NAFTA Round One Concludes – Joint Statement From Canada, Mexico and United States….

Hot off The Presses.  Round One of scheduled NAFTA renegotiations has concluded today and a trilateral statement has just been released. [My thoughts follow press release]:

Washington, DC – On August 16, 2017, United States Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland and Mexican Secretary of the Economy Ildefonso Guajardo launched the renegotiation and modernization of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in Washington, DC.

This began five full days of meetings by a team of subject matter experts covering more than two dozen different negotiation topics.  Detailed conceptual presentations were made by the United States, Mexico and Canada across the scope of the agreement, and negotiating groups began work to advance text and agreed to provide additional text, comments or alternate proposals during the next two weeks.

The scope and volume of proposals during the first round of the negotiation reflects a commitment from all three countries to an ambitious outcome and reaffirms the importance of updating the rules governing the world’s largest free trade area.

In addition to the negotiations, officials from all three countries continued to engage a wide range of stakeholders, including representatives of the private sector; industry associations; civil society, including labor groups; legislative representatives; and state/provincial officials.

Negotiators from each country will continue domestic consultations and work to advance negotiating text through the end of August, and will reconvene in Mexico for a second round of talks from September 1-5.

Negotiations will continue at this rapid pace, moving to Canada in late September and returning to the United States in October, with additional rounds being planned for the remainder of the year.

While a great deal of effort and negotiation will be required in the coming months, Canada, Mexico and the United States are committed to an accelerated and comprehensive negotiation process that will upgrade our agreement and establish 21st century standards to the benefit of our citizens.  (link)

First, as to the probability for a joint agreement, the outlook still remains at a level “3” on a scale of 1 to 10.  The bottom line for optimism isn’t really optimism; it is more drawn from a simple reality: neither Canada nor Mexico have any alternative.

Other than bang their virtue-signaling and threatening drums loudly, there’s no actual substantive economic leverage held by the CanaMex twin parasites; who are trying to negotiate an enhanced sustainability through discussions with their economic host.  The reality is the three nations Canada, Mexico and the U.S. are not equal.  Canada and Mexico stand to lose the most from ‘no deal’.  They just don’t have any leverage beyond politics.

All of CanaMex’s talking points are political in nature.  Unfortunately for them, the Trump administration is looking at the trade deal purely through the prism of economics, not politics.  Trump ain’t trying to win virtuous points with Vildegaray (Mex) or Freeland (Can), period.

From the perspective of Trump/Ross/Lighthizer it’s about math, jobs and GDP economics.  Nothing more.  This cold economic reality crushes the heavily-nuanced feelings contained within the Canadian and Mexican positions.   Virtue signaling (Canada’s approach) and threats of social anxiety (Mexico’s approach) ring hollow against the sheer scope of economic leverage carried by team U.S.A.

If all participants were equally carrying leverage the likelihood for an agreement would be Zero because the economic combatants are generally loggerheads across all sectors. However, this is not an agreement amid equals.  Access to the U.S. market is vital for the continuance of Canada and Mexico’s sustainability.  Therefore one must temper the desire for a zero-sum outcome amid the reality that CanaMex cannot afford to walk-out.

So long as CanaMex cannot exit, and team U.S.A. drive the economic standard, there will be an agreement.  CanaMex won’t like the agreement, but when the elephant is not afraid of the opinion of the mice, and the elephant holds the key to the cheese vault – what’s the two mice gonna do?

The countries head to Mexico City for the second round, from Sept. 1st  to 5th.  A third round is schedule in Canada in late September, and then back to U.S, in October.

As previously stated the first round was heavy on on introductions and schedule-setting, while also featuring substantive discussions on matters of key divergence including auto-parts rules, cutting edge pharmaceuticals and labor wage rates.

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135 Responses to NAFTA Round One Concludes – Joint Statement From Canada, Mexico and United States….

  1. sundance says:

    Liked by 9 people

  2. Johnny Bravo says:

    Oh it’s gonna hurt to be a Canadian or Mexican bought and paid for politician. Tell me, who’s gonna pay for squat?

    That farting sound you can hear, that’s coming from the CanMex delegation as they consider how to spin this negative into a positive!

    Liked by 7 people

    • jmclever says:

      It will be positive for the people if The US can work in minimum wages for Mexican laborers. It’s really the politicians who will lose. A strong NAFTA can help the Mexican people and then they might want to stay in Mexico. Too bad we can’t write in a clause about Mexican drug cartels and narco-politicians being ousted/jailed into the trade agreements.

      Like

      • Jenny R. says:

        Why not? Canada wants to write in clauses about “First Nations”, LGBQWERTY, and climate change. Why couldn’t we write in clauses about drug and human trafficking (it isn’t just Mexico on that one…Canada is point of origin for a lot of that too…worth a look sometimes about the situation with their “First Nations” girls).
        It’s at least actually got something to do with international law enforcement.

        Like

  3. svenwg says:

    It would seem that for Canada and Mexico it would be better for them to walk away as at least their pride would be intact. The reality is that they will be outmanoeuvred at every turn and will be forced to sign, and implement, a treaty they hate, but which allows them some access to the US economy. MAGA, the winning just keeps getting better!!!

    Liked by 12 people

    • mswords000 says:

      They didn’t bother to send more effective people, which to me indicates that the previous Mexican and Canadian teams were probably not a lot better. So this shows again that the reason these countries did so well previously is because the U.S. negotiators gave away the store.

      Liked by 26 people

  4. auscitizenmom says:

    This is actually fun to watch. 🙂

    Liked by 22 people

    • sundance says:

      I agree completely. It really is, and I’ve tracked and followed trade deals for a long time; but this time is different.

      Take politics out of the equation, and the resulting outcomes are really enjoyable to watch. We have massive leverage that is too difficult to accurately frame with words.

      I’m pretty optimistic about the end result.

      Liked by 9 people

    • Judith says:

      What makes this even more interesting is that President Trump’s idea of “fair” trade does not leave the trading partners out of the equation. I’ve no doubt he will hammer out a deal that makes their own countries great again too. He is not only forcing our government to do what’s best for the American people, he is forcing Mexican government to do what is right for their people. He wants Mexico to pay their own people a living wage. He is negotiating on behalf of their people! And he has said he will only trade with Cuba if they can work out a deal that benefits Cuban people instead of their greedy government. Trump not only intends to MAGA he will also make the world great again. No more self-serving politics that puts the people last to benefit the global Elite.

      Liked by 6 people

  5. M. Mueller says:

    I was hoping these talks would have fallen apart by now and the whole NAFTA thing would be ended. Oh well, if it stays we have the team to make it work to our advantage.

    Liked by 4 people

    • pawatcher says:

      Hope it will lead with trade deal with each country individually: US/Canada and US/Mexico. Then Canada and Mexico can negotiate their deal.
      Trade should be the only topic of the negotiations: no one should lose any sovereignty, and none should be influenced politically to import people.

      Like

  6. jmuniz1 says:

    We need to kill NAFTA after these negotiations are over. It is a horrible deal. We need think about the American worker NAFTA killed millions of jobs.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. “canamex twin parasites”

    😂😂

    Liked by 9 people

  8. indiamaria2020 says:

    NAFTA will be signed — N ice A MERICAN-F riendly T rade A ppeasement.

    Liked by 10 people

  9. Bamalaker says:

    So much winning!

    Liked by 5 people

  10. lftpm says:

    Did anybody notice that the Mexican negotiators are not Native American or Mestizos, but pure-blood Spaniards, and clearly of lily-white (originally northern European/Frankish) ancestry ala Tom Perez of the DNC? When these people talk about “fairness”, they mean “We must protect our Conquistador riches, stature and privilege.”

    Liked by 31 people

    • CiscoKid says:

      Excellent observation, imo too.
      👍

      Liked by 4 people

    • Kathy says:

      Interesting point, one I’d not have noticed. The reality of who holds power in Mexico is something I need to learn more about.

      Liked by 2 people

      • G. Combs says:

        Mexico is a two class system. Many of the Indians do not even speak Spanish.

        Liked by 4 people

        • maiingankwe says:

          G. Combs,
          I did not know that, thank you.

          Now there is some interesting history I wouldn’t mind reading into. Always love reading and learning new things, especially different cultures of our world. Again, thank you.

          Like

        • Sylvia Avery says:

          Twenty years ago, I worked in an office with about 50 people. One woman who worked there was a Mexican immigrant but from the elite class. Another woman, who worked for me, was a Mexican immigrant but from the lower class.

          I had read about Mexican class differences, but ya know. I’m an American. Class? Interesting to read about in a book, but we have work to do so who cares.

          There were many little humiliations. Lots of condescending attitude and superiority, especially about my employee’s use of language. I began to notice and went to speak to the elite Mexican’s supervisor and I told him what I was seeing. He explained the class thing to me.

          I couldn’t believe they would leave their country, come here, and play that game out on our soil. I told him he’d better get his Princess under control or my chica and I would take her down. (Or words to that effect, LOL).

          Liked by 10 people

        • davidsstones says:

          Every country speaks the language of it’s Conqueror. A conqueror may know several languages but his native language will be the conquerors language. It disadvantages, weakens the people. Mexico’s elite would wear crowns today if it was allowed by world leaders promoting the doctrine of democracy by elections. They settle for their religion (Catholicism) their language and their classed society. Many of the natives cannot contribute to the economy that supports the rulers; they don’t need to trade in Spanish,

          Like

        • EJ says:

          My grandfather came here from Mexico in the 50s. So I have an opinion on this. When the President said they do not send us their best, he meant it. That is not to be derogatory, but that is their own opinion of culture. There are “blancos”, “morenos” and everything in between (meztizos). There is a sliding scale from light skin (Spanish) to dark (indigent indians). Ask your self (drugs aside) – if there is money to be made in Mexico, who holds the power? Who stays in Mexico to be successful? Who is coming here? Once you figure this stuff out, it becomes really funny to see Mexican Americans (who have been here a while) run to the defense of the new illegals regarding Trump’s comments. Mexicans keep to themselves, they just want to work and mind their own business. So running to the defense of their “culture” here, makes little to no sense. There are somthing like 60+ language and 18 ethnicities in Mexico. So that defense of the indian illegal immigrant is a learned (American) narrative, because that narrative certainly does not exist in Mexico. 20 years ago, there was kind of a hierarchy here, except it seemed to be more of first generation Mexican Americans (successful assimilated) v. the new wave. The old generation was hard on the new one. With older Mexicans, you still see it, but identity politics is gaining in popularity now. For example, my family has long assimilated and everyone spoke English. No one dared to speak Spanish. If I visit Mexico City, they all want to speak English to me. Everyone in Mexico wants to be European or American. It is bizarre to me that now, the new wave wants be “Mexican” again and fly their damn flags.

          Like

      • Read up at least a summary on MX’s history. During the entire time they’ve been our southern neighbor, they’ve never had a decent gov’t. It’s been awful corruption after every election for centuries. Generations of Euro-Spaniard elitists take turns lording over the natives like they’re garbage.

        That’s why it’s never made sense to me when Mestizos living in California, bring Mexican flags to attend ball games where they boo the American team, spit on them, throw beer on them etc., projecting all their hate onto the USA, ignoring the exploitative bigotry of 1%’ers like Jorge Ramos who don’t provide any real value.

        Liked by 5 people

        • yet when you examine MX’s natural resources, they’ve got gorgeous forests and landscapes comparable to US and Canada. But it’s wasted, never been harnessed or effectively developed, b/c the white ruling class behaves as selfishly as Soviet leaders did, preferring to pamper and flatter themselves instead of authentically unleashing their nation’s potential to compete and become a dynamic first-rate economy.

          Like

          • Tegan says:

            Same in Guatemala where I lived. For men, having even a tiny hint of facial hair was a source of pride…meaning you had some Spanish DNA.

            Like

          • Tegan says:

            If you’ve ever visited Venezuela, you know it’s a vast country with miles of open plains. The fact that people are starving…are breaking into zoos to eat the animals is mind-boggling when there is plenty of land to grow food, there is an accessible, large ocean to fish, plenty of sun and rain for year ’round crops. Instead, the President’s son is driving around Europe in a gold-plated Ferrari.

            Liked by 2 people

            • wrd9 says:

              I never understood why the West didn’t use more economic sanctions against corrupt elites/regimes in the developing world. Both Europe and the US allow corrupt elites and their relatives/friends from Latin America, Africa, and Asia to invest and live lavishly in the West. We all know that African despots and their cronies siphon off massive amounts of foreign aid. Why aren’t we freezing bank accounts and preventing the elite and their relatives from enjoying the West’s benefits? Colleges and universities should be blacklisting certain countries because of their human rights records and other abuses. Why is the US allowing wealthy Chavistas into Florida while their country starves its citizens? US CEOs and politicians virtue signal via discrimination against 50% of American citizens yet support vile regimes and cultures. It’s unbelievably hypocritical.

              Like

            • I also heard that Maduro doesn’t live in the presidential palace b/c Chavez’s beloved daughter Maria lives there enjoying her elite $4billion fortune.

              Like

          • Judith says:

            Trump will force the Mexican government to do right by their people. USA’s formidable trade leverage combined with Trump’s sense of fair play is an unbeatable combination. People the world over will thank Trump for his magnanimity. Their corrupt governments, not so much.

            Liked by 2 people

          • The Demon Slick says:

            Mexico is one of the richest countries in the world. Up until recently the world’s richest man was NYT owner Carlos Slim, of Mexico. Recent stock market gains combined with lower oil prices pushed Bezos and Zuckerberg ahead of him. It’s the corruption and the tiered class system keeping them down. White Spaniards still rule all these many years later.

            Like

    • flawesttexas says:

      Illegal Alienism is mainly pushed by Gringo MX….who want to ethnically cleanse Mexico and Latin America of their Mestizo and Indigenous peoples.

      Look at how many times Vicente FOX cursed at Trump…calling him a Racist. Lily white Gringo MX wanting to ethnically cleanse Mexico…but Trump is the racist🤔

      Liked by 11 people

    • tonyE says:

      I think they have some blood from Extremadura and Andalucia…. gypsies not to be taken too seriously up in Barcelona or even Madrid, just watch they don’t pick pocket your wallet.

      Like

    • annieoakley says:

      You got it!

      Like

    • Lindenlee says:

      And corruption. One reason Mexico can’t grow it’s economy from the bottom up is the corruption at high levels. They desperately need an oil refinery, can’t get it built because none of the corrupt eyes can figure out how much of their beaks will get wet. Same with their steel industry and copper fabrication. Very sad. This will NEVER change. It is the Mexican Way.

      Like

  11. grlangworth says:

    NAFTA will be what we say it will be. Nothing more, nothing less. Sundance has made it clear who holds all cards.

    Liked by 11 people

  12. Brian L says:

    This is going to be embarrassing for our neighbors all the way through, isn’t it?

    Liked by 6 people

    • janc1955 says:

      And strangely, I’m fresh outta give a sh!ts. So very tired of my country being the butt of every joke. Americans take note: Feeling perpetually privileged and guilty for being who and what we are has got us to this place. ENOUGH.

      Liked by 15 people

  13. Betty says:

    So much of NAFTA seemed to be focused on benefiting Canada and Mexico, even to giving them a two to one advantage in binding (?) arbitration in disputes with America over trade practices. And it seem they accorded the privilege of bidding on American infrastructure projects financed by American Taxpayer money.

    Why, oh why did they jeopardize their trade agreement with us by letting other nations (China) sneak in to the American market by using them. What fools. And I wonder what American politicians were in a position to know what was going on and as a direct result of knowing how much cash they made.

    Liked by 7 people

  14. parteagirl says:

    Oh Canada, bless your little potato heart.
    Mexico, you can keep your “best” on your side of the new wall, thanks.

    Liked by 12 people

  15. CiscoKid says:

    This is no Trump train any longer,🚂🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸.
    It’s the Trump steam roller.
    M🇺🇸A🇺🇸G🇺🇸A!

    Liked by 11 people

  16. Donna in Oregon says:

    “discussions on matters of key divergence including auto-parts rules, cutting edge pharmaceuticals and labor wage rates”

    As pertains to China? As in Fentanyl, here is an old article that is still relevant because the same problem still exists: http://dailycaller.com/2016/07/27/china-and-mexico-are-bringing-in-nightmare-super-drugs/

    Chinese car companies in Mexico? http://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/chinese-firm-opens-plant-in-veracruz/

    Chinese made auto parts duty free, and slave labor used in China? As in Rules of Origin? http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/top-dem-warns-of-tpp-car-mexican-made-of-chinese-parts-sold-in-us/article/2583851

    Those kinds of ‘discussions’ is why President Trump dumping TPP is so fabulous….now to phase 2 of China……..I mean NAFTA (snicker).

    Liked by 6 people

  17. Canada is going to regret it’s virtue signalling, which was done to belittle and demean the USA.

    Mexico is going to regret, oh so much, their threats to swarm us with illegals gangs drugs.

    Mexico’s economy is also HEAVILY dependent upon USA tourism. They need to keep that smile.

    MAGA

    Liked by 8 people

    • Donna in Oregon says:

      Tourism…..not only should tourists not drink the water, but don’t drink the alcohol either.

      Mexico raids 31 hot spots, 10,000 gallons of illegal alcohol seized after Wisconsin woman’s death at posh resort
      http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/08/14/mexico-raids-31-hot-spots-10000-gallons-illegal-alcohol-seized-after-womans-death-at-posh-resort.html

      Be sure to bring your bullet proof vests with your suntan lotion.

      Mexican resort beach shooting kills 3, officials say
      Published August 07, 2017 Fox News
      http://www.foxnews.com/world/2017/08/07/gunmen-attack-group-at-mexican-resort-beach-killing-3-men.html

      Shootout in Cancun: Narcos Take Their War Into Hot Beach Resorts
      https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-07-21/showdown-in-cancun-narcos-take-their-war-into-hot-beach-resorts

      GRAPHIC: 19 Cartel Gunmen Killed in Firefight near Mexican Beach Resort Town
      http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2017/07/02/graphic-19-cartel-gunmen-killed-firefight-near-mexican-beach-resort-town/

      Maybe those cheap vacations should come with a Costco casket, eh?

      Liked by 3 people

      • CiscoKid says:

        My dearest friends went to Los Cabos, but returned home safely before the shootings.
        I used to enjoy going to Mexico.
        I liked the all inclusive resorts, all food an liquor include.
        But that was 15 years ago. Once the cartel scourge started, I haven’t been bac.
        Sadly, Paris which I enjoyed is on my list of no go.

        Liked by 3 people

      • pyromancer76 says:

        Oh, how I loved to go to Rosarita Beach. No more. Even long ago, early 2000s, attended a conference in Cancun. One day after we left, there was a shootout at the door of the restaurant where we had dined two days ago. A number dead. Beautiful, beautiful country. Wonderful people. Corruption and criminality everywhere. A tragedy, as much for Mexicans as for those who like to enjoy their country as tourists.

        Liked by 4 people

      • nimrodman says:

        I’m skeptical, I think some of that “contaminated alcohol” and “bootleg” reporting may be disinformation covering up a widespread practice of roofy-ing tourists for robbery or worse, sexual assault of females

        Then again, this other story mentions the dead woman and brother were 3 times legal limit, 0.25%.
        http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/07/21/contaminated-drugged-liquor-may-be-responsible-for-womans-mysterious-death-at-mexican-resort-dad-says.html

        “Abbey Conner, 20, was found next to her brother, Austin, face-down in a pool at the five-star Iberostar Paraiso del Mar in Playa del Carmen.

        “Officials said the siblings had a blood alcohol level around .25, three times the legal limit in Wisconsin.

        Still, the brother is dishonest about it:

        “Austin also claimed that he and his sister were not attempting to get drunk the night of her death. Austin said the two consumed a few shots of tequila and another “Jagerbomb” type shot before blacking out. Austin also said he hit his head at the time and had a “golf ball-sized lump” on his forehead.

        “I’ve been in college for five years and had my fair share of drinks before,” Austin told The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “No way in hell I’m putting my face down in a pool and going to sleep.”

        Sorry, brother, you don’t get to 0.25 blood alcohol from just “a few shots and another jagerbomb”

        You may have had your “fair share of drinks before” but at 3x the legal limit you’re staggering drunk. Am I wrong about that? Anyone have experience with someone 3x the legal limit?

        Like

    • Gil says:

      No where in mex is it safe anymore for tourists. Cancun was able to keep all that violence out for many years to their credit, esp since el presidente has the summer residence there(surrounded by gator infested swamp), but that ended years ago. I would never risk my safety there unless they seriously went medieval on corruption and criminals.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Lindenlee says:

        Not true. Chapala and San Miguel are still safe, Queretaro too. I have a house in the Chapala Area. Mexico is a,huge country, but you have to stay out of the drug lanes.

        Like

    • Judith says:

      The global elite will suffer greatly. They can no longer loot and pillage each country at will. It was a global shell game with money disappearing everywhere, before Trump came along. People the world over will finally realize who all the bad actors are.

      Liked by 2 people

  18. lftpm says:

    In the 1950’s there were economists who proposed America’s “advancement” from an Industrial economy, to an office-based economy. Looking through the retrospectroscope, the evidence was obvious: the vast expansion of “university education” to the blue-collar-worker class (WWII, Korean War veteran generation and their progeny abandoned physical labor for paperwork).

    By the 1960’s major American corporations had enough cash to buy other corporations–they did not need international bank funding to diversify their domestic holdings. This was a mostly zero-sum game. In order to expand international banking business, it was necessary to create new industrial economies in historically agrarian regions. China was obviously the best place to do this because it had a huge population of people who were willing to work hard.

    China, an agrarian economy lacked technology and lacked the university and industrial know-how to move up to the industrialization stage. Solution: transfer American knowhow and Euro-American bank financing to jump-start a super-fast evolution.

    The problem, for American industrial workers, was that the jump-start meant ultra-low labor-cost Chinese farm-to-factory workers would vastly underprice American industrial laborers, rendering them superfluous. They themselves were the descendants of agrarian serfs and peasants. They were “living too well”, in the minds of the international plutocrats, and not working hard enough, and costing “too much money”, to be price-competitive against the newly farm-to-factory workers in China.

    Liked by 3 people

  19. we knew there was a reason for these tycoon to leave the council!

    Liked by 5 people

  20. 52686 says:

    Die NAFTA Die. With Mexico’s low wage and the Canada/Mexico tag team on trade disputes, how can NAFTA go on and still bridge the huge trade gaps. ( And you just know Mexico will cheat if NAFTA stays somehow.)
    Just kill it already and start a new trade agreement with Canada and another one with Mexico.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. HMellville says:

    It’s unfortunate for Canadians that Trudeau is PM rather than Cons. Steve Harper in his prime and before his multi term party imploded from within. Harper and his trade reps like the U.S reps today would be “looking at the trade deal purely through the prism of economics, not politics (and wouldn’t be ) trying to win virtuous points,” as the article accurately states.

    Here are some interesting figures (to me) regarding Canada:
    77.8% of Canadian exports (by value) were delivered to its North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partners, United States and Mexico. Asian importers purchased 11.1% followed by European imports at 8.4%. Latin America and the Caribbean consumed 1.4% of Canada’s total exports.
    Canada’s Top 10 Exports:
    1. Vehicles : US$64.3 billion (16.5% of total exports)
    2. Mineral fuels including oil: $62.3 billion (16%)
    3. Machinery including computers: $30 billion (7.7%)
    4. Gems, precious metals: $18.7 billion (4.8%)
    5. Wood: $13.2 billion (3.4%)
    6. Electrical machinery, equipment: $12.6 billion (3.2%)
    7. Plastics, plastic articles: $12.1 billion (3.1%)
    8. Aircraft, spacecraft: $10.3 billion (2.6%)
    9. Pharmaceuticals: $8.4 billion (2.2%)
    10. Aluminum: $8.1 billion (2.1%)
    (From WETX stats)

    Other than Canadian natural resources like wood, aluminum, gems, precious metals and possibly Mineral Fuels incl. oil (ie.Keystone) and other raw resources that the U.S MIGHT NEED to import to its benefit, it looks like most of the products could be easily manufactured or made in the USA. I also suspect most of the companies involved in the exported products are American owned esp. the vehicle makers. Trudeau’s PC team had better ensure that they don’t overdue their supercilious grandstanding and pontificating about their “supposed” moral and ethical superiority over Trump’s admin. during these negotiations or their GDP could plummet.

    Liked by 2 people

    • TheLastDemocrat says:

      Had better ensure?!
      They are locked in to what they had better avoid. The only way they are politically viable is by opposing what, in regular economics, is unfeasible.

      Here comes the Invisible Hand knocking…

      Like

  22. When all is said and done Mexico will pay for the wall and be happy to sign the check.

    Liked by 8 people

  23. I have decided to dub this CanaMexiLoonsCarumba…. as you may or may not know Loons are revevered in Canadia, they are beautiful and their call is God sent, the Canuckistans even have a Loony ($1) and a Twoony ($2) Carumba is a hat tip to SDs I-Carumba overpass fast express train

    Liked by 1 person

    • chbailey says:

      My 1st visit to Canada was on a camping trip in Algonquin Provincial Park north of Toronto and at dawn I woke to a loon call out on the lake. From my tent, I glimpsed several loons through the fog and fell in love with Canada then and there. My brother bought me a Reed Weir Loon Whistle from the Vancouver Art Museum as a memento.

      Liked by 1 person

      • BEAUTIFUL!! It truly is a beautiful sound!! One morning at the lake, I heard the call while on the dock, and in the morning mist and pink/orange sunrise I looked up & snapped a picture of a Loon pair calling to each other….not the greatest pic, but will post to you tomorrow….they were so close and the sound just beautiful! It makes you truly catch your breath!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Like I said not great pics, but best I could do as I was totally surprised by them appearing and didn’t want to scare them off

        Liked by 1 person

        • chbailey says:

          Oh my, how nice was that experience! That’s the thing about loons, they can disappear in a trice. I froze, too, because I didn’t want them to see my movement on the shoreline. Beautiful is right and very good shots. Really captures the moment.

          Liked by 1 person

    • TheLastDemocrat says:

      Ay Caramba! its Toll-licios!

      Like

  24. CiscoKid says:

    “So long as CanaMex cannot exit, and team U.S.A. drive the economic standard, there will be an agreement. CanaMex won’t like the agreement, but when the elephant is not afraid of the opinion of the mice, and the elephant holds the key to the cheese vault – what’s the two mice gonna do?”
    Scathing brilliant Sundance!
    👍

    Liked by 2 people

  25. Bob Thoms says:

    Sundance, at weeks end are we still around a level #3 on the probability of a deal?

    And mega thanks for posting this thread. I look forward to it at the end of each day, and email it to a couple of friends and family just to keep them in the loop. These folks aren’t really interested in this kind of nuts and bolts stuff, but I send it anyway hoping some of it sinks in. I always tell them 3 things :

    – Trillions of Dollars At Stake
    – Economics is Survival
    – Everything Else is Chaffe

    Thanks !

    Like

  26. Bob Thoms says:

    If AntiFa/BLM/Anarchists had any smarts they would be in Washington protesting this kind of serious stuff; not statues and rebel flags.

    On second thought, it’s a good thing they are so clueless.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. TexasDude says:

    I did not notice this from other posts, but just looking at whom Canada sent, they were not serious. That explains their ridiculous, unserious demands.

    Like

  28. Paco Loco says:

    The Canadian and Mexican economies are appendages of the US economy. If we are up, they are up. If we are down they are down. For the US, the problem is that its an unequal balance of trade where we buy more than we sell. http://www.worldsrichestcountries.com/top_us_imports.html

    NAFTA was a gift to US Big Business letting them move production (like automobiles, electronics, white goods etc.) to Mexico where labor was non unionized and cheap. 80% of Mexicos trade is with the US. Canada is our largest trading partner
    http://www.munknee.com/what-are-the-major-imports-exports-between-the-u-s-and-canada-this-list-might-surprise-you/ and has the most to loose if the US walks away from NAFTA. NAFTA Is a real stinker of a deal ( thank you Bill Clinton.) that is obscenely unfair to the US.

    The US is better walking away from NAFTA ( with its many back doors for Chinese goods) and just go to bi-lateral trade deals. We don’t benefit from NAFTA so why keep it?

    Liked by 3 people

    • Paco Loco says:

      China is our largest trading partner, then Canada, then Mexico.

      Like

    • KittyKat says:

      Today one USD is worth about 1.26 CAD. That makes it easy for the U.S. to buy Canadian goods at a big discount, while to Canadians, U.S. goods are almost unaffordable. That’s why there’s such a big trade deficit.

      Before the trade deficit can be reduced, something’ gonna have to even out the valuation gap between the USD and CAD, to make U.S. goods more affordable to Canadians.

      Liked by 1 person

      • KittyKat says:

        About five years ago or so, the CAD and USD were at parity, with the CAD sometimes worth a wee bit more than the USD. I don’t t know why the CAD has tumbled so far in value, but it must be hitting the Snowbirds hard.

        Liked by 1 person

        • KittyKat says:

          Maybe the CAD was valued more back then because Canada’s Prime Minister, Stephen Harper, was an economist and a conservative. Maybe there’s now less faith in the CAD because the Canadian leader is a lefty-artsy school teacher. Also, tumbling oil prices haven’t helped Canada’s economy.

          Like

        • dekester says:

          The Canadian dollar is a petro dollar. As goes the price of oil, so goes, or at least used to the Canadian dollar.

          Many Canadians own property and run businesses in the U.S. and keep U.S. dollar accounts..it is useful to remember that something like 80% of the Canadian population lives within 50 Miles of the U.S. border.

          Our ties were/ are deep. Hopefully PDJT can heal the divide. It will be different cult, because of the alt left, and SJWs But one can hope..

          God bless PDJT

          Liked by 2 people

          • dekester says:

            Argh..auto correct. Should have read difficult. Sorry.

            Like

          • KittyKat says:

            The lower oil prices are a lesson that viable economies need to be more diversified and less dependent on one product. .

            Like

            • KittyKat says:

              That statistic about the population of Canada was interesting.

              I know that U.S. – Canada ties are deep because my dad was American and my mom was Canadian. So I have family on both sides of the border. Some of my Canadian forbears even fought in the U.S. civil war.

              Liked by 2 people

      • Paco Loco says:

        The Peso also got devalued down to 21:1 before it’s come back to 17.5:1 usd. There’s many parts to the economic engine that need tuning.

        Liked by 1 person

  29. Craig W. Gordon says:

    Team Trump for USA is the right team at the right time. Thank God!

    Like

  30. Donna in Oregon says:

    Sorry I forgot to say thank you Sundance. Every time I read about these negotiations my ADHD kicks in and I go….wait, is that a squirrel? After President Reagan left it all went downhill and I have decades of issues being addressed all at once.

    It is splendid. Thank you for slowing the process down so I can enjoy this. Heavenly 🙂

    Like

  31. TexasDude says:

    Note …

    Free trade is great.

    We do not have free trade with our enemies or allies alike.

    So, there is no free trade.

    Like

  32. The left has used ideology and emotions over voters to get what they want for too long. Now they are face to face with a pragmatic lion who sees ideology and emotion for what it truly is, entitlement and hoodwinking.

    Like

  33. MaineCoon says:

    Trump Team: Calculating

    CanaMex Team: Miscalculating

    And The Winner Is (drumroll): USA🇺🇸USA🇺🇸USA🇺🇸

    Like

  34. Glenn E Stehle says:

    Trump, with his demand that Mexican workers be paid more and treated better, has all of a sudden emerged as the hero of the Mexican working class.

    This is from Napoleón Gómez Urrutia, the Secretary General of the Union of Mining Workers of the Republic of Mexico.

    Donald Trump and the Mexican reality
    http://www.jornada.unam.mx/2017/08/17/opinion/019a1pol

    The Trump administration is pushing hard for better labor standards, which were never included in the original NAFTA.

    In addition, a progressive labor reform is needed that generates fundamental changes, not makeup, that truly protects workers’ fundamental guarantees, and also democracy and freedom of association.

    In a contradictory and ironic way, Trump will eventually be the protector of the interests of Mexican workers.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Glenn E Stehle says:

      Liked by 1 person

    • Glenn E Stehle says:

      Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo’s response:

      If the United States insists on reviewing labor costs, Secretary of Economy Ildefonso Guajardo will withdraw Mexico from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) negotiations.

      Undersecretary Juan Carlos Baker said Mexico was ready to renegotiate the treaty, but not to give in to the pressures of Donald Trump. If Mexico withdraws from NAFTA, due to its status as the less favored country, bilateral trade would be governed by the pre-existing agreements of the World Trade Organization (WTO). If so, the US could charge slightly higher tariffs on Mexican imports, but Mexico could multiply tariffs that it charges on imports from the United States.

      That is why when on Tuesday…Robert Lighthizer introduced the salary issue in the negotiation, the answer was blunt: if the United States insists too much on this issue, the renegotiation for Mexico will be over.

      La idea de Trump de obligar a México a aumentar los sueldos amenaza la renegociación del Nafta
      Trump’s idea to obligate Mexico to increase salaries threatens the renegotiation of NAFTA

      http://www.lapoliticaonline.com/nota/107491/

      Like

      • Judith says:

        Sounds like the Mexican government is controlled by the global Elite, just like Canada, the EU and the USA was before Trump. Open borders was always about slave wages, a movement of people, or human trafficking to maximize corporate profits. The American taxpayers covered the difference, importing cheap laborers for businesses and then providing basic services, medical care, food and shelter. That was on our dime.

        Our withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord made it clear that we were also paying the freight for migrants the world over. We pull out our funding and suddenly it is no longer about “climate” and EU countries begin to close their own borders. Without our billions in their shell game they no longer can afford their human trafficking schemes.

        Liked by 1 person

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