We Remember, We Honor, We Celebrate

This is a modified re-post from last year. I love the video and I cannot top it, so I offer it again.

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Today all across this great land we call America, we pause to remember those who have fallen. We give thanks for their final sacrifice, for their love of country, and we say prayers for them, for their families, for the country they serve. We fly flags to honor their service, to observe our own dedication to America.

However, being the ever optimistic Americans we are, we have turned this day formerly known as Decoration Day into a nation wide party, a celebration of patriotism, family, summer’s promise, and just any old other thing we choose it to be, but in some places like our little town Memorial Day is still about the fallen servicemen and women who gave their lives for our country.

Tracking the origins of Memorial Day proves to be a somewhat difficult task. Some attribute it to former African slaves paying tribute to fallen Union soldiers. There is strong evidence that women of the South were decorating graves before the end of the Civil War. On May 30, 1868, flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery. By 1890 all the northern states were observing the day. The South would not observe the same date until after World War I, when it became more than an observance recognizing those fallen in the Civil War.

So, it took another war to unite Americans in remembrance of those fallen heroes.

Stubborn aren’t we? Memorial Day is specifically a day to honor our fallen who died while serving in our Armed Forces. Nevertheless, it reminds me of many trips to the cemetery as a child.

Here in the South, I grew up visiting the cemetery on birthdays, holidays, and whenever my mother felt a need to connect with those gone from her – but never forgotten.

Each visit to the cemetery (my mother never let us call it a graveyard) was a fascinating experience to me as a child, and sometimes we visited, or at least drove by the National Battlefield.

We drove past it everyday on the way to my dad’s business and I always used to watch for the large flag to be at half mast. I knew then that a soldier or sailor had died, or sometimes it signified a national loss like the Apollo 1 tragedy or the loss of a president, as I remember the death of President Kennedy.

There was a protocol to the visit. Always walk around the plots, never step on one. Wander away as my mother knelt in the grass coaxed lovingly into growth in the red Georgia clay. Look first for relatives, those my mother spoke of, and those strange names I was unfamiliar with. Look for the little stone with the lamb on top – the resting place of my mother’s baby sister, Carole. Look for more lambs and little angels – they were dotted around the older section with alarming frequency, something I noticed even as a child. Take note of all the flowers.

It was a fine thing for a family to have many who remembered to honor their dead. I also very vividly remember the little American flags stuck in the ground on days such as Memorial Day and the Fourth of July.

Not too long ago, I found a small cemetery with a mass grave of Confederate soldiers who mostly died of an outbreak, possibly flu, during the war. Those little flags had been put in the ground around the few individual markers. I wondered if they minded that 50 star flag, or if they were grateful to be remembered, honored, prayed over.

It was something I lived with as a child, this presence of the dead. I never thought much about it until recently. Here you literally cannot stray far outside your own yard without encountering some reminder of the war fought on this soil, and those fallen. As a child, many of our parents remembered grandparents who fought in the war. It is alive for us, and so has colored how we honor our dead, those who have fallen in battle, and those who in the words of many a fire and brimstone preacher, “The LORD has called home to be with HIM.” Believe me, no disrespect intended, just an indication of a little local flavor.

And so, I find myself wondering. Is this a southern thing? Is it an American thing? Or is it something common to all of us, this need to return to the place we left our loved ones for the final time on this earth? Is it a regional custom, tied deep in the roots we are so tangled in, or a need born with our souls? I think it must be the latter, with a twist of regional observances that may vary from place to place, but sooth the heart of those who wait here, on this side.

Perhaps, after all is said and done, it meets our needs more than just paying respect to the dead. We wander there, among those peaceful plots, wondering, imagining, where are they? How is it there? When will my time come? Will I be with them again? Then, that most human of all questions. Who will honor me in my time, when I lay beneath the grass coaxed lovingly into growth in the red Georgia clay?

In Ringgold volunteers work for several weeks to place the poles and crosses you saw in the video. You can even get a list of names and locations so that families can locate the cross for their own loved one. We Remember, we honor, we celebrate. I sure hope we always will.

I hope you enjoyed the video of my former hometown. I could not have been more proud to have lived in a place like this little town. I am happy to say that the neighborhood I live in now also places crosses and flags to honor our fallen, not quite as spectacular a display as the town of Ringgold, but volunteers come together to honor those from this community who gave their lives for our freedom, and they have not been forgotten or gone unappreciated.

 

This entry was posted in Celebrations, Christian Values, Military, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

184 Responses to We Remember, We Honor, We Celebrate

  1. MelH says:

    Many thanks, Sundance. I missed seeing it last year.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. TMonroe says:

    Given the discussion of history and memorials, this came to mind:

    Joshua 4:1-7 — “When the whole nation had finished crossing the Jordan, the LORD said to Joshua, “Choose twelve men from among the people, one from each tribe, and command them: ‘Take up for yourselves twelve stones from the middle of the Jordan where the priests were standing, carry them with you, and set them down in the place where you spend the night.’”

    “So Joshua summoned the twelve men he had appointed from the Israelites, one from each tribe, and said to them, “Cross over before the ark of the LORD your God into the middle of the Jordan. Each of you is to take a stone upon his shoulder, according to the number of the tribes of Israel, to serve as a sign among you. In the future, when your children ask, ‘What do these stones mean to you?’ you are to tell them, ‘The waters of the Jordan were cut off before the ark of the covenant of the LORD. When it crossed the Jordan, the waters were cut off.’ Therefore these stones will be a memorial to the Israelites forever.””

    Liked by 6 people

  3. regitiger says:

    Joseph Rodman Drake

    “And they who for their country die shall fill an honored grave, for glory lights the soldier’s tomb, and beauty weeps the brave.”

    Liked by 10 people

  4. freepetta says:

    What a beautiful tribute to all those who made the ultimate sacrifice.
    Happy Memorial Day All!

    Liked by 6 people

    • I am sorry but many a soldier can tell you that their fallen comrades being remembered makes them very happy.

      Dying for us and being dismissed is one of the worst things that soldiers have to contend with here in this ungrateful nation.

      Like

    • jumpinjarhead says:

      I appreciate and understand your intended sentiment as I know what a sincere patriot you are, but for us combat veterans it is pretty much impossible to be “happy” on Memorial Say.

      Liked by 2 people

      • jumpinjarhead says:

        Day. Sorry.

        Like

      • freepetta says:

        Thank you jumpin. We owe you a debt of gratitude.
        I should know it’s not a happy holiday where those made the ultimate sacrifice.
        I pray and thank y’all.💁🏻‍♀️

        Liked by 1 person

      • freepetta says:

        Jumpin my favorite people are in the military or was in the past.
        While I fight the urban war, you men and women fight for all of us and make our country better and safer.
        God Bless You💁🏻‍♀️

        Like

  5. leavemygunsalone says:

    That is a lovely video, and it is worth the repeat. The two little towns that I am sandwiched between put out flags along Main St. I agree, Ringgold’s is most honorable and special, as I wish it was like that everywhere. I was not happy that this year the Boy Scouts, or shall we say, their parents were not allowed to place flags in the cemeteries. I make it an annual homage to visit a few graves, and it is always breathtaking to see all those flags peppered throughout the cemetery.

    I tried to watch the PBS Memorial Day thing, and I made it thru something 45 seconds. Memorial Day is not about Wuhan virus hospital workers, it isn’t about fireman, or policemen or our living military. It is about honoring and mourning those that gave their lives while serving in our US Military. We have a Coast Guard, an Army, a Navy, a Marine Corps, and now a Space Force. That’s it, period. 4th of July is to celebrate the birth of this nation, not our military, Veterans Day is to honor our Veterans. If someone wants to create a day to honor those that died in the line of duty doing other jobs, great, do it, I will honor them, but Memorial Day is strictly for our Armed Forces. The confusion, syrup and sap each year drives me nuts. Sorry for the rant.

    Liked by 18 people

    • A couple years ago, the kids across the street baked me some cookies for Memorial Day.
      They even gave me a handmade card thanking me for my “sacrifice”. lol
      I thanked them, of course, but explained the difference with Veteran’s Day.

      Liked by 4 people

      • jbt says:

        How sweet…they will never forget! (and, thank you for your service, blue).

        Liked by 1 person

      • jumpinjarhead says:

        I too have received various kinds of “thanks” on Memorial Day. While, like you, I am polite and try to look beyond the mistake, it is nevertheless very very painful as it underscores just how ignorant and lackadaisical so many Americans (and the number is steadily increasing) are about those other Americans who gave their lives (and now due to advances in military medicine that save lives otherwise lost in former conflicts, their limbs) to protect and preserve the very freedoms we all enjoy and take so lightly.

        Liked by 2 people

        • I could have taken the card to the local school board. Sadly, I probably would have to explain it to them as well.

          Liked by 1 person

          • jumpinjarhead says:

            Indeed. You might have even then be labeled one of those “right wing” veterans so prone to extremism and violence.

            Liked by 1 person

            • The city already has my number.
              Small town and I live a block away from city hall. This city inspector saw(from his office window) that I had a new water heater standing up in the back of my truck. When got help, I replaced the old one, laying it down in the truck.
              Two days later, I received notice(water heater photos included) by mail that I failed to buy a permit to replace my own water heater. $150, AND, a fine for an additional $150. $300. I walked down to CH, and called them all effin commies.
              I paid $150, but they “let me off” for the fine.
              Minnesotastan.

              Liked by 1 person

      • leavemygunsalone says:

        Very nice, very thoughtful, and the best part is that you got to educate them in a way they will never forget, thus hopefully as they grow up they can correct and teach others.

        Liked by 1 person

    • jumpinjarhead says:

      And now as I survey the “news” and various platforms of social media, as evident in the obscene NYT banner headline yesterday purposely hijacking Memorial Day to further its agenda of magnifying the “virus crisis” where it “solemnly” listed the C19 dead as if they were KIAs, progressivists are now actually equating (not merely comparing through analogy) the C19 dead (the numbers of whom are themselves grossly manipulated for political purposes) to our military war dead.

      As I said, obscene.

      Liked by 2 people

      • leavemygunsalone says:

        It is obscene, and upsets me greatly to the point of w/exception of this site and a few others I do not want to read or hear anything about Memorial Day. Last year I stayed hunkered down and marathon watched Band of Brothers because I couldn’t bring myself to surface.
        Most years I make my trip to the cemetery to place a stone, say some prayers and think about the Gold Star families I know. Thankfully my family’s Gold Stars are from long ago, but our current generation it is all still very much in the present. Occasionally there will be something done by the community, even those somehow tend to be mundane, or a show of sorts. It varies from year to year, but I tend to do my own little ceremony and stay away from people.

        Like

        • jumpinjarhead says:

          Me too. My brothers in arms who never care home alive will never be forgotten by me as that would be the greatest dishonor of all.

          Like

  6. skylark2016 says:

    Beautiful! Thank you.

    Liked by 6 people

  7. History Teaches says:

    Brought a few tears watching NASCAR”s respectful and dignified homage to those who made the ultimate sacrifice and the military in general. Well conceived and authentic. Too bad it was an empty stadium.

    Liked by 4 people

  8. hpushkin says:

    Thank you very much, a lovely post.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Lucille says:

    Thank you, Menagerie! God bless your Memorial Day!

    Liked by 14 people

    • Angus says:

      So beautiful.

      Thank you Lucile, and Menagerie, and Ad Rem.

      The Book will for sure have your names.

      As it has those who said to themselves first, and then to God:

      Father, this is worth fighting for.

      Father, they are worth dieing for.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Lucille says:

        You’re most welcome, Angus! I’ve known personally only one person who died defending our nation, my dear friend Robert, a 25 year old USMC pilot. If he were still living he’d be 83 now.

        “The good die first, and they whose hearts are dry as summer dust, burn to the socket.”

        Like

    • The Tundra PA says:

      I missed you next door on Sunday, Lucille (well, it’s still Sunday in Alaska for a few more minutes). Glad to see you posting here, assures me all is well.

      Like

  10. Retited IG says:

    Thank you Sundance for sharing your experiences and how your Mother honored those passed on. She taught you well.
    Many of my dearly departed are buried in the church cemetary less than half of a mile away. Grandparents from both maternal and paternal families, as well as Aunts, Uncles, and my two sisters.
    After going to church on Sunday’s we would drive through the cemetery just to remember them.
    Tomorrow I will be flying the American Flag to Memorialize my Father first. He joined the Army re WWII. No one is around to tell me how he became a Mess Sergeant stationed at Fort Belvoir.
    But I have the Army Cookbook. My Dad had to train men to cook mashed potatoes for 1,000 men. He told me toward the end of life, that wasn’t serving. I hope and think I told him BUKKSHIT.
    My Uncle Willie, Dad’s brother was in the 10th Mountaineering Division. I cannot even imagine the training my Uncle went trough. And to get a CITATION from General Hay. Imagine wearing ski’s and using a machine gun.
    My Mother’s brother, Uncle Paul was a pilot, and was killed in in the South Pacific. Plane shot down. No one sure if his body was ever recovered, but he has a headstone at Arlington Cemetery My sister has his Medals.
    My Uncle’s Toot and Chuck were on boats. Coast Guard and not sure what other. They NEVER talked about their experiences. I can only imagine to talk about them would be to open a personal Pandora’s Box for them..
    Spend time every year putting live plants on their graves. On Memorial Day as well as Christmas. I miss them all.
    Just wish ALL OF THEM were around these DAZED and CONFUSING days to hear their take on washing their hands, wearing a face mask ,and agreeing to FOLLOW ORDERS TO STAY AT HOME AND OBEY THE COMMANDS FROM DICK HEAD FAUCI AND THE SCARF WEARER BRIX. Not on her FACE, but around here NECK from the get go.
    My family would not go quietly into the night.
    And if Shakespeare were still alive, I would LOVE to read his interpretation of this PLAGUE UPON OUR HOUSES.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ad rem says:

      I’ll relay Menagerie your thanks….as it is her article.

      Liked by 4 people

      • budklatsch says:

        A few thoughts from New England. My grandmother was for years while I was growing up, the President of the local town’s Women’s Auxillary, affiliated with the American Legion. Memorial Days were always full of Pomp and recognition for those fallen, just as July 4th and Veteran’s Day. Lots of fond Americana memories including visits to several local cemeteries. Kinda scaled back these days. I have always tried to visit the cemetery with family there, from another state now. Last year, when I visited on Memorial Day, I saw how the alabaster gravestones had all been thoroughly scrubbed and shined so impressively. I asked the groundskeepers thinking they had performed the service. They said no, that it had been a project of local scouts that took it on. There must be several hundred stones dating back to the civil war in the two military sections. God bless those young scouts.

        Liked by 6 people

      • Retired IG says:

        Was reading other peoples comments tonight re not giving attribution to Menagerie. My sincere apologies to Menagerie. And thanks Ad rem. I’ll pay better attention to the writer going forward.

        Like

  11. These American Patriots gave their lives for this country, only to see our public servants to turn it into what we are fighting today.

    Despicable.

    Prayers and blessings to their families, descendants and friends.

    Like

  12. Nancy Brenner says:

    I love this post and video so very much. Thank-you for posting these beautiful in memory tributes, Sundance. I also want you to know how much I have learned from reading you everyday for the past two years. All of it, has meant a lot to me.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Fallen Heroes We Remember You, We Thank You, and We Salute You

    Liked by 3 people

    • Treeper 46 says:

      This year we miss the Field of Flags on Memorial Day at Mooresville NC Field of Honor organized by The Mooresville NC Exchange. This year 2020 this tribute has been rescheduled to July 1st-5th. If you can go you will be impressed by the hundreds of flags poled throughout the park. Not sure of ceremony times but we will be sure to attend.
      https://www.healingfield.org/event/mooresvillenc20/
      Last year on the 4th of July we attended the July 4th Parade in DC. Was impressive as well.

      Liked by 3 people

  14. Kathleen Lutman says:

    Thank you,, “ Happy Memorial Day” Many Blessings..” Kat”

    Like

    • ADDgolfer says:

      Have a Blessed Memorial Day yourself.
      If you are to spend it with family and loved ones, then yes that is happiness, enjoy it.
      Get a new fridge at 30% off on a Memorial Day sale?
      Dang, Go for it, be happy.
      The day itself … solemn remembrance.

      Rant over
      Thank You

      Like

      • stella says:

        There’s a smart ass in every crowd.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Menagerie says:

        I guess you chose to ignore the fact that I’ve deleted your comments today. If you do this crap again I’ll block you.

        Like

        • ADDgolfer says:

          Yes, perhaps came off I was grimacing Memorial Day. That was not my intent.
          That type greeting for Memorial Day, though meant well, has always rubbed me the wrong way.

          You’re a woman of faith…
          Happy Easter—rejoice, he has risen
          ‘Happy’ Good Friday —umm, Not so much

          My Dad
          US Army – medic
          1941-1945
          N. African and European theater

          Myself
          US Army – administration
          1971-1973
          Vietnam era (stateside) not Vietnam vet

          I could/should have follow my late mom’s advise
          “If you can’t say something nice…”
          Instead I go and say
          “Get off my lawn”
          Oh drat, I have become my dad

          Like

  15. free73735 says:

    Thank You Menagerie!

    Liked by 4 people

  16. TigerBear says:

    Edward A. Bennett
    Edward Andrew Bennett, Jr. was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military’s highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in World War II.
    Service/branch:
    United States Army
    Born:
    February 11, 1920, Middleport, Ohio
    Died:
    May 2, 1983
    Rank:
    Major
    Battles/wars:
    World War II, Korean War
    Years of service:
    1944 – 1962
    Awards:
    Medal of Honor, Silver Star, Bronze Star, Purple Heart (4)

    This amazing man is our great Uncle and our last child is named after him!

    THANK YOU for your Service!!! We love and miss you!!!!! 💜

    May God bless our Warriors and Patriots!
    I bow my head in prayer and thanksgiving for these great men and women who sacrificed everything to protect and defend our Freedom and Liberty!!

    Happy Memorial Day
    Please take the time to thank those who serve. 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

  17. hawkins6 says:

    Menagerie. This tribute video and article is well done and worthy of being repeated. Americans aren’t the only people on Earth that should pay homage to the sacrifices members of the U.S. Military have made in freeing people in other countries or keeping them free.
    —————————————————–

    Vera Brittain was a VAD nurse in a British military hospital in ‘Etaples France in April 2018. The Germans were advancing on nearby Abbeville and defeat seemed probable. Commander of the British Armies Haig, had already written a letter to all ranks, “…There is no course open to us but to fight it out. Every position must be held to the last man…” and other words to inspire his embattled and exhausted forces.

    Vera emotionally describes (understandably) how a large contingent of troops unexpectedly marched through the beleaguered camp’s main road on their way to the Front: (slightly paraphrased)
    “…though the site of soldiers marching was familiar…an unusual quality of bold vigor in their swift stride caused me to stare with puzzled interest. They looked larger than ordinary men, their tall, straight figures were in vivid contrast to the under-sized armies of pale recruits to which we had grown accustomed…Had yet another regiment been conjured out of our depleted Dominions? I watched them move with such rhythm, such dignity, such serene consciousness of self respect. But I knew the Colonial troops well and these were different. Then someone exclaimed, “Look. Look. Here come the Americans.”

    “I pressed forward to watch the U.S. enter the war, so God-like, so magnificent, so splendidly unimpaired in comparison with the nerve wracked British Army. So, these were our deliverers at last…and in the fearless swagger of their proud strength they looked a formidable bulwark against the peril looming from Amiens.”

    “Somehow the necessity of packing up in a hurry moved further away…The coming of relief made me realize how intolerable had been the tension, and with the knowledge that we were not, after all defeated, I found myself beginning to cry…” (From Testament of Youth by V. Brittain)

    Liked by 6 people

  18. Rhi says:

    Thanks Menagerie, quite evocative and poignant. Yes, we remember, we honor and we celebrate those who have given so much so we can be free.

    A beautiful tribute to them, from a friend:
    http://worriersanonymous.org/Share/Mansions.htm

    Liked by 2 people

  19. teaforall says:

    To all the men and Women who gave the Ultimate sacrifice
    WE WILL NEVER FORGET

    Liked by 2 people

  20. heidi says:

    it was so beautiful, i shared it on twitter & included a link to full video, thank you so much to everyone here

    Liked by 1 person

  21. bruzedorange says:

    Does anyone know if Ringgold is commemorating in their traditional way today? I’d love to drive down there if they are.

    I think it was two Memorial Days past that I went to my father’s gravesite (USMC-WW2: Guam, Okinawa) at National Cemetary and had the most meaningful experience. It started in a windy, cold, heavy rain and me in a t-shirt. Soaked, walking bact to my car, I noticed the wind from the storm had knocked down many of the small flags that had been set at each grave.

    It’s funny how something simple and merely symbolic can grab your heart and squeeze ’til tears stream from your face. But I just walked around crying for an hour or so, straightening and resetting flags in the rain. I’m choking up now just remembering.

    And that’s the point, isn’t it: Remembering and honoring.

    Those lives, no matter how long ago taken, continue to be vibrant–strengthening and blessing our nation–as long as we citizens are willing to pick up their fallen baton and run our leg of the race
    …as long as we are willing to remember and honor them from the heart, however simple, however symbolic.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Menagerie says:

      We are driving down this morning. I’m sure that they have those crosses and flags out, they did it the Memorial Day after the tornado had devastated the town a little over a month earlier, in 2011. I’ll let you know.

      Liked by 5 people

      • bruzedorange says:

        Thank you, Menagerie.
        May God bless you this holiday with an honest memory that recalls all the people you’ve been used to touch and bless, despite whatever human–but forgiven–frailties or faults the accuser may try to hold against you.

        Like

  22. Barb Meier says:

    Thank you, Menagerie. I have kept the Ringgold video pinned at my Twitter profile since you first shared it and played it several times. Altogether lovely. Have a good Memorial Day.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Conservative_302 says:

    Your video brought tears to my eyes. Every time I watch things like this, I am reminded of the scene in Saving Private Ryan when Tom Hanks says, “I’ll see you on the beach.” And then holy hell breaks loose. The courage soldiers have is something very rare, and makes them very special. May God bless all of them, their families, and loved ones.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Tl Howard says:

      “Tell me I’ve been a good man….”

      Blows me away.

      Thank you, Menagerie. What a great hometown you have.

      I’d have to say that small town Ca does do it’s share of remembering but suburban CA, which is what most of the pop. is now here, does not.

      Like

  24. Dora says:

    Liked by 3 people

  25. lotbusyexec says:

    My oldest daughter, home from college, painted this as a gift for my husband and I, on this 2020 Memorial Day weekend ❤️🇺🇸💙 — Hope it comes thru (i’m not a computer whiz 😉 )

    /Users/lizanneotoole 1/Desktop/IMG_7133.jpeg

    Liked by 2 people

  26. rah says:

    For 10 years I served as a volunteer on the Madison County, Indiana Cemetery Commission. We five on the committee were all volunteers. Our mission was to identify and restore every cemetery in the county not maintained under the laws of perpetual care or by a Church. After the identification, registration of the graves, and restoration, the cemetery was turned over to the elected county commissioner in who’s area it was in for continued maintenance.

    We had a $20,000.00 year a budget to do this work. We did all of the research and field work to find the cemeteries and identify those in them and all of the work restoring and repairing the stones and sometimes ordering new ones from the VA for veterans. The fencing, landscaping, and tree removal, we would contract out. Where cemeteries were destroyed and built over we would place road signs designating the name and location of the cemetery. Needless to say a few people were less than happy with that.

    The years serving on that commission gave back to me every bit as much as I put into it, and that was a lot. I learned much about the history of the county I was born in and now live in. The pioneers that first settled there, the original traces, wells, churches, the migrants that were passing through on the great migrations to the west that left behind their loved ones that happen to die on the hard trapes west, and the veterans, dating back to the revolution. Many interesting stories.

    Restoration was often a very arduous task. Layout a grid system, remove the stones, repair those needing it, ordering new VA stones for those damaged or missing as the landscaper leveled the ground. Probing and ground penetrating radar was used to locate graves. Then remount all the stones, fence the property, install proper signage.

    Here are a couple links to our work at the Weddington Cemetery. First some pictures from the rededication ceremony. I’m the guy in uniform in the picture of the commission members.
    https://www.cemeteries-madison-co-in.com/Weddrededication.htm

    And here is a link to pictures that give you and idea of how much work was involved in restoring Weddington and some of the other cemeteries we worked on. For the Weddington Cemetery I actually built a new bridge over a small creek because the existing one could not handle the heavy equipment required to do the work at the cemetery.
    https://www.cemeteries-madison-co-in.com/weddington.reconstructi.htm

    One of the 1812 veterans in the cemetery was in a Virginia volunteer regiment that was in Ft. McHenry that faithful night when Francis Scott Key wrote his poem that became the lyrics to our National Anthem.

    Liked by 10 people

    • Menagerie says:

      I loved your story. I like to find cemeteries, especially old ones, and go there to walk and pray, and wonder about the people whose names I can sometimes barely read on the old stones.

      Liked by 1 person

      • rah says:

        They are often the names of those that established what you see around you. Those that dug the wells, put in the roads, built the churches and other structures. IOW those to which we owe a great debt of gratitude for the legacy they left us. So many people take for granted and don’t even think about how all the stuff they see around them and enjoy the benefit of came to be there.

        And then there are the infants and children’s graves attesting to the high mortality in those days. Men who had 3 or 4 wives during their life time because so many women were lost.

        The graves of those that died on the trails heads west and have no other family buried in the county. One a boy that drown in the White River.

        And then the veterans. In our county we know there are at least 8 revolutionary war veterans buried but had only found the graves of three of them.
        Veterans from the War of 1812. Veterans from the Civil war including men who fought in the 19th and 20th Indiana volunteer Infantry Regiments, the most storied Indiana regiments from that war and some of who’s artifacts are in the corner stone of the Soldiers and Sailors monument in the circle at Indianapolis which remains to this day the tallest war monument of all the states. Indiana, per capita sent more volunteers to fight for the Union cause than any other state. And veterans from all the other wars. Including one that may have been the guy that actually shot and killed the great war Chief Tecumseh.

        Liked by 4 people

    • ncbirdnwrd says:

      You are to be commended, sir.

      Like

    • rah says:

      I made a mistake. Forgive me, it’s been a few years. After restoration the cemetery would be turned over to the Township Trustee for maintenance and not the county commissioners. Such details matter for those that read what I have written and may become interested enough to see if their own counties have such commissions and wish to become involved. Many counties in the various states do have such organizations. If you don’t have any idea where to start ask your county historical society.

      Liked by 2 people

    • hawkins6 says:

      Excellent post and great work Rah.

      Like

  27. Jase says:

    Here in Australia, Anzac Day, April 25th, is the day set aside for honouring our veterans.
    There is a dawn service at cenotaphs in every town big and small and an Anzac Day parade in which veterans, or their families, and current service men and women proudly march through town.
    This year, our Government banned the March and the dawn service because of the ChinaFlu.
    Want to know what they told us to do instead of gathering to pay tribute?
    Stand in our driveways at dawn.
    I have not often felt so ashamed of my country’s politicians as I did that day.
    Brave brave men and women gave up their magnificent lives to save our freedom, and we repaid them by giving up our freedom to save our miserable lives.

    Liked by 3 people

  28. forthelove76 says:

    Thank you so much for this Menagerie. Ringgold is my former hometown too. We are just north of the border in Tennessee but after my husband retires from the CPD in July, I am going back home again.

    On a side note, I heard on the radio last week the flag display this year in Ringgold has been dramatically scaled back due to the CCP Virus. Apparently they did not have enough volunteers to place the flags. When I heard that I just sat in my car and cried 😢

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Dora says:

    ‘Greater Love Has No Man Than This’

    It is because of this Christ-like sacrifice embodying John 15:13—“Greater love has no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”—that, regardless of whether one died in the jungles of Vietnam or in the remote villages of Afghanistan, every death in the service of our country is a noble death worthy of national memory and appreciation.

    https://www.crisismagazine.com/2020/greater-love-has-no-man-than-this

    Like

  30. strateshooter says:

    from the UK…
    Thank You to all the brave American soldiers who have fought for freedom and justice over the centuries.
    In todays media war you may be forgiven for thinking that people hate America…but they don’t.
    Real people…the guys in the street everywhere… KNOW.

    Even as Brit…I think the American DoI and the US Constitution are the greatest documents ever written and worth defending.
    Freedom , Liberty, Happiness , Equal justice under the rule of Law.
    they have formed the basis for all our lives.

    It strikes me , sadly , that during the past 20-30 years the USA has allowed dominion of its citizens by the corrupt UniParty/Media/CIA alliance instead of a British king.
    Hopefully this dominion can be stopped and the legal terrorism employed against innocents like Michael Flynn can be corrected and punished.

    if not , I really fear for where you guys might be headed.

    Liked by 4 people

  31. Country_Kat says:

    Liked by 4 people

  32. 335blues says:

    Today, and always, I honor those who risked their lives and limbs
    for America, the greatest country in the history of mankind.
    They are the real heroes.

    Liked by 2 people

  33. FofBW says:

    Thank you all for remembering my friends that gave their all who’s names are on ‘The Wall’

    We do it out of love for country, family and above all, GOD.

    Gratitude cannot describe

    Liked by 2 people

  34. mac says:

    Strateshooter,

    Thanks for your kind words. I have on my desk the Remembrance Poppy I received in Singapore when I attended my last Remembrance Day Ceremony there at Kranji War Memorial. Your British High Commissioner and the Gurkha Contingent bagpipers did your fallen heroes proud that day. “Amazing Grace” and “I Vow to Thee, My Country,” will always be cherished memories for me because of those ceremonies.

    We came to help you in two World Wars because we loved and admired the virtues your civilization had taught us from our founding. We still do. Like family, we don’t always see eye to eye, but if the chips are ever down again as they have been in the past, we will be there for you again, just as we know you would be for us.

    May God continue to bless and guide the United Kingdom and the United States of America!

    Liked by 4 people

  35. no-nonsence-nancy says:

    Thank you Menagiere, that is beautiful. I remember the video from last year.
    I grew up in a very small town in northern Pa. We had a very simple but nice tradition for Memorial Day. Our cemetery is on a hill above the town. All the graves of veterans are decorated with flags. A procession of townspeople would start at the far end of town and walk up the hill to the cemetery. As the procession came to your house your family would fall in line. By the time we got to the cemetery there would be a sizable crowd. There was a certain grave that the ceremony was performed. The school band would be there and the trumpet players would play taps. I don’t know if they still have that tradition as neither I nor any of my family have lived there for many years.

    Liked by 2 people

  36. We honor all Those fought and died for our Great land of America,

    Like

  37. Bubby says:

    When I was growing up it was still know as Decoration Day and we used to put red, white and blue crape paper in the spokes of our bikes and then ride all around town to watch all the festivities. Looking at that flag made me thankful and I felt blessed that I was born in America and now get to live in Texas. The freedom I have and enjoy is due in part to those who died fighting for this country. Undoubtedly to me the greatest country on earth. To all that have served I’m grateful. I believe that God has always blessed us with warriors, from the soldiers and sailors to Generals and Admirals, to protect us from evil. From Abraham, to Moses, to Joshua, to Samson, to David, to Gideon, to Washington, to Grant, to Pershing, to Patton, to Schwarzkopf God has always provided us with warriors. For all those warriors I am thankful but this weekend especially for those who died in service to this country I love. Rest in peace brave warriors! Godspeed Sundance!

    Like

  38. Thank you for posting this Menagerie, as it is a wonderful tribute to our fallen.

    Like

  39. CorwinAmber says:

    And now it gets personal, sigh. For my entire life of 7 decades, there have been two important national holidays for me – Memorial Day & Veterans Day – due to my old man who spent many years in service to his country. He was born in 1919 and graduated from college in the summer of 1941 as the commander of his ROTC unit. After 6 months of active duty, the date of infamy occurred and his next 5 years were laid out for him. He and his buddy decided this new fangled “airborne” infantry thing would be interesting (plus it paid an extra 50 bucks a month because you had to jump out of perfectly good airplanes) so they volunteered to be in the initial cadre and ended up training all the paratroopers that followed in the 11th, 17th, 82nd & 101st airborne divisions.

    He finally deployed to Europe in February 1945 and served there until VE day whereupon he received orders for Operation Downfall, which thanks to HST never occurred. He spent the next 25 years in the Army Reserve with callups for Korea and the Cuban missile crisis, amongst others. He retired in 1969 as a Colonel and always regarded his 3 decades in the military as one of the highlights of his life…along with family, church and country.

    No matter where I was or what I was doing, I would always call him on Memorial Day and Veterans Day to thank him for his service to our country. On Memorial Day, we would talk about his buddies who did not come home with him, and on Veterans Day, we would talk about those who did. Well, this past March, having been a good, church-going Irish Catholic lad his whole life, he could not attend Mass due to the shutdown of church services so God decided to call him home instead. The phone calls have ended and Memorial Day will be different without him, sigh.

    He lived a good life…was born during the height of the Spanish Flu and checked out during the Chinese Flu. He made it thru the Depression, WWII and the Cold War. He raised 6 kids and was a wonderful father – a splendid role model for all of us, though none could fill his shoes…may God have mercy on us all.

    1919-2020 has a nice symmetrical ring to it, doesn’t it? Requiescat in pace Dad, I’m not half the man you were, but I’ll keep trying…

    Liked by 10 people

  40. That drew some 74 year old tears………..

    Liked by 1 person

  41. T2020 says:

    Land of the Free because of the Brave. RIP🙏😇🇺🇸⭐️❤️💙

    Liked by 1 person

  42. alligatriot says:

    Menagerie!

    Thank you for a poignant post this Memorial Day.

    We were in west-central Georgia a few days ago where my wife’s brother has a beautiful spot in the woods surrounded by cotton fields. Wildflowers poking up through that red clay, birds nesting, time with family.

    While serving in Europe with the Air Force, I had the honor twice of representing U.S. armed forces at Memorial Day ceremonies at the World War II cemetery at Lorraine, near St. Avold, France. Over 10,000 American soldiers are buried here. Looking out over that many white stone markers with American and French flags placed at each one, crying as taps was played – an experience like no other.

    No parade in our town this year. I’ll visit a nearby National Cemetery in a little while for their formal ceremony. Flags are flying throughout our neighborhood.

    Thank you again for helping us all remember those who gave the ultimate sacrifice.

    Like

  43. jimrockfish says:

    This is very nice. Reading this made me remember some thing as a child in the 60s that are so different now. The flag at half staff when I was a youngster actually meant something big happened. No disrespect meant but nowadays the flag is at half staff constantly. When I was a kid you knew a President or someone else large in stature had died.

    God bless all the fallen. I’m grateful to enjoy the freedoms they gave everything to defend. Thank you all.

    Like

  44. Tulips Moran says:

    Seeing the vast number of flags the Ringgold community displays honoring it’s fallen citizens brings to mind hundreds of thousands of little towns across our nation who gave so many of their young men and women to the noble wars around the world. Yet once red pilled you can’t help but to realize these noble people were pawns in wars of the elite globalists in pursuit of their selfish agendas. Even now as the truth discloses we’re learning that same evil is waging war on the world’s people with the phony hoax virus in hopes that Trump will be brought down and the ultimate surveillance vaccination will become mandatory threatening an end to our Republic. Yet the spirit of the Patriots will arise one again to vanquish the enemy from within.

    Liked by 1 person

  45. Wethal says:

    Arthur Thompson

    Died of his wounds in France in 1918, age 19.

    Your family still remembers you, Arthur.

    Liked by 3 people

  46. Shark24 says:

    Here’s the Ft Walton Beach Florida ceremony. Live stream. God bless
    https://www.facebook.com/pg/cityoffwb/posts/

    Liked by 1 person

    • Shark24 says:

      If you want to see a 100 year old veteran give a short speech, take a look.

      Liked by 1 person

      • hawkins6 says:

        Colonel Roberts gave a great rendition of the “Ragged Old Flag” and didn’t seem to read any of it. The fallen would be grateful for this well done ceremony in their memory.

        Like

  47. Pale rider says:

    Memorial Day is one of those days almost erased but, it is the cultural fabric that holds freedom in our thoughts. A religious act to remind us of freedom and to never allow it to evade our thoughts and it’s price.

    Like

  48. I turned the television on to catch the weather and got thoroughly pi$$ed off at the beer commercials and half-naked women selling Lord knows what. Now, I like beer and women and not necessarily in that order – but – not on DECORATION DAY.

    When I was a kid, it was a solemn day remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice. Somewhere along the line, it got commercialized and the name changed. I remember my folks saying this was especially a very sad day for the widows whose husbands were listed as Missing in Action. They didn’t have a grave to decorate.

    Most of the WW2 widows are gone. We should not forget them either.

    Liked by 2 people

  49. jumpinjarhead says:

    Thank you Sundance. This is the hardest time of the year for me, made worse as I see how many Americans increasingly seem wholly unaware of the meaning of the day, much less seem to even care if they are aware.

    Liked by 9 people

    • czarowniczy says:

      As the media constantly reminds us it’s the first day of summer and the first official PAR-TAY! This year a number of politicians have even, through various means, prevented flags from being placed on veterans’ graves.

      Liked by 2 people

      • jumpinjarhead says:

        Oh, believe me I know.

        At such times, I check the “news” with trepidation as there are so many (and increasingly so) reminders of with the crassness of so many Americans who well know the meaning but hijack it for commercial or even worse partisan purposes or those growing number of Americans who are wholly ignorant of such unimportant things as Memorial Day.

        Anyone caring to debate the point can begin by noting the number of Memorial Day or Veterans Day parades and other suitable remembrances held in America 50 years ago compared to our ever-so-sophisticated modern “culture.”

        Again, as a voice crying in our modern “cultural” wilderness, I rhetorically ask why that is and then suggest it is “simply” our collective and individual loss of “virtue” as citizens. Regrettably, too few Americans appear to want to be troubled by such an arcane and old-fashioned notion.

        Liked by 6 people

        • czarowniczy says:

          Vietnam was a turning point, it was the lever the Leftist media needed to pry away the respect the American people had for the military. Note how, beginning with the Gulf War, how the media and various pundits started separating the dislike of conservative American policies from the troops, constantly reminding the public (after years of denigrating them) how we should respect the troops (small ‘R’) as (paraphrasing here) they’re just ignorant fool dupes of the repressive DC regime.

          I’m sitting here with my GGS and, ironically, watching ‘Vietnam in HD’ on History Channel. Strangely I turned it on just as the 1967/1968 TET and Khe Sahn pieces came on. I’m watching a piece on what we did at Khe Sahn, trying to keep the base supplied from the air. I can’t find myself or anyone else I knew – many of the shots are not of Khe Sahn, they’re stock footage meant to support the spoken narrative – and though he’s 12 he has no connection to it, little interest in it and his only knowledge of the war is his history lessons about the peace riots in the US.

          All of his teachings about American military involvement from Vietnam to date are heavily salted with anti-American sentiments and very little history. The excuse for the spotty teaching is that there’s too much history to teach and they only have time to gloss over it. Seem to have enough time to teach the students to hate their country though.

          Vietnam and the Gulf War gave rise to a new wave of American patriots who kept conservatism and the country alive, let’s pray that some 20 years of war against a Moslem enemy every bit as caustic a threat to individual freedom as Hitler of the USSR has produced a new crop.

          Liked by 4 people

          • jumpinjarhead says:

            Wonderful but sadly very accurate post.

            Everything in our lives (including curricula in our “schools”/indoctrination centers, what we think and do on our “holiday weekends” etc.) is a matter of priorities that we apply as individuals and corporately (government, “schools,” our “culture” etc.).

            As it has become pretty clear, except perhaps for the conservative “remnant” you mention, IMHO, far too many Americans’ “priorities” simply have no room anymore for the “virtue” required to re-order their “priorities”

            Our Founders and all those we honor on Memorial Day certainly re-ordered their “priorities,” even to the point of giving their lives, so that Americans today are free—-to fritter away their freedoms without a thought about how they got them.

            Liked by 4 people

            • czarowniczy says:

              In order to usher in the New America all of the Old America has to be diminuated and destroyed. Honor, duty, patriotism and morality have to be redefined in order to make them a junk food commodity that anyone can have – or disregard – as they see fit.

              Liked by 3 people

              • jumpinjarhead says:

                Wonderfully stated. It is reassuring to see there are other patriots who understand just how fundamental the quality of “virtue” (a term that includes all of those attributes you cite) is for us as individuals and a nation.

                It is a continuing source of sadness and frustration to see the apparent lack of understanding and appreciation for the critical need for “virtue” among so many Americans, including an incredible number of those who profess to be Christians, conservatives and/or “patriots.” So many appear to have been so subtlety compromised by our enemies that they do not even realize it.

                Liked by 3 people

          • SamlAdams says:

            All you can do is try to keep the knowledge alive. Growing up, everyone’s Dad and/or uncles had served in WWII or Korea, including my own. Tried to instill and appreciation in my kids for what that meant. My older grandfather served as a sapper with AEF in 1918. He said little about it, though I spent a lot of time with him growing up. He told me more about his grandfathers, who were both Civil War veterans than about himself. But when “They Shall Not Grow Old” was released took both my sons to see it. And for the first time really understood the utter horrors of what he had seen. Both kids were shaken by the experience. Still have his regimental picture over my desk at home. Ironically, it was taken at Camp Forrest, not 200 yard from where his maternal grandfather fought under George Thomas at Chickamauga.

            Liked by 2 people

            • czarowniczy says:

              My grandfather were in WW1…on different sides. My father was in WW2 (8th AF) with my other grandfather coming back (again on the other side). My father went on to the Berlin Airlift and the Korean War.

              I enlisted while my father was still on active duty and we swapped tours in Vietnam. He retired in ’71 and I went on to Panama, the Gulf War, the border area with Joint units and retired in ’07. None of my sons or grandsons served, they’d seen enough of what it was when I was in. I have a new grandson far too young to even spell Army and two great grandsons who are just entering their teens so there’s still hope…

              Like

    • gunrunner03 says:

      I just walked the dog in my neighborhood of about 45 homes. This is a very diverse neighborhood–race, cultures, immigrants, established citizens–and seven of us are flying Old Glory. Saddening is the only word that comes to mind.

      Liked by 4 people

      • jumpinjarhead says:

        Indeed. A nation that stops honoring its heritage, especially the lives of those lost protecting it, stops deserving any such sacrifices in the future.

        Liked by 3 people

    • stella says:

      Sundance didn’t write this post.

      In any case, I agree that Americans either don’t know or ignore the meaning of this day.

      Liked by 3 people

      • jumpinjarhead says:

        I realized I was following the herd of other Treepers own the wrong path but alas I could not retrieve my erroneous attribution. The spirit is the same of course.

        Liked by 1 person

    • TreeClimber says:

      You’d appreciate my Facebook feed today, then. Almost every single page I follow has a Memorial Day tribute up – even the prom boutique and orthodontist. It’s not forgotten everywhere.

      Liked by 1 person

      • jumpinjarhead says:

        I know-and all patriots are appreciated. I believe my calling is to work on the margins as it were to try to do what I can to turn some summertime patriots into year-round rock-ribbed and of course VIRTUOUS patriots who are “ALL IN!”

        Like

        • TreeClimber says:

          The owner of the prom shop (a place of my former employment) is the wife of a local sheriff’s deputy. She never ever posts anything political, but I do remember when the whole thing with the NFL kneeling went down (no pun intended) she and hers were vocal about giving it up for good. As far as I can tell, they’ve not reneged. She also approved the idea of giving teachers guns.

          (I like her.)

          Like

    • Jorizabeth says:

      I just texted a picture of my huge flag to a half a dozen family and friends asking them to never forget and ask THEIR friends and family to do the same. I have never done that before on Memorial Day and I have had great feedback.

      Liked by 1 person

    • jumpinjarhead says:

      My profound apologies to Menagerie for the erroneous attribution. Your post is greatly appreciated. I will try to do better in my accreditation.

      Like

    • HD says:

      Like

      Jumpinjarhead:

      We care. I still placed the flowers and flew the USMC flag to honor my Dad. Most others did too. Some folks social distanced very far apart, yards and yards, say in cars, pitched lawnchairs, or sat on benches to reflect (in CT). You are not alone!

      The Prez and 1st Lady also gave a respectful rememberence at Ft McHenry (c-span and rsbnetwork).

      If you don’t know what to say or pray, move, walk and just say Jesus.

      Liked by 1 person

    • amjean says:

      Just because we have family picnics, doesn’t mean we don’t care. We all care more
      than anyone knows. And, if there was one thing besides shutting down religious
      services that makes people angry it is not allowing Memorial Day services and parades.

      That is unAmerican; we don’t like it and we will be voting Nov. 3.

      Like

      • jumpinjarhead says:

        Please do not misunderstand me— I, along with all the veterans I know, especially combat vets, WANT Americans to ENJOY THEIR FREEDOMS!

        That is the whole point!

        My concern is that so many Americans do not give either their freedoms that are UNIQUE in history in both their source and their scope, or those who have ensured those freedoms, even with their lives and limbs, a passing thought in today’s American “”culture.”

        My related point is that the ability to actually enjoy TRUE freedom of being an American wholly depends on the extent on possesses virtue.

        As Thomas Jefferson cautions, “The order of nature [is] that individual happiness shall be inseparable from the practice of virtue.”

        Thus I would hope more Americans will understand that it is right and proper to enjoy their wonderful freedoms, especially on occasions like Memorial Day. However, such enjoyment, if virtuous, will necessarily be with a genuine spirit of appreciation and honor, especially for their countrymen who sacrificed their own “rights” (to live, enjoy their families, grow old in safety etc.) for them to enjoy theirs.

        Thus, such freedom is in stark contrast to licentiousness of too many ignorant and/or uncaring Americans whose “enjoyment” is not moderates and tempered by virtue. This is very often self-evident when one looks at what they consider “enjoying their freedoms,” marked by immorality, drug use etc.

        Liked by 1 person

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