President Trump Selects Robert O’Brien as National Security Advisor…

Robert C O’Brien (pictured left) is currently the State Department’s special presidential envoy for hostage affairs.  A founding partner of the Los Angeles-based law firm Larson O’Brien.

NYT – Mr. O’Brien served with Mr. Bolton when he was President George W. Bush’s ambassador to the United Nations and has advised Republican candidates like Mitt Romney, Scott Walker and Ted Cruz. In both the Bush and Obama administrations, Mr. O’Brien worked on an initiative to train lawyers and judges in Afghanistan.  (link)

People describe O’Brien as similar to his friend John Bolton without the virulent twitchy trigger finger. In his capacity as special envoy for hostage affairs, O’Brien wrote a letter to Swedish prosecutors urging them to release A$AP Rocky.  According to CBS O’Brien’s work “on Rocky’s case endeared him to Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and one of his top advisers.”

CBS’s Margaret Brennan gives a good outline here:

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221 Responses to President Trump Selects Robert O’Brien as National Security Advisor…

  1. Bendix says:

    Not half bad to look at, is he, ladies?

    Liked by 15 people

  2. Zy says:

    Which way does this go? Bolton, Kudhnet connections? Bulldog negotiator?

    Like

    • SAM-TruthFreedomLiberty says:

      President Trump appointed him. That’s where it goes.
      The question with Trump hires is if he’s a power player(e.g. Pompeo, Willbur..) or a pawn in Trump’s game(e.g. Bolton, ).
      My guess is the former as he’s moving up with Trump knowing him already.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Ma McGriz says:

        ” The question with Trump hires is if he’s a power player(e.g. Pompeo, Willbur..) or a pawn in Trump’s game(e.g. Bolton, ). ”

        Stand him up with Secretary Pompeo for a five minute presser and that will tell us the answer.

        Liked by 3 people

    • Ad rem says:

      ZY….Zorro….inquiring minds…..

      Liked by 3 people

  3. Where he stands depends on where he sits. It appears he will follow Trump’s lead, and can think and accomplish tasks.

    Liked by 8 people

  4. Bigly says:

    Trust trump.

    Don’t like state department cause Colin Powell worked there and he setup scooter Libby

    Liked by 2 people

    • Louisiana Tea Rose says:

      Our President isn’t a monolithic idealogue, defies stereotyping, and thinks outside the box. When you are a trailblazer in a world composed of herd animals, ya gotta find really good border collies who are trustworthy and independent thinkers that understand and can carry out the job delegated to them. There has to a shared vision: not sycophants willing to bend to any will for reward or prestige. Jared and Ivanka fit that requirement. They don’t have to be idealogically in lockstep with the President on every detail. And he knows he can trust them.

      Liked by 7 people

    • mikeyboo says:

      Colin Powell turned out to be among the swampiest of swamp creatures. UGH!!!
      He was willing to destroy a good man and let him go to prison. Piss on Colin Powell!

      Liked by 3 people

  5. fanbeav says:

    I heard he was recommended by Pompeo. If so, I give him the benefit of the doubt!

    Liked by 11 people

    • sunnyflower5 says:

      Unlike the NYT & CBS LOL spin- According to CBS O’Brien’s work “on Rocky’s case endeared him to Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and one of his top advisers.”

      Like

      • Pancho says:

        Well she’s a “reliable” reporter. I don’t believe the Kushner reference at all.

        Liked by 1 person

      • SAM-TruthFreedomLiberty says:

        Funny how Jared is the target of the far right and far left all the time. Must be doing something right…

        Liked by 14 people

        • lokiscout says:

          Ya got that right. Even catches flack from some Treepers! I believe in the old Jacksonian tradition that “To the victor go the spoils”!

          Liked by 1 person

        • mikeyboo says:

          SAM: Great observation! I believe Jared (and Ivanka) gives Pres Trump an honest opinion not rooted in ambition or greed. Once Pres Trump makes a decision Jared supports him.
          That’s exactly what you want in an adviser-not a bunch of yes men and azz kissers.

          Liked by 4 people

        • trumpmemesandreams says:

          Whilst Trump may have a blue-collar billionaire panache about him, Jarvanka are the textbook definition of patrician RINO. They were both for Paris Climate Accords, are for more ‘legal’ immigration, are for free trade (notice how China trade actually has repercussions & motion on it now that Kushner is largely out of the picture?), and so on and so forth.

          Criminal justice reform is great and all, but that’s not why Trump got elected nor will it win him 2020. I’d rather Jarvanka both take a graceful bow out of every day operations and hit the campaign trail and be good-will ambassadors (and fund raisers).

          Like

          • DV Meca says:

            You must be fortunate enough to have never had family or friends incarcerated then. When I was growing up, a close family member and a couple of other guys I knew pretty well did time. Prison reform was—(and still is, even factoring in the encouraging progress under Trump)—desperately needed.

            I’m not saying we should look the other way when crimes are committed or go easy on criminals—not even close. I understand that breaking the law has consequences, but we’ve had a horrible system for generations, one that’s not only bad for prisoners, but also for their families, communities and society as a whole. Prisons are de-facto segregated and run by racial gangs. Most prisoners are essentially forced to become gang members, even if they otherwise would avoid such associations. Guards are often as brutal and corrupt as the inmates. A family member who is hard of hearing ran into problems because they’d get furious if he didn’t understand what they said and immediately comply (didn’t care at all that he couldn’t hear well—they considered that his problem). When a guard became angry over this, he’d return to his cell after the brief time allotted to go outside each day and find it completely empty—all his possessions gone, either stolen or trashed. The guards weren’t just strict enforcers who demanded obedience—they were generally involved in all sorts of illicit business, including drug dealing inside the prison (if not personally, then via a protection racket for the actual dealers). Rape and assault is common in prisons. Nobody really cares. They do care about access to books and education, though—both are severely limited in most prisons, even limited books allowed per month to a small #, as a common rule! Education is probably the best way to help inmates avoid recidivism, but nobody seems to care. Instead, we make white prisoners join neo-Nazi/skinhead gangs, black prisoners join all-black violent street gangs or Latino prisoners join all-Latino violent street gangs, just to survive—many prisoners aren’t racists or gang-affiliated going in, but we sure do our darnedest to make sure they’re racists linked to violent gangs by the time they leave. We also let them get raped in many instances and then many (most?) Americans just chuckle about it as if that was a perfectly reasonable part of their sentence—“Hey, don’t do the crime if you don’t want to get violently sodomized,” basically. Finally, after years of this hell on earth, with little opportunity to better themselves, we release felons with a modern scarlet letter. They can’t get most work or rent an apartment in most areas because background checks reveal they were incarcerated. So, after all that, we (predictably) have the highest recidivism rate in the first world.

            Prison reform was and is tremendously important. I’m very grateful to POTUS and Jared for what they’ve done. Yet, despite my enthusiastic support for the First Step Act, it’s much closer to the start than it is to the finish line re: necessary prison & criminal justice reform.

            Jared’s lead role in coordinating the bipartisan alliance that developed and supported the First Step Act, including Jared working with POTUS on First Step to get it to a place where POTUS could break with Republican orthodoxy and enthusiastically support it for months, selling his base on it at rallies and pressuring a reluctant McConnell to bring it up for a vote—in my book, what Jared did with the First Step Act is the single greatest contribution to the country by any member of the administration except for Trump himself, so far.

            I don’t take this position because there’s anything in it for me personally. I’ve never been in legal trouble and I haven’t spent time around people who are for quite a while. (I don’t even have a reason to visit my old neighborhood since my dad passed a few years ago). I knew it was important to get out of the area where I grew up and build an adult life far away from that sort of culture—I’m currently fortunate enough to live in a safe, upper-middle-class neighborhood and interact in professional and social circles in which I neither see nor hear the sorts of violent and lawless behavior I used to see and hear on a daily basis while growing up. My kids won’t ever have to deal with any of that BS. But there are millions of Americans who do have to deal with it. Prison reform isn’t just about how we should treat prisoners to lower recidivism and keep innocent people safe (although that’s very important!), it’s also about the families and kids who are impacted by the system through no fault of their own. That’s a huge problem and Jared’s help addressing it has earned my respect and support.

            Liked by 1 person

      • GB Bari says:

        Knowing President Trump, he would place far more weight on Pompeo’s opinion than Kushner’s. But PDJT will not ignore Jared’s opinion as long as Jared provides examples of O’Brien’s character and performance. However if there was any conflict between the two men’s recommendations, I am confident that President Trump would make the best decision because he knows what skillsets are going to be of highest priority in his appointee.

        Liked by 2 people

  6. mg says:

    I have plenty of doubts with this booosh, mittens lackey.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. IMO: The only candidate not tied to Deep Staters.
    Pompeo-vetted to boot.
    👍🏼

    Liked by 7 people

  8. AnotherView says:

    “endeared him..to..Kusher”……I don’t like the sound of that. The Kushvankas have way too much influence as it is. And none of it good.

    Like

    • TreeClimber says:

      So you don’t like USMCA or the tax cuts or Asia respecting us? Duly noted.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Albertus Magnus says:

        AnotherView is just spouting what Bannon and Brietbart spun while Bannon was busy undermining PDJT during his WH tenure and the immediate after period. He wouldn’t say it now, since PDJT has allowed him back into the MAGA tent, but those folks who don’t pay attention just haven’t gotten the memo yet that Javanka bashing is just so yesterday among the Bannonistas.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Daniel says:

          I have come to realize Kushner and Ivanka are definitely on the left politically. They won’t cross the president, but they do have their influence.

          Ivanka is a feminist. That’s more identity politics. I can’t unsee that.

          I trust Trump. He appears to weigh risks and benefits and acts accordingly. But the approval of a Never Trumper shifts things to the negative a bit.

          Liked by 2 people

          • mikeyboo says:

            Daniel, be comforted. Pres Trump respects his daughter and son-in-law, AND Pres Trump is definitely his own man.

            Liked by 2 people

          • GB Bari says:

            What a lot of conservative ideologues seem to miss is that the President himself is no ideologue. He has so far governed mostly conservatively, but not exclusively.

            IMHO, his prison reform, his First Step program, his Opportunity Zones program, his Jobs Retraining program and several other initiatives that he’s promoted are all illustrative of a President reaching out to people in our country who’ve long been screwed over by both parties. I have no doubts that his daughter and son in law have had a hand in those efforts.

            I like that President Trump is trying to adopt policies that help ALL Americans regardless of economic status or ideological “limits.” He has kept very true to his campaign promises.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Kenneth D Taylor says:

      That article is probably fake news. Do you trust it?

      Like

    • MaineCoon says:

      FTA: “Ivanka Trump leads a workforce advisory board meeting at the Boys & Girls Club; ”

      Maybe you have Ivanka mixed up with her father. She’s the one busy worldwide in her niche — WORKFORCE.

      Her father is the one busy running USA (and impacting the world).

      https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/Photos/This-week-in-Washington/12190/ph1/

      Liked by 2 people

    • SAM-TruthFreedomLiberty says:

      Jared and Ivanka did more for Trump, MAGA and America than you will ever be able to do with your low intelligence and faulty DNA.

      Liked by 1 person

    • TexasDude says:

      Trump’s daughter and son in have too much influence?

      What is the deal with trying to fracture Trump’s family?

      Liked by 4 people

    • Sharon says:

      Is that you Steve Bannon?

      Like

      • AnotherView says:

        Nope…but for those who haven’t noticed, Jared and Ivanka are liberals. Chelsea Clinton is Invanka’s best friend. And why is Ivanka worried about jobs for women in South America folks when she’s supposed to be working on jobs for Americans–think about that one.

        Like

        • LULU says:

          No, I doubt very much that Chelsea Clinton is Ivanka’s best friend. They both live in New York (although the Kushners are now in DC). There is a large social set there. People who go to the same cocktail parties, know the same people and all that. PDJT used to be in that scene.

          We show our provincialism – and maybe even our nasty sides – when we go after the President’s family, whom he values as advisers (unpaid), with assertions that have no basis in fact. Doesn’t make us sound like his friends and supporters, IMO.

          Liked by 3 people

  9. I’ll let you know after I find out what the left thinks on the if they hate him scale…

    Liked by 3 people

  10. lurker2 says:

    If he’s loyal, keeps his lips zipped, and he understands that President Trump is the boss, then it’s all good.

    Liked by 5 people

  11. L. Gee says:

    If Trump can withstand Bolton’s “drumbeat of war” (which he did–no sweat), then I don’t foresee any problems with this gentleman. After all, if O’Brien doesn’t work out, Trump can always fire him and hire someone else!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Daniel says:

      And yet, Bolton seemed to do more against Trump’s agenda than he did advancing it. Can we agree Bolton and many others were hiring mistakes? If so, what makes you think a Romney-approved National Security Advisor isn’t a mistake?

      “…can always fire him and hire someone else!” Really? When damage is done, it’s not fixed with simply firing and hiring someone else. TIME is lost and matters have to be cleaned up as well. It also serves to create more negative appearances.

      I get that selecting and hiring the best people is an immensely difficult, if not impossible, thing to do under these circumstances. After all, if the interests of the swamp were to be served, you could throw a rock in any direction and hit someone who would support the swamp’s interests. But if the interests of this country are to be served, it seems impossible to find someone who has a combination of qualifications, true love of country and the strength to withstand political attack campaigns from the swamp.

      The fact that Romney approves is very worrisome to me. I was on-board until I saw Romney’s tweet.

      Liked by 1 person

      • skipper1961 says:

        Daniel,
        I see the possibility that willard anticipated his “reverse midas touch” effect, and expect him to continue to try to infect Mr.Trump’s world. Good luck there, mittens…
        BTW, I wonder if Mr. Trump has ever considered going public w/ ENDORSEMENTS for his opponents? It could be the kiss of death to some of those sociopaths!!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Rhoda R says:

        Why should Mitt’s opinion on this issue matter any more than his opinion on any other Trump-related issue?

        Liked by 2 people

      • L. Gee says:

        Ehhh . . . whatever! . . . I’ll wait to see how this pans out before I light my hair on fire. As for Bolton’s “damage,” I think the president is smart enough to hear opposing advice and then do what he thinks is best for the U.S. Plus, Bolton wasn’t the only person on this team, so there had to have been other saner voices speaking to the president as well. I can handle dissenters in the cabinet, and apparently Trump can, too.

        As for Romney’s endorsement, I don’t put much stock in it! But, hey, you can go ahead and panic if you want to!

        Liked by 1 person

    • mikeyboo says:

      ” if O’Brien doesn’t work out, Trump can always fire him and hire someone else
      Right-and we know he will!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. M$M tries to conflate “Advisor” with “Operator”.

    IMO the job of the National Security ADVISOR is to get the President the info, options, assessments, potential scenarios and operational considerations he needs to make the best possible decisions … including how to organize, adapt and oversee for success.

    President Trump needs an advisor who can run the process, not sway the decision, and strategically tap his entire Cabinet to magnify leverage and deliver outcomes on multiple fronts.

    Seems that with each passing month, his Cabinet is expanding their agendas domestically, and now internationally … and this from what we can see publicly.

    Liked by 10 people

  13. WeThePeople2016 says:

    Liked by 11 people

  14. Bendix says:

    I get this nervous feeling in the pit of my stomach, a “here we go again” sensation, with the announcement of new appointments.
    It’s so hard, what our president is undertaking.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. CharterOakie says:

    Three CBS know-nothings blathering on about things they…don’t know.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. dawg says:

    I’m of the opinion that it doesn’t really matter because President Trump makes his own decisions. If he proves useful, he’ll keep him, if not, he’ll fire him.

    Liked by 7 people

  17. Mike in a Truck says:

    If he dosnt work out then PDJT will replace him. That’s what is great about having a CEO as POTUS- your either a live wire or dead weight. No political hacks needed.As I would tell my artillery section – put your finger in this cup of water and pull it out, if the hole dont fill up your indispensable.

    Liked by 4 people

    • LULU says:

      Most seem to be under the faulty impression that the President vets all candidates for any position in the WH. That he somehow chooses them all by himself. We’ve already heard that many of his early “mistakes” were persons recommended by the likes of Condoleeza Rice and other GOP big guns. (PDJT was a businessman; not a swamp denizen.) Most have – or seem to have – no experience in corporate business where executives do come and go and more come and they too may go. (I always called it “Creative Turnover” when the HR types were whining.)

      So I tend to give our President a break. I am not in his shoes. I do not know everything he has to deal with. What is in his mind. And I don’t believe I am better suited than he to determine what he should do and whom he should do it with.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Ma McGriz says:

        ” I tend to give our President a break. I am not in his shoes. I do not know everything he has to deal with. What is in his mind. And I don’t believe I am better suited than he to determine what he should do and whom he should do it with. ”

        I agree, LULU.

        LOL….for ever and always the denizens ran the swamp unopposed and in complete smugness.

        Then came President Donald Trump, who quietly but firmly said, ” I don’t think soooo…..”

        Thrash! Thrash! went the denizens!
        Gnash! Gnash went their fangs!
        Bash! Bash! Went the Left!
        Crash! Crash! Went some other things!

        But nothing avails, and their impotent crashing and bashing goes on, noticed by all and growing weaker by the hour. Their fangs and claws are useless against Trump’s armor.

        Ain’t it great?

        Liked by 1 person

        • skipper1961 says:

          Ma McGriz,
          I’m reminded of the picture that SD uses here often… The one of Mr. Trump sitting, his back to the group, privately smiling…..
          He HAS to being enjoying the show!!!! (At least I hope he is.)

          Liked by 1 person

          • Ma McGriz says:

            Copy that, skipper. Me too.

            Liked by 1 person

            • LULU says:

              I was once put in charge of a very troubled business. No one else wanted the assignment, so it was handed to me. It had been neglected, even abused. When someone working with me asked how on earth I could smile and have a sense of humor in the face of impending doom and probable failure, I said “Because I’ve given it a lot of thought, and I believe I have figured out a solution.”

              Thrashing and gnashing use up a lot of energy which would be better spent on coming up with solutions. Eeyore may be the most low energy creature ever… The strongest critics are often the laziest persons in the room who would rather jibe at others than get busy…

              Liked by 3 people

      • mikeyboo says:

        Well see, LULU, now you’re just being rational-and you know we can’t have that.

        Liked by 1 person

        • LULU says:

          Awww. I didn’t know you’d notice. 🙂

          Long ago when I went through a long day of psychological testing to determine if I was qualified for a high level position in a corporation, the psychologist wound it up by saying that I was too logical (as opposed to being emotional). I have never worried about it. Most of the time it seemed like a pretty good idea…

          Now, about O’Brien, it’s my belief that President Trump and Secretary Pompeo will determine fairly quickly how good he is going to be at this new job. I don’t expect a long honeymoon unless he is a superstar who can work with them.

          Liked by 2 people

  18. Margaret Berger says:

    Grennell is impressive. He pushes the Trump doctrine of America First. His endorsement is reassuring. Not that it matters, but it never hurts, Grennell is the best looking man in the government.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. sunnyflower5 says:

    President Trump just did a little presser before boarding AF1 -with Mr. O’Brien

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Sherri Young says:

    Having voluntarily lived in Los Angeles would usually be a negative aspect for me. In this case, I like the idea of an advisor who would be more in touch with the idea of human and drug smuggling via our southern border.

    Here is his bio from his law firm’s website. Pretty impressive.

    https://www.larsonobrienlaw.com/attorney-detail/robert-c-o-brien

    Liked by 1 person

    • LULU says:

      A bunch of low-life lefty Democrats got themselves some power after decades of Republican leadership in California and suddenly anyone from California is a bad guy. I am reminded of the woman who once posted on another forum “I’ve never been to California, but I know I wouldn’t like it…”

      Put away the broad brushes. California ia a huge state, huge population. And it is not all San Francisco-Los Angeles-Sacramento. Unfortunately the Dims have managed to amass 40% of the voter registrations (the other 60% are pretty much in the GOP and No Party Preference categories). Those of us who are not satisfied with what has happened here are finding that we are not the only ones who are unhappy with the leftward tilt. Those NPP voters have made a difference in the past. Republican defeatism has also kept some away from the polls. Perhaps being fed up with policy changes that bite them and ruin their lives will also be compelling if and when those NPP voters hit the polls. And remember the Reagan Republicans? The Dims have swung the pendulum so far left that many of their own cannot live with the results…

      We’ll see. But don’t count all of us out. Just our share of registered voters was about 5 million the last time I looked. How many in your states?

      Liked by 8 people

      • LULU says:

        That should have said “Remember the Reagan Democrats.”

        Liked by 3 people

      • Louisiana Tea Rose says:

        I hope over the next year, we will hear more from our American Patriot Californians about the dynamics in their state that impact their lives and well-being. Things are not going very well for huge numbers of them, and their current Governor was elected in an off-year where the disenchanted often pass up the ballot box.

        I must admit I’ve pretty much “signed off” on anything good coming out of a statewide election, but who knows….President Trump has a way of changing minds and hearts.

        Liked by 4 people

      • skipper1961 says:

        LULU,
        I have MANY God fearing, hard working, conservative friends in California. Hunters, most of them. (Even some from L.A.!) Fine folks, they are. Maybe one of them might waiver, before pulling the handle for President Trump. Then again, they have JOBS & PAY TAXES, so… there’s that.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Rhoda R says:

        How many illegals are the california dems allowing to vote this time?

        Liked by 3 people

      • Sherri Young says:

        Thanks, LULU. I’m in Texas where 4,685,047 persons voted for Donald Trump in 2016 vs. 3,877,868 who voted for HRC out of 8,969,226 votes in the presidential contest. Some Republicans who were said to be unhappy because Ted Cruz was not the candidate apparently did not vote.

        A few years ago, I drove up 99 from I-20 to Modesto then later went on to Oakland for a couple of hours. I was thrilled with what I saw in the valleys. Farmers had signs with scripture posted on their property lines. One farmer had plants with the name Jesus cut into them.

        The main person with whom I interacted in Oakland just beamed when he got to mention the name of Kamala Harris. It was akin to how teenage girls used to act at the mention of Elvis or their favorite Beatle.

        When I had to decide between driving down the coast or returning through the valleys, I took the valley route.

        Liked by 1 person

        • LULU says:

          Sherri, we love our native state as you probably love yours. Being wished earthquakes and excommunication from the United States, and lots of other ugly stuff, is very painful. Those who say “why not just vote the Democrats out” are speaking from ignorance about facts like registered voters. But times can and do change, pendulums do swing. There are moderate Democrats who are sick about what is happening to their party – and thereby affecting their daily lives as it does the lives of the rest of us.

          I have never known a Californian to wish ill on another state – we pray for hurricane and tornado and flood and ice storm victims, send help and encouragement. We really love the rest of our great United States. The vitriol is hurtful … and, it seems, un-American. Pulling us apart into separate states instead of uniting against those who would divide and conquer us? Why?

          Liked by 1 person

  21. Elle says:

    Okay, I’ll translate for ya’ll.

    First, this is from the NYT. Think of what they say as coming from the mouth of an ugly old gutter-snipe. They lay awake at night, feverishly thinking of ways to make Trump look bad. So when they say he “served with”, does that mean he was Bolton’s BFF or does it mean that they both served under the Bush Administration – never once speaking to each other or being in the same room together? They say he “has advised Republican Candidates”. Yah. Pfff. So have I. I spoken with a few of my representative now and then and gen them my advice too.

    For their base, linking him to Bush and Scott Walter and Mitt Romney makes Trump Orange man B.A.D. That it also gives conservatives angst is just a side benefit.

    Liked by 6 people

  22. John-Y128 says:

    Another unknown to Trump establishment recommendation, hope this one works!

    Like

  23. Troublemaker10 says:

    Like

  24. I keep forgetting… did we elect Jared Kushner? Was he part of the package I missed at the rallies?

    Liked by 1 person

    • SAM-TruthFreedomLiberty says:

      Just vote for Trump and don’t think too much with your broken mind between elections..
      Let’s face it.. you don’t have the mental capacity to understand what Trump is doing nor how real life works beyond the perimeter of your couch.

      Without Jared you wouldn’t know about MAGA. Of course this will go over your head too.

      Liked by 2 people

      • This is entirely untrue. Anyone could have organized Trump rallies and Jared is an unlikable beta male. People attended Trump rallies for:
        1) Trump’s America First, nationalist agenda
        2) his likability as a person
        3) the fact he was an outsider

        As a reader of this blog for several years now, I understand the positive (data mining) and negative (prison reform) roles Kushner has played both in getting him elected and in shaping the presidency since.

        Having said that you are a fool for making both the accusations about my knowledge on the Trump presidency and the direct attacks on my mind/mental capacity/my success or failure in life (of which you have zero idea). You should think before you type and be a better human, have some impulse control, and avoid the immediate accusatory outrage.

        Disagreements and questioning the God Emperor should be welcome.

        Treepers are/should be better than this.

        Like

      • JoeMeek says:

        You sound a lot like Kamala Harris chastising Brett Kavanaugh.

        Like

      • erm9164 says:

        Stop with the ad hominem attacks.Totally uncalled for!

        Liked by 1 person

    • SAM-TruthFreedomLiberty says:

      And yes, cause of your low brain capacity you didn’t realize how Trump rallies were organized and attended by Jared Kushner.
      I remember vividly Candidate Trump alluding to the genius of his son in law multiple times at them.
      People like you are disgusting..

      Liked by 3 people

      • SharkDiver says:

        LOL! Couldn’t have said it better myself…Sofa warriors crack me up.

        Liked by 1 person

      • skipper1961 says:

        SAM,
        If I may, While I don’t necessarily agree or subscribe to goldenunicorngaming’s comment, I do try to cut some folks some slack for sheer fatigue. Let’s face it, even Mr. Trump has to play for “optimum” conditions. I imagine in the eyes of a Titan like President Trump, just about everything might amount to “settling”, having access to the very best of everything for decades.
        I must admit to being frustrated @ all of the obstacles that the swamp presents to the Trump Train, sometimes. The aforementioned commenter DID say “rallies” (plural). That implies to me that he (?) @ least jumped onto the Train when we needed him(?) most.
        Sorry, admonition/over
        Skipper

        Liked by 2 people

        • skipper1961 says:

          P.S. I had the pleasure of attending 5 rallies, and NEVER met anyone who ever doubted Mr. Trump. If you have stood in line since 0600 hrs, to get into the venue, you know the kind of people I am talking about.
          I am looking forward to this campaign season, as I have secured a slot on the crew to set up the rallies on the I-4 corridor (Florida)!!!!!
          MAGA!!!
          KAG!!!
          TRUMP/PENCE 2020!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

          Liked by 3 people

          • Agreed. I still haven’t technically attended a Trump rally, but my take on what they are like is exactly what you wrote. I had the unfortunate displeasure to wait outside in line for 6 hours in Chicago, only to get in and watch while Jan Shakowsky’s thug husband and his hired hands ran around and beat the crap out of Trump supporters and patriots outside the venue, only to have the entire thing ultimately get cancelled before it started.

            But I will make one this time around.

            Liked by 1 person

            • skipper1961 says:

              goldenunicorngaming,
              Good for you, that you were @ least able to continue standing. Twice, I had to exit right before Mr. Trump took the stage (arthritic spine, and standing in one place too long). It did give me a chance to indeed witness the many THOUSANDS of Patriots satisfied w/supporting Mr. Trump from outside! Think of that! THOUSANDS of people happily gathering together, because they couldn’t get in!!!
              Sorry the Chicago rally was cancelled. Very disappointing. I hope you are able to attend one (or more) this time around. There really is NOTHING like a Trump rally!
              BTW, I wonder if anyone thought to invite the Bikers for Trump crew to events @ “questionable” locations? Mr. Trump could give his Secret Service detail the day off!
              As far as shakowsky’s posse…. I’ll quote the inimitable Jake Blues.., “I hate f*&^%!g Illinois Nazis!”

              Like

      • Summer says:

        Still, no need to insult a fellow poster, he has every right to express his doubts, just like you have every right to express your confidence.
        On a side note, asserting mental superiority by hurling insults is what many of us here despise in liberals. It’s worth to exercise self-awareness once in a while. Thank you.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Sharon says:

        Yes SAM our President has called Jared his Golden Boy! These people are disgusting you are right!

        Like

      • JoeMeek says:

        You sound a whole lot like Kamala Harris chastising Brett Kavanaugh. You will only drive more people away from President Trump with your ‘tact”.

        Like

    • Kaco says:

      Yes, you did, he is an adviser that is part of the package. POTUS has given him credit for his campaign success and for back channel negotiations with other countries.

      Liked by 3 people

      • And it is also fair to express displeasure that that POTUS never told the public he was going to have Ivanka and Jared have undue influence on his presidency, either. I acknowledge Jared has been both a boon and a bane with Trump.

        But I never see Jared in the spotlight fighting for things I elected Trump to address or fix.

        Like

    • swissik says:

      I didn’t vote for either of the Kushners and to this day I mistrust them. Jared played an important role in the Israel situation, moving the embassy and such but other than that I’d prefer if he didn’t have so much influence in the WH. Nothing we can do about that however. Am I the only one who remembers that we were told they would be out of the WH after 6 months?

      Liked by 1 person

    • tozerbgood8315 says:

      Well you didn’t elect Robert Obrien or John Bolton or any of Trump’s other cabinet members either. But you still have them.

      What is your point anyways… if you indeed… actually have one?

      Like

    • tozerbgood8315 says:

      Hey unicorn… you didn’t elect Robert OBrien, or any other of Trump’s cabinet. But you still got them. So do you even have a point?

      Like

      • I don’t even know who Robert O’Brien is. And that’s the beauty of your post… bringing up an unknown cabinet member, and comparing him to Kushner. Kushner is incessantly making decisions for Trump this entire presidency, and I’m tired of it. I voted for Trump to make these decisions, not constantly do what his daughter and Jared tell him to do. Get them out of there.

        I’m not looking to start an argument or a back and forth, I’m 100% pro Trump, and I occasionally disagree with what he does and we can leave it at that, unless you REALLY don’t want to. 🙂

        Like

  25. I S says:

    He’s a negotiator! The next phase of the NK, Iran, Afghanistan, Iraq saga is negotiating. That’s why PDJT picked him.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. bearsgrrr says:

    “In both the Bush and Obama administrations, Mr. O’Brien worked on an initiative to train lawyers and judges in Afghanistan. (link)” – Why do we waste so much money on crap like this?! Lawyers and judges – in a Islamic sharia law never gonna change shithole country.

    Liked by 2 people

    • skipper1961 says:

      bearsgrrr,
      If Mr. O’Brien is the professional that being hired by Mr. Trump implies, he was probably assigned a really crappy detail (perhaps one that he was ideologically opposed to ?), by the current President, and dispatched of his obligations as best he knew how. He may have @ least been one person who didn’t give the farm away, being a hostage negotiator, and all?
      And I agree, there’s little function for a pair of shoelaces, among those who wear sandals (and don’t shake hands, IYKWIM?).

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sherri Young says:

      “O’Brien previously served as Co-Chairman of the U.S. Department of State Public-Private Partnership for Justice Reform in Afghanistan under both Secretaries Rice and Clinton. The PPJRA promoted the rule of law by training Afghan judges, prosecutors and defense lawyers and provided scholarships for young Afghan lawyers to study in the U.S. From 2008 through 2011, O’Brien was a presidentially-appointed member of the U.S. Cultural Property Advisory Committee, which advises the federal government on issues relating to the trafficking of antiquities and other cultural items.”

      https://www.state.gov/biographies/robert-c-obrien/

      So he introduced American legal tradition and process to judges, prosecutors, and defense lawyers after they received a new constitution under which they had never practiced. Probably not a bad idea.

      Like

      • bearsgrrr says:

        So they brought Afghanis to the U.S. to “study”.

        It’s a very bad idea.

        How many over stayed their visas? How many brought their tradition of bacha bazi with them?

        Like

      • bearsgrrr says:

        Sorry that last comment was sent too soon. Introducing rule of law is useless in an Moslem society. They are a theocracy. Sharia is the law. The only law. If a Moslem doesn’t practice sharia they are apostate. The penalty for apostasy is death.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sherri Young says:

          Understood. However the Afghan constitution of 2004 declares Afghanistan to be an Islamic state and Islam as the state religion. At the same time, it allows freedom of religion. It is a compromise and functionally sets up a strong central government instead of the tribal rule that had prevailed.

          If you want the rule of law to come from a new constitution, the officers of the court must be trained. Consider it as missionary work. We evangelize, they choose what to do with what they have been taught.

          Articles 1-3 of the 2004 constitution should have their calming effect.

          Article One
          Afghanistan shall be an Islamic Republic, independent, unitary and indivisible state.

          Article Two
          The sacred religion of Islam is the religion of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. Followers of other faiths shall be free within the bounds of law in the exercise and performance of their religious rituals.

          Article Three
          No law shall contravene the tenets and provisions of the holy religion of Islam in Afghanistan.
          ================
          The history of the Spanish peninsula is evidence that not all muslims are head-chopping radicals. The Jews on the Iberian peninsula in the Middle Ages were allowed to live peacefully under Islamic rule. Not so under Catholic Christian rule. Just ask Christopher Columbus. He filled up three small ships primarily with men who, as suspected Jews, had to be gone by a certain date or be dead under the Inquisition.

          Disclosure: Charlemagne and Crusaders are among my ancestors.
          ===============
          Back to bacha bazi and visa overstays —
          My guess is that since visiting law students would have to be literate, they would not be from the rural tribal areas in the north where, at least some accounts relate, bacha bazi is more widely practiced. Over here, there are probably plenty of boys who are made available as sex toys without having to dress up and dance.

          Like

  27. wwwrobotC says:

    “While America Slept: Restoring American Leadership to a World in Crisis” By Robert C. O’Brien

    https://books.google.com/books/about/While_America_Slept.html?id=RabLDAAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=kp_read_button#v=onepage&q&f=false

    Liked by 1 person

    • Rhoda R says:

      Thanks for the link – I just ordered the book so haven’t read it yet, of course. But from the Amazon description and the buyers’ comments it doesn’t appear that O’Brien is any kin of deep state stooge.

      Liked by 2 people

    • lokiscout says:

      Like the cut if his gibe! Reading that book excerpt I can see why President Trump picked him. This Adviser position may portend to more prominent and influential positions in the future.

      Recommend the jittery Treepers here read the link wwwrobotC provided. Powerful stuff from the “horse’s mouth” (pen if you will).

      Like

    • Rynn69 says:

      Just remember: A man named James Comey wrote “A Higher Loyalty.”

      Of the Swamp, by the Swamp, you ARE the Swamp.

      Like

  28. Heika says:

    Lawyer swamp trash

    Like

  29. rcogburn says:

    “the influence and role of the National Security Advisor varies from administration to administration and depends…on the style and management philosophy of the incumbent President.”

    VSGPDJT sees the NSA job very differently than the Uniparty establishment and the past presidents who gave the NSA enormous influence and power: GW Bush/Condy Rice; Obama/Susan Rice; Carter /Brezhinski; Nixon/Kissinger. (Reagan, on the other hand, went through six NSAs).

    Under Trump, the NSA is a greatly diminished role with vastly less power. Whatever his reasons, this President does not want or need a Condy Rice or Zbignew Brezhinski in his White House.

    Trump keeps his NSA on a short leash, to the dismay of the establishment.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ma McGriz says:

      Quiet as it’s kept, I suspect a whole buncha folks are gonna be shocked and rocked to learn Trump talks a lot less but carries a way bigger stick than they had thought.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Trump is a Chess player – he always has been, even in business. He negotiates by “moving the cheese.” He tries to create a situation where you realize that you want and need to do what he wants you to do. And, it works.

        The power of the United States is not only military – awesome though that power is – but also economic. Sometimes the best thing to do with the Mighty Military Stick is to hold it in your hand and say, very calmly, “come, let us reason together.”

        I hope he’s got an advisor who understands that, too.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Ma McGriz says:

          Yes.
          This man has long been a successful and experienced father of teen-agers. lol
          He gets it about matters of true power and restraint.

          Like

  30. tozerbgood8315 says:

    LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Ma McGriz says:

    We know and talk a lot about the corruption and infestations at the State Department, but not as much gets discussed wrt the loyal folks who witnessed it and rode it out, holding the line as best they could within their circumstances, and working with willing hearts toward the day the State Department would come under the right leadership. Yes, there were and there remain too many “resisters” and saboteurs drawing paychecks and earning benefits on our dime, but there are also a great number of people serving in federal government who have been waiting for the opportunity to help right the ship of state.
    I look at O’Brien and wonder if he’s one of those.
    I hope so.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Rock Knutne says:

    Geez…another lawyer?

    The swamp is full of nothing but lawyers!

    Like

  33. beaupre03 says:

    I’m a little disappointed. I was hoping for Jerry Boykin.

    Like

  34. I just want to see a NatSec advisor who isn’t humming a tune (with apology to the Beach Boys’ “Barbara Ann”): “bomb bomb bomb .. bomb bomb I-ran .. bomb bomb bomb .. bomb bomb I-ran … bomb I-ran-n-n-n-n …” 😀

    Yes, without question, “America has the biggest ‘big stick’ in the world,” but sometimes the right thing to do is to “talk softly.” In years past, I think that many of our enemies quickly learned that we wore great big buttons on our sleeve and all they really had to do was to push one. With Trump, they’re confronted with a Chess player … who’s holding a very big stick but not swinging it. (Yet.) There is finesse in “how this man negotiates, even militarily.” I hope that this new advisor has similar thinking.

    Liked by 2 people

  35. jeans2nd says:

    Robert O’Brien seems to be a multi-faceted person.
    Brad Thor, NY Times #1 novelist, who has known Robert O’Brien for 30 years, calls Mr O’Brien one of the smartest and most humble people he has ever known.
    Thor dedicated his newest book, “Backlash,” to Robert O’Brien.
    Thor spoke of his friendship with Mr O’Brien this afternoon with WMAL’s Larry O’Conner – 12:05 –
    https://omny.fm/shows/the-larry-o-connor-show/brad-thor-on-the-larry-oconnor-show-09-18-19

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Rynn69 says:

    Sigh. Shuffling the chairs on the deck of Titanic again. We had one chance and all is dust in the wind…

    Like

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