make America safer, and stronger, and greater than ever before. And I can tell you, as far as people getting out of prison, it’s going to be far, far, far greater than ever before. You’re going to get that chance, you’re going to really make everyone proud, and you’re going to be proud of yourselves.

So it’s an honor to be with you. I want to thank everybody for working so hard on this. It’s — so many of the people I recognize in the room. This is literally their most important thing. We have so many different things — economic development. This is literally — and I can speak for at least five or six of the people I see — this is literally the most important thing they work on.

So it’s an honor to have helped, and we’re going to get something that’s really going to be outstanding. Best — it will be the best of its kind anywhere in the world, that I can promise you. It really will. Okay? (Applause.)

So God bless you all. Thank you. Thank you. (Applause.)

END

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This entry was posted in Education, Election 2018, Legislation, media bias, Police action, President Trump, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

214 Responses to President Trump Delivers Remarks During Prison Reform Summit…

  1. “And the stock market is only being held back a little bit for one reason, although it’s up almost 40 percent since Election Day. But they’re waiting to see the trade deals. And I can tell you they’re going to be great trade deals. It’s going to be great for our country. Our country has been ripped off long enough. And we are making great deals.”

    TRANSLATION: “That NAFTA thing? Yeah, it’s going bye bye.”

    #MoreWinning 😀

    Liked by 17 people

  2. DanO64 says:

    I love this man.

    Liked by 16 people

    • fleporeblog says:

      How could you not! There are currently 6.6 million available jobs in this country waiting for employees to fill them.

      Regrettably many young adults graduating high school find themselves caught up in the “You got to go to college” push by society, friends and family. The student debt currently sits at over a Trillion dollars. Many graduates have such high debt that they won’t consider some of those 6.6 million jobs.

      As we continue to push Apprenticeship Programs for high school graduates, it will take time to change the mindset. 600,000 released prisoners a year could help to fill that void especially if prisons create some of those Apprenticeship Programs. You can use it as a carrot 🥕 for those prisoners that behave day in and day out. What an incredible motivational tool.

      On another note, I was so happy our President nominated the Deputy Secretary of the VA. He spoke yesterday at the Press Conference where he accepted the quarterly check donated by our President. I was so impressed by him and his commitment to our Veterans and our President’s agenda. Maybe just maybe that speech carried him to this nomination!

      Liked by 11 people

  3. emet says:

    Van Jones—don’t trust him.,,

    Liked by 21 people

  4. I’m not used to having someone in government doing what the people want and need. It’s sort of refreshing, to say the least, but strangely unusual. What a hole we must have been in before DLJ.

    Liked by 15 people

  5. Minnie says:

    Thank you, Mr. President 🇺🇸

    MAGA!
    COVFEFE!

    Liked by 9 people

  6. One of my sons been involved in the prison reform for a few months now working 80 hours a week…I am so proud of my child! And he started to do it on his own, without even knowing that that it is our president’s initiative!

    Liked by 14 people

  7. Beenthere says:

    Who ever thought Commie Van Jones & Capitalist Donald Trump can work together for a common goal. WOW!

    Don’t like Van Jones’ philosophy but I think he’s one of the honest ones from Obama’s posse.

    Liked by 9 people

    • treehouseron says:

      Beenthere I hope you’re strong enough to fight off the hoarde of cruzians who are about to attack you for being slightly off in your thinking 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • Albertus Magnus says:

        Amen, Ron!

        This is a FREAKING Summit. No one was given a job. Nobody was given authority or power. A summit brings diverse voices to the table to talk.

        It is the same idiots denouncing PDJT over Van Jones’ being included and who threaten to take their marbles and go home.

        A month ago, same ones threatened the same thing because PDJT bombed Syira.
        Before that, same ones threatened the same thing because PDJT signed the budget bill.
        Before that, it was the same ones who threatened the same thing if PDJT signed off on anything besides deportation for the DACA folks.

        My prediction for next month: Same folks will threaten the same thing if when the IG report is released if Hillary, Obama and Lynch are not IMMEDIATELY locked up.

        You get the picture.

        We have LOTS of people here who do not trust PDJT. They claim to trust him when they agree with his actions or when they stop their bellyaching and crying long enough to understand what he is doing.

        My advice to everyone here who TRUSTS PDJT. He needs us to DO OUR PART. He needs us to trust he is on top of it all. He needs us to trust him to self correct when necessary, like with Tillerson, like with Price, like with Priebus, like with Spicer, like with Bannon. Hasn’t he earned that trust?

        I say yes. And, I also say that those whose support of PDJT is SO TEPID that if he makes any kind of move they don’t like that they will stomp their feet and go home either or too short-sighted for their opinions to mean much or who never truly supported PDJT to begin with.

        TRUST PDJT! MAGA!

        Liked by 7 people

        • winky says:

          I remember PTrump saying that he was the president for all people whether they voted for him or not. I do not have a problem with VJ being there and this tells me a lot about our President. Never know….VJ might just decide he likes being on the good side.

          Liked by 2 people

        • famouswolf says:

          THIS. I completely agree, and I wish I had posted this excellent post.
          Like times infinity.

          Like

        • Dixie says:

          Albertus, my first thought when I read about this was that we know President Trump makes it a point to listen to what everybody has to say.

          Like

        • 🍺Gunny66 says:

          Ouch…very nice…..very nice indeed😎

          Like

    • bessie2003 says:

      I remember he (Van Jones) caught grief a month or so back when he said something nice on CNN about the President, and thought then maybe a dent was being made in their wall of resistance. It will be interesting to see how this unfolds.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Mark McQueen says:

      An honest Commie? Nahh…..

      Liked by 4 people

    • woohoowee says:

      Van Jones is the only one of Othugo’s crew that I think would actually be a fun person to pass time with. He espouses a hideous idealogy, but I bet he’s quite personable and fun.

      Liked by 3 people

      • treehouseron says:

        Also the only one of that whole cabal who said ahead of time that he knew Trump would win.

        Liked by 4 people

        • kayray444 says:

          I remember watching his plea to other democrats on his Facebook page not to get comfortable and not to dismiss Donald Trump. We may agree on virtually nothing, but he got it. He understood the power of DJT way before the election.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Evelyn says:

            I do have a great deal of respect for Candace Owens’ judgment, so her endorsement carries some weight. No personal knowledge of Van Jones whatsoever. I haven’t watched CNN since the election in 2016. With that said, though, we should bear in mind that Malcolm X had an epiphany and started preaching that the problems the black community was grappling with were rooted in ideology, and there were white people that were not evil and could be trusted allies. That was enough of a threat that Louis Farrakhan had him murdered.

            Kind of reminds one of Kanye, only I don’t believe they will kill Kanye and I am personally certain that no evil will befall our POTUS such as befell JFK because there is an invisible hedge around him and his family.

            Like

      • emet says:

        Sure. Mumia likes him. Jones has been trying to get him released for years.

        Liked by 3 people

    • Lemmy says:

      He was definitely honest when he didn’t know the Project Veritas camera was running and he called the Russian collusion story a big nothingburger.

      Liked by 3 people

      • flova says:

        Van Jones is a shape shifting commie. He is behind the war on cops and has been at it since the 1990’s after Yale Law School. He also threatened Andrew Breitbart before he died for the Shirley Sherrod video.

        He has bragged about going from ‘street’ to ‘elite’ in order to gain access to political power. But he is a stone card carrying communist.

        Another suit wearing liar who Valerie Jarrett praised when they got him to work at the White House in 2009. How could anyone here at CTH believe that Jones at the Trump White House is a good thing?? He is a dangerous, dangerous revolutionary. Just because he looks like he stepped out of GQ does not mean anything. Just said “to young people in a speech, “The NRA is like the KKK.’ Does that sound like someone we should trust?

        Please read and wake up.

        http://www.discoverthenetworks.org/individualProfile.asp?indid=2406

        http://www.trevorloudon.com/2018/02/commie-van-jones-to-young-people-the-nra-is-like-the-kkk/

        Liked by 7 people

        • ImHopeful says:

          “…keep your enemies closer.”
          I don’t trust him, and I’m betting VSGPDJT doesn’t either. But, if it serves a useful purpose toward achieving one narrow set of objectives, that’s not necessarily a bad thing. We have a president who is working hard to show that his administration is actually doing things to help the quality of life for African Americans. This is quite unlike our past president who did nothing but stir up racial divides, play the race card, pal around with celebrities and pretend he was somehow helping “his people” with all of his nonsense.

          And, VSGPDJT is seeing higher approval ratings across multiple ethnic groups, which can only help us in an election year.

          Liked by 2 people

          • leebelieu says:

            President Trump is a pragmatist, not an ideologue. The only thing he is fanatical about is the well being of the USA and her people. It’s refreshing after 16 years of dogmatic nincompoops from the Left and “Right”.

            Liked by 2 people

            • WES says:

              Leebelieu: Yes Trump is a very pragmatic person. He doesn’t see right or left. He sees a problem, then seeks to solve the problem.

              Like

          • Tom F says:

            Stop with the logic.
            Emotion, we want emotion! /s

            Like

        • Oldschool says:

          sadly flova, your facts will not matter.

          Liked by 1 person

        • jbrickley says:

          Initial reaction to Jones being invited to the party on Prison Reform was, WTF!?!? Have they lost their minds? But then I remember Trump really does want to bring everyone together and solve real problems and not just buff up a scratch, actually fix the problems for good. He’s also good at throwing several diverse balls in the air and juggling them while whistling a tune and keeping them distracted until BAZINGA, when they realize it’s too late to do anything about Trump winning.

          Liked by 2 people

          • 🍺Gunny66 says:

            Take the lumps out…….

            On Van Jones….the President is discussing Prison Reform….What are in prisons? Criminals….
            What better way to understand Prison Reform than to talk to a Criminal?

            I did not say, agree with, but to understand….

            If you want to understand baking, you don’t talk to a plumber, you talk to a baker

            If you want to understand prison reform….You talk to a crook.
            Van Jones……if you teally think about, again, our President is a genius. VSG

            Like

        • famouswolf says:

          Who said anything about liking him or trusting him?
          In this regard, he’s a tool in DJT’s toolbox…and I bet that’s it.

          Liked by 2 people

        • greenmakescents says:

          “I’m willing to forego the cheap satisfaction of the radical pose for the deep satisfaction of radical ends.” That hasn’t changed.

          Like

        • Beenthere says:

          We all knew & know that Van Jones is a card carrying commie. You could say he wore it on his sleeve. Not too sure about Obama because he’s such a f**cking liar. . ———– See the difference.

          I would rather talk to or even be a friend with an honest commie than a f**cking liar.

          Like

    • johnps30 says:

      Interesting take by Jeffrey Lord “On disagreeing without being disagreeable (59:52)” wherein he talks about Van Jones. The whole podcast is worth listening to: Jeffrey Lord is a great speaker and very thoughtful thinker.

      This podcast was broadcast 4 days before the election and is conducted by Jaime Weinstein was then Senior Writer for Daily Caller.

      http://dailycaller.com/2016/11/04/jeffrey-lord-trump-a-little-like-reagan-churchill-lincoln-and-goldwater/

      Like

  8. bessie2003 says:

    Bringing people together in common interests – the beautiful part of Making America Great Again.

    This was an extraordinary event to watch unfold, the honesty and earnestness in each of the speakers. Nice.

    Liked by 6 people

    • treehouseron says:

      I didn’t get to see it yet but I’m going to watch the whole event later, I think stuff like this is very important. He’s talking about changing culture for the better.

      Liked by 5 people

  9. treehouseron says:

    We send people to jail, they come out bigger menaces than when they went in. They largely end up back in (with us paying for it) or on welfare.

    We absolutely need Prison Reform, I say bring it on President Trump!

    Liked by 7 people

  10. Mark McQueen says:

    I enter a career in Corrections back when the progressive reform movement was well established (19800. Fact is, it didn’t work and a lot of money was wasted try to make it work.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Mark McQueen says:

      ….and I do believe it was recidivism rates that eventually killed it.

      Liked by 3 people

      • woohoowee says:

        My take is that the individuals who don’t want to go back to prison don’t do anything to be sent back to prison for, and the rest don’t really care if they are in or out of prison.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Mark McQueen says:

          Some reforms can work on a small scale. Like I said though, it’s expensive and not as effective as some would have you believe.

          Liked by 4 people

        • Sylvia Avery says:

          I agree with your statement in general terms. I do think there might be cases where someone does somehow actually manage to realize while in prison that they don’t want this any more and they want to go straight.

          I also think going straight is probably quite difficult. If you are a felon it can be difficult to impossible to get housing. Understandable. As a former landlord I wouldn’t rent to a felon. It can also be hard to get work. Understandable. As a former hiring authority I wouldn’t want to hire someone with a record!

          And if you are a felon who has served your time and find it difficult to get work or housing you are probably going to then be living in high crime areas. Me? I’d want a gun to protect myself. But felons can’t have guns. Understandable! I don’t want felons to have guns.

          And living in a poor neighborhood where crime rates are high, I bet it would be hard to meet some of the terms of your probation with regards to staying away from known dirt bags or people with drug records or involvement.

          So I can see where this all could becomes pretty hard to try to manage to hold onto your determination to go straight and stay straight, unless you are fortunate enough to have family or community to give you a hand here and there.

          I have family friends who had a good, solid middle class family. Their son got involved stealing cars and eventually, after years of being in and out of jail, did some time for grand theft auto. Either in prison or after he got out he got training as an electrician and he was determined he wasn’t going back, and he did not. He changed his life. But his family was intact and willing to help encourage him and provide him help (not necessarily money) after he got out. It was a happy ending.

          However, I am doubtful there will be very many happy endings no matter how much money and programs we devise. And that doesn’t make me happy at all. It is pretty darned sad.

          Liked by 4 people

          • piper567 says:

            Sylvia, Your comments near the end of your posts are, imo, important.
            Whether its family, church or otherwise, that offers actual support, the fact that so many felons come from weak or non-existent families, is an publicly overlooked factor.
            One of the reasons Melania’s support of drug addicted babies is so appealing, is the operations/programs she supports are treating the Whole Families of these babies.
            The Government is NOT the only support these felons need.
            The family you described is the primary factor, imo, in the young man’s success.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Sylvia Avery says:

              Thanks Piper. You extracted from my comments what I should have said!

              Family breakdown is a really significant factor in the success or failure of kids going forward. Too many are from broken homes with non existent, or drug addicted, or otherwise absent or neglectful or abusive parents.

              For someone getting out of prison, a job is super important. But they also need something the government really can’t provide and that is the love and support of family, church, or a community of some kind.

              I’m not just talking about someone who can loan you forty bucks till pay day, but someone to talk to about stuff. All kinds of stuff. How to handle yourself in various situations. Practical advice. Emotional support. Financial advice. Child raising issues. Life stuff. The kind of stuff I was still asking my parents about right up until they died.

              If anything, I would think people fresh out of prison and trying to start a new life would need MORE of that kind of support than ever, but have less of it available. And I don’t know how that gets fixed.

              Liked by 1 person

          • woohoowee says:

            I know a few happy endings and the common denominator is they knocked off breaking the law after the first time. My observation of repeat offenders is that the few of those who eventually get it together, do so after being incarcerated for a pretty good stretch of time. The in-one-year and out-the-next, over and over, doesn’t appear to work.

            Liked by 1 person

      • woohoowee says:

        Mark – Do you have any insight into the difference in recidivism rates between State and Federal prisons?

        Like

        • Mark McQueen says:

          Not really. I’m not familiar with Federal sentencing practices. At the State level, when I started, we had a “day for day” term. For each day you served, you got a day off your sentence. Plus you earned “good time” reductions for good behavior and participating in various programs…usually 30 day blocks for each program completed. Long story short…if you got 5 years, you were out in 2. 1 year…4 or 5 months. Even with programs and time off, they kept coming back.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Mark McQueen says:

            …they kept coming back because they kept going back to where they lived…well trained for a new job or not.

            Liked by 2 people

            • Mark McQueen says:

              …well I can’t get it all in one thought…What I’m saying is while some were serious about helping better themselves, many others were just gaming the system to get out sooner.

              Liked by 2 people

          • woohoowee says:

            I believe in second chances, but my personal observation is if they don’t fly right after the first period of incarceration it’s going to take a substantial amount of time actually served for them to get it right (if they ever do).

            Liked by 1 person

        • booger71 says:

          The recidivism rate in the Federal system has historically been about 70%

          Liked by 1 person

    • treehouseron says:

      So your point is what YOU tried before didn’t work.

      What does that have to do with what President Trump is proposing today? Or him TALKING about it?

      What is the point of you pointing that out? Is it just to piss allover any chance of change?

      Like

      • Mark McQueen says:

        I’m relating direct personal experience with job training and education as part of prison reform in the past. Would YOU care to share your experiences?

        Liked by 2 people

        • treehouseron says:

          Sure. I’ve known many people who went to and got out of prison, some that went back, and some that didn’t. What President Trump is talking about is a GOOD THING, and we don’t need people like you killing it in the crib before it even happens because you think you tried something similar 30 years ago and you think it didn’t work.

          Any more questions?

          Like

          • Mark McQueen says:

            I know it didn’t work. I saw it happen. I simply does not produce the results expected.

            Liked by 2 people

            • treehouseron says:

              Mark, what YOU tried didn’t work.
              You have no clue what President Trump is going to try, and the fact that you’re even conflating the two is kind of astounding. Are you arguing that his ‘reform’ is what you tried in the 80’s and it didn’t work?

              Come on man. How about just waiting until we hear the plan before you piss on it? Are you this negative in every aspect of your life or just locking up thugs?

              Like

              • Mark McQueen says:

                I’ve read the President’s comments. I see nothing new in what he states as the goals. I worked at the Vienna Correctional Center in Illinois for the first 5 years of my career. VCC was considered a National Model for prison reform and received many accolades and awards for it’s programs. It eventually failed because the millions of dollars poured into it ultimately didn’t pay off. I think I have a very good perspective and enough insight to comment.

                Liked by 4 people

                • DanO64 says:

                  Truth is, in most cases if they end up in prison it’s deserved.

                  Liked by 2 people

                • Mark McQueen says:

                  My view is if your going to spend a lot of money on education, job training, and drug rehab do it on the FRONT end BEFORE they become inmates.

                  Like

                • Sylvia Avery says:

                  I think you certainly do have a thoughtful and valuable insight to offer and I appreciate your sharing what you know.

                  Everyone seems to be in a horrible mood today. I don’t think I have ever seen so many people jumping down other people’s throats as I have today.

                  Unless I am missing something I didn’t think you were being unreasonably pessimistic about PDJT’s hope for prison reform. I took your comments to be of the “let’s not throw the baby out with the bathwater” nature.

                  We did try prison reform. We were all about rehabilitating prisoners. It cost society a lot in terms of lost lives and wasted money. That doesn’t mean future attempts at prison reform are not going to work but I think we would be well served to learn from what hasn’t worked in the past.

                  It is a difficult situation. I admire PDJT for being willing to look at it. But I can’t help but think denuclearizing the North Koreans is an easier goal than prison reform. I will be interested to see what PDJT comes up with.

                  Liked by 2 people

                • Mark McQueen says:

                  Thank you Sylvia. No I’m not trying to p… on anything Trump is proposing. Just offering another side to the story. Trying to to get involved in that sort of “contest” too. 😉 I’ll say my piece and we can all talk about it here. I doubt I’ll comment again elsewhere. No need to. 🙂

                  Liked by 2 people

                • marywilbur says:

                  Illinois is a terrible example because there are so many extraordinary high hurdles, not the least financial, the state requires to obtain a license in order to work in so many different occupations. See Illinoispolicy.org “A 2017 Comeback Story for the Ages” under the heading “Criminal Justice Reform.” It’s shocking. If person leaving prison can’t get a job outside, he/she has no hope.

                  Like

                • Mark McQueen says:

                  Problems licensing Health Care workers? That’s odd because VCC had an EMT program…even ran an ambulance service for Johnson Co. when it didn’t have one of it’s own. Maybe she was trying to get a nursing license? I noticed the Ill. Policy Institute was also for the legalization of pot. “Watchdog” organization? mm..hmm.

                  Like

          • booger71 says:

            It is not worth the millions to billions it would cost to implement or should I say reimplement. Spend that money on the wall or the VA

            Liked by 1 person

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      I read the transcript of PDJT’s remarks. I can agree in theory. But I too remember the last time we tried to go all soft and touchy feelie on prison reform and it didn’t end well. There was a pretty high cost to society. Our emphasis was on rehabilitating the criminals. I think criminalists learned a lot about the criminal mindset and character.

      So, maybe there are a few who get out of prison who would genuinely like to go straight and have a different kind of life. I’m optimistic enough to believe that is possible. And I believe if there are some, let’s say ten percent, it would be good to recapture them and help them fit into society and get jobs so they can make their own way and pay taxes.

      But folks this is going to be an uphill road I’m afraid. Most people aren’t in prison because they made a mistake, it is usually a whole series of mistakes and crimes committed and diversion programs and probation and all kinds of things to help keep them out of our prison system before they get there.

      Anyway who knows. Maybe PDJT will be able to make this work, too.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Mark McQueen says:

        One thing to remember is it’s going to be VERY expensive and the prisoners can’t pay for it.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Mark McQueen says:

        Yes…”touchy, feely” did create a terrible mess. It took a lot of hard work to straighten that out.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Rhoda R says:

          Why do you assume that the President’s final plan will be ‘touchy feely’? I don’t think Pres Trump is much impressed with ‘touchy, feely’, I expect that whatever idea he comes up with will be quite a bit more creative than that.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Mark, I’m new to this discussion and short on experience.

          What might President Trump “change” in approach (that might be useful):
          • Sponsoring many “competing approaches”
          • Elevating selfless leaders in the spirit of his selfless Cabinet
          • Tapping prison “alums” who have overcome obstacles to succeed
          • Developing a Prison Apprenticeship Competition that both cool and rewarding
          • Multiplying jobs to the point that quality graduating cons are sought out
          • Rewarding employers who hire quality graduating cons
          • Eliminating the supply of Illegals who undercut the market for graduating cons
          • Starving what fails to fund more of what works

          For graduating cons you’ve seen succeed, what made the difference?

          Liked by 1 person

      • piper567 says:

        Sylvia,
        In my limited experience, the fact that most towns, cities, etc., are soft on youngsters when they first go down the wrong road is a contributing factor to a continuing pattern of crime.
        For example, in Seattle, the record that minors accumulate is not allowed to be forwarded with the offender when he/she becomes an adult (the most common of these is auto theft).
        Bc these records are not forwarded, and youngsters KNOW this,and the punishment for these “juvenile” crimes is soft, there are basically no consequences to these early signs that thing are going awry.
        If there Were early consequences, we might be able to steer such juveniles clear of later poor choices.

        Liked by 2 people

        • dutzie60 says:

          Might want to start that “consequence” thing beginning in Kindergarten all the way through to high school graduation. Complaints or lawsuits by parents be damned. IMHO

          Liked by 2 people

          • The Real Bob_W says:

            “What dutzie60 said.” Holding individuals accountable “in some meaningful way” from the gitgo in life would – IMHO – go a long way toward inculcating into those same individuals a sense of personal responsibility for their actions and their consequences, when those actions/consequences are “generally inimical to society’s mores.” Failing to do so, and expecting individuals to suddenly/magically “act as responsible adults” upon attaining legal age, is beyond ludicrously stupid…yet it’s also distressingly common throughout U.S. society these days. (Sigh.)

            This shouldoughta be a “Duh!” observation…except – based on 40+ adult years of skeptical observation of the world around me – it DOESN’T go without saying…as the past 2+ years of treason and sedition on public display in the D.C. Swamp ought make abundantly clear to critically-thinking adults. Some people are “born psychopaths,” while others – probably most – learn it.

            Actions (and ideas) have consequences, even – arguably, especially – if those consequences appear to be non-existent (i.e. NOT holding individuals accountable). The fastest way to get MORE of any behavior is to subsidize it. Failing to hold individuals accountable is a form of subsidization, only the monetary effects are displaced in time.

            Also, “Ditto!” on the observation that “family matters” (Duh!).

            Common sense. Not so common. Easily unused.

            As for holding people accountable for their actions, like planting a tree, when are the best two times to actually do it?
            A1: Right now.
            A2: Twenty years ago.

            Liked by 2 people

            • nimrodman says:

              Holding individuals accountable “in some meaningful way” from the gitgo in life

              Yes.

              Small example from my childhood: I was maybe 9, in cub scouts. Had a sweet tooth and liked candy. Climbed to an upper shelf in the kitchen cabinets where my mom stashed candy and swiped a candy bar that she’d probably intended for herself at night with milk after getting the kids to bed. It was the only one so at some level I had to understand that she’d know.

              I got a scolding. I’d disappointed my mom and that was serious, I felt real bad about that. I probably lied about it too, denied it on first questioning.

              Plus, being raised Catholic I knew at a deep level that I’d done wrong. Hey, Catholic guilt isn’t entirely a bad thing, it has its place.

              Then, I wasn’t permitted to go on the scout outing that was planned the next day. I was made to understand that what I did was contrary to the scout honor code.

              So I knew I’d done wrong, had been dishonorable, I felt the guilt and shame about it, and I suffered a very concrete withholding of a privilege that I dearly wanted (the scout outing).

              Now, that’s but one small example in bringing up a kid who’s responsible and law-abiding.
              But it’s an example “from the gitgo”.

              And if it ain’t happening like that on later, more serious, offenses …
              … then whaddya get?

              Like

            • nimrodman says:

              RealBob – loved your “twenty years ago” answer. Part of what jogged my reminiscence.

              Like

      • johnps30 says:

        Trump is a winner. You can see it in the reaction of the GOP outside after they passed the tax bill. To a person they remarked on his tireless, innovative approach combined with the command of the minutia embed in the existing tax code. He brings fifty years of creative thinking and courageous decision making when his money, business and employees were on the line. He will not settle for getting a bill passed if it in fact doesn’t improve the situation for the public and for the second chance’rs.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Homesteader says:

      When I worked construction I got to know two men who had been in prison. They did not know each other. Both were in for very serious crimes, did well enough in prison and were released. Both got well-paying consyruction jobs almost immediately.

      “John” got put back in because he was drinking a beer in a state park. Until that one beer he was doing real good. His second term was brief but when he was nuts. Got re-hired by the same outfit but wouldn’t show up for work and robbed blind the kind people who took him in and gave him a home so that he could get out of prison in the first place. No idea where he is today. Ex pro football player. Was last seen wearing lipstick, a blonde wig and heels.😮

      “Art” was returned to a cell because he big time robbed his employer and was also dealing drugs on the job. Real shame. He had every opportunity handed to him. No idea where he is either.

      Not sure whose argument I am reinforcing. Just relating the truth of what I know regarding two hard timers that I once worked with. Sometimes those who fight the good fight are battle weary and can’t recognize friend from foe. Even grownups need Time Out sometimes.😘

      Liked by 2 people

      • Mark McQueen says:

        I’m familiar with both scenarios. In “John’s” case sometimes his Parole Officer has some leeway and sometimes the law leaves no option for parole violations. But if John had “no alcohol” as a condition of release then he should not have been drinking in a park. A bit harsh IMO but none the less….

        “Art” is not uncommon, unfortunately.

        Liked by 2 people

  11. fred5678 says:

    CNN just lost 12 % of their viewing audience after seeing their homey Van making nice with Hitler.

    Liked by 7 people

  12. flova says:

    It’s called being a master of deceit. CNN knows full well why Jones is there. They probably sent him. The commie devil should never be near this White House. It’s very bad energy. Jesus told his apostles to not to entertain the devil.

    Oh and when the left says “prison reform” they don’t mean the same thing as conservatives!

    They want criminals out on the street. We already have people with a rap sheet a mile long who get out , rape, kill and steal. And it’s a race thing for the left. This prison pipeline garbage is another way for minorities, especially blacks, to get out of being held accountable.

    Liked by 1 person

    • nimrodman says:

      You’re on it, flova

      When the Left say “prison reform” or “criminal reform” they don’t mean what the rest of us think by those terms.

      It’s analogous to the West’s “denuclearization” and Kim Jong’s “denuclearization”, to cite a recent example.

      The Left want minority communities to not be held to account for their crime.
      They don’t even want minority communities to be policed.

      Best example I saw was in the wake of Ferguson, when protests spread around the country to other cities.

      Recall that in Ferguson, there was a lot of clamoring for “police that look like us”, meaning “we don’t want these white cracker police”, essentially.

      So they put a black Police Chief in charge in Ferguson, with the kind of hug-a-thug policies you’d expect. Process has been repeated in countless other cities as well.

      So the example of hypocrisy I saw was in Seattle, I think it was. Unrest at a Christmas-tree-lighting ceremony.

      There was video, and in one segment the unrest was winding down and a weary black police officer was walking down the street away from the camera and a black woman walked along at his side, waving her arms and endlessly berating him for his part in policing the protestors, calling him “Uncle Tom” and “traitor” and every name in the book, and “whose side you on?”

      Right there it was crystal clear.
      It mattered not one whit that her community was policed by officers “who look like us”.

      She simply didn’t want her community to be policed AT ALL.

      For order to be upheld.
      For proper behavior to be enforced.
      For lawlessness to be punished.

      She didn’t want ANY of that.

      So improve the situation where possible
      But be clear-eyed about the realities

      Like

  13. CarolynH says:

    One of the things that has worked in prisons in States like Colorado was their canine program.. working with dogs does amazing things to soften the heart of inmates and in turn gives them incentive to turn their lives around. Heard a story about one just a couple of weeks at on a site I follow in Colorado a guy who had been in and out of prison all his life in Colorado learned he had amazing talent for working with dogs and has become one of the best of the best dog trainers on the outside and is in demand – and absolutely no thoughts of returning to his old way of life. I think this is but one example of thinking out of the box that could make a difference in many areas of our nation.

    Liked by 8 people

    • treehouseron says:

      We’ve got to get through to them that there’s some place for them in this world, and they’ll stop being so destructive.

      Not all, but a good many of them.

      Liked by 2 people

      • DanO64 says:

        Truth. To be honest, the best way is through Christ.

        Liked by 3 people

        • treehouseron says:

          You got THAT right!

          Like

        • Rhoda R says:

          Faith based rehab programs do seem to have lower recidivism rates than religion neutral programs.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Viavera says:

          AA was very highly successful program in its day, God and Christ were central to its main teaching for power and deliverance .They were pressured due to government involvement to water it down to everyone’ s higher power which most don’t even know what that is.All that does is cause them rely on their own will,no power and no deliverance.they have to settle with once an alcoholic always an alcoholic instead of Completely complete in Him.(col 2:10)

          Like

      • Oldschool says:

        Hey, contact Glenn Beck. He may have some teddy bears left over from his welcoming committee of the divine illegals. 😎

        Like

        • flova says:

          I agree.

          I do not think people understand how complex human nature is.

          I have worked in a city ER for 20 years. Prisoners from the local jail are sent to us if they have a medical emergency. I am always astounded when the sheriff’s deputy hands me their info which includes their histories of incarceration. Most are repeat offenders with a long record of offenses. They have been given one chance after the other to clan up their act. Recidivism is what makes compassionate people like President Trump and others want to do something.

          But I look at prisoners like addicts or alcoholics. It takes a real spiritual awakening to move chronic offender to change their lives. It’s possible and once they hit that wall, having a job and support does help, but it’s secondary to the fundamental spiritual change that needs to happen first.

          Communists like Van Jones want the government to spend billions on wasteful programs, not because of compassion but because that gives him and his fellow travelers control and power over the justice system. Heck, they are already almost there.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Oldschool says:

            Completely agree flova. Thank you for sharing your experience and wisdom.

            Liked by 1 person

            • nimrodman says:

              Communists like Van Jones want the government to spend billions on wasteful programs … control and power over the justice system …

              Jobs too.
              Lots of jobs come along with those wasteful programs.
              Public-sector jobs with public-sector pensions.
              Lots of sit-on-your-a$$ jobs and probably some no-show jobs as well.

              Look at the welfare agencies.
              Lots of desk jobs generated to shovel public outlays of cash to the unproductive.

              So how “productive” are those jobs, even?
              Is there a tile floor or cabinetry left at the end of the day from those jobs?
              Even a ditch that’s been dug or a highway cleaned of trash?

              Nope.

              Like

    • piper567 says:

      Carolyn,
      The same thing has happened here w/women.
      The local prison for women is now training dogs as companions for people with disabilities or diseases/conditions such as seizure disorders.
      Many of the women who train to be trainers are provided with v useful skills, and make do well on the outside due to their training.
      Would have to dig up “success” rates, but the trainer i know says the provided training is in much demand.
      Co-ordinating this sort of training with outside needs would seem to be one good idea.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. freewillnc says:

    Van “White Lash” Jones….no thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Our president had lunch with Pelosi and Schumer and survived. Strong stomach for dirty work, that’s why we hired him. 🇺🇸❣️

      Liked by 2 people

      • Oldschool says:

        not apples to oranges Always Faithful. Scumer and pelosi, as distasteful as they are, are congressional representatives who cast votes on behalf of the people. Trump must work with our elected officials.

        Last I checked, Van Jones is not the guru of law enforcement or the penal system. He is a soros tied, communist agitator, in the private sector. There has yet to be one valid reason that anyone has articulated for having him there. Surely it cannot be the color of his skin?

        Liked by 1 person

  15. NoJuan Importante says:

    It all boils down to jobs. They interviewed hundreds of Chicago inmates a few years ago who were involved in the drug trade and almost all of them would take a $10 an hour job over the drug trade. There just wasn’t any opportunity. It may be $12 now but the point is our President gets it. A good job is the key to EVERYTHING

    Liked by 5 people

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      I do think a good job is the key to EVERYTHING for a certain part of the population. But there are also an awful lot of people who are just plain broken and a job isn’t going to make a difference.

      Still, it simply cannot hurt to train people for jobs after they get out and then for jobs to be available to them. There are surely people who will grab hold of the opportunity and run with it. I hope so! And I am rooting for those who do.

      Liked by 2 people

      • marywilbur says:

        This is where dogs come in. Dogs can heal broken people. Maybe prisons, county jails, and juvenile detention centers could try connecting with local Humane Societies.

        Like

  16. Dutchman says:

    Splattered grey matter alert. Chronic nevertrumper Glen Beck converts to MAGA. Blames media for driving him into Maga. I guess whatever it takes, tho i wont forgive or forget. Sorry of off topic or already posted, just saw on brietbart.

    Liked by 3 people

    • treehouseron says:

      Being against Trump destroyed his empire. At least he’s smart enough to switch.

      Like

      • jbrickley says:

        Crying on air and embracing conspiracy theories on top of turning again MAGA is what doomed Glen Beck. He’s a real nutter…

        Liked by 2 people

      • Deb says:

        His empire was starting to crack before PDJT, thanks to the teddy bears and soccer balls stunt at the border. His PDJT meltdown was the nail in the coffin. This latest stunt is his Hail Mary.

        Like

    • Oldschool says:

      Beck spotted van jones at the whitehouse, read all the kumbaya comments here and thought there is use for his leftover teddy bears. Timing is perfect!!

      Like

  17. Dutchman says:

    Impotante: EXACTLY. In exporting good, middle class jobs to China, we were exporting our middle class lifestyle to China. They get less peasants, build their middle class, we get less middle class, more ‘peasents’, i.e. poor.
    Add on open borders, etc. Construction and manufacturing USED to be giod jobs, didnt require college, could support family.
    And, a way out of poverty and prison pipeline. I know, I was in that pipeline, as young man. I got out, and job was key, by grace of God.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Clinteastwood says:

      Prisoners get their medical care for free under the supervision of the federal judiciary, who know nothing about medicine, but hold that they are entitled to the prison doctor putting them through a medical learning curve on a case by case basis every time a prisoner claims he’s not received “adequate” medical care. As such, prisoners are the ONLY persons in our society who have a constitutional right to ANY kind of medical care…..and boy do they know it. Almost one quarter of all federal court cases are about some prisoner claiming “inadequate medical care.”

      The feds ought to reverse the Supreme Court’s original 1976 decision Estelle v. Gamble—the case that started all the federal judges looking over the prison doctor’s medical practice. Prisoners can still sue for malpractice in state court, just like you and I, they don’t deserve this special federal civil right just because they’re locked up. This freebie contributes to recidivism; any feeling of entitlement works against their rehabilitation. Bleeding hearts refuse to see that.

      Prisons and jails have all kinds of trouble getting ANY physician to provide medical care for inmates because of this federal judiciary nonsense. All the more reason to leave the practice of medicine to the people who know what practicing medicine is all about.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Dutchman says:

    Impotante: EXACTLY. In exporting good, middle class jobs to China, we were exporting our middle class lifestyle to China. They get less peasants, build their middle class, we get less middle class, more ‘peasents’, i.e. poor.
    Add on open borders, etc. Construction and manufacturing USED to be good jobs, didnt require college, could support family.
    And, a way out of poverty and prison pipeline. I know, I was in that pipeline, as young man. I got out, and job was key, by grace of God. High school drop out, got GED and 14 college credits while ‘in’, eventuall became paramedic.
    But worked construction, while schooling. Would have ended up as prison lifer, for sure, if not for good paying job.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Dutchman says:

    Hes predicting Trump landslide in 2020, (Beck is), so conversion seems complete. Yes, he lost the farm with one bad bet, all in. How many not famous, average americans are, every day, experiencing cure for TDS? BUNCHES!
    While im tempted to gloat, or demand lots of crow eating, Christian view is “while you’re late to the party, lets just rejoice that you showed up, at all!”

    Liked by 1 person

    • treehouseron says:

      I agree 100% Better late than never. I’m late on plenty of stuff. Just don’t trust him, but no problem with agreeing with him.

      BTW Dutchman, if you look below the comment you want to reply directly to, there is a little red ‘reply’ just to the left, if you click that your reply will line up just underneath who you are responding to.

      Liked by 1 person

    • dutzie60 says:

      Do we have to say anything other than ‘Hi’ to him while socializing at our Trump Party?

      Like

  20. TMonroe says:

    This is as important to get right as the immigration problem. The PROMISE program — remember how that impacted Nicholas Cruz — is part and parcel with the prison reform that’s being sold on a bipartisan basis. The push to decriminalize is mostly snake oil, so we can’t leave what is mostly snake oil to the good intentions of politicos. We’ve seen how the immigration program got out of control once it became a political football and the laws and enforcement were ignored. We haven’t unleashed the relaxing of laws and enforcement completely, though the Soros DAs etc all are doing their level-best to do so. We can’t take our eye off this and let some omnibus bill get through on the fed level, period.

    Prison reform has been euphemistic language for early release, pleading down violent crimes to non-violent misdemeanors, not prosecuting a score of crimes, and generally cranking down on the crime numbers. For one thing, in lib-run bergs where they have no answer for crime, it cooks the numbers (except for murder, those are harder to finesse.) In lib areas and states, it also takes down the cost of financing prosecutions and prison-related costs. The problem is repeat offenders get impugnity to raise their game, as the risk associated with violent crime plummets. Under Barry’s non-violent release guidelines, think of the scores that can do violent crime but get out under the nonviolent plea down.

    Again, any omnibus fed level package no to be written by the Soros/Barry crew, and yet he Mike Lees etc of the world have talked glowingly about it. This needs to be fought just as hard as the amnesty push. And those not in big cities, have you noticed how ex-Chicagoland criminals are getting arrested in more rural settings in Indiana and Iowa? This problem isn’t staying local if the discipline and ability to make punishment stick — including incarceration as appropriate, especially for violent and repeat offenders no matter their ethnicity — gets blunted by fed intervention.

    Liked by 3 people

  21. TMonroe says:

    Here’s a video from Colin Flaherty, who has documted criminal justice reform extensively.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Concernedcitizen says:

    Incarceration rate is high due to drugs (both addiction and dealing). Recidivism rate is high due to drugs. No amount of so-called prison reform will work unless we, as a Nation, attack the drug problem. Best argument there is for building the Wall. Stemming the flow of drugs into the country will solve a lot of problems and give programs like jobs for felons a chance to work.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. booger71 says:

    Sorry, but I spent 20 years working in a federal prison. I saw many reformers come and go. They instutied all sorts of job training, schooling, you name it I’e seen it. Some will take advantage of it, but most will just use it to get out of there regular prison job, and take advantage of getting some time knocked off their sentences…but 70% historically will go right back to dealing when they hit the streets. Money is just too good to pass up

    Like

    • treehouseron says:

      Why thanks for your input ‘Booger”, we’ll make sure not to even try because you gave up.

      Liked by 1 person

      • booger71 says:

        Not a matter of giving up..it is a matter of real life.

        Like

        • treehouseron says:

          No, it’s a matter of you giving up before we even start. Typical Loser talk. I’m not a loser, so I’m going to ignore the loser talk you’re putting forward.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Tom F says:

            So you’re what………advocating ‘trust the President’?
            Trust the President?
            Great idea.

            Like

            • treehouseron says:

              YOU’RE DAMN RIGHT, Trust the President.

              I’m also advocating trying to work with the other side to fix the problem, those who want to try to fix the problem.

              I’m also advocating listening to anybody, including Van Jones, who says they want to help.

              I’m also advocating doing things differently than we’ve done in the past, just like President Trump has done MOST things differently than we have in the past.

              I’m also advocating waiting to see WHAT THE SPECIFICS ARE before we all say it won’t work.

              Common sense stuff.

              Like

    • TMonroe says:

      It’s notable that the rare cases post-60s where they’ve seen success, like Giuliani, is at the local level. It can be managed and customized there, as opposed to the fed level.

      Liked by 2 people

    • ImHopeful says:

      If we knock 30% off the recidivism rate I think that would be a win. I know there are a lot of hard-cores who will never give up their gangs, crime, street life, whatever. I’m no idealist or do-gooder. I get the many know no other life, or even want to.

      But, if some people can be taught a trade, can get hooked up with a company that has a program to hire former (non-dangerous) inmates, I think It’s worth a try. Not because it feels good, but because it costs so much to house prisoners that job training and apprenticeship programs may be a bargain in comparison.

      Liked by 3 people

      • treehouseron says:

        You have the best fitted screen name on the entire forum 🙂 It’s amazing… it’s as if you’re willing to TRY to fix a problem!

        Isn’t that just crazy? I mean,… you’re talking like maybe we should TRY something, instead of

        A. imagining what it is
        B. deciding we’ve already done that
        C. bitching about the problem instead of trying to find solutions

        I don’t know what to think of you I’mHopeful. For some reason, you’re looking at the positive and imagining what might happen, instead of looking at the negative and imagining what might happen.

        Bravo!

        Liked by 1 person

  24. Piggy says:

    Prison Reform sounds like Immigration Reform. It’s an ambiguous term and doesn’t mean much. It just means more nanny state money paid for by people who don’t commit crimes to a majority of people who don’t deserve it. Well intentioned ideas have had bad results and approaching this from a macro big government level will just create other problems.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Oldschool says:

      BINGO piggy. You summed it up in a paragraph.

      Like

      • Tom F says:

        Do you have a plan, Old?
        What’s your plan?

        Like

        • Randy says:

          My plan would be to have in prison trades training programs. Coding for the brainiacs, mechanical/HVAC/plumbing/carpentry for the hands on types etc.. When trained to a certain level of proficiency that would allow them to join a crew of tradespeople they are released to work for companies that would hire them at a wage of 75% of what the others at that level make. After 6 months if they work out they get a full wage the same as anybody else their skill level makes. This would incentivize the greed of the capitalist for the good of society…one soul at a time.

          Like

      • Randy says:

        Old School. Jesus loves. Man is a beast of burden. He is meant to work. He will find a way to fulfill that stricture. Society should offer an honest days work and pay to all comers. For the lot that are prepossessed to have that work be of a criminal nature and harmful to others then we have bars and concrete walls to secure them where they can do as little external harm as possible.

        Like

    • treehouseron says:

      This is a disgusting way to look at life.

      Like

    • Randy says:

      So Piggy. What do you estimate the costs to be to society when recidivists commit further crime? How much would these costs be reduced or possibly even handled from the possibility that even 10% of those trained for work leave prison, enter the work force and stay there?

      Like

  25. CNN_sucks says:

    I still support the 2nd amendment because of Comey, Brennan and Clapper that corrupted our government. What happen today is a different issue that need to be address as a society where violence has been glamorized by hollywood.

    Like

    • Rhoda R says:

      So have the teen-aged shooters. Have you seen the way the media celebrate these losers as some sort of sympathetic anti-hero? Maybe one reform should be to close down all reporting on the perp until the trial. If the perp dies, then let his memory die with him.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Paul B. says:

    Absolute Grand Slam. Despite the press, this guy has to be winning over his opponents, one at a time.

    Liked by 2 people

  27. Pam says:

    Liked by 1 person

  28. winky says:

    I am sure there are a lot of things not to trust Van Jones about….and I am sure PTrump knows everyone of the reasons but as I mentioned PTrump said he was the president for all people whether one voted for him or not.

    But I think what this says is the example it sets for all other blacks who may have thought they had nothing in common with PTrump…..that even a radical like Van Jones can have his views and be welcome to the WH. Even a radical like VJ may have good ideas on how to help blacks. Even a radical like VJ can add something to the dicusssion and be welcomed by the Presidet. We may not all agree but our common goal is important and is what counts.

    Republicans have always been blamed for not being accepting of others and their views…but it is the vile Dems who are guilty of that…..I think PTrump would accept and listen to anyone who would respectfully express their views to him.

    Liked by 4 people

  29. Brant says:

    V. Jones. Friends close, enemies closer? I know early in the administration, Trump perhaps was too trusting of some of the DC deep state/”we just want to help” folks. Also, kind of had to get some folks to get his sea legs in DC. Some took advantage of his newness to the maze. He probably thought he knew DC. He got quite an education in the last 1 year+. Now, hopefully he has become more experienced in this snake pit of politics. Perhaps the V. Jones link is a link to a different group and he will keep his eyes open….and will make sure of no leaks. Hope he keeps V. Jones out of any super important decision meetings, etc.

    Also, if V. Jones verbally disses him now, Trump can say, “Well, I tried to build a bridge.”, etc. Hopefully. he is thinking of something like that.

    Like

    • Brant says:

      Also, with V. Jones in Trump’s presence, will he get the Kanye West treatment? Maybe thats another angle of our VSG. Let V. Jones feel where the real heat is coming from. V. Jones couldn’t exactly turn him down.

      Like

  30. jbrickley says:

    Interestingly, there was a caller on Rush today that claimed he was imprisoned at 18 and was serving an eight year sentence and he kept messing up and was tossed into solitary. So they revoked his TV privileges and all he had was a radio. He became bored with music so he tuned into Rush on AM talk radio. He claims it changed his perspective on things so much that he became determined to get out of jail and make things right. What he was trying to get across is that society taught him a world view that made him think he was screwed and there was no way he would get ahead. He blamed whitey, The Man, the police and authority figures and that’s how he ended up in prison. The change in viewpoint to Rush’s Conservative perspective was that anyone can succeed if they work hard enough and do the right thing and never give up and not listen to those who tell you otherwise. How often was this man told you’ll never amount to anything, you have no chance to change things, don’t dream you’ll never succeed., etc., etc. Then he realized he had been lied to all his life by media, by politicians, by his neighbors, his friends, his community leaders, etc. He simply became “Woke” and was red pilled. He realized that it is possible to escape the slavery mindset that had been keeping him down and causing him to rebel and commit criminal acts.

    So how do we wake up these prisoners who will want to succeed? Obviously, not all of them but how do we make a difference and improve the numbers of those where rehabilitation works and they can become productive members of society again?

    Details haven’t been released but it seems reducing their sentence via voluntarily joining the new programs has not worked in the past. Too many took advantage of the program, walking the walk and talking the talk until they got an early release then they went back to their wicked ways only to be re-incarcerated. Wasting money on those who are not seriously going to make an effort to change is clearly a mistake.

    This is not about re-education so much as it is about freeing their minds. The Democrats have conducted social warfare on blacks for decades. If enough of them wake up to the fact that the ghettos, liquor stores, check cash places, planned parenthood clinics, poor schooling, cultural influences that destroy families and lack of good old fashioned Christianity are all due to Democrats and that it has been the plan all along… Watch out! This is why they lash out at Kayne. The jig is almost up. If the blacks wake up, the Democrat party is finished.

    What needs to happen is a sort of de-programming, they need to be awoken to the truth so they can be set free. Most foreign legal immigrants who assimilate who are black, tend to do very well in this country. Yes, racists exist and they are scum but they no longer control everything. Those days are over and buried.

    Like

  31. GaterG says:

    been cruising ctv for quite a while, todays topic pushed me over the edge. been a youth couselor for forty years. seen somethings that work somethings that don’t .what i kno is it cost about 40,000 a year to incarcerate and 25 k to treat low on both ends.but what makes it transparent to me is if we get em we save whole families. that makes sense. to me

    Liked by 2 people

    • piper567 says:

      Gater, i agree ab the family aspect of this whole discussion…Families. or churches, must be involved imo.
      It cannot just be Government “programs”.

      Like

    • treehouseron says:

      Thank you GaterG! Thank you for your work as a youth counselor too and the lives you’ve impacted.

      Like

  32. GaterG says:

    BTW if you got the burn go watch clockwork Orange. It will twist your pipes up

    Like

  33. Rose says:

    In Canada we’ve tried incarceration and rehabilitation/education, didn’t work. We tried incarceration and job training didn’t work. We tried incarceration and retribution hasn’t worked. Gang bangers never change, kids raised in ghettos see no way out and are raised to glorify the gang banging drug dealing lifestyle. I think the key is to break the cycle of poverty and provide poor kids with positive role models. So many poor black/Latino/White boys have no role models other than violent gang bangers and drug dealers. One of the best books I’ve read about a career criminal was Go Boy, it’s the story of a low level criminal who would commit small time robberies never using violence and he’d end up in jail again and again for most of his life. He broke the cycle when he wrote the book but ended up with a motor neuron disease and ended up committing one last crime because he felt that prison was the only place he belonged.

    Like

  34. Derek Hagen says:

    I’m sorry but Van Jones has always impressed me as not having any love at all with anyone left of extreme left. If he smiled at me I would have to take a shower.

    Like

  35. Mia C says:

    I love everything about this.
    1) I have a friend and family member who needed a second chance after serving time and I pray this helps them get that and keep gainfully employed. There are a LOT of good people who screw up and really can be saved if the system doesn’t make it impossible.
    2) I LOVE that this is outreach to minority and poor white communities who end up in prison more often. I always said I truly, truly believed Trump could help communities that Dems have turned into murder capitals.
    3) I LOVE seeing Van Jones man up and admit that even someone he personally hates can have a good idea. Please give credit where it’s due. It wouldn’t have been easy for any one of us to sit at some Obama summit, if he’d ever had a good idea which of course he didn’t, so I give him credit. (Although when Obama called out black fathers on Father’s Day and told a black college they needed to admit there had been progress I actually did think it was great although his own side attacked him mercilessly).
    —Anyway, we NEED prison reform. Prisoners NEED to be hired or they’ll just end up back in prison so I think this is wonderful.
    –The only criticism I have is that they haven’t publicized any specifics. I want to hear HOW this is going to work.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. scott467 says:

    Before there can even be any kind of prison reform, there needs to be prison CONTROL re-established. Take the asylum back from the inmates, literally.

    Like most problems that need fixed, this is not hard, it just requires the will to DO it.

    1) no gang affiliation of any kind allowed inside the prison. If breaking up gangs proves impossible, then segregate gangs by designating entire prisons to specific gangs or ethnicity. It’s not a social engineering experiment, it’s a prison. If people of different race or ethnic background cannot get along in a contained environment, then separate them.

    2) no free weights or exercise equipment to turn violent felons into stronger violent felons

    3) no cable TV (no TV at all), no porn, no radio without earplugs. Prisoners are not there for entertainment, and the fewer things there are to fight over, the better. If they want entertainment, they can read books. Prisons should be practically SILENT, like a library, not a madhouse.

    4) no DRUGS — if the reason drugs get into the prison is because of corrupt guards, then figure out how to screen new guards better and get rid of the corrupt ones. If drugs are getting into the prison some other way, find out what it is and STOP it.

    5) violent felons are never incarcerated with non-violent felons; keep them separated and guard each category accordingly

    6) no more rape. Prison is not a place you go to rape somebody, and prison is not a place you go to be raped. If you are in the custody of the State, the State has an obligation to provide a living environment that does not include sexual assault.

    7) the GUARDS run the institution, NOT the inmates. Prison should not be a barely contained riot, it should be orderly and regimented. Everybody wears the same prison-issue clothing. Everybody tucks their shirts in and wears their pants like a normal human being, pulled up to the waistline. Everybody wears shoes and socks. Order and discipline are expected and enforced.

    8) Guards will be treated with respect at all times. If you don’t understand how to properly discipline prisoners, watch an old movie.

    ……………………………………………
    “Them clothes got laundry numbers on them. You remember your number and always wear the ones that has your number. Any man forgets his number spends a night in the box. These here spoons you keep with you. Any man loses his spoon spends a night in the box. There’s no playing grab-ass or fighting in the building. You got a grudge against another man, you fight him Saturday afternoon. Any man playing grab-ass or fighting in the building spends a night in the box. First bell’s at five minutes of eight when you will get in your bunk. Last bell is at eight. Any man not in his bunk at eight spends the night in the box. There is no smoking in the prone position in bed. To smoke you must have both legs over the side of your bunk. Any man caught smoking in the prone position in bed… spends a night in the box. You get two sheets. Every Saturday, you put the clean sheet on the top… the top sheet on the bottom… and the bottom sheet you turn in to the laundry boy. Any man turns in the wrong sheet spends a night in the box. No one’ll sit in the bunks with dirty pants on. Any man with dirty pants on sitting on the bunks spends a night in the box. Any man don’t bring back his empty pop bottle spends a night in the box. Any man loud talking spends a night in the box.”

    It will be a shock to the system at first, but they’ll get used to it.
    ……………………………………………..

    9) insane people are SEGREGATED from the general population

    10) troublemakers are SEGREGATED from the general population

    11) anyone who commits violence is SEGREGATED from the general population

    The people who are violent, insane or otherwise SEGREGATED from the general population stay in a high security prison.

    That would be a START to taking back control of the asylums that pass for ‘prisons’.

    Once you accomplish that, once you have regained control from the lunatics and the gangs, THEN you can begin teaching those who are willing to learn how to succeed when they get out.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Excellent recommendations! If we were able to reform the prison systems consistent with your principles/rules, it would be more expensive in the short-term, but would save a lot of money in the long-run.

      Liked by 2 people

    • dutzie60 says:

      scott, that sounds like the Alcatraz audio tour. 🙂 I say forward to PT sounds like a great plan.

      Liked by 1 person

    • jello333 says:

      Agreed with nearly all of that, but only partially on #3. I agree no porn (duh!) and for the most part no TV… but allow a little up to a point. Maybe History Channel, HGTV, an old sitcom channel (like ME TV?), a “news” channel (though I could see that maybe causing problems), and a couple others. No more than half a dozen altogether, and nothing that can reasonably be expected to cause any issues… just enough to make them feel they’re somewhat still connected to the outside world… which will be important when they eventually get back there.

      Like

    • jello333 says:

      Oh, and I think the restrictions on gang activity may be the most important. Right now, the conflict between rivals is out of hand, and even worse is the RECRUITMENT. I mean even if you’re not involved with a gang when you go in, you very well may be pressured to choose sides. So to prevent that, ANY gang activity, even just talk, will mean serious punishment. Crack down HARD on gang stuff!

      Like

  37. President Trump takes the opposite approach on both public policy and political warfare, respectively, compared to typical Stupid Party politicians.

    On policy, Trump uses the panda/dragon approach: stylistically, he profusely praises and patronizes his policy opponents, making lots of friendly gestures at them (e.g., Van Jones). Substantively, though, Trump concedes very little ground.

    In contrast, Stupid Party politicians constantly stage nasty public kabuki theater fights with their gangster Democrat counterparts, but then turn around and give away the farm to the Democrats on actual policy behind closed doors (maybe because they are always lying about their true policy agendas).

    When it comes to actual political warfare – not the kabuki theater variety – Trump brings a gun to a knife fight, while Stupid Party politicians beg for civility (because they are only pretending to be at war with their “opponents”; their real opponent in PT).

    Liked by 2 people

  38. TreeClimber says:

    Reading between the lines – that is, that Sessions was there, that Sessions has been fighting the drug war, that PDJT mentioned the drugs so prominently – my guess is that Sessions is doing what PTrump wants of him and the “disappointment” tweets are smoke and mirrors.

    I could be wrong.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. CMDCMRET says:

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    🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼
    🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

    Like

  40. woohoowee says:

    I think drugs being in prisons are a fact, but a fact that isn’t often acknowledged.

    (And perhaps probation only sentences are a problem, too.)

    -snip-

    A Jefferson County jury on Monday took 15 minutes to find a former Arkansas Department of Correction officer guilty of attempting to bring drugs into Tucker prison in 2016 and another hour to determine his punishment.

    Deputy Jefferson County Prosecutor Bryan Achorn said the jury of nine women and three men recommended a sentence of five years in prison and an alternate sentence of 10 years probation, along with a fine of $15,000, for DeJuan Wills. Jefferson County Circuit Judge Jodi Raines Dennis chose the alternate sentence of probation.

    http://www.pbcommercial.com/news/20180306/former-adc-guard-convicted-after-attempt-to-smuggle-drugs-into-prison

    Like

  41. Critical Mass says:

    President Trump is a truly good man and a wonderful leader. He speaks to the high and the low. How many decades is it since a president has reached out to people on the lowest rungs of society and offered a helping hand – that is, if they are willing to take personal responsibility and not just a handout? Compassion with realism.

    How many decades is it that a president has said something so spiritual, profound and full of hope as:
    “America is a nation that believes in the power of redemption. America is a nation that believes in second chances, and third chances, ……America is a nation that believes that the best is always yet to come.”

    He may not have written those words, but he certainly endorses them.

    Wouldn’t it be great to see him do something similar to Johnny Cash and give a speech to inmates in a prison somewhere?

    Like

  42. CNN_sucks says:

    Clinton crime bill has incarcerated more black men in history. But I am still mystified of how the black community still supporting democrats? I guess they figure out incarcerating more black men and exploit their weakness leads more of their race on government subsidies and dependency.

    Trump is right. Time for reform.

    Like

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