President Trump Participates in Opioid Epidemic Briefing – and Press Conference…

WASHINGTON – President Trump on Tuesday said one of the best ways to prevent addictions to drugs such as heroin and prescription painkillers is to keep young people from taking them in the first place.

“If they don’t start, they won’t have a problem,” he said in remarks to the media, according to pool reports. “If they do start, it’s awfully tough to get off. So if we can keep them from going on and maybe by talking to youth and telling them, ‘No good, really bad for you in every way.’ But if they don’t start, it will never be a problem.” (read more)

Additionally HHS Secretary Price and Kellyanne Conway participated in a press briefing at the conclusion of the meeting with President Trump. Video below.

Remarks begin at 07:40 WATCH:

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143 Responses to President Trump Participates in Opioid Epidemic Briefing – and Press Conference…

  1. Tonawanda says:

    Can we stop people from putting needles in themselves?

    And what do we think about the completely innocent people who have been killed, robbed, assaulted and burglarized, events which would not have happened without the war on drugs? How come they never get counted into the equation?

    Because it has been decades since we have even assessed and analyzed what the equation is.

    If you do not promote the hysteria, you are pro-drugs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • joshua says:

      many urban communities used to GIVE AWAY syringes to prevent passing on STDs and other diseases from sharing needles.

      Ignored the underlying problem…and aided it…..

      Liked by 4 people

      • Tonawanda says:

        What is the underlying problem?

        There seem to be a dozen or so.

        Liked by 1 person

        • coco1050 says:

          In rural communities the jobs are gone—–That’s a big one.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Tonawanda says:

            Yes, there may very well be a correlation between lack of jobs and drug use.

            Liked by 1 person

            • The Deplorable Tina says:

              People are also starting to realize that with the drug testing for the jobs that are available, people that are testing positive are denied a job. Then they fall back into the drug cycle.

              I think this needs to be addressed. Not sure how & I realize that the liability of allowing a drug-addicted person to operate heavy machinery is prohibitive. But. If someone is offered a job on the condition that they get clean & attend meetings & have regular tests, or something, that might incentivize them to turn their lives around. If the employers just say “sorry, no” then there would not be much incentive to try to get clean. Easier to just lay around & float all day, right?

              Liked by 1 person

              • Tonawanda says:

                My concern for a long time is that we (our American society) has not even considered doing a deep analysis and assessment of the problem.

                Drugs have been so hysterically propagandized, it is not possible for a politician to ask for a genuine study of the matter without being called pro-drug.

                Trump is the only one who could do it, but I am not sure if I were advising him that I would suggest he do it, it is that toxic.

                Like

              • Kaco says:

                I saw a news report of this very thing, 40% of applicants in Ohio heavy equipment jobs can’t pass a drug test. Many apparently don’t bother applying because of drugs in the system, knowing they can’t pass a test.

                Like

          • TheLastDemocrat says:

            Boo hoo hoo.

            i have driven across the country, with no money, on a shoestring budget, to make my way in the world.

            I figured out plenty of ways to slip out of a very demanding job in order to hit up a pay phone, with one of those long-distance prepaid cards, and talk to people at graduate programs so I could figure out where it would be worth my time to apply, at $50 per application fee. There was no cell phone back then. No internet.

            Then, I hung up the pay phone, in that hot booth, and hurried back to work quickly so my standing would not decline at work due to the absences necessary to reach the right people during business hours.

            And fulfilled my job well. Then, loaded up in the rental again, towing my economy car again, halfway across U.S. to yet another city that was new to me, to make my next move.

            No jobs? Work scratch up some money, rent a moving van, pack yourself and load the van yourself, load up the car on the dolly yourself, and move.

            Like

          • kp3ace says:

            Injuries in the workplace! My ex worked for the local steel mill! Just walking around trying to get things done was dangerous. Bits of sharp metal all over the place, dim lighting, so you couldn’t see where you walked.

            Like

        • joshua says:

          addiction…it is a disease…has many forms…drugs, alcohol, internet, sex, gambling, fast driving….it requires a life change and committment to overcome…and total abstinance for the abused substance/activity…..recovery is hard work, and requires help from outside the person themselves.

          once into drugs, the addict hangs around no one but dealers and other druggies, and cannot escape…even when what would be hitting bottom for most people occur, many druggies stay on the street homeless or otherwise.

          Addiction is a family disease, often the root is in DNA from historical generations past.

          Never start a substance that is addictive is the true cure…prevention…..and that is HARD because many users are not addictive personalities and can just use for recreation, and the addict thinks he or she should be able to do the same as peers.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Oldschool says:

        Agree joshua and throwing billions at rehab programs that yield 10% success rate at best is a huge mistake. It can only be addressed at the root and it is multi faceted and complicated.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Tonawanda says:

          The “root” is not even what we all recognize as criminal, it is human nature and human biology. What do you do about those “roots”?

          We need the police officers on CTH and especially the narcotics officers to help us with these questions.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Oldschool says:

            The recent epidemic is not primarily rooted in criminalty. It is behavioral. Lack of jobs, lack of intact families, culture of instant gratification, inability to tolerate minor discomforts, easy access to pot at younger ages, parents who use, docs writing prescrptions, overuse and acess to meds, vast increase of disabilty/medicaid. The list does go on. Rehab programs will fix none of these problems. Family, faith, work ethic, personal responsibility and jobs are the solution.

            Liked by 4 people

            • Michelle says:

              “Inability to tolerate minor discomforts”…so true. That particular characteristic is so prevalent today. Think of all the libs needing safe spaces after every little event.

              Liked by 2 people

            • Tonawanda says:

              Yes. Law enforcement is a strange fix for cultural/spiritual problems.

              Like

            • kp3ace says:

              Our laws also have an affect. When it became illegal to discipline your children, not abuse, discipline. Some of the worst crimes I’ve seen are from adults that I knew as children. Spare the rod, spoil the child comes to mind.

              Like

          • joshua says:

            actually you need to hear from addicts that are in recovery themselves, who are practicing a 12 step type of program and who are aware of how is was and how it is now. Police officers cannot tell anyone how to stop using, they are just there to arrest people who are breaking the law…and unless there is violence or danger to the addict personally or to others around him, they are not going to haul the addict off to jail…because he will be sent to a outside program and will not attend meetings and do the work when they are out of jail.

            Drugs and Alcohol are NOT the problem….they are the ADDICTS Solution to his or her problem….which, in a nutshell…..is the inability to accept Life of Life’s terms as it comes…they lack honesty with themselves and others, and they are in denial about their addiction….they are usually shame based people who have an underlying set of emotional problems, anger, loss of family and friends, jealousy, greed, lots of emotional issues dragging their lives into a pit of terrible horrible unsolvable living issues….so they use the drug of choice to escape those miserable feelings for at least a moment or so….

            and while they are not in control of their actions, they do improper things.

            Liked by 4 people

            • highdezertgator says:

              Addiction is a “spiritual malady” that can only be arrested by a “spiritual solution”.
              Honesty, Open-mindedness and Humility are all necessary ingredients for recovery. …and Hard work!
              Ask an addict or alcoholic how they got started… tobacco, alcohol, pot, …then cocaine, meth, crack, oxy and heroin. Alcohol is always there to feed and fuel “control” the addictive state of mind.
              So before the opioid epidemic alcohol was and is still king and queen of addiction
              “An estimated 88,000 people (approximately 62,000 men and 26,000 women) die from alcohol-related causes annually, making alcohol the fourth leading preventable cause of death in the United States. In 2014, alcohol-impaired driving fatalities accounted for 9,967 deaths (31 percent of overall driving fatalities).”
              https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-facts-and-statistics

              Liked by 1 person

            • Tonawanda says:

              Immaturity, dishonesty, despair, it is so complicated. Most horrible of all are the vengeful suicides which throw so many others into despair and suffering.

              Like

        • Tonawanda says:

          The rehab programs for those other than the wealthy might be inadequate.

          I don’t know. But neither does any average American.

          Tens of billions of dollars are spent by government.

          Where do they go, and how well spent are they?

          Like

    • georgiafl says:

      Hysteria?

      Trump’s resolve to solve the heroin and opioid problem isn’t hysteria.

      Not by a long shot.

      It’s a thoughtful, strategic, multi-pronged, multi-level commitment to the best for America and its citizens.

      Liked by 9 people

      • georgiafl says:

        The widespread use and deaths from Opioids requires responsible action!

        Just look at one state – West Virginia – state of Trump’s last rally – where the governor said he couldn’t help his people as a Democrat.

        http://www.wvgazettemail.com/news-health/20161218/suspicious-drug-order-rules-never-enforced-by-state

        Liked by 2 people

      • Tonawanda says:

        Trump’s resolve is not in question.

        Trump made the most sensible statement possible, don’t start.

        But the current “crisis” “epidemic” “death death death” propaganda is hysteria over something government is very ill equipped to do.

        TODAY I saw a billboard on a busy street in Buffalo warning that driving under the influence of heroin is a crime.

        That really ought to shake things up.

        America has not in a long time (ever?) done a thorough assessment and analysis of the many considerations of drug use, and they are MANY, not simply addiction and drug deaths.

        The issue is highly politicized, meaning it cannot be discussed rationally.

        It is too bad, a whole new look at things might genuinely benefit our country, if it is fair, and considers the MANY aspects of the issue.

        Let me throw out one: how many lives of otherwise productive Americans have been permanently destroyed by a criminal record consisting of drug possession?

        Liked by 3 people

        • georgiafl says:

          Drug use is preceded and predicted by many factors, events, experiences. Those also need to be addressed.

          Otherwise productive Americans, even without an arrest, will most likely have their lives and their family’s lives destroyed by drugs.

          Liked by 3 people

        • TheLastDemocrat says:

          “Let me throw out one: how many lives of otherwise productive Americans have been permanently destroyed by a criminal record consisting of drug possession?”

          Oh, please. My kid just cleared $70 with a lemonade stand a couple weeks ago.

          How many idiots cannot mix Country Time lemonade mix and water?

          A friend of mine redoes furniture and makes a good handful of money from each piece. Despite a long-term chronic pain problem.

          Like

        • G. Combs says:

          “….how many lives of otherwise productive Americans have been permanently destroyed by a criminal record consisting of drug possession?…..”

          I am dealing with three of them right now. Can’t get a decent job because had a felony conviction years ago. Can’t get the $$$ (I was told $800 for lawyer) to get the felony expunged. Stuck in no job/dead end low pay job.

          […] This statute provided a legal process in which the records of “first offenders” that were under “the age of 18” at the time of the commission of a “nonviolent felony,” could be expunged, completely removing the history of said arrest and conviction from the person’s criminal record. An individual seeking to expunge the conviction under this statute needs to have a clean criminal history from the date of the conviction(s) being expunged, meaning no additional convictions other than traffic violations. The convictions can be expunged 4 years from the conviction date or completion of any sentence, whichever is later.[…]
          http://www.kirkkirklaw.com/legal-resources/can-i-have-my-felony-conviction-taken-off-of-my-criminal-record/

          Liked by 1 person

      • joshua says:

        it cannot be done by a Government program or because of money.
        there are institutions that know what to do…but folks with shame and pride will not surrender to the process and job it takes to recover.

        even if you get the drugs off the street…the addict will find ways to get them.

        Sorry, but HHS and President Trump (who does not drink nor drug and never did, but lost a relative to alcohol ) does not have the knowledge or experience to fix this issue…and no one in HHS is prepared to do the work either …..faith based recovery programs are about 40% successful, and that is as good as it gets statistically for a practicing addict.

        Unless the social emotional issues….not poverty….maybe ignorance and lack of nuclear family mentors and solid adults to help learn about NOT USING in the first place, this cannot be fixed by wishing to do good…..stop before it starts, and educate as INDIVIDUALS that it cannot do anything but go badly if you EVER use or even TRY drugs.

        Liked by 3 people

        • georgiafl says:

          Joshua, I believe Trump is wise and smart enough to seek experts who DO KNOW what to do and how to do it.

          Having studied psychology, social work and addictions for decades, I know many gains have been and being made.

          Doing something is better than doing nothing – but Trump is a man of excellence and commitment – and his work will be thorough, evidence-based and results-driven.

          Like

          • Judith says:

            One important aspect President Trump can influence is our government’s profiting from big pharma and drug cartels alike. Heroin has flooded the market and its high grade and dirt cheap. Opioid pills are over prescribed and expensive. Pill addicts then switch over to the cheap heroin. Why does our government guard the poppy fields? Don’t be surprised if drug running is a key reason our dirty pols oppose a border wall.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Tonawanda says:

          Christianity is perhaps the most successful immediate approach to addiction (and not much).

          How well will that be regarded in our society?

          Like

    • Can you stop people from doing it? NO!

      Can you make it harder and more difficult for them to get to that point? YES!
      Drugs right now are in the norm. There isn’t a place in the country that if you wanted something you couldn’t find it.

      There is no simple solution to any of this. No magic bullet. But stopping the availability sometimes stops one more person. That person can stop someone else.
      If any addict can find drugs in Every city, why can’t the police find that same guy? And then the next guy to replace him.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Tonawanda says:

        Here is the ultimate irony: the “victims” the drug war purports to save are also the criminals who are harshly punished.

        Stopping the availability, yes, but is the only way to destroy the village to save the village?

        Liked by 1 person

        • woohoowee says:

          What about those who are victims of theft and/or violence and/or the general chaos of those under the influence of drugs?

          Liked by 2 people

          • Tonawanda says:

            Depends on the drug, and depends on their motivation.

            Do the drugs do it, or does the illegality of the drugs do it?

            How about a gentle, intelligent, altruistic young man who has done state time for burglary. Would it ever have occurred to him to burglarize if it were not for his illegal addiction?

            And here is an aspect people NEVER consider: what about the completely innocent victims who are collateral damage in the drug war? The ones who are killed, robbed, assaulted, burglarized and displaced because the illegality of drugs created the circumstance of their victimhood?

            Even the victims themselves do not think of it that way. But the number is probably in the millions, people who have been collateral damage in the war on drugs.

            Liked by 1 person

            • woohoowee says:

              Around here it’s the drug of choice, methamphetamine, which makes the users erratic and violent. And the users *know* what it does to them, but do it anyway. These users leave their own collateral damage both on individuals and the community at large.

              See where I’m coming from?

              Liked by 1 person

              • Tonawanda says:

                Oh yes. Meth and coke lead to violence, just as alcohol does in many cases.

                There is a spiritual problem involved in all this, something Trump recognized early in his life. One of the reasons I admire him so much.

                Liked by 1 person

            • JoAnn Leichliter says:

              One can argue that it is the illegality of drugs that causes all or most of the problems, but I suspect that is incorrect. Legalizing drug use has not worked out well for countries that have tried it. Supposing purchasing and using drugs were not a crime, would addicts then be less likely to commit crimes, violent and otherwise, often associated with addiction? Would there be fewer addicts? Think past stage one here.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Tonawanda says:

                I am by no means an expert, but Portugal decriminalized all drugs 16 years ago.

                Here is one report: among other things, the addiction rate went down.

                https://mic.com/articles/110344/14-years-after-portugal-decriminalized-all-drugs-here-s-what-s-happening

                But “success” is measured in narrow terms, the effect on addiction.

                I would broaden the criteria. How many crimes against innocents have not been committed?

                How many engineers have has their careers destroyed because of drug possession, throwing away talented and educated people? Or preventing gifted people to contribute to society?

                People do stupid things to themselves, and many learn to be better people in a way which substantially contributes to the rest of us.

                Is it worth even asking whether “we” are throwing such people away?

                Like

              • kp3ace says:

                I disagree, JoAnn! I can name 2 people who were given the “legal” drugs prescribed by their doctor for pain, 1 is a veteran! Took him years to get himself off of the pain medication. He figures he has enough time to finish raising his kids. Youngest just turned 17. He 56 years old. Now he smokes mj. because it helps. Can’t get disability because he does pot. In the meantime, he’s helping his youngest get a sports scholarship.

                Like

      • woohoowee says:

        If any addict can find drugs in Every city, why can’t the police find that same guy? And then the next guy to replace him.

        One reason is that people don’t tell law enforcement anything. One of the reasons for that is b/c people don’t want to end up with their house burned down or worse.

        Like

    • nimrodman says:

      At top of comments Tonawanda mentioned “needles”.

      Indeed.

      ‘It’s raining needles’: More than 13,000 used heroin syringes are picked up in ONE month across the nation’s parks and public spaces as America’s opioid crisis spirals out of control
      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4702438/Its-raining-needles-Drug-crisis-creates-pollution-threat.html

      ”Little children have been known to pick up used needles, thinking they’re toys or even thermometers and getting poked by them”


      Like

    • Sam says:

      And what about legitimate pain patients? They suffer needlessly under the War on Drugs. There’s a price to society for that too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Tonawanda says:

        A friend of mine in his late 70’s, a HIGHLY productive and valuable member of society, told me last week how difficult it is to get his pain medication for multiple conditions. He was explicitly told by the doctor that the opioid “crisis” affected medical decisions, not individual cases.

        Like

      • You can say that again. Total knee replacement 3 months ago. among 10 other MAJOR surgeries thruout years. Docs were playing games, I cant write the script, let him! Surgeon to Pain Mgt to Primary to Cardio to Ansthsis. Unreal, like in time warp. Then pharmacy wouldn’t fill until 4 days later when they spoke to doc to approve the script he wrote.

        Like

    • carrierh says:

      If you keep the people drugged whether with cannabis or any other drug, they all eventually are slaves and easy to manage and/or vote. I grew up in an era that no one ever took drugs and not even pushed by doctors, and antibiotic translates to kill the necessary creatures in our body to take care of our immunity and digestive and brain! I am allergic to antibiotics and don’t take any other drugs because I find Chinese Medicine herbal formulas do the trick with hurting the body and they are safe too! Seeing how so many from the 60’s suffered from sexual diseases and drug taking made it clear to me that no way would I go either route. Free sex leads to expensive health care or AIDS; expensive drugs generally lead to a lot of deaths as well and Big Pharma, thanks to Obama, can’t be sued if you wind up with more serious illnesses or die. Ain’t that nice! NOT!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. average Joe says:

    I read an article the other day,that said Medicaid played a big role in the opioid epedemic ,by paying for a LOT OF PRESCRIPTIONS.

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Deplorable_Vespucciland says:

    Pro-drug legalization czar GeorgeSoros is busy undermining the Trump agenda.
    The SorosFamily monsters need to be arrested and their assets confiscated.

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/08/leaked-memo-soros-funded-media-matters-working-facebook-twitter-kill-pro-trump-articles/

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      I bet there is a RICO case lurking there somewhere if only a clever and determined federal prosecutor could get to work.

      Liked by 3 people

      • piper567 says:

        I find it hard to believe there is not a little group at work within the Trump Administration that is not right on top of what is going on with soros. All kinds of info circulates, along with photos of his activity, even on redditt sights.
        So how is it we may think Trump and his are not aware?
        But this is just like any other heavy handed pursuit: has to be a airtight case before any action takes place to indict.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sylvia Avery says:

          I hope you are right. It would seem to me if this wasn’t happening, PDJT’s people would really be missing a bet, and so far PDJT has shown me nothing to make me believe he would miss an obvious bet like this.

          Like

        • carrierh says:

          I don’t worry because the list is long but surely all these problems will be resolved and traitors arrested and hanged.

          Like

  4. kenmar1965 says:

    I am not pro-drug….. I am pro-personal responsibility.

    Like

    • georgiafl says:

      I’m pro-public official responsibility too!

      The ‘elders’ of our nation from local officials to national officials and even the UN are responsible to STOP the flow of drugs – if that means nuking or napalming Afghanistan’s poppy fields and sending special ops to patrol our borders and coastlines.

      ANY politician caught taking drug money should be electrocuted shortly after conviction.

      Liked by 7 people

      • Tonawanda says:

        “ANY politician caught taking drug money should be electrocuted shortly after conviction.”

        Does that go for police officers who steal money or drugs on a drug raid?

        If you were invisible, would you sneak into the theatre to watch a movie for free?

        Liked by 1 person

        • georgiafl says:

          That was hyperbole. Drug dealing is death dealing. Politicians and police taking drugs and drug money should have a very VERY stiff penalty. I feel the same way about rapists and child predators.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Tonawanda says:

            Let me pose these questions about death dealing:

            1) to what extent have people taken drugs and otherwise lived productive lives? Do we even have an idea?

            2) does the drug war cause people to take stronger drugs or more debilitating drugs because the illegality creates cheaper, more powerful drugs?

            3) how many people die each day? 7K. How many die from drugs? 150. How many die from car accidents?

            My point is not to minimize the problem, my point is to put it in a realistic context, which is impossible, because anyone who suggests a thorough assessment and evaluation of this complex problem is pro-drug and does not understand the crisis! the epidemic! and the death death death!

            Like

            • joshua says:

              taking drugs is not the same as being ADDICTED to drugs.
              you can drink alcohol, sober up with a hangover, and decide that it wasn’t worth it.
              but an addictive person does not know they are drunk until way after taking on much more that it takes to get drunk…they have no normal warning mechanism in their brain…and when they pass the drunk stage, they lose ability to manage their intake, so they keep drinking until they pass out or worse…..they are a danger when they are drunk, not because they are an addict…..and whereas a normal person might decide that booze isn’t that much fun, the addict goes right back to the same playgrounds time after time, hanging out with other drinkers or druggers who may or may not have addiction problems…Vicious circle for the addict……No way that person can manage themselves to get sober and stay sober every day for the rest of their lives, as they cannot IMAGINE a life without the drug or the alcohol….it is all they know and most of what the live for.

              Liked by 2 people

              • Most people do not comprehend that there can be 2 sides to medication. Some see taking opiate pain meds as an addiction to get high, just like the drunk drinks to get wasted. And then there are those who take same PRESCRIPTION medication to function due to palliative care chronic pain. They need this medication just to get out of bed every day. Unfortunately, the line between the two sides has blurred and making those who need constant ongoing medication just to have a “life” is getting very difficult. Especially for cancer patients. Imagine stating to someone “well we don’t want you getting addicted”, when they only have months to live. Now they think anyone who takes opiates is a drug addict.

                Like

            • georgiafl says:

              I don’t have a lot of patience or sympathy for drug users or drinkers as a child of (functional) alcoholics.

              I believe there is no such thing as ‘he’s only hurting himself’ and a little drug use is OK. There is a change in the person and the family and the environment.

              There are auto accidents, increased emotional, physical and sexual abuse, apathy and abandonment issues for children of substance users.

              I’ve had enough of this topic.

              Liked by 2 people

        • JoAnn Leichliter says:

          On the lighter side, if I were invisible, it might be pretty complicated if I tried to pay to get into that flick.

          Liked by 1 person

  5. Let’s start one prong of this effort by stopping the Ritalin/whathaveyou pushers shoving pills down our youths’ throats in an effort to make them sit still. Some do need it, naturally. But it’s gotten out of control and there’s few who would argue against that.
    If you drug them young, they look for the void later when their meds aren’t sufficient.

    Liked by 7 people

    • joshua says:

      most ADD and ADHD meds are amphetimine based drugs and are very habit forming…and they work as bursts, but not cure alls…mostly to improve concentration and focus for a few hours…then they dump you….the schools are OVER RUN with these diagnoses and meds….

      Liked by 2 people

    • kyasgrandma says:

      I agree with you.
      Drugs very often disguise and/or hide symptoms. They don’t cure the problem.
      I have a congenital defect that can be painful.
      I refuse drug therapy.
      I rely on strength training and other exercise type conditioning to enable me to take control of pain.
      I know – that’s just me.
      But it is possible for everyone.

      Liked by 8 people

      • Bless your heart, hon. I admire your strength and pray that you’ll be able to be comfortable.

        Liked by 4 people

        • kyasgrandma says:

          You know…in the south…”bless your heart” can mean a couple, entirely different things. haha!
          I know sometimes we just can’t get on top of the pain.
          I’ve been there a few times and have taken a Motrin.
          I also know we have varying degrees of pain tolerance.
          Guess I am kind of “Suspicious cat” – I want to question everything and verify everything.
          And I have known too many people whose lives were nearly and completely ruined by the pesribed use of opioids.
          So I despise seeing kids introduced to pharmaceuticals as a coping mechanism.
          Truly don’t intend to offend anyone.
          We must all make our choices.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Sam says:

        Hate to contradict you but it isn’t possible for everyone. traumatic wounds, cancer, surgery and various other ills require pain meds, often opioids.

        Liked by 2 people

        • carrierh says:

          I had minimal surgery because of two deep medial nerves causing excruciating pain in buttocks and I had to sign a release form because I would not take the opioid so doctors are still pushing drugs. I had a wee bit of pain after 2 days and succumbed to allow myself to said Tylenol and didn’t take it as suggested but stretched the time and in 2 days no longer needed. ALL over the counter drugs are the #1 killers of drugs and so open to anyone to purchase. I had to study pharmacology and no way will I take any drug unless absolutely necessary! And think about this, they prescribe one drug and then another to offset the side effects of that one, and on and on until you are on 10-20 drugs daily. Now that is insane!

          Like

    • Oldschool says:

      Given to our boys to alter their biologically driven energy.

      Liked by 5 people

    • G. Combs says:

      I have a whole folder on the “Ritalin/whathaveyou pushers shoving pills down our youths’ throats”
      My very long comment with a lot of links HERE

      These are perhaps the best of the bunch:
      Violence in Schools? It’s the Prozac and Ritalin Stupid!
      by Lawrence Wilson, MD
      Edited by William Wong ND, Ph.D., Member World Sports Medicine Hall of Fame.

      Gifted or ADD?
      “Parents, if your child seems bright then please, please, PLEASE have a qualified psychologist evaluate him or her for giftedness BEFORE you accept a diagnosis of ADD and medication.

      Gifted children and adults are at high risk for being identified as ADD. Most people, including most medical professionals, do not realize giftedness is often associated with the following behaviors: […]

      Moreover, sometimes adults do not realize a child is gifted because they don’t really know what “gifted” means. Or they may believe a child is both ADD and gifted. As a result, many gifted children these days are being medicated for a brain defect they probably don’t have.

      Most people have an incorrect view of gifted children and adults. The “gifted” are supposed to be model students, teaching themselves how to spell and perfect their grammar, win spelling bees, have perfect social skills and become neurosurgeons. This is true of SOME gifted children and adults. Many others, however, act out and space out in boring school settings, and their increasing anger and frustration may lead to oppositional behavior and underachievement. They may have sloppy handwriting because of fast thought processes, miss details, and be unorganized and forgetful. Gifted adults are not always easy to spot, either. They are housewives, teachers, and carpenters, and they may not even realize they are gifted. Some even believe they are stupid.

      There is some evidence that as many as half of all kids with IQs above 130 get below average grades,[…]”

      The targeting of the up and coming gifted especially WHITE BOYS is in my opinion INTENTIONAL!

      Reminder – David Plouffe: “Trump Must Be Destroyed”

      Liked by 1 person

    • kp3ace says:

      When my children were in elementary school the teacher decided my daughter should be on Ritalin. Principal got behind her (agreed). They threatened to have CPS(child protective services) remove my daughter from my home. That was kindergarten!

      Like

  6. joshua says:

    KAC looks exhausted and unkempt, and her dress was rather sad looking at the press briefing…what is going on with her? She has always been UPBEAT and strong in the past.

    Like

  7. PDQ says:

    My husband just had knee replacement surgery – they pushed Oxycodone on him BIG TIME.
    Nurse daughter said the slang for Oxy is “Hillbilly Heroin”.

    Well, my husband HATED it…nasty, nasty, powerful stuff.

    Stay away if you can…

    Liked by 6 people

    • joshua says:

      very painful post surgery procedure…but the meds are too much….much less dangerous pain killers available…My wife had surgery on knee three years ago….and it was a miserable recovery and physical therepy deal….

      Liked by 2 people

      • PDQ says:

        went to outside PT, first time today…yeah, it’s pretty painful…hope your wife is MUCH better now.

        Like

        • PDQ says:

          and you know what, with our company insurance, the Oxy was only $6 for 60 pills…
          6 dollars !!!…almost free.

          Like

        • joshua says:

          advice about PT based on watching my wife recover.
          DO NOT SKIP ANY PART OF IT, and the pain is going to be terrible, but if you do not get the knee straight out and bending as fully as possible as fast as possible, you will lose the flexibility in that knee….my wife nearly kicked the PT guy across the room when he was working on her and cursed him….and she never curses…and was in tears, and she never cries and has NO self pity….it is terrible….but it does NOT last long if you do it…..She had a PT guy at first who took pity on her, and did not do the work…and the surgeon hit the roof, fired that guy and sent her to Rasputen the mad PT terrorist….who worked the hell out of that knee…and when it was over, she loved him will all her heart.

          Like

          • joshua says:

            best of luck to you…..by the way, when you have a knee replacement….if you ever go to the dentist for serious cleaning or any procedures…you must take antibiotics PRIOR to the work and you CANNOT have any infections as they will attack the knee replacement attachment….a real PITA…but she is religious about it.

            Like

          • piper567 says:

            Joshua…what a great story…hope you and your wife keep spreading it, especially the part of her “conversion”.

            Like

          • JoAnn Leichliter says:

            My mother had both knees done, back in the day (1980s), and the PT must have been very difficult for her, but she never complained much. Truthfully, I never realized what a champ she was about it until very recently.

            Like

  8. M33 says:

    Folks should read Drug Crazy by Mike Gray.

    A brilliant solution which circumvents all this never-ending BS.

    Just say no doesn’t work.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. MAGA Engineer says:

    Just remember, some people have chronic issues. I have an industrial accident with a 20% disability rating in my lower back that forces me to rely on pain medication. This has been a ten year battle of trying to live with pain and it sucks.

    Liked by 9 people

    • woohoowee says:

      Yes, it’s important not to throw the baby out w/the bath water, so to speak.

      Like

      • JoAnn Leichliter says:

        True. A serious ongoing issue–in the other direction–is the reluctance of many conscientious physicians to prescribe adequate pain medication for the terminally ill who suffer with serious, chronic pain. Not a new phenomenon, unfortunately, and the root cause is fear of losing one’s license or even just being investigated.

        Liked by 1 person

        • woohoowee says:

          Yep, Doctors have been in an increasingly impossible situation and so have their chronic/severe pain patients.

          OTOH I didn’t realize the sheer numbers of prescription narcotic abusers until Trump45 started talking about it.

          There has to be a way to reach an equilibrium with this situation. It isn’t right for patients in severe/unrelenting pain to suffer without help.

          Like

  10. rainy973 says:

    Dr’s have PUSHED oxi’s out since they were developed advertising them as long lasting pain killers. Turns out this wasn’t true as research now is proving, you can look up all the articles about it. But big Pharma and some Dr’s have made huge profits at the expense of the American people.
    My mother’s Dr PUSHED them on her for relief from spinal stenosis.She tried to stop taking them and ended up suicidal in the e.r.
    Last November she tried committing suicide with these pills. I found her half dead in her bed but God wasn’t ready to take her yet.
    At the same time my beautiful daughter who had just graduated from nursing school ended up in a psychiatric hospital from these pills. She started taking them with her boyfriend and when she tried to stop she went out of her mind. I know so many people who have lost loved ones by these opioids.
    Greedy Dr’s and Pharmaceutical Co also need to be held accountable.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Linda says:

      Wow, rainy, that’s awful! Prayers for your mother and daughter.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Oldschool says:

      Yes, pushers with licenses. I have seen the dependency develop in their patients and they continue to prescribe to shut them up and get them out of the office. Docs know they are addicted, but don’t want to be sued and don’t want to deal with them, so they continue to write the scripts.

      Liked by 1 person

    • One in three of my sons friends from just three or four years ago are dead from this crap. I put my son in a treatment program that kept people until their counselor believed they were ready to stay clean… 8 months. The 90 day treatment facilities don’t work on this poison.

      Liked by 1 person

    • georgiafl says:

      Oxycontin is an evil addictive drug and doctors should not prescribe it.

      They tried to push it on me with merely a cracked foot bone and a cast.

      I got by with tylenol and motrin.

      WHY are the medical professionals pushing opioids?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sharon says:

        Just because it’s prescribed doesn’t mean a person has to take it.

        I have both oxy- and hydrocodone in the cabinet from the cancer surgery last October. And there it sits.

        I have yet to see it jump out of its bottle and chase me down and demand that I open my mouth.

        I need to check with the pharmacy about turning the massive excess over to them for disposal but I don’t see any need to take it and then blame somebody else.

        I guess personal responsibility doesn’t apply in this area. Or when illegals without drivers’ licenses kill US citizens? Shifting group reactions.

        Liked by 3 people

        • georgiafl says:

          Miss Sharon,

          I’ve seen the effects/devastation of oxycontin in my peripheral family.

          Generations past, it was demerol that was an addiction problem, but nothing like the spread of oxycontin and heroin now. Living in a small town, it was known which doctors would write excessive pain med Rx and which drug stores would fill them. Things weren’t tracked and regulated as much back then.

          I still think the opiates epidemic is much worse. I’ll ask the doctors in my family what they think about it. They were trained at Emory and Johns Hopkins, not the kind to dish out opiates, but will have a good idea what’s going on and how to deal with it.

          Like

          • Tonawanda says:

            I do not mean to be contentious, but doctors have no more expertise or global knowledge than any given affected person.

            Doctors are very different in their understanding of things. They are not gods, they are human beings.

            And in the big scheme of things, it is always wise to track the many routes the money takes, in every direction.

            Like

            • georgiafl says:

              Physicians are not gods, but after years of training and clinical practice, they have wisdom about the effects of substances on people, short and long term.

              Liked by 1 person

            • georgiafl says:

              Heck, I know about doctors as human beings, having had generations of them in our family. Close to medical community, I’ve seen my share of sick dysfunctional and even incompetent doctors.

              Liked by 1 person

      • rainy973 says:

        $

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rainy
      My heart goes out to you. I’ve been burned as you have been by things not in my control.

      Liked by 1 person

    • It’s interesting how some people can get these drugs and others can’t. I have a friend in terrible pain from spinal stenosis and her doctor will not give her anything. She has tried all kinds of alternative therapy and nothing helps. Last time I saw her she said at some point she will commit suicide, if her quality of life continues to deteriorate. My friend is 70 years old and continues to work. She is no sloucher. But, she can get no one to help her.

      Like

  11. PDQ says:

    Secretary Price posing with members of Phoenix Multisport Gym in Colorado Springs, which provides free workouts to people in recovery from substance abuse.

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/1600daily

    Liked by 5 people

  12. alliwantissometruth says:

    You know I was just thinking, what would happen if Maxine Waters & Nancy Pelosi started shooting heroin? Would that make them normal?

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I’m completely convinced that big pharma and insurance companies have prevented major advancements in procedures to deal with pain so they can sell more poison.

    My husband was not allowed to have his knee replacement for two years because the insurance company wanted him on pain management for at least two years..hoping he would be satisfied doped up.. he got one done the first of June and his other is next week. Taking no chances on waiting in case they change internal policy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • PDQ says:

      how is he doing?
      my husband was supposed to have his second one done on Aug 31.
      he will not go through with it…

      Like

      • Top 3% of recovery post op metrics. He worked really hard at PT and it was painful .. but now he can manage his pain with Aleve. The key is working hard at PT no matter how bad it hurts – pays off. He can’t wait to get the other one done – it hurts a lot but he knows there is hope. Praying this one goes well. We are really angry we couldn’t get it done sooner.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Marygrace Powers says:

    Is The CIA Responsible for The Current Opioid Crisis?

    By Derp McDergal – June 19, 2017

    Whistleblowers have Alleged CIA and Other US Agencies are Involved in the Opioid Epidemic.

    “How are opioids finding their way to small towns throughout America? Why are we providing families with Narcan, a drug to counteract the effects of opioid overdose? For years whistleblowers in the CIA and US military have made allegations that shadow operatives are assisting the inflow of drugs from various parts of the world including South and Central America as well as the Middle East. Since the war, Afghanistan has been radically transformed into a narcostate, and the mainstream media has refused to cover it. Why? The Afghan business of opium harvesting is a one trillion dollar industry.

    The current opioid epidemic in America has two facets: 1) over perscribing pain killers and 2) the increasing use of illegal forms of hard opiates like heroin. Both have resulted in thousands of deaths in the U.S. The CIA may have their hands in both.”

    https://squawker.org/conspiracy/cia-responsible-opioid-crisis/

    Liked by 3 people

  15. StrandedinCA says:

    Doctor shopping is a huge problem. We need to have a national network that tracks every narcotic that is prescribed and filled through pharmacies. This would make it so easy to bring the hammer down on these doctors that are just running pill mills and take away their medical licenses. It would also identify individuals who have multiple doctors and prescriptions. We have the technology for this now – – why aren’t we using it??

    Liked by 1 person

    • piper567 says:

      better yet, let States control this, maybe with suggested Federal Guidelines.
      States like CA will facilitate abusers, and other States will show success.
      Let the chips fall where they may.
      Don’t mean to sound callous toward those actually wanting help, but a Federal Program? ‘nough of those/,

      Like

  16. Remeber, they laughed at Nancy Regean and her Just Say No program. The Federal Government is not responsible to rehab drug addicts. We’re $20 trillion in debt. Just Say No to spending $45 Billion on drug addicts.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Marygrace Powers says:

    The Opioid Crisis Becomes a National Security Threat

    JULY 26, 2017 | MICHAEL J. MORELL

    “On October 23, 2002, dozens of armed Chechen terrorists seized a Moscow theater and took some 850 people hostage. Because of the layout of the theater, the number of extremists, and the large amount of explosives in their possession, a SWAT-type raid was out of the question.

    When two of the hostages were murdered almost three days into the crisis, the Russian government chose to pump an incapacitating agent into the theater via the air vents. But the agent was too toxic, and while all the extremists were killed, so too were some 130 of the hostages. The Russians have never publicly identified the particular chemical agent used, but it is widely believed to have been carfentanil.

    Fast forward to June 2016, when authorities in Vancouver, Canada seized one kilogram of carfentanil. The agent was sent via mail from China to an address in Canada, and it was hidden in a package that was declared on a customs form to be printer accessories. It was the largest seizure of carfentanil to date.

    Carfentanil, a synthetic opioid, is highly toxic. The drug is 10,000 times stronger than morphine and 5,000 times more potent than heroin. Only 20 micrograms, roughly the size of a grain of salt, can be fatal. The seizure in Vancouver was enough to kill 50 million people – every man, women, and child in Canada.

    Carfentanil was developed in the 1970s as a tranquilizer for large animals – elephants and hippos. Dr. Rob Hilsenroth, the executive director of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians said last year that carfentanil is so powerful that zoo officials wear protective gear “just a little bit short of a hazmat suit” when sedating animals because even one drop in a person’s eye or nose can be fatal.

    The public discussion about – and the government focus on – carfentanil is all about the dangerous role it plays in the contemporary drug epidemic – with good reason. Drug overdoses, with a growing number caused by carfentanil, are now the leading cause of death from injury in the United States, surpassing motor vehicle accidents, suicides, and homicides. Some police and paramedics have themselves overdosed after coming into contact with carfentanil.

    But the drug also constitutes a significant threat to national security. It is a weapon of mass destruction.”

    https://www.thecipherbrief.com/column_article/opioid-crisis-becomes-national-security-threat

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Another part of the problem is that we have been lead to believe a pill can cure everything.
    That the mental set up that is going on too.
    My son in law is a healthy active guy in his mid 30’s. Doctor said he was on the high side of normal with his blood pressure. Here’s a pill!

    My daughter argued with the doctor as to why he couldn’t eat better and lose a few pounds to see if made a difference. They were told no. They did it anyway.
    Guess what? Pressure is not only normal, he feels better and has more energy.

    We live in a world where doctors are pushing all kinds of pills and never once thinking if you just make some changes, you can be healthier and better on your own.
    They never consider the long term effects of keeping you medicated because that’s where the money is.

    Feeling sad? There’s a pill for that. Feel pain? Pill. Can’t sleep? Pill. Can’t go to the bathroom? Go to often? Pill & pill.
    Can’t do this? Got a pill for that. Do it to much? There’s a pill for that too.
    My dad was taking all kinds of pills for every conceivable thing he said was wrong with him.
    But not one doctor every made him eat better or lose weight. He was the perfect patient. Fully insured and a return office visit every 3 weeks.

    Like

  19. QuestGirl says:

    Shut down Poppy Bush and his CIA Deep State.

    Like

  20. parteagirl says:

    I was talking with a man on twitter who had an accidental back injury. He’s been on prescribed pain killers, an addictive opioid, and 100% disability for 14 years, but was denied surgery at the time it happened because he was on Medicaid. Since then, 2 other surgeons have told him that if he had had immediate surgery, he would have been able to back to work.

    This gentleman thinks that there is something nefarious about the pushing of addictive pain killers by physicians. He thinks that the risk of surgery and possible complications, along with the high cost of medical insurance, makes doctors default to the pills instead of surgery. But think about the cost of one surgery vs 14 YEARS of disability! This is costing tax payers a fortune!

    Like

  21. mot2grls says:

    President Trump is correct that once a person gets on opioids of any kind it is very hard to get off. Once that molecule is in the body it never leaves. I can remember growing up in the 70’s being told how heroin was immediately addictive. The first time. Somehow that message has gotten lost. I’d urge you to read “Dreamland” by Sam Quinones. He details the pain clinics that popped up all over the country and then how the Mexican cartel came in right on their heels to sell a cheaper, more potent black tar heroin. He literally criss crosses the country and demonstrates how the heroin comes from one small town in Mexico.
    President Trump definitely has his finger on the pulse of this issue. I was so pleased when it became a major campaign issue.

    Like

  22. woohoowee says:

    Kellyanne relays the statistic of one addicted baby born every twenty-five minutes.

    That is a staggering figure that will leave you at a loss for words.

    Like

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