Thanksgiving planning and sharing !!

If you’ve been around the Tree with us for awhile, you know we do recipe threads for the holidays, and we get lots of requests for them. This year I am in the middle of a move, so I am sharing stella’s post.

You guys fire away, while people still have plenty of time to enjoy perusing the recipes and choosing the menu, as well as shopping for the ingredients.

Don’t be stingy. Go on over to stella’s and share some recipes over there too!

Stella's Place

Planning for Thanksgiving? I have already ordered a free-range fresh turkey that will be delivered on the Tuesday before the big day, and I plan to roast it in pieces after an overnight dry brine. Here’s the process and recipe I will use:

I have NEVER cooked a turkey on Thanksgiving that isn’t whole and stuffed, so this is a complete departure for me. Turkey is delicious no matter what, so I have high expectations. I have spit roasted whole small turkeys on a gas grill before, and that is absolutely delicious, if you want to try something different, but when I did it, it was July or August.

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79 Responses to Thanksgiving planning and sharing !!

  1. amwick says:

    I just knew when I read the title (in the twitterverse) that this was a Menagerie special post.

    This year we are traveling.. Thanksgiving will be somewhere in the Pacific, I think…. The good thing is that there will be some friends on the same trip, and we have already promised to celebrate together. Family in the moment… so, it’s all good…

    TY Menagarie for ushering in this very joyful season.

    Liked by 6 people

  2. I am a vegetarian but that looks delicious and gorgeous! Might check it out and have a stunning main dish.

    My actual Thanksgiving preparation has to start with cleaning my house. Ugggh

    Liked by 9 people

  3. Mama says:

    I love when American still celebrate Thanksgiving overseas. I have friends that moved to the British isles and still celebrate there … hopefully they are remembering America in their celebrations.

    Anyway… this is a great idea. We raised two of our own turkeys for Thanksgiving and this could be a great option for the hen.

    Note, we also have two geese that we hope to have for Christmas (that is if I can get over my attachment to them). We have never eaten Geese and would love any recipe suggestions.

    Liked by 1 person

    • bour3 says:

      Lucy’s Kitchen Notebook. Remembering the first time I cooked Thanksgiving. Nov 6,2008
      https://kitchen-notebook.blogspot.com/search?q=Remembering%3A+The+First+Time+I+Cooked+Thanksgiving

      An American girl in China cooks her first Thanksgiving dinner away from home to additional surprises that can happen only in China. [samples]

      We were all crying into our drinks at that point since we were all pretty much orphans and none of us knew how to cook. I had never done Thanksgiving dinner before, but was willing to try, I said. Why not do it together?

      The party started as dinner for 4, then turned to 10, 12, then 15.

      “You see,” he began, swallowing, eyes going cold then lowering his head again as if this was a true disaster… “We put an ad in the paper… Miss Lucy…” I wished he would stop calling me Miss Lucy. What? What had he done?

      A crew of smiling curious happy workers who wanted nothing more than to please were provided by the owner to help me in preparing the vittles.

      There were lots of gushing American students who had found out about the dinner on the radio, who had a great time.

      And so on. This is the most beautiful Thanksgiving story that I’ve ever read. Told beautifully by a beautiful writer and a very good cook besides. Now an expatriate living in Lyons.

      Like

    • Lanna says:

      This is a really good method for domestic goose: https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_roast_a_goose/
      (Wild geese are usually leaner, older, tougher. Breast cooks quicker, legs and wings need to cook longer, so the recipe needs to be adjusted for a wild bird.)

      Since geese are red meat, one additional step you can take to insure tenderness is to denture the protein using a shortcut dry aging method, koji, which is rice with the Japanese aspergillis fungus. You can buy koji in Asian markets or online, grind about 1/4 cup for a 10# goose, rub it all over the goose and set on a rack over a pan in the fridge (cover with a clean dish towel). Do the same thing the next day, then rinse all the koji off the third day, dry goose with paper towels and proceed with the recipe.

      The koji works wonders with steaks, a 48-hour koji-cured steak tastes like a 45-day dry aged steak. Sprinkle 2 T. ground koji over steak, sprinkle rice flour all over the entire surface so the aspergillis has something to help it grow, put on rack over a pan in the fridge covered with a clean dish towel, after 48 hours rinse, dry, sear in butter/olive oil in hot pan and finish in oven. Don’t let it age for more than 48 hours or it will begin to cure and toughen.

      Sous vide is another great way to cook geese. Cut up the bird, roast the legs and wings as above (use the wing tips, back and breast bones to make stock for gravy). Seal the boneless breast halves in sous vide bags (zip lock freezer bags work too), cook 1 hour at 128 degrees using sous vide wand in a container. The set up I use is a Gourmia 1200 watt sous vide wand and a 12 quart plastic food safe container. Remove from bag, sear in butter/olive oil in hot pan.

      Hope this helps, cooking a goose can be tricky but when done right it’s absolutely delicious.

      Like

  4. Tess from Philly says:

    I don’t know what it is about turkey, but I can’t stand it. I make it for the family, but the last couple of Thanksgivings, I’ve made some roast beef for me and anybody else who wants it (and more people want it than you might think). I’ve been keto (more or less) for about five years now, and have converted a few family members. Right now I’m in a very strict mode and would like to stay that way up to Christmas, so if anyone has some good keto recipes, I’m all eyes and ears. Not sure yet who’s coming this year, but I typically have anywhere from 8 to 20 people for Thanksgiving dinner.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Menagerie says:

      Years ago, perhaps the first year we started this blog, or maybe even the precursor to it, a former commentor recommended this recipe to me, and I have used it ever since. It has never been less than a favorite, and delicious. The whole family, who liked turkey well enough, became raving fans of this particular one.

      https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/member/views/alton-browns-turkey-brine-51410501

      It was hard for me to decide to try a new recipe, because the old one was super easy and very moist. If you want to try that, and it would be totally keto friendly, put a stick of butter and aromatics like onion, apple, orange peel, and I always use a cinnamon stick, and rosemary, and place in the cavity. Put bird in roasting pan with at least two cups of water. Heavily salt and pepper bird. Now use heavy duty foil and absolutely crimp it tight to the pan, so that no steam can escape.

      Cook the bird overnight or all day on 200-225 degrees. The meat will be very moist because it will mostly fall off the bone. If you don’t mind not having a turkey to put on your table as centerpiece and carve, then this is a great and easy recipe.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Tess from Philly says:

        I keep saying that I’m going to try brining the turkey, but I haven’t yet. Thanksgiving is a little later this year so I have more time to get my house ready. This may be the year. Thanks!

        Liked by 2 people

        • bour3 says:

          I tried brining several times but the best one was with buttermilk. I didn’t have enough to cover the bird so I used a towel soaked in it to wick it up the top (actually the bottom). Also, I didn’t wipe off the buttermilk before baking so it browned in splotches so it wasn’t the most beautiful thing, but honestly, it was the most moist turkey I’v ever cooked. Thin slices curled and folded off as they were cut. And it was baked rapidly within a few hours, not slowly overnight.

          Photos here, if you like.
          https://thingsimadethenate.blogspot.com/2014/11/whole-roasted-turkey.html

          Like

    • kabuki100 says:

      We are doing keto as well. This site has good reipes:

      https://alldayidreamaboutfood.com/best-low-carb-thanksgiving-recipes/

      Liked by 1 person

      • kabuki100 says:

        Recipes. Sorry.

        Like

      • Tess from Philly says:

        Thanks! Have you tried any of them? I’m definitely going to try the bacon gravy, practicing it in the next couple of weeks on chicken, because I may want to tweak it a little bit. If I could have one perfect keto side dish that would make passing on mashed potatoes and stuffing bearable, I’d be all set. Full disclosure: I detest cauliflower. I may pass on making a keto dessert as we now have a keto bakery here in Philadelphia that’s only a couple of blocks from my sons’ high school. And I can offer some Rebel ice cream on the side with whatever I buy.

        Liked by 1 person

        • kabuki100 says:

          Tess- I haven’t tried them, but will do so for the holidays. I am finding it fairly easy to adapt regular recipes to Keto, except for desserts. I do not like the taste of stevia or sugar replacements, so making a dessert will be a challenge.

          Like

        • Lanna says:

          You can mash celeriac (celery root). I usually use cauliflower as a mashed potato substitute (often people don’t realize it’s not mashed potatoes, especially under gravy). I’ve used celery root too, but it’s a difficult vegetable to work with. Hard to peel and chop, but then just boil, drain, mash and add butter, heavy cream, salt & pepper.

          My favorite keto side is roasted Brussels sprouts and cauliflower, but I’ve also done all sprouts or all cauliflower. Clean the sprouts, slice vertically (if using cauliflower, separate into florets, slice vertically). Toss with olive oil, minced garlic, salt & pepper. Roast in an open pan (I use a large foil pan) at 375 about 40-45 minutes, stirring occasionally, until tender and a bit charred. While doing that, chop bacon, fry until crisp. When sprouts are done, toss in the bacon and some of the bacon fat for flavor. You can drizzle a bit of balsamic vinegar glaze over it to really take it over the top but that adds sugar. You can roast the sprouts a day or two before, then mix in the cooked bacon and bacon fat and reheat in the microwave.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Tess from Philly says:

            Do you make your mashed cauliflower yourself? I’ve tried the Green Giant frozen mashed cauliflower and no matter what I do to it, it still tastes like cauliflower, which I’m not crazy about. My most successful recipe with them was fauxtato skins, which I could tolerate (if not quite enjoy) in spite of the cauliflower flavor.

            Can I buy celeriac at the regular grocery store? I can get to a Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s pretty easily as well.

            Like

            • Lanna says:

              I have a steamer pot, so I just remove the leaves, cut out some of the core and steam it whole. That way it doesn’t get too soggy. Drain, then put cauliflower on paper towels, press out as much liquid as you can. I process the florets in a food processor and whiz until very smooth, adding cream cheese and heavy cream, about 3 oz. cream cheese, 3 T. cream per medium head of cauliflower. If you’re doing a lot, do it in batches. Then taste, add salt if necessary, pepper if you want. I like to use a bit of white pepper so there’s no black specks in it. Then when you put it in a serving bowl, add a few last of butter to melt on top. This is something you can easily make ahead and reheat.

              I don’t like to use the frozen cauliflower ‘rice’, it often seems freezer-burned and I think they may use older, stronger flavored heads of cauliflower to make it.

              You should be able to get celeriac in a larger regular grocery store. I’ve bought it at both King Soooper’s (Kroeger) and Safeway.

              Like

          • spoogels says:

            Maple syrup over roasted Brussel sprouts is YUM

            Like

    • orbitup says:

      We are doing steak and crab legs this year. Of course everyone want to come to our house now!

      Like

    • buanadha says:

      I really don’t like Turkey either! I’ve made this a few times for holidays as it’s unique and really not all that hard to make, and I like Duck a whole lot more than Turkey!

      https://honest-food.net/braised-duck-recipe-german/

      Like

  5. moe2004 says:

    The holidays are coming, so excited and looking forward to all of it!

    Like

  6. Mike Robinson says:

    We often roast Cornish game hens, for our small group.

    Like

  7. ale81inn says:

    Celeste Wilde and I from the Ale 81 Inn a big fans of Carolina Gold chicken wings. This inspired us to develop a “gold” themed Thanksgiving dinner. We’ll have to get back to you with the whole program, but what we have started to sketch out for this idea is the bird prepared in a Carolina Gold baste, a cornbread stuffing with pumpkin seed and golden raisins, a golden squash soup, Yukon Gold whipped potatoes…..you get the idea. There would of course be some greens of some sort to balance the plate. We’re still working it out in full and will have it up later this week on the Passione Azzurra page on our site. Would love to hear any suggestions!

    Tom

    Liked by 1 person

  8. flatlandgoober says:

    I’m trying something new this year. Brine curing a turkey the way I cure ham and bacon. Then hot smoking it.

    Like

  9. I offer to you a family favorite stuffing for your Thanksgiving bird. What does not fit in the bird tastes great cooked in a separate covered Corning pan or similar.

    Stuffing (or Dressing as we call it for some reason) for a 14 lb bird:
    1 bag Catherine Clark Sage & Onion bread stuffing or similar
    1 cup chopped onion
    1 cup chopped celery
    1 cup chopped pecans
    1 cup dried cherries (can mix in dried cranberries too if desired)
    1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
    1 teaspoon pepper
    1 cup salted butter
    1 1/3 cup water
    While melting butter in the water, mix the dry ingredients together. Once water/butter mixture is cooled mix into stuffing mix. Stuff bird or cook separately.

    Enjoy and happy Thanksgiving to all on this website

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I wish that poor family that was brutally murdered in Mexico were still around to celebrate Thanksgiving with the rest of us. For that, I would be truly thankful.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Justin Green says:

    Nom nom nom!!!

    I haven’t decided yet – but may fry a turkey this year. Otherwise, we’re doing non-traditional smoked pork butts, lol. Yummy!

    Like

    • Fools Gold says:

      Cook them to 195f internal and double yummy! I always remove from smoker at about 165 wrap with foil and refrigerate then put them in the oven and back til 195. Great as slaw burgers with your favorite sauce. Personally I like to coat with Louisiana hot sauce prior to smoking but I eat the slaw burgers with Texas Pete. I cook them any time I got an itch for a good ole slaw burger like I had as a child in the 60’s…

      Like

  12. SpotTheSpook says:

    Tried this two years ago before buying an electric deep-fryer and it was the best (and quickest) turkey I’ve ever had!
    https://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/holidays-recipes/article/how-you-roast-turkey

    Like

  13. H.R. says:

    For Thanksgiving, I’m doing 4 racks of beef ribs on the pellet smoker grill, low and s-l-o-w. I ran across some smoker wood pellets made from whiskey barrels. I think that’ll add a good smoke flavor.

    The daughter-in-law will be in China. Son will just be returning from London. We’re leaving the day after Thanksgiving to snowbird in Florida.

    So I’m figuring that beef ribs, being pretty much all bone, will be completely consumed with perhaps only enough leftovers for a sandwich or three.

    Last year, I did the whole bird and sides thingy because there were a lot more appetites around and there were a couple of days afterward to clean up, prep for snowbirding, and lots of leftovers to sustain everyone while cleaning/packing.

    This year, it’s cover the grill, dump the smaller aluminum foil pans I’ll be using for the sides – no dishes – and the kid can take home enough for a couple of meals…. maybe ;o)

    It will be a completely different Thanksgiving for the H.R. household, but it should be tasty!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Niagara Frontier says:

    I’ll spare everyone this year my usual post about all the benefits of spatchcocking the turkey. There are enough good sites out there for you to find one that suits you.

    I’m doing it again this year. It always results in a whole bird cooked quickly and evenly, and there’s double enough crispy skin for everyone.

    Like

    • Rhoda R says:

      Have you tried cooking your turkey de-boned, with stuffing placed in the center and then tied into a log? I’ve seen a lot of Y-tube videos on this method.

      Like

      • Niagara Frontier says:

        I’ve seen that but it seems like too much work for me. Besides, IMO cooking a bird bone-in adds flavor. Heck, sometimes removing just the backbone from a giant raw turkey is sometimes work enough.

        Like

  15. Fools Gold says:

    Always enjoy reading recipes and some good ones show up here. Thx for keeping it going and remember everyday is a good day to celebrate our lord and savior Jesus Christ!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. dogsmaw says:

    Yule Log Cake*

    I suppose you can use many things here as the filling (your favourite jam, buttercream, whipped cream, chocolate mousse…). In my area, we have flavoured quarks that make the filling a bit lighter than for example the buttercream.

    For the dough
    4 eggs
    1½ dl sugar
    ¾ dl wheat flour
    ¾ dl potato starch
    3 tbsp cocoa powder
    1 tsp baking powder

    For the filling
    1 dl raspberry jam
    2 dl whipping cream
    200 g flavoured quark (I used quark flavoured with chocolate & mint)
    1 tsp vanilla sugar

    For the frosting
    100 g dark chocolate
    200 g flavoured quark (I used quark flavoured with chocolate & mint)
    1 dl whipping cream
    cocoa powder (optional)

    Preheat oven to 225 °C. In a bowl, whisk the eggs and sugar into a hard, light-coloured foam. Mix the dry ingredients together and add them into the egg–sugar foam carefully.

    Pour the dough evenly onto a baking pan covered with baking paper, smoothen it if necessary. Bake the dough in the preheated oven for approx. 7 minutes.

    Take another baking paper sheet and sprinkle it with sugar. Place the baked dough on the paper and let it cool down. Spread the raspberry jam on the dough.

    For the filling, whip the cream and add the quark and vanilla sugar. Spread the filling on the dough. Leave an area of 5 cm free at the front edge. Roll the dough. Place the roll with the seam side facing down. Cut the both ends “clean”, and then cut a piece off from both ends. Place the long remaining piece onto a serving tray. Form the two cut pieces into “branch stumps” and attach them onto the log or on its sides.

    Make the frosting: Melt the chocolate and mix it with the quark. Whip the cream and add it to the chocolate mix. Spread the frosting over the cake. Take a fork and run it down the length of the cake to make the surface look like bark. You can sprinkle some cocoa powder (through a sieve) on the cake to make the surface darker.

    *Note – I do love my sweets and this is one straight from a Hobbit 😛

    Like

  17. Beyond a rotisserie roasted Cornish broiler raised on my homestead as my celebration in thanksgiving for the bounties which I have been blessed. But perhaps a small suggestion, but nonetheless enjoyable, is to brew the best cup of coffee you can sprinkling pumpkin pie spice on the grounds before water pours over them. Serve with full fatted cream and enjoy a cup of heaven….

    Like

  18. TheLastDemocrat says:

    I have a question – a guest cannot eat dairy, so I cannot do mashed potatoes with cream or butter.

    An alternative is to cook them with chicken stock, which is OK but not great.

    Please help with other ideas, and comment on two ideas I have rolling around in my head…

    1. bake a couple potatoes, and then mix in while mashing potatoes – so that the mashed potatoes get some more flavor.
    2. bake a squash – maybe butternut – and mix in while mashing so the potatoes get some more flavor.

    Like

    • lolli says:

      TheLastDemocrat,
      Why ruin it for everyone? Lol
      In those situations, I would take a few servings out, while potatoes are plain, then the remaining servings can be buttery and creamy.
      The plain mash pot, you might use a bit of olive oil, or bacon juice with your seasonings and stock to add flavor.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kathy says:

        Agreed, Lolli … I would “doctor” the small serving with some turkey grease/drippings (strained) in place of butter, a little chicken broth, and some roasted garlic. FYI, I roast several heads of garlic all at once, flatten “clove-sized” portions between small sheets of waxed paper, and store the stack in the freezer. This way, whenever I need just a clove or two, it is ready to be peeled off the waxed paper and added to whatever I’m making.

        Like

    • Lanna says:

      Use some non-dairy creamer and plant butter — Country Crock has one out now. You’re going to want the plant butter on your table for your guest anyway. Don’t put butter on any other veggie, just have real butter and the plant butter on the table for guests to add as desired.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Terry says:

      I would add some horse radish sauce in it. Love y mashed potatoes like that. May want to try a batch before thanks giving.

      Like

    • If lactose intolerance or dairy allergy is the problem you might try using ghee.
      Ghee is the least likely dairy product to cause unpleasant intolerance symptoms. … Very pure ghee (99 -99.5% pure butter oil) may have trace amounts of casein and lactose remaining, but unless a person is extremely sensitive, it will normally not cause problems, even if other dairy does.

      Like

    • spoogels says:

      What about cashew nut milk?
      It honestly is the best non airy milk I have ever tasted

      Like

    • Indimex says:

      I have a friend that uses mayonnaise. It tastes better than it sounds!

      Like

  19. Nigella says:

    We deep fry our turkeys… 40 minutes and done… really moist

    Like

  20. milktrader says:

    Ordered an heirloom today.

    My experiment with plant-based gluten loafs is over.

    Also got some fresh local eggnog and planning a cheese plate of washed rind Brie and some blue cheeses. With pate.

    Like

  21. sempest says:

    I accidentally came across a different way to cook the turkey if I can line it up with the local meat market. The turkey will be deboned then stuffed with stuffing and rolled and tied to hold together.

    Like

    • Rhoda R says:

      There are numerous Y-tube videos on how to debone a turkey if your butcher can’t (won’t) oblige.

      Like

      • sempest says:

        Does not look to difficult but the place we get our meat from said on facebook that one of their more experienced butchers can do it and we just need to make arrangements waiting to here back from them.

        Like

      • Kathy says:

        Greetings, Rhoda … While deboning a turkey may not be difficult, I would suggest people TRIPLE the amount of time they allot for the task. Those YT videos were definitely helpful but — even after having practiced on a roasting chicken — my first turkey took considerably longer than I guestimated.

        Like

  22. Journal- says:

    This is the base recipe for Perfect Biscuits.

    Self-rising* low-protein wheat flour for cakes, pastries, biscuits, crackers:
    soft red winter wheat
    soft white winter wheat
    soft white spring wheat

    *If all-purpose soft flour add 1 1/4 teaspoons baking powder.

    1 cup/160 grams of flour self-rising
    1/2 cup/60 grams of shortening/lard
    1/2 cup/65 grams of buttermilk or milk

    fork or pastry knife lard/shortening and flour; then fork in milk.
    fold dough 3 times. Do Not knead like bread dough!
    cut biscuits shapes. Do not twist biscuit cutter. Press cutter down firmly one time only.
    Bake 15minutes at 475f.

    MUST USE PROPER FLOUR. Hard wheat bread flour = FAIL!

    Like

  23. waicool says:

    Pour a jigger of crown royal and a jigger of Disaronna together over clear ice in a high ball glass and add a couple maraschino cherries with a splash of juice, stir = A Red Royal, the holidays in a glass. Cheers!

    Like

  24. VegGOP says:

    Please include options for Trump-supporting vegetarians! There are MANY of us.

    Like

    • Indimex says:

      I make my yams, not sweet potatoes, like this:
      Cut into 1/4” rounds, sauté in coconut oil until tender, sprinkle with cinnamon and cayenne pepper, lightly drizzle real maple syrup over top just before serving. Super delicioso!

      Like

    • Kathy says:

      Greetings, VegGOP … This Keto-friendly salad (2 carbs per serving) is a favorite at our neighborhood Octoberfests. The first time I took it, four men sought me out to ensure I shared the recipe with the hosting family. It does include bacon but, for vegetarian guests, this could be omitted and still be delicious. My only modification is to prepare the dressing the night before — adding half the onion and bacon — which pre-distributes these flavors into the dressing. Serves 12.

      Low-Carb Loaded Broccoli Cauliflower Salad
      from Denise Wright, MyLifeCookbook.com

      INGREDIENTS
      ….. 1 cup mayonnaise
      ….. 1 tablespoon Swerve
      ….. 2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
      ….. 3 cups raw broccoli
      ….. 3 cups raw cauliflower
      ….. 1/2 red onion, finely diced
      ….. 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese
      ….. 8 oz. bacon, fried and crumbled
      ….. 1/2 cup raw pecan pieces

      INSTRUCTIONS
      In a small bowl add the mayonnaise, Swerve and apple cider vinegar. Whisk to combine. In a large bowl add the dressing and all the other ingredients and mix well. Refrigerate until ready to use.

      Like

  25. sewnice says:

    We enjoy a “Squanto” Thanksgiving dinner of salmon, which is a real treat for us. None of us are keen on turkey, although brining does make it super flavorful. The recipe I use for salmon is from a Costco monthly magazine, in which the salmon is marinated, then coated with a dry rub, baked, and served with a relish. It is a bit of work, but so flavorful, and the baked salmon oozes with those good oils!. Also on the menu is basmati rice pilaf, cole slaw, sweet potatoes, and a green veggie, either broccoli or aspargus. I would like to try Menagerie’s brussel sprouts recipe as a new addition to the line up.
    One of the things I make sure to do for holiday dinners is to divide up the work in advance, whether it is food prep or making sure the dishes are being washed as the food prep is done, the garbage is taken out, the table is set, chairs are brought to the table from all parts of the home, etc. I post a list of who is responsible for what in a prominent place in the kitchen. It just makes the work flow easier.

    Like

  26. Lanna says:

    Reminder: If you make homemade cranberry sauce, it takes 48 hours in the fridge to gel properly.

    If you want a cranberry sauce with less sugar, use the basic back-of-the-bag recipe (12 oz. cranberries, 1 C. water, 1 C. sugar) but reduce sugar to 1/2 C. and add 1/2 tsp. baking soda. The baking soda reduces the acidity of the berries, so less sugar can be used. The reduced sugar sauce gels a bit less than the full sugar recipe. I thought of experimenting with reducing the water by 1/4 C. or adding a tsp. of unflavored gelatin (softened in a small amount of water, stirred into cranberry mixture after cooked, but while still hot) to increase the gel, but haven’t tried either yet.

    Like

  27. phattcat says:

    That’s all I got…

    Like

  28. Here’s my Thanksgiving roundup – and also, I’m giving thanks for all of these great ideas and recipes!

    https://glovergardens.com/2018/11/20/thanksgiving-roundup/

    Like

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