Frank Stephens Congressional Testimony: A Rebuke of “The Final Solution”…

Speaking on behalf of a goal for continued funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), this opening statement by Frank Stephens might very well be the best testimonial made to a congressional committee since the incredible Catherine Engelbrecht speech.

“Happiness is worth something”…  Yes, Mr. Stephens, yes it is.   Please WATCH:

 

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173 Responses to Frank Stephens Congressional Testimony: A Rebuke of “The Final Solution”…

  1. JaimeInTexas says:

    Moving testimony. Yes, your life is worth living.

    Now, amend the Constitution to empower the FedGov to enable expenditures in such thing as the NIH.

    Do we mean it when we say that the FedGov must be limited to only those delegated powers or not?

    Like

  2. TheLastDemocrat says:

    Great post.

    in the U.S., it is believed that 9/10 babies with suspected DS are aborted.

    March of Dimes prefers to be “non-committal” on abortions. They do accept and recognize abortion when birth defects are suspected as part of regular health care, and they fund some research and activities that work to this end.

    Their slogan has changed over time. For a while, it was “Reducing the number of children born with birth defects.” –Clever, eh? Right under your nose. So, to achieve that end, they can work for prevention of birth defects, or they can work to help improve detection of birth defects so that the baby can be aborted, and so fewer children with birth defects will be born. IOW: if we kill them, we meet our noble-sounding goal.

    If anyone doubts me, please go check yourself whether March of Dimes is dedicated to being distinctly pro-life.

    What to do if someone asks you for a donation for their MoD fundraiser? Simply explain that you would give $20 or whatever, but you don’t support MoD, and find a similar organization of your choice and give that $20. Let your friend know you gave in response to their request.

    We do this with Komen, as well – Komen continued to truck with PP – I know many women feel a strong respect for Komen, and it is terrible that breast cancer research and advocacy overall decline as Komen declines. But they have had the choice to pick sides, and they clearly have.

    Liked by 1 person

    • H. Jorgan says:

      Most abortions are spontaneous! Within seconds of conception\impregnation; for all folk, critter, creature, varmint, etc (sans politician)! Earthling politicians are but the residue of needed ‘abortion’! The idea is not ‘sacred life’ (religious doctrine), but viability for the continuation of life after death! Trial and mostly error.
      Conception, then 9 months of spontaneous\assisted test of possible VIABLE .
      If ‘viable’, traumatic for all; may result in birth of baby\infant\idiot (incapable of providing for self). How many more months of that learning from giving parents, does LIFE begin? Do you have even a guess? How about the so valuable MEDIA opinion? How about opinion from Francis, or any governmental entity?

      Like

  3. Raven says:

    When I was 11 my 10 year old sister lost her hearing. At that time — mid-1960s — the medical profession told my parents to put my sister “away” in a home for deaf children.

    Doctors told my parents to get rid of their child because she was no longer acceptable within everyday society.

    My parents have been gone from this earth for over 25 years now. While here they were fierce warriors for their children.

    My parents would have NEVER put one of their kids “away.”

    Instead, my sister continued attending the same hearing school she had been going to when she lost her hearing, and that we went to together. She graduated with straight A’s, got married, had 4 children and is now the proud grandmother to 14 grandchildren (and still counting).

    So far God has brought about 18 miracles through a woman doctors told my parents to “put away.”

    Liked by 6 people

    • wondering999 says:

      Raven, so glad your sister thrived the way she did!
      When I was in first grade, I recall a classmate who probably had significant hearing disabilities, based on my memories of how she spoke. She left our elementary school for whatever reason, and it occurred to me later that she may have gone to Tennessee School for the Deaf.

      I hope that she thrived also., even if she wasn’t at home with her family. Her family was extremely poor and she may have received more beneficial services at TSD. I just don’t know. I hope so. For some students, residential schools are a godsend.

      I’d love to see TSD thrive…our whole community should work on making deaf schools an excellent resource to be proud of and to support children and families (not a place to “send children away”)
      http://tsdeaf.org/about_tsd/our_school/slcl.html

      Like

  4. sedge2z says:

    Frank Stephens:
    “We are an unusually powerful source of happiness.
    People with Down Syndrome as well as their parents and siblings are happier than society at large.
    Surely happiness is worth something.
    We make the world a happier place.”
    (Sundance posted this under the category “Heroes”)…… 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Alligator Gar says:

      I have a downs cousin, the child of a first cousin. She is profoundly disabled and autistic on top of her downs and incapable of speech. But she bring such joy. I have known many downs citizens. They are incredibly giving and kind people who DESERVE to live and to give us all a lesson in humanity and decency.

      My autistic son couldn’t speak until he was 4. I missed the baby talk, the first “I love you.” All of it. He makes friends wherever he goes. I have seen him draw people out with his infections smile and inevitable hugs.

      “Disabled” is eugenicist. There is no such thing as “neurotypical.”

      Like

  5. Farmon says:

    Treeps,
    Great testimony. I have two kids with DS, one we adopted. Without them we would not be nearly who we are as a family. My little girl (whom I call my Honduran “burrito”) is the cutest creation God ever made (well, ok, human creation). She is truly a blessing. If you understand that, great. I do not say any of this for the glory, but to give glory to the One who made us all… If you don’t understand, well, you wouldn’t understand. It’s a sanctifying life, but a rich one. Taking care of my son with Down syndrome and autism (DS/ASD) as the hardest work I’ll ever love.

    As an aside, take care to use words carefully when speaking about children with Down syndrome, or people with disabilities. They are people first… So, when speaking about my son, I do not say “he’s a Down syndrome kid”, I refer to him first and then describe him. Much better is “My son ______ is 12 and he has Down syndrome”. This is such a subtle thing but if we think correctly about who they are it will help how we talk about them. When people with disabilities advocate for them selves, one of the things they talk about is how frustrating it is the way other people talk about them.

    All of my children are a big source of happiness in our family and the ones with Down syndrome contribute greatly to everything we do including being happy most of the time. I was pleased to watch this video of a fellow Virginian, Mr. Frank Stephens. SP, if you’re reading this, keep up the good fight. We love you down here in the South.

    Like

    • Alligator Gar says:

      So true. My son has autism, global apraxia, OCD, and ADHD. Those are things that make him the blessing that he is for my entire family and all who know him. He is accepting, loving, and so MAGA it is scary. This kid LOVEs the USA and out great President. His differences come AFTER I introduce him as my beloved son. His humanity comes before any of it. So glad to hear that you advocate for your children in the same manner.

      Like

  6. Farmon says:

    Treeps,
    Great testimony. I have two kids with DS, one we adopted. Without them we would not be nearly who we are as a family. My little girl (whom I call my Honduran “burrito”) is the cutest creation God ever made (well, ok, human creation). She is truly a blessing. If you understand that, great. I do not say any of this for the glory, but to give glory to the One who made us all… If you don’t understand, well, you wouldn’t understand. It’s a sanctifying life, but a rich one. Taking care of my son with Down syndrome and autism (DS/ASD) as the hardest work I’ll ever love.

    As an aside, take care to use words carefully when speaking about children with Down syndrome, or people with disabilities. They are people first… So, when speaking about my son, I do not say “he’s a Down syndrome kid”, I refer to him first and then describe him. Much better is “My son ______ is 12 and he has Down syndrome”. This is such a subtle thing but if we think correctly about who they are it will help how we talk about them. When people with disabilities advocate for them selves, one of the things they talk about is how frustrating it is the way other people talk about them.

    All of my children are a big source of happiness in our family and the ones with Down syndrome contribute greatly to everything we do including being happy most of the time. I was pleased to watch this video of a fellow Virginian, Mr. Frank Stephens. SP, if you’re reading this, keep up the good fight. We love you down here in the South.

    Like

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