CCW – Gun Control

Hat Tip BrutalHonesty:  Worth the minute.

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23 Responses to CCW – Gun Control

  1. redgrandma says:

    I know the Denny Crane character on that show was meant to be a laughable parody on conservatives, but as far as I was concerned he was the only redeemable character in the cast. I eventually had to stop watching because I couldn’t stand the liberal preaching. Love, love, love this scene, however. Thanks Sundance!

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    • howie says:

      The “shot heard ’round the world” is a phrase that has come to represent several historical incidents. The line is originally from the opening stanza of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “Concord Hymn” (1837), and referred to the beginning of the American Revolutionary War in the battles of Lexington and Concord. This armed conflict started a chain of events which subsequently led to the signing of the Declaration of Independence and the Thirteen Colonies achieving independence from Britain.

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    • ctdar says:

      Hahaha Denny made him dance!

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  2. howie says:

    First Battle of Fort Sumter
    Main article: Battle of Fort Sumter
    On Thursday, April 11, 1861, Beauregard sent three aides, Colonel James Chesnut, Jr., Captain Stephen D. Lee, and Lieutenant A. R. Chisolm to demand the surrender of the fort. Anderson declined, and the aides returned to report to Beauregard. After Beauregard had consulted the Confederate Secretary of War, Leroy Walker, he sent the aides back to the fort and authorized Chesnut to decide whether the fort should be taken by force. The aides waited for hours while Anderson considered his alternatives and played for time. At about 3 a.m., when Anderson finally announced his conditions, Colonel Chesnut, after conferring with the other aides, decided that they were “manifestly futile and not within the scope of the instructions verbally given to us”. The aides then left the fort and proceeded to the nearby Fort Johnson. There, Chesnut ordered the fort to open fire on Fort Sumter.[16]
    On Friday, April 12, 1861, at 4:30 a.m., Confederate batteries opened fire, firing for 34 straight hours, on the fort. Edmund Ruffin, noted Virginian agronomist and secessionist, claimed that he fired the first shot on Fort Sumter. His story has been widely believed, but Lieutenant Henry S. Farley, commanding a battery of two mortars on James Island fired the first shot at 4:30 A.M. (Detzer 2001, pp. 269–71). No attempt was made to return the fire for more than two hours. The fort’s supply of ammunition was not suited for the task; also, there were no fuses for their explosive shells. Only solid balls could be used against the Rebel batteries. At about 7:00 A.M., Captain Abner Doubleday, the fort’s second in command, was given the honor of firing the first shot in defense of the fort. The shot was ineffective, in part because Major Anderson did not use the guns mounted on the highest tier, the barbette tier, where the gun detachments would be more exposed to Confederate fire. The firing continued all day. The Union fired slowly to conserve ammunition. At night the fire from the fort stopped, but the Confederates still lobbed an occasional shell in Sumter. On Saturday, April 13, the fort was surrendered and evacuated. During the attack, the Union colors fell. Lt.Norman J. Hall risked life and limb to put them back up, burning off his eyebrows permanently. A Confederate soldier bled to death having been wounded by a misfiring cannon. One Union soldier died and another was mortally wounded during the 47th shot of a 100 shot salute, allowed by the Confederacy. Afterwords the salute was shortened to 50 shots. Accounts, such as in the famous diary of Mary Chesnut, describe Charleston residents along what is now known as The Battery, sitting on balconies and drinking salutes to the start of the hostilities.
    The Fort Sumter Flag became a popular patriotic symbol after Major Anderson returned North with it. The flag is still displayed in the fort’s museum. A supply ship Star of the West took all the Union soldiers to New York City. There they were welcomed and honored with a parade on Broadway.
    [edit]

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  3. jordan2222 says:

    I grew up in and around Charleston. The Battery (we call it the Bahtry) is worth a visit. It is near the Citadel. The cannons are positioned as if ready to fire on Fort Sumter again, clearly visible from that vantage point. The Francis Marion monument is there as other reminders of our place in history.

    The majestic old homes stand just as they once did. No one can make any changes to them, including painting them or fixing up anything without approval of the State legislature.

    Even Hugo respected them so much that his visit left them unscathed, as if God put His hands around them to shield them from harm.

    As soon as you leave the Battery, you would notice that most of the homes are built with the side facing the street. This was done because taxation was based on how much of the house faced the street. Many shared a common garden in between.

    “Charlestonians” are a rare breed with their own language. Aristocratic blue bloods still introduce debutantes into society. Old customs do not die out.

    We were taught history every year beginning in the 3rd or 4th grade, starting with a SC history book that featured CawCaw the Indian boy. No one back then would have it called it the Civil War. It was the War Between the States, although many called it the war of northern aggression or a few other unflattering names.

    We all learned the true reasons for secession and of necessity, the Constitution was drilled into our heads.

    At one time, huge signs greeted anyone who entered Charleston that said, “Welcome to the great state of Charleston.”

    Will the South rise again? I think that now means: will the republic rise again?

    Thanks for your account of the battle, Howie.

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  4. Coast says:

    He needed 30 rounds…

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  5. Shooting the robber in the knee and both legs is not going to work. You can’t shoot after the threat is eliminated.

    http://www.twincities.com/localnews/ci_22067764/little-falls-man-describes-finishing-teenagers-shots-heads

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  6. brutalhonesty says:

    wtf 404 Media Not Found the video doesnt show?

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  7. brutalhonesty says:

    its this video for those who see the 404 message

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    • brutalhonesty says:

      wow it still says 404 media not found heres a link to the vid..boston legal clip denny crane shoots black robber in parking garage
      youtube.com/watch?v=_KvO-8IvoCI
      This is concealed carry in action. That poor thug never saw it coming; then again he is just another stupid criminal preying on a “defenseless” hard working honest citizen. But this time the citizen was armed, and was obviously well acquainted with gun control, meaning the ability to control his gun so as the bullets come out of the barrel well aimed and on the right target, in this case a scumbag out to do no good.

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  8. czarowniczy says:

    A piece on the New Orleans evening news featured a criminologist at a local university who, along with a local psychiatrist, was asked to submit a work they were doing on local gun-crime to Biden’s panel. Don’t know if Joe and The Boys knew about a lot about the report though, as it feature a rather lengthy piece centering on black gun-crime. I wonder if they sent a shovel with the report so that Biden et al won’t have to waste time looking for one to bury it

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  9. I still remember the nervous laugh from the preppies in my big city high school in the late 70s about this song, “The South is going to do it again!”

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  10. arkansasmimi says:

    National Association for Gun Rights
    We’re giving away $700 in ammo! The drawing will be conducted on Wednesday, January 23. Sign up to enter using this link: http://www.nagr.org/ammogiveaway.aspx?pid=fb17 then LIKE and SHARE!

    Enter to win here ►► http://www.nagr.org/ammogiveaway.aspx?pid=fb17 — with Debbie Astorr Weir.

    Like

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