President Trump Delivers Remarks On Opioid Epidemic in New Hampshire – 2:40pm Livestream

President Trump travels to New Hampshire today to speak Manchester Community College.  President Trump will deliver remarks regarding the ongoing opioid epidemic in the US. at approximately 2:30pm:

UPDATE: Video Added

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110 Responses to President Trump Delivers Remarks On Opioid Epidemic in New Hampshire – 2:40pm Livestream

  1. Sentient says:

    One pill can kill.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Caius Lowell says:

    Would this be the same opiod crisis that was created by Obama and Hillary’s good friends and funders the Sacklers?

    Liked by 4 people

    • Elizabeth Carter says:

      The drugs began pouring into our country in the 60’s. The Clintons and Bushes under Reagan were bringing these drugs into Mena Arkansas to fund the CIA Iran Contra battle. They destroyed our country with this.
      In our area there are Doctors, Lawyers, Judges and Police who are the major drug traffickers. When the prescriptions are stopped, they convert them to Heroin addicts. When people are arrested it is almost always some poor addicts and not the high level dealers. The top dealers should definitely get the death penalty.
      My son became addicted in San Fernando Valley in 1975. He came to NC to live with me at 38 and was finally off the drugs. He got vey sick at age 40 and a doctor prescribed OxyContin and it destroyed him. He died at age 42. Many of his friends died in their late teens and early twenties because of drugs, so we were lucky.
      My Dad got bladder cancer at age 57, had surgery and chemo. They had given him 6 months to live prior to the surgery and 6 months to live after the surgery. At the 6 month mark, he went for tests in Atlanta. He was an executive for General Motors so he had great hospitalization. They called him after the tests and told him he would have to come back and redo these very invasive tests because they had lost them. He said no. He never went to a doctor again. He died at age 69 and functioned pretty good until the last year. He could drive, cut the grass on a riding lawnmower and was clear minded. The last year the tumors were all over his body in the lymph glands and some were as big as his fist. He had lost weight from 185 to 135 when he first had surgery and never gained it back. My brother insisted that a doctor come see Dad 2 weeks before he died. The doctor prescribed Morphine. My Dad took it for 2 days and stopped it. He said he could deal with the pain but he could not deal with it if he did not have control of his mind.
      I had polio when I was 3 and was paralyzed for 6 weeks and in a leg cast for a year. I learned to walk again and most people would never know I had polio. I have had a lot of pain in my life and I sometimes take Aspirin or use Bio Freeze. I learned that if I can find something interesting to occupy my mind, it makes the pain easier to deal with. I hurt less in my old age than I did in my youth. I do not go to doctors at all anymore. I went once in 1986 and once in 1993 for a physical which I passed. I am 76 1/2 and still have my own business and function quite well. I have pain in my left knee and hip but just use a knee brace sometimes and it heals. The people I know who have knee, hip and back surgery have not done as well as I do. In July 2017, I drove 5100 miles to visit my Granddaughter and Great Grandchildren. I drove 600 miles a day average by myself. I do have GPS which makes it a lot easier to negotiate big cities. It was a great trip!! My Granddaughter is a supervisor in the ER at a large hospital in NV. I believe in ER because they deal with immediate problems and save lives. I am very proud of her work.
      Opioids do not relieve pain. Morphine was invented to keep the soldiers in battle from screaming because it scared the other soldiers and they might run away. My Dad was the first person I had the opportunity to actually learn about the Morphine and he said it did not help the pain at all. He just made it hard to deal with.
      I had a friend who is dead now. She had 13 knee and hip surgeries. She would take the pain killers the first 2 days and was dedicated to the rehabilitation exercises. She finally ended up in a wheel chair but she held out for over 25 years with crutches. She never became addicted. She was going to the Doctors at Duke University. When she was 73, a young doctor asked her is she was allergic to Gluten. He tested and she had Celiac Sprue. If she had been tested at 45 or so, she would never have had to have the surgeries. She said her Mom died of the same thing. Her Mom had been a nurse.
      People who would never take illegal drugs will take drugs their doctors prescribe and many lives have been ruined because of it.
      My husband and daughter died of diabetic complications. Now they have discovered that if you just stop eating sugar, the diabetes goes away.
      This is too long, but the subject hits me on so many personal levels, I can’t seem to stop. Oh well, I stopped.

      Liked by 3 people

      • jello333 says:

        Thanks for that, Elizabeth. It must be hard to write about all that… and I can actually relate to some of it. One thing I’ve learned is that a LOT of people who wind up using (and sometimes dying from) heroin, etc got started with legal drugs prescribed by their “well-meaning” doctor. I like to consider doctors on a case-by-case basis, and many of them are decent, caring people. But too many of them just don’t seem to put a lot of thought into the long-term NEGATIVE effects they can have on their patients.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Elizabeth Carter says:

          You made me smile. My younger brother was named Joe L. We used to call him Jello.
          There are good doctors. I have had a few. I just got burned out on the program over the years.
          I have good friends who are doctors. One got upset with me because I don’t go to doctors. He is a surgeon and has had patients die which is heartbreaking. I said to him, “you know how you tell patients that you have done everything you can and they need to pray now?” He nodded. I said, ” I just pray first and when I run into something God can’t handle then I will go to a doctor.” He has not brought it up again.
          I get sick sometimes. God made me self healing. I pray. I respect my body and I take care of it and baby it when it needs special attention. In a while, I get well.
          I never tell others not to go to doctors and when they do, I support them every way I can. People have to do what they believe in. If they try to do something because someone else pressures them into it, it never works out.
          One of the things I notice a lot when I take them to doctors is that many doctors do not seem to notice the NEGATIVE things they say to their patients and they really make it hard for the patient to recover because they create fear in the patient.
          When I get sick, I just pray for God to heal me so I can do the work he has planned for me. I am not at all afraid of dying. I just figure, worst case is I get to go home. Fear is a great impediment to healing and to living for that matter.
          I live my life and enjoy it. When I am going through really hard times, I pray and Jesus comforts me. Even in the hardest of times, He takes care of me, dries my tears and gives me peace.
          I have never had one day that I knew I would still be alive by evening.
          I just try to give each day my best and appreciate the miracle we live in. God has created the most wonderful world. It is just full of beauty, life and love. I try to help others and do my part in helping people by telling the truth as I know it because I do know that the Truth will set us free.
          I am so grateful to be alive at this time because I really do believe that God has given us this opportunity to stand up to EVIL and to bring God’s love and hope back into the world.

          God Bless America
          God Bless President Trump

          Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed by Thy Name.
          Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.
          Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our debts as we forgive our debtors.
          Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from Evil.
          For Thine is the Kingdom and the Power and the Glory Forever. Amen

          Liked by 2 people

      • formerdem says:

        That was extremely interesting and helpful. I am so sorry about your son I don’t know what to do or say. But thank you for sharing. I’ll remember what you said.

        Like

    • idon'tremember says:

      from 50 years ago:
      ‘Well, now if I were the President of this land
      You know, I’d declare total war on The Pusher man
      I’d cut him if he stands, and I’d shoot him if he’d run
      Yes I’d kill him with my Bible and my razor and my gun’

      Steppenwolf – Pusher man (Studio version)

      Like

  3. DanO64 says:

    Don’t punish legitimate patients who actually suffer pain on a level most of us are fortunate not to have ever had to deal with. Just say N.

    Liked by 21 people

    • Oldschool says:

      Amen dan and it’s happening every day.

      Liked by 3 people

      • donna kovacevic says:

        It is happening here in Canada as well the legitimate people are put through the wringer trying to get pain meds. I know am one of them with 5 failed back surgeries and that is my only hope to make it through the day. Addicts will be addicts regardless what but please many really need some meds for day to day living so the can cope.

        Liked by 8 people

        • talkietina says:

          I thought they sold codeine over the counter without a prescription in Canada. That’s what a poster from Canada on the Fox forums told me.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Sylvia Avery says:

            They used to anyway, I believe. I used to hear all the time about locals driving up to Canada to purchase what were called 222’s over the counter in Canada for people with migranes and other chronic problems. I have no clue what was in them or if they still make them.

            Chronic pain is a real issue for a lot of people. I don’t know what the answer is. I watch in amazement the personal stories on the local news of regular people who got hooked following a surgery.

            I believe individual body chemistries must play a role in how the drugs are metabolized, or something. I’m a wimp. I do not have a high pain threshold. But my experience with most pain meds has been unsatisfactory.

            I have been prescribed things like Percocet and Vicodan so many times after car accidents, surgeries, stuff like that. But for me, my body seemed to habituate to them so quickly that after a couple of days the prescribed dose was no longer effective.

            At that point I was faced with the problem. Either I take more than prescribed, run out of pills and have to deal with the pain because I’m out of pills, or I quit taking them now and accept that I have to deal with the pain. Either way, all roads lead to no pills and I have deal with the pain. Insert large unhappy face here. For me, it was a logical choice. Quit now, hurt now. What’s the point of delaying the inevitable?

            All that stuff made my mom deathly ill. She couldn’t take any of it. So like I said, I think different people’s bodies react differently to this stuff.

            I feel very sorry for those who are addicted. It is a horrible, horrible scourge and destroys families. But I also feel very sorry for those who have to manage chronic pain and now they are viewed with suspicion, disbelief, and have to leap over all sorts of hurdles to get what they need.

            I pray our VSG PDJT is able to find a solution for this mess.

            Liked by 5 people

            • talkietina says:

              I have never been impressed with the pain killers, like Vicodin . I have been prescribed them for pain after surgery and dentall work. I don’t think they work very well. You have to take them I’d say every two hours, not four.
              Aspirin and a couple of drinks work better.

              I have never had chronic pain, but I have had acute pain in the back, in the jaw, whatever. It’s hard to function. It would be terrible to have to live with that all the time.

              Liked by 3 people

        • v4ni11ista says:

          About 10 years ago, my doctor was talking hip replacement (mine was a lower back/hip combo-platter of agony). No doctor EVER mentioned inversion therapy. But I got an inversion table and was CURED IN 3 WEEKS! Back and hip. I take no pain meds anymore and regularly go on 5 mile hikes (and still hang upside down once a week or so). PLEASE, anyone considering back or hip surgery, try inversion first! Even post surgery, I think it could only help. You need not go completely upside down. You can lay at whatever angle, however slight, you feel comfortable with. Even for people without “problems” the decompression of the spine feels SOOOOO good! Best of luck, Donna. I think about people like you every time I’m upside down.

          Liked by 3 people

        • flova says:

          donna

          There are many with chronic pain who manage their pain legitimately with painkillers. They do not abuse the drugs and stay within the prescribed amount.

          As an ER tech for over 20 years I can tell you that in the last 8 years physicians have been regulated off the chart when prescribing narcotics. In short, they have cut way back. But guess what has happened? The heroin laced with fentany has been flooding the market. It’s cheaper than percocet on the street–way cheaper.

          The war on prescription painkillers has the consequence of increasing the number of heroin addicts and the heroin trade. Compared to heroin, percocet, hydrocodone and even oxy are not as toxic.

          This war on doctors began under Obama which tell you a lot. As the Obama administration clamped down on doctors prescribing legal narcotics, the illegal heroin trade incraesed 100 percent.

          Doctors and Big Pharma are easy targets but the OD’s we have seen coming in to the ER are NOT, i repeat NOT prescription narcotics. They are 99 percent heroin lace with fentanyl. When we ask the 18-28 year old males which is the biggest demographic how they got started, many say their heroin use is primary, not percocets or legal painkillers. people are being lied to.

          Liked by 1 person

          • sat0422 says:

            The post above that referenced the Clinton drug business was the start of something really big, I also hold venues like “Woodstock” for introducing the youth culture to drugs and a fantasy world. The 60’s was a time that changed Americans forever.
            Yes, every lawyer, police person, and medical person who stopped honoring their oath to protect and defend were and many still are a part of the problem. My ex-son-in -law’s mother was a nurse but I do believe that she became entangled with drugs on the job. She was even guilty of passing along pills to him when he certainly didn’t need them. She was a marijuana head until about three years ago and is seriously ill at this time. She abused her body with all lkinds of stuff. The biggest drug users I know in the 70’s worked in hospitals.

            Like

    • I agree DanO64.

      My elderly parents are very worried that the pendulum will swing back the other way.

      They suffer from many aches and pains and are very good at taking their pain pills as instructed.

      But they do need them.

      I also am worried that we will see many suicides again like we saw several decades ago with the elderly suffering from the easily preventable aches and pains of old age.

      We should not throw the baby out with the bath water.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Agreed. My son was post op & ran low on his pain meds (Oxycodone, I think). The local pharmacy could only quickly do a partial refill as they needed to order the remainder of the prescription. If we took the partial refill we wouldn’t be allowed to get the remainder of the pills. If we waited for the full refill then he would have gone without prescription pain meds when he was in the early stages of more intense post-op pain (plus the discomfort of a foley catheter).

      I spoke at length with the pharmacist about this for with other refills we’d never had a problem taking a partial refill & getting the remainder later when the shipment came in. She said this was based on the opioid changes to the law. In fact she said that the law changes limited how much pain killer the pharmacy was able to obtain & that they couldn’t even get sufficient meds to cover their known patients with chronic pain management prescriptions–basically an outrage!.

      Whenever I hear about some much talked about “crisis” I get pretty skeptical as to whether it’s nearly as much of an issue as the media portrays. “Never let a crisis go to waste” is a cautionary distortion of issues on the national stage to me…

      Our experience in the lack of pharmaceutical pain management was very upsetting & that was just for a short term & a temporary scenario. What abuses are faced by people battling chronic pain & other long term pharmaceutical needs are really unimaginable..

      Liked by 8 people

      • talkietina says:

        I was at a friends this morning walking our dogs, and he needs to get a tooth pulled Wednesday, so I went to the pharmacy with him to get his prescriptions. His dentist gave a big fat prescription bottle of Vicodin. The pharmacy had no problem filling it. I was shocked the dentist gave him so much though. I told him to only take them when he needs them and then stick them away, because you can’t easily get those pain meds anymore.

        Liked by 8 people

        • One of my sons had a recent surgery on a broken collarbone & had a plate put in. They gave him a very small prescription of pain meds with no refills. Thankfully he was fairly tolerant of the pain & used the pills at a lower dosage than allowed so he actually has a couple of pills left. The whole issue seems to be getting out of hand & lacking in common sense. Central planning is rarely an effective “solution” to real issues…

          Liked by 6 people

          • talkietina says:

            It’s the people who get the street opioids who are addicts. It’s not the ones who get pain meds from a doctor. If you are in pain, like with a broken collar bone, they should give him enough to get through a couple of weeks. You aren’t going to become an addict in two or three weeks.

            But if the doctors stop prescribing enough of them for pain, that might drive people onto the street to get them.

            Opioids work. They really have only one bad side affect, you can become addicted.

            Liked by 2 people

            • Nope, it all started with Doctor’s over medicating… that’s how they got hooked in the first place. I worked in the Medical industry and was married to a surgeon, I know.

              Liked by 6 people

              • talkietina says:

                Of course. The doctors can’t over prescribe. It’s hard for doctors to judge sometimes.

                In the 80’s a friend of mine hurt her back jet skiing. After quite a while she was still taking the drugs for pain. It was
                like an excuse.

                Eventually after the worst pain is calming, then people need to start taking insids. Pain just has to be faced eventually.

                Like

            • THIS is what caused the Heroin problem.. (I’ll add more later on this subject, I gotta get my pressure washer working|) 😉

              Liked by 2 people

            • jello333 says:

              “You aren’t going to become an addict in two or three weeks.” Well, I’d say that depends on a number of variables. Not that I want them to ban strong pain meds (I think they absolutely ARE needed sometimes), but I also believe they need to start being much more careful, because yes… in some cases you CAN become addicted very quickly.

              Like

    • annieoakley says:

      Agree

      Liked by 1 person

    • Unfortunately, I’m “One” of those folks..
      “Phamtom Pain” about drives me to commit….. It really is indescribable…
      Also working “one-armed” all My life, (hard labor), even though I tried to “work smarter” has taken a very deep toll on my joints & body…
      Though the good news is this..
      I’ve went from taking OxyMorphone & Percocet’s 3X daily..

      I’m now….
      Down too 2 “light” pills in the morning.. Since VSGDJT took office..
      2~5/325 Vicodin’s.. in the morning..
      Donald J. Trump has giving Me HOPE & inspiration…
      He has been a “Inspiration” to Me, as well as many others I’m sure..
      My Doctor gave scripts out like Candy, seriously…
      I called Her a “legal” drug dealer.. Once
      She didn’t like that much..

      Liked by 2 people

    • nhgardengram says:

      It sounded like he’s after the dealers not the doctors to me. He wants the drugs to stop coming into the country. Doctors should be able to manage their patients. Seniors are not the risk here, I hope.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. NHVoter says:

    I am not at this event but I’m thrilled to see President Trump back in my beautiful state!

    It all started in New Hampshire 😀

    Liked by 10 people

  5. Dekester says:

    The camera just panned the crowd.

    AG Sessions is seated next to Melania. He was beaming like a “ Cheshire Cat”

    There is no way that AG Sessions is not behind PDJT one hundred percent.

    At least that is my opinion.

    God bless PDJT

    Liked by 12 people

  6. fred5678 says:

    Anyone wonder why the drug crisis in general and opioid specifically was ignored during the the last administration and grew exponentially??

    Liked by 2 people

    • mimbler says:

      I’ve read it is one of the many unintended consequence of Obamacare. People at the poverty level were given health insurance for free, and opioids are like cash. So they would get the prescriptions to sell the pills if they were not users themselves.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Sylvia Avery says:

        I have a friend who sort of lives of the fringes. I’ll call her Monica. We worked together for a number of years but grew apart and didn’t see each other for probably ten years or so other than very briefly.

        After her kids were mostly grown and we had each suffered some deaths in our families, we got in touch again and started to see each other fairly often. Monica always looked like she had it together and lived a pretty normal middle class life. However, with time I discovered our lives had gone in very different directions.

        She used to shock the living heck out of me fairly often and I finally detached myself from our friendship because of it. From her, I learned a lot about the seedier side of life.

        Monica had a couple of adult children who had both gotten into trouble with the law…felony charges kind of trouble. They both did drugs. At least one of them had a couple of kids while she was doing drugs and because of the kids she got on welfare and food stamps and medical and whatever else. She regularly sold her food stamps to her mom, uncle, grandma…. and because it was her family they gave her dollar for dollar instead of fifty cents on the dollar which is the standard rate, I learned.

        Monica and her youngest daughter (the one on welfare with the kids) had a bizarre and unhealthy family dynamic. The daughter and grandkids were always moving in and out of Monica’s house because the daughter was unable to make it on her own, kept hooking up with a succession of men who were let’s just say unsuitable (and unsavory). There was much drama. Police supervised exits of the daughter and grandkids from the home. Threats of violence. Protection orders. All inevitably followed by guilt that the grandchildren would be living on the street so all would be forgiven and the cycle would begin again. And again. And again.

        Anyway, it was from my association with Monica and hearing her stories about her daughter that I learned that not only did people sell their EBT cards for cash so they could buy what they really needed…(I’ll let your mind fill in the blanks) but that Monica’s daughter would also go to the doctor to get prescription meds that she could sell to get money for what she really needed….

        The whole entire thing was appalling and hearing about it made me feel sort of sick. And Monica didn’t seem to see much of anything wrong about it which shocked me, too.

        Long story, but the point is: you’re right. That actually does happen. And not to people that look like homeless bums but look like your neighbors and friends. SMH.

        Liked by 5 people

    • Lurker2 says:

      I can only say that it must be because the Democrats really don’t care about people except for their votes.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. NHVoter says:

    Lawrence, MA is a real shithole. I’m glad President Trump mentioned it.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Pam says:

    Liked by 2 people

  9. tuskyou says:

    Death Penalty for the “big pushers”!

    Like

  10. Mary Ann says:

    Living in New England I have seen the drug crisis..
    Problem is, they cater to the issue.. Drug court instead of jail time.. Methadone treatment, to sell on the streets.. paid for by medicaid.. There are people who have been on Methadone and Butes for years.. I do sympathize for people with any form of addiction, and know the root cause is looking for something to fill a void.. But when you give scrips for NARCAN, and they have NARCAN parties.. something has to give.. I know not everyone believes in God.. but He is the answer.. 98% have been healed of addiction in a faith based drug treatment center.. Why not try it? your loosing your life.. what more do you have to loose?
    Thus the end of my rant 🙂

    Liked by 7 people

  11. Pam says:

    Liked by 6 people

  12. Ziiggii says:

    Liked by 4 people

  13. fred5678 says:

    How can this very good man not win in a landslide in 2020???

    Liked by 4 people

  14. Pam says:

    Liked by 2 people

    • Lurker2 says:

      The drug traffickers and dealers KILL people. Death penalty is completely warranted.

      Liked by 1 person

    • jello333 says:

      Let’s just make sure they have different categories for “dealers”, because they absolutely are NOT all equal. The big-time ones that have “business models”, and the cartel types… yeah, I’m all for the harshest punishments we can give them. Many of them are already into murder, so that’s an easy call, but even the ones who aren’t into outright violence are STILL in effect killing people… and in a premeditated manner. So yeah… hit them hard.

      But on the other hand, many addicts will go out and sell a little bit of their own supply to friends who are also addicts. Buying and selling to feed their own habit. While these people are also technically “dealers”, and while there should also be punishment attached to that, we absolutely must NOT lump them all in together with the big-timers. We have to be careful when we say “death penalty for drug dealers” to make it clear which type we’re talking about.

      Liked by 2 people

      • churchmouse says:

        Unpopular as it might be here, many small towns have people who have ‘friends’ whom the Feds might classify as ‘big-time dealers’.

        As many of us would like to see big-time dealers eradicated, that group could include many smaller neighbour-friendly dealers — people who might be known and liked by multi-generational groups.

        It’s a difficult stream to cross, and one that certainly carries controversies — including family worries.

        President Trump is, in theory, correct. However, many people at that Moon Township, PA, rally were, from what I read and saw, no doubt concerned about people they knew and liked.

        It is no doubt the same elsewhere in the Western world.

        Phrased correctly, the President could reach the correct context and penalty with a change of vocabulary.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. daughnworks247 says:

    Bombshell!!!!!!!
    Oh, you don’t say…….
    Jeff Sessions is with Trump in New Hampshire…. so, Sessions was on
    Air Force One!

    Liked by 5 people

  16. fred5678 says:

    I remember well candidate Trump’s first campaign speech in NH (I watched them ALL!!) when he made a big deal about what NH citizens were telling him about their biggest problem — heroin and drugs in general, etc.

    The man LISTENS!!

    Liked by 7 people

  17. fred5678 says:

    Remember, everything POTUS Trump is discussing today are a things that Obama did NOT do.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. This is and might be my only time I disagree with one point of POTUS on the opioid drug problem. Since Obamacare my insurance has been destroyed, my deductible is 6000 dollars with a very high monthly premium. I have constant pain issues and am required by my physician/hospital to be seen quarterly and drug tested regularly to make sure I am the one taking the prescription. My doctors visit is at 135 dollars a visit, the drug test is 250, none of this is covered, I must pay out of my pocket for all visits and drug screenings. I would be considered lower middle class as far as income and it is a stretch to pay this. My point is I am already being punished for taking my script as prescribed because of the overdoses and now you want to reduce the amount I can receive? This isn’t right or fair to people like myself you really need the medicine and live by the rules that have been laid for us out to date.

    Liked by 8 people

    • fred5678 says:

      Condolences and great example why we need strong pain relief with non-addicting Rx that don;t require all the testing and costs.

      Call your Congresscritter (if an R) and schedule a local visit if you can. If not an R, call the nearest R Congresscritter and try to visit in person.

      All the best,

      Like

      • booger71 says:

        What we need is to be able to legally own opium poppies again like my grandmother did. She made a pot of poppy tea once a week for her and Grandpa to take the edge off the pain. Poppy tea is a weak opioid that works.

        Liked by 3 people

    • Lurker2 says:

      I think the prescription limit will not apply to you. I don’t know exactly what he said at this event but reports are mentioning “initial prescriptions” being limited to 3 days or so, and there will be exemptions for people with certain conditions, e.g., chronic pain.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sharon says:

      Every time I see one of this opiod-focused events, I wonder how many people are dying from alcohol use (or in car wrecks) each year, and why there is not a parallel excitement about that. Looks like the Moral-Battle-Of-The-Decade type thing as far as I can see.

      Just another displacement of personal responsibility. Once the government is funding the thing, you can count on: 1) It will never end. 2) The costs [related government grants and taxes] will never be eliminated. 3) Those who want to use will continue to use. Those who don’t want to use won’t start.

      A lot of the people who are jumping on this bandwagon are probably not too excited about the government telling them what to do in other/all areas of their lives. Once the government is given permission/responsibility to tell us what to do, we don’t get to choose any more — what to do.

      Personal responsibility. Consequences. Those are life realities. Attempting to help people avoid them by building a hospital at the foot of the cliff where the people are jumping off is really expensive. And it doesn’t work. And it creates a whole lot of collateral damage.

      My opinion.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Lurker2 says:

        I think the problem with opioids is that they are SO addicting. More so than alcohol. Like you don’t need the gene, it can happen to anyone and everyone who uses the drugs enough. And yes, personal responsibility plays a large part but there are so many addicts who are 1) kids and 2) people who were legitimately prescribed the drugs to manage pain and became addicted.

        Like

        • Sharon says:

          I have two bottles of opoids in the cupboard, prescribed post-surgery. Personal responsibility dictates that I take them as prescribed.

          Once we accept that “Well, personality responsibility doesn’t apply here because it’s really hard…..” well, the consequences of that will be what they will be.

          This whole scenario guarantees that the ones causing the problem are bearing neither the consequences or the cost of the cleanup.

          I have had and presently have close family impacted by this crap. My opinion has not been formed in a vacuum.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Lurker2 says:

            Personal responsibility also dictates that physicians not over-prescribe and people not bring heroin in from other countries, but that doesn’t seem to be happening. Now we have a big mess thanks to all of the prior administrations.

            I too have my experience of being close to someone who became addicted. Started out with prescription, then turned to heroin. If we didn’t have so much heroin available he might have actually gotten clean.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Sharon says:

          It occurs to me that one way to address this, then, would be:

          Since they are willing to designate millions and millions to lifting the cost of the consequences for those who have brought the problem on themselves, maybe they can designate millions and millions more to alleviate the costs that will be visited on those who have never abused opiods or any other substance.

          If normal patients are going to be required to pay thousands/hundreds of dollars more for screenings and tests to prove they are not abusing the drug, let the government pay for those, too.

          That would make some sense…at least it would demonstrate some consistent thought.

          If they want the whole country to be responsible for the choices of some, then make the whole country responsible for all the costly consequences, not just the consequences of those who created the problem.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Lurker2 says:

            You just reminded me that health insurance policy costs are jacked up as people get older. You could be the healthiest person on the planet, but if you are 50 or 60 or 70 or older you’re going to pay through the nose for a policy that you barely use. Young people pay next to nothing. But this drug epidemic makes me wonder just how little the young people are costing us. Rehabs are super expensive! I’d love to see some data.

            Liked by 1 person

            • formerdem says:

              I do think Obama meant it to become a cage fight between young and old, with the young constantly calculating what it meant to them for this or that old person to go on living. Me, I will not play that game. Young or old, abandon No Body.

              Like

      • Way more people die from Opioid use than car crashes.

        Like

        • TPW says:

          Yet less than alcohol caused deaths……how many people die from over the counter meds….bet they don’t have the stats.Would like for them to divide the opioid users into categories then lets see in which category deaths occur most frequently. Illegal drug use is always a problem but I suspect that this is a false flag for some nefarious purpose….not by our President and other well meaning people but by corrupt politicians and MSM. Does anyone believe MSM gives a sh!t about opioid deaths.

          Liked by 1 person

    • I sympathize with you problem Catherine Thompson.

      My elderly parents are very, very worried that their much needed pain meds will be with held for some crazy government interfering reason.

      My family has seen both sides of this issue in that my youngest brother became addicted to opioids after back surgery then moved on to heroin.

      He died after damaging his heart.

      So I understand the need to be careful but I also know that many people, like my parents, can and do use strong pain killers properly every day.

      Like

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      Thank you for posting your story for us. All I can say is WOW and not in a good way.

      I am always horrified, shocked, and never surprised in a good way when I hear what Obamacare has done to people who used to have good insurance. But this takes it to a whole nother level.

      The expensive requirements forced on you to be sure you are in compliance kind of leave me speechless. I am so sorry for you and all the others out there like you.

      Like

      • jahealy says:

        Allow me to share as well. I’m a freelancer (self-employed) and 62. Healthy by all traditional measures, and on the lean side. I don’t qualify for subsidized health insurance. My monthly premium is $622, and my deductible is $6,500.

        In October I wound up in the ER for what turned out to be a nosebleed that wasn’t exiting via my nose (I’ll leave the gory details to your imagination). Of course I had no idea WTH was going on, thus the trip to the ER (and I was referred there by my health insurance phone-a-nurse).

        Long story short, I wound up with $8,000 in medical bills from that adventure and follow-up visits with my own docs. Had to take out a personal loan.

        Went to an urgent care in January for what turned out to be yet another bout of sinusitis. Got prescriptions for the usual meds. Bill for that visit, which involved no tests of any kind was $327.

        I really hope tackling “health care” and “health insurance” in this country is on PDJT’s agenda.

        Liked by 4 people

        • Sylvia Avery says:

          I am just speechless. I had thought stories like this were limited to people who had Obamacare, but when I realized I was hearing similar stories from people who had employer provided health coverage that used to be GOOD coverage, even if the premiums and co-pays seemed high, it really blew my mind.

          This will probably make you unhappy, but I was just talking to a friend of mine who is on Social Security Disability and Medicare and now she qualifies and receives some kind of Medicaid paid Medicare Advantage program.

          First off, let me say I have no issues with this woman being on SSD and if I bored you with her health details I’m pretty sure you’d agree that she is one of those people this program was truly made to help.

          And because she has a lot of serious health problems of course Medicare and the Medicaid paid supplement seem appropriate to me because she is frankly quite poor. She doesn’t get much from SSD as she has never been able to get or hold a very high paying job due to her limitations.

          But this new Medicaid paid Medicare supplement has me a little unhappy because one of the benefits she gets is $150.00 every three months and she gets to pick stuff from a catalog like an electric toothbrush, cough drops, special soap for dry skin, I can’t even remember what all that to me sound like nice stuff to have but not exactly high priority, you know?.

          Anyway, this is a drop in the bucket and I’m probably being small minded. But when I hear stories like yours where you have to get a personal loan to pay for the trip to the ER I just, well, something is radically wrong with this system is I guess about all I can say.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Tegan says:

      Not necessarily replying to any one person, but Catherine’s post detailing her expenses makes me wonder why more people do not try acupuncture for pain. I have had at least two conditions that after trying many “medical” solutions, I was only able to get relief with acupuncture. And, in my state, or with my insurance, the sessions are not covered BUT it certainly is a lot less expensive than Catherine’s Doctor visit copay.
      I’ve used several in various parts of the country. Currently, mine is a former military medic that studied in China. His approach is much more “mechanical” than the “yang/yang” philosophy others might practice. He strongly believes most back surgery is unnecessary and does more harm than good, but because it’s paid for by insurance people are more willing to endure it than pay a few hundred dollars to see if acupuncture will help them first.
      Just a thought to throw into the conversation.

      Like

  19. Lurker2 says:

    It bothers me so greatly that the Dems never aligned the flood of illegals across the border with influx of opioids. When the oxy- and hyrdocodone users can’t get more prescriptions they turn to heroin because it’s easier to acquire.

    Liked by 4 people

  20. Mickturn says:

    I have to ask what the point is in having drugs that kill that don’t work as intended.
    Outlaw all of them! Prosecute Drug Companies if they make it at all, even for foreign distro.

    OR

    Give them to Libs FREE and wait until they all ‘self demise’!

    Like

  21. KBR says:

    IMO:

    I hope a change comes such that “there’s a pill for that” stops being NORMAL.

    Honestly everything, everything that is NORMAL has a pill for it these days.

    Tired. Sad. “Stressed,” aches-post-excercise, grief, not wanting sex/erectile problems (for a little while), passing-anger, feeling happy “too much,” smiling “inappropriately” (by someone else’s definition of inappropriate/appropriate),” feeling tenderhearted, getting tears-in-eyes over the little things, Boyfriend/girlfriend broke up with you, your kids aggravating you, a rare/passing headache,
    Things that occassionally make you occasionally sneeze, too little energy, too much energy, had a quarrel with someone, somebody “gets on your nerves,” “need to relax,” “need more pep”…you name it, there is a drug for it.

    IOW, LIFE! Today’s motto seems to be: Don’t live it, take a pill for it.

    (Not talking here about pain from traumatic injury, nor severe traumatic stress from unusual severe traumas, nor any real disease)

    But pains and joys of ordinary everyday ups and downs of life need to be lived through, experienced, learned from.

    The meme that for every minor discomfort there is a pill needs to 🛑!

    Liked by 5 people

  22. WVNed says:

    My father was a pharmacist. My wife is a pharmacist. I worked in a pharmacy for 17 years until I got the hell out.

    Opioids turn people into liars and worse things. Keep that in mind while you hear all the crying.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Kenji says:

    I guess I don’t understand the “pain crisis” that we appear to be having in America. Less than a year ago, I had a hip replaced. No … that sounds too benign … I had my femur forcefully dislocated, sawn-off, my pelvis ground down with a power grinder, a titanium casting pounded into the marrow of my open-ended femur, and plastic cup shoved into my reformed pelvis. Google hip replacement surgery … you’ll see enough gore to make you pass out.

    I had my surgery at 8:30 AM … and was walking the hall (with more ease than Hillary in India) at 1:30P. I awoke to … not what I would call “pain” … but more like an ache in my hip. As I understand it … the surgery site is filled with injected slow-release pain killers, and I took some regular pain meds orally for about two weeks. None of the pain meds that I took (Norco, as I recall) gave me the least bit of a “high” or feeling of euphoria. When I made my first post-op visit to the surgeon I told him that I wasn’t really in any pain, but perhaps he should renew my Norco just in case. He laughed, and said that I didn’t need any, and was doing far better than most patients. He flat out rejected my request for more meds. So … was I lucky? Or am I a “stoic” who just toughs-out pain? Probably both.

    But the idea that I can get through one of the most invasive surgeries, with no pain, no addictions, no problems … suggests to me that this “pain crisis” is an artificial construct. Don’t get me wrong … I have friends with chronic back pain who can barely get out of bed at times. I am not speaking of LEGITIMATE pain patients. But from whence did a “crisis” emerge ? Well … Pharma like to SELL SELL SELL their popular products … and … with the amount of FAKE doctors (with degrees) who are pain pill mills … I believe this is a case of cracking-down and prosecuting FRAUD … like Medicare and Medicaid FRAUD.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Michelle says:

      Last year we took our then 8 yr old daughter to the ER for a broken arm. Before they wrapped it (not even a cast) and put it in the sling, they wanted to give her a form of morphine in case it hurt. We objected and she was fine without any painkillers. The last thing we wanted was for her to become susceptible to get addicted to opioids, especially from something as mild as a broken arm. But it was our understanding that most parents just agree to it. Scary.

      Liked by 2 people

      • kenji says:

        When he was 7, my youngest son spiral fractured his tibia (only his fibula held his leg together). Because he wasn’t screaming in pain … the Doctor at the ski resort set him aside and spent his time treating the drunks who came in with facial lacerations. I finally had to get up and raise a ruckus … wherein the Doctor told me that he was sure that my son didn’t break his leg … otherwise he would be in more “pain”. When the Doc. got the x-Ray back … he was SHOCKED to see my son’s tibia in bits and pieces and immediately took action by offering med’s to a kid who was sitting there calmly, wondering when he would be able to play soccer and basketball again … I guess we come from tough stock ?

        Like

    • Sharon says:

      Exactly. My late husband had a hip replacement and had the same experience. He was back at work at Home Depot in less than one month, working in the tool crib.

      Like

  24. jahealy says:

    I’ve had 8 major surgeries in my lifetime and assorted dental procedures, and I always receive prescriptions for narcotic painkillers. For some reason, maybe I’ve been lucky with surgeons, I don’t have much pain after surgery (even abdominal surgery), and ibuprofen actually works much better for me than opioids (with none of the icky side effects). I realize too much ibuprofen is also not a good idea, but I’ve often wondered why surgeons don’t tell patients to start with ibuprofen (or acetaminophen – Tylenol – if they prefer it), and then call for something stronger if they need it.

    Liked by 3 people

  25. Scout says:

    Dunno.
    My memory is that far more people die from medical negligence (all causes) than illegal drug use. I thought medical negligence came in third after heart and cancer. 250,000 deaths a year vs 17.000 from legal drugs.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Scout says:

    illegal drugs

    Like

  27. Rynn69 says:

    It would be beneficial to have a Commission of non-government healthcare professionals to analyze the use and prescription of opiods for pain management from all angles to have a better understanding and grasp of this problem. Then a targeted correction could be applied.

    Like

    • AngelOnejudicial says:

      Problem is we had that under Obama and they were hand picked Soros funded radical anti opioid zealots whose job was 2 fold obfuscation, to blame physicians for the heroin open borders problem and to eliminate a healthcare expense which is disabled diseased and elderly Americans successfully using prescribed opioids with great benefit to their lives and well being.
      Those tactics allowed the epidemic to metastasize while deaths either premature or suicide skyrocketed amongst patients who’d been needlessly removed from pain care (saving government payers millions)

      Like

  28. AngelOnejudicial says:

    I’m one of the millions of Americans who take opioid painkillers everyday for the treatment of chronic leukemia. Painkillers allowed me to have a relatively normal childhood to complete medschool to have a family and spend some time working. Obama’s pain policies destroyed my ability to have my pain adequately treated and this contributed to me being sidelined from work along with disease progression and treatment complications.

    I’m glad president Trump is focusing on the real issue which is illegal drugs pouring into our cities. I’m fed up with the millions of good hard working Americans who ended up in severe pain thru no fault of their own being blamed for kids using Chinese fetanyl and Mexican heroin. I pray for families suffering with addicted loved ones and I pray for others like me who live in chronic pain, I pray we don’t hurt one trying to help the other and that a balance can be found one that’s rational not reactionary.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. My painkiller of choice for dental work is a cd player with earphones. If I know it’s going to be really painful, I get a cd that can be turned up almost earsplittingly loud. Had heard of this, but didn’t believe it. The dental assistant almost fainted when she realized I really was going to do it.

    Kept waiting for the pain to start. It never did. When the dentist said she was finished, I angrily accused her of lying to me and sneaking in an injection She vigorously denied giving me anything.
    As I walked the half-block to my local health food store to get some of their great home-made soup.

    Felt a bit woozy and talked to the proprietor. She walked straight over to the shelf with Astragalus Root solution and said it was good to shocks to the body, even if said shocks were not hurting. It calmed my system down right away.

    I’ve told all my friends about this neat trick, but no one else wants to try it! This is how an idea stays fixed in your head. Once you believe something, there is almost no amount of evidence that can change it. I have several other personal experiences like this, but you get the point.

    Like

  30. Anyone knows why FLOTUS went up with him? Extra protection? I’ll do the same if everyone is threatening my husband!

    Like

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