Systemic Shock…

One aspect to Donald Trump’s presidency that almost no pundit, analyst, or media type ever seem to discuss is the 180° shift in executive branch administrative objectives from all prior modern presidencies.

President Trump is a life-long businessman, with 100% of his focus in the area of Main Street capital.  Real estate, building construction, resorts and the industries of service and hospitality (a multitude of holdings) is where Donald Trump made his empire; later expanding into media and entertainment.

The important aspect here is that businesses survive and/or grow based on action toward material objectives.

Successful business is not a process; it is a series of planned events with specific action toward a financial goal.

The purpose of a business is based on action, not process.  This is generally the opposite emphasis of government which is based mostly on a never-ending process that only rarely actually delivers an action. If the industry of government had to be efficient (or profitable) in order to sustain itself, everything about the entire system of government would be fundamentally different.

Process, as an objective of/unto itself, produces no actual results.  However, the valuation of process, what we call political effort, is entirely connected to the ceremonial duty of government.  In many ways; heck, in almost all ways, the process of ceremony, the absence of any functional action, is the exact opposite of what’s needed in successful business.

The reason I mention this is to think about how the administrative offices of government; those career line-level system operators; must be reacting to a Chief Executive who expects their process to deliver an actionable result.  The systemic shock is almost unfathomable.

Imagine having a president taking over and bringing the CEO perspective to the operation; who asks, at any given moment in time, entirely unanticipated by those in the middle of the system, for updates on their function?…  When is “X” going to happen?  Where are we with “X”?  How soon before “X” is delivering a result?  Who is measuring “X’s” result?… and let the “X-er” group know know I want to talk to them tomorrow, at 9:15am, for 18 to 23 minutes, so I can evaluate their success.

Now imagine that common sense question; a business review/inquiry toward achieving an actual measurable goal; happening for hundreds of simultaneous “X’s” on any given day or week… amid a system of process administrators… that have never delivered an actionable and quantifiable result?

In the big picture, we can only imagine how foreign that would be to thousands of people who have absolutely no concept of private sector accountability or efficiency.

Imagine how those who built a career on never-ending process must feel about a system-wide shift in priority toward achieving a result.

Really quite stunning if you think about it.

“It must be remembered that there is nothing more difficult to plan, more doubtful of success, nor more dangerous to manage than a new system. For the initiator has the enmity of all who would profit by the preservation of the old institution, and merely lukewarm defenders in those who gain by the new ones.”

~ Machiavelli

Carry on…

 

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234 Responses to Systemic Shock…

  1. LafnH20 says:

    One of the penalties of refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.

    ….

    In politics we presume that everyone who knows how to get votes knows how to administer a city or a state. When we are ill… we do not ask for the handsomest physician, or the most eloquent one.

    ….

    If you can discover a better way of life than office-holding for your future rulers, a well-governed city becomes a possibility. For only in such a state will those rule who are truly rich, not in gold, but in the wealth that makes happiness–a good and wise life

    – Plato

    Liked by 22 people

    • Carrie2 says:

      LaFnH20, great and wise information from centuries ago meaning mankind has not made many changes in accepting change, but being rich and powerful while lousy in leadership. We never learn on the whole, do we? But the time has come to upset the applecarts and get our Republic back on the road and back to real freedom and rights and get rid of our hired employees who have only one non-thinking nor reasoning of a process that is best for this country.

      Liked by 2 people

      • LafnH20 says:

        Most kind, Carrie2!!
        TY

        I Agree with your thoughts, as well….

        https://goo.gl/images/mhqpJb

        The Time has Come.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Y’all Know What Time It Is says:

        Supposedly, we’d do as well if we picked random names from the phone book to be our Congressional represengtatives.

        Like

      • Daniel says:

        Feudal Japan attempted to remedy this problem by separating wealth from the ruling class. It was considered beneath them to concern themselves with wealth or money. Of course they enjoyed nice things and had people collecting various forms of taxation or tribute. But to be concerned over those things was unseemly.

        We don’t have any such separation here. In fact we have the opposite. They get absurd levels of pay (ostensibly to make them less vulnerable to corruption) and on top of that, are exempted from insider trading laws and can vote raises and other benefits for themselves at their pleasure. And none of that is enough for them… they still want more.

        We don’t have the right core ideology or morality nor do we, as ‘educated voters’ have the wisdom to pick the right people — we have Obama getting elected on hope and change while his history and background details shielded from review. We have the media defending all of that as well. There is no honor. The word isn’t even defined any longer.

        Like

    • Mendy says:

      In other words, term limits.

      Like

  2. Arthur says:

    That’s 100%. Process is God and regulations are the angels in government.
    Take away the rules and regulations and the employees would run around like headless chickens.

    When confronted with a problem, their first thought is not “how do I solve this ?”, but “What rule, paragraph and section can I use for the problem ?”.

    Not to mention that there never are real deadlines for anything. Sure, in theory there is some date by which something should be finished. Nobody takes that seriously.
    If the deadline comes and the project is nowhere near completion, and than so what ? We’ll give it another year. Or 2. Or 5.
    Odds are, a new manager comes in place and cancels the project. Than he starts another one which reflects better his pet priorities.
    And round and round it goes….

    Liked by 7 people

    • Perot Conservative says:

      My ex, a former lawyer from a top-10 law school, left private industry to work for a State; then she was lured to the Federal Government – same work, about 15-20% more pay. And perks. Telecommutes 60% of the time, mass transit reimbursed. If she works 9 or 10 hours in a day, she can bank more time for vacation.

      With the State, yes, it was all process. And there were deadlines to submit certain forms within x amount of days, interview appropriate people within y amount of days. She was not in a legal position here, but supporting said process.

      The caseload of certain people she ‘supported’ was between 2.5 – 5% of the private industry!! 2.5 -5%!! And I am being kind.

      When I suggested she contact State X and Y to compare performance metrics, the conversation stopped. She wasn’t happy with minimal results, but didn’t want to rock the boat.

      BTW, with the Feds, her department tried to rush in ‘new hires’ by breaking the normal process / protocols, because they knew there was a high likelihood President Trump would freeze employment levels. I witnessed numerous discussions first hand.

      Liked by 15 people

      • Christian Kat says:

        To those on this site who work for the Federal Government, this comment isn’t intended as a slap in the face. But has anyone noticed that we are comfortable with “only essential services” you would think Dem’s would be getting hammered by their constituents. If this goes on to much longer, A. we will realize we don’t need most of them, B . we will save so much money we can pay down the debt , C. many will give up and seek private sector jobs. This truly is a win/win for President Trump.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Remington.....it says:

          Yes Kat, I’m sure they’ll seek employment elsewhere. However, unless you are desperate, I would take caution in hiring these people. Metric ton of bad habits – mentioned here. If I was still in ….corporate America, it would be a cold day in hell before I’d make that hire.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Shadrach says:

          No worries. Part of the problem is that what is meant by “essential services” has been unclear to everyone not a Fed. Why some enterprising journalist doesn’t explain it is beyond me.

          For example, you can be an Emergency Employee, and required in the case of a natural disaster, but currently furloughed. These employees were recalled from furlough yesterday to help with the snow storm. Now they are back on “non-essential” status. They were pretty essential yesterday……

          Essential employees are those for whom the day to day actions of gov’t cannot go forward…for example the TSA screeners and the prison guards. That doesn’t mean that these government actions can go on forever without HR. Having HR is a necessity we all hate, and HR is furloughed.

          Please don’t take this to mean I don’t agree that some Feds need to be removed from gov’t. I just wanted to explain why shutting the door on the “non-essential” employees won’t help anything.

          Like

    • MrG says:

      Precisely-I recently retired from a 30+ year “career” in the fed gov’t. To get past GS-13/14 one MUST show a talent for not only extending a current “project” but adding resources to the core group assigned to the project (increased budget) and spawn another “support group”: for that project and all the while making it look like something is actually being done.

      I came from private industry so it took me a few years to figure this out.

      Liked by 2 people

    • G. Combs says:

      “…When confronted with a problem, their first thought is not “how do I solve this ?”, but “What rule, paragraph and section can I use for the problem ?”.
      NO!
      The first thought is ‘ How can I make this person go away.’ Government employees are in the business of saying NO! They really are not interested in the law and regulations unless you rub their noses in them.

      We do children’s entertainment. If the party is to be in a city park we tell the people to FIRST get permission IN WRITING and then get back to us. Why? Because we found that even if you do have spoken permission, the guy on duty on the weekend will stop you cold until you can find the person who gave you the permission in the first place (Good luck with that.)

      We normally suggest they check with the churches in the neighborhood and see if they can rent the facilities. That has been MUCH more successful for everyone involved.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Perot Conservative says:

    Rush commented on this in a different way recently.

    He said he was golfing with some government workers, probably higher in the food chain, all Trump supporters.

    But he said how they spoke, their terminology, etc, was completely different than the real world.

    Liked by 6 people

    • starfcker says:

      You can hear that in the endless word round and round when Christopher Wray is asked any question. All process and no result.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Process IS the end result for gov’t. I worked for a decade in academia, nonprofit and gov’t. Then I went back into sales of mfg goods because I couldn’t stomach it. Any time you get your $ from someplace other than the people you serve, you are thrust into a no-win situation. You serve two masters, and the one who gives you the pay/budget/resources always wins. The paymaster never comes into contact with the actual customer and is completely clueless about solving customer problems. Yet the bureaucrat dictates all of your interactions with users of your service. Capital cities are the only safe place because there are no customers; only idiot paymasters who reward suckups.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. GB Bari says:

    This is an excellent primer on the YUGE difference in perspective and approach to problems between PDJT and the status quo of the government bureaucracy. It’s like oil and water.

    Sundance’s explanation adds clarity; it is so simple, yet so profound.

    IMO, this is required reading for all, but especially those who have not yet weaned themselves off of watching, listening, or reading the propaganda that gushes out of the Mockingbird eneMedia on a 24/7 basis.

    Liked by 15 people

  5. Mike in a Truck says:

    Like the old saying goes: if youre doing what you always have been doing,and youre getting the same results-youre doing something wrong.

    Liked by 2 people

    • GB Bari says:

      But if you ARE interested in getting the same results, such as bureaucrats want, doing the same thing is the exact path on which to continue.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Mike says:

        They cannot think outside the process

        Liked by 5 people

        • olderwiser21 says:

          Yes, Mike – THIS is the real problem….Sheeple.

          Like

          • glissmeister says:

            They are not paid to think outside the process. They are paid to administrate; to police; to execute policy, and to not make waves. So they usually do what they are paid to do, however pathological. Those who use their authority to abuse their authority will tend to advance and prosper. Administration selects-for psychopathy in positions of authority.

            The decent and sane tend to lose promotional opportunity or otherwise find some means of escape from the waste, cruelty and despair. This leaves the high-functioning sociopaths consolidating power as the system selects for the next psychopath to rule over them.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Carrie2 says:

          Mike, mainly because they want committee positions and why the committees must be taken away as never can do anything of value. Waste of time and our money. They want to be honored, greeted as though knights, paid for doing little and enjoy the benefits we did not authorize for them, doing little work over a short period of time and the pay way past their capacities, mentally or physically.

          Liked by 1 person

  6. I would recommend bulldozing the whole federal district if it were not for the pretty architecture and parks.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. These observations are intuitively known to most people .. and very obvious to those who must deal with the federal govt. on a regular basis.

    Most federal employees earn more, with better healthcare / pensions / vacation time, than workers in the private sector. Of course they will protect their individual fiefdoms to the last tax dollar we give them.

    And behind this army of federal sloths, squashing any hope for reform / accountability in the bureaucracy, are the all powerful unions.

    This shutdown is a godsend.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Mark B Smith says:

      To that end, is there any way to make this painless(to me at least) shutdown more permanent? If President Kennedy unionized the federal workers by executive order, can President Trump reverse that process? It has to initially start with the departments of felons of course, the FBI, the DOJ, IRS and the State Department, Hillary’s lair. Somewhere down the line in the next 5 1/2 years, those individuals who attempted the soft coup must pay for it. Americans won’t tolerate sweeping this sedition under the rug, ignoring that it happened, and allowing it to go unpunished. A massive federal reorganization would probably require martial law and the military, but it should be considered as a national security imperative. I keep returning to the hundreds or thousands of people who were unmasked by the FISA process as the most heinous crime of many in this coup, because Americans are guaranteed safety from unreasonable search and seizure, I suspect that the illegal unmasking process has been performed regularly and often, long before Donald Trump thought about running for office, which brings all the security apparatus under suspicion. The FISA Court has been completely silent, yet 33,942 warrants have been issued and only 12 denials since 1978, statistic which invite dishonesty. So where do we start?

      Like

    • k4jjj says:

      “This shutdown is a godsend.” Yes, and may the Divine hand vanquish “this army of federal sloths.”

      Pray no righteous person turns and looks back at Washington, DC, lest they be turned into a pillar of salt.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Mike says:

    I’m blown away by this simple observation. It’s the outcome what we measure in the private sector continually. The process is nothing more the means to get to a success or failure.

    Thanks SD

    Liked by 4 people

    • Remington.....it says:

      I remember Timothy Leary, yeah that one, saying DC was sooo polluted, so out of control, the best thing you could do was divide in in five sections, and move the sections to other parts of the Country.

      Who e Dr thought het be spot on.

      Like

  9. Rose says:

    The Status quo has been in power for forty years in the US and Canada, they thought they were safe in their corrupt sewers now it appears Trump shows up and exposes their dirty laundry and instead of loading the washer they attack the the laundry. Both Republicans and Demorats have created a fake two party system, expose one you expose the other. Demorats rely on the Repulsives to be caretakers of their corruption when they are in power and so far they’ve been happy to keep the deep state in swamp water.

    Liked by 5 people

  10. jackphatz says:

    IF……Trump can beat back the entire Leftist machine in DC and elsewhere, he just may get reelected. Everyday it’s something different. We can’t have normal folks get tired of the BS, we need everyone engaged.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Robster says:

    The difference between the public sector and private: PUBLIC SECTOR – do everything you can to SECURE BUDGET…PRIVATE SECTOR – do everything you can to maximize value to the customer and minimize cost. While I’m glad we have a private sector CEO in office, IMHO not nearly enough has been done to reduce the budget or size of government.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. WonkoTheSane says:

    I left the private sector to work in the public sector 20 years ago. The culture shock was immediate and took quite a while to absorb. Everything is done by process and documented, put into a database where a chart can be created to show upper management how much work is being done (even if it’s not). Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) rule the day. The charts are used to impress upper management and justify positions or garner more funding, “Quantifiable data” they call it. The workers figure out how to enter the data in the proper timely manner–they manipulate timing of data entry to satisfy the end product. It doesn’t necessarily mean anything is getting done, but it sure looks good when presented in pie charts and graphs at the board meeting.

    Example: In the private sector if someone noticed a sink was clogged they’d look under the sink to see if there was some drano. If yes, pour drano in the sink, wait 15 minutes and see if the sink drains. If not, maybe someone working there has the skills to fix it. If not…call a plumber.

    Same scenario in the public sector. Sink is clogged. Report it to the supervisor so they can submit a work order to Maintenance. Within 24 hrs, Maintenance acknowledges they have seen the work order and change the status to “work in progress”. At this point nothing else needs to be done immediately because there is a period of time that needs to pass before it will show up in the database as overdue. Maybe a couple of days later, Maintenance covers the sink with plastic and tape and prints up an “out of order” sign. They look in the supply closet for some drano. None there. “Can we buy that on the P card?”, the Maintenance guy asks. “Nope, we used up our monthly allotment on the P card already”, is the answer. “You’ll have to request a PO from the Purchasing Office…oh, and be sure to update the ticket.” Work order goes into holding status and the timer for a deadline turns off. Purchasing darn sure isn’t going to go straight out and issue a PO. They gotta call the maintenance supervisor and see why they need drano. Maybe they should get together and discuss it over coffee.

    I mean the story goes on from here, but you get the drift. In the end it could take anywhere from a week to a month to get a sink unclogged. In the private sector 15 minutes to 24 hours. And that’s a simple sink clog. The bigger the project, the more exponentially the time and costs rise. But as long as the KPIs are met and it looks good on the charts and graphs at the board meeting, you’re golden!

    There are some people who actually care about the job they do and have a work ethic of sorts, so things do get done, but man, the system does wear you down after a while.

    Liked by 9 people

    • MTeresa says:

      Oh you had me spitting my wine out on the computer screen! This was spot on!

      Liked by 2 people

    • olderwiser21 says:

      Wonko – very good analysis. Thanks for that – I had no idea!

      Liked by 1 person

    • I have a solution:
      • Destroy all government sinks.
      • Just toilets … clogs just became PERSONAL.

      Liked by 2 people

    • MrG says:

      Yep it wears down even the most ambitious (am retired now, but I like to think I was in that category).

      I had a family and a mortgage and, well-yeah. Children and wifey-poo didn’t want to hear I was leaving a well-paying secure job over my “principles” and dissatisfaction with the drudgery. I was depressed most of the time and didn’t know it until a couple of years after I retired.

      Like

    • Shadrach says:

      Sadly, this is true. If you could cut out that useless layer of middle management, the gov’t would work much better. And always that layer keeps expanding….it’s where you stick the useless workers you can’t fire but don’t want to have to actually work with.

      We’ve had two more puff-pastry upper management layers added since PDJT’s taken office, and that’s just at the higher mgmt levels. I think it’s looked on as insulation against accountability-for us it just makes getting a decision made almost impossible. SMDH.

      Like

  13. thegoosefish says:

    Super good quote of Machiavelli. Hopefully another one of Trump’s many goals will be to decentralize the federal government.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Carrie2 says:

      thegoosefish, we the People are the Government and these are the employees we thought would represent us, and the 2 parties in 1 are not doing so. It is up to us to close down the Congress Swamp, lock all doors, and give the keys to Trump for safeguarding needed. They are one of 3 departments and all are hired just as did Trump, and he those for the SC. This department is for legislating and some economic work. Strangely their ideas of legislating is faulty and only protecting themselves and their benefits, etc. Their economic work means spending, spending, and always on the many wrong things, i.e. giving our money to groups for no reason at all, and those groups come up with stupid programs such as how to wash your genitals, or another was how to teach a shrimp to walk on a treadmill. Nothing to do with out economy and spending our money wisely at all. Enough with keeping them as employees and time to route them out. Some people have said it can be done even if they must remove them bodily or threaten with weapons because so many real Americans are fed up with the hired help. They help themselves to being rich and ignoring we the People. They dislike Trump for upsetting their applecarts and no matter what most say, they are against him and us because we follow him and approve of him. A business man is far superior to a lawyer and I have worked with both!

      Liked by 2 people

  14. emet says:

    ICE, for example, does not deliver an actionable result? What then are they delivering? And what does Sundance recommend to fix them? I felt Homan delivered results, and Treepers supported what he was doing, but now apparently he is just part of faceless bureaucrats that are superfilous and have undreamed of benefits . And didn’t some ICE employees sue Napalitano for the right to do the job they swore to do? Are they being bashed also? And I thought Treepers appreciated the Border Patrol, and the rough challenges they face, but are they just more lazy Feds who couldn’t make it in the real world. Imust say that this column and some of its comments are not what I would expect from Treepers

    Liked by 1 person

    • jebg46 says:

      Unfortunately some very essential workers are being hurt so their bureaucrats need to reclassify their jobs. No plan is ever perfect but this was set up to have the least impact. The admin will try to fix as much as they can but still achieve its goals.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Federal bureaucrats are protected to the last breath by their unions. This was once considered “unthinkable and intolerable” by someone democrats (used to) revere.
    ——————-
    FDR’s Letter on the Resolution of Federation of Federal Employees Against Strikes in Federal Service, August 16, 1937 –

    https://finance.townhall.com/columnists/mikeshedlock/2018/07/02/public-unions-have-no-business-existing-even-fdr-admitted-that-n2496532

    Liked by 1 person

    • Carrie2 says:

      thelastbesthope, despite what Franklin might have done is strange in that when I was growing up only 25% of workers in DC and no unions. So the unions have to go as well and the democrats don’t want that to happen, but it must happen. And, yes, they are overpaid for little work in Congress and departments, benefits and bonuses for little to nothing being done as workers, while so many in America are stills struggling. Enough with wasting our tax money and time to take over the Congress and continue the shutdown so hopefully many Obama holdovers will quit because they need income. Good salaries but ever save for the rainy days, except in a few workers. A new and better Congress but not in DC but in their home states and business electronically. State pays their salary and any benefits, and not the whole country. So the 17th Amendment needs to be reoked and all back to the states. Ditto the 14th Amendment as anchor babies were not included and need in any case to repeal the 14th Amendment which for the blacks/slaves only and no longer needed. In other words we need to take back the reins as the GOVERNMENT and they truly are our employees. May the shutdown go on for a long, long time and what can the democrats do? Little to nothing but lose more voters for being rearends.

      Liked by 2 people

  16. starfcker says:

    My brother-in-law works for Freddie Mac. I’ve asked him point-blank, what do you do for a living? He rattles off his title. I ask him, what do you actually do all day? He talks about meetings and reports. And I asked him the result of those meetings and reports. He gets very uncomfortable and looks at me as if I have two heads. He doesn’t understand why I would ask him these questions in the first place, and he seems very very upset oh, I think a large part of it has to do with the fact if you work one of these jobs, deep down you know the truth

    Liked by 9 people

  17. Marshall says:

    Yes Minister episode:
    MP: I want this department to be more efficient.
    Chief administrator: I will get right on it.
    Next scene:
    MP: How is the efficiency effort going?
    Administrator: Great sir! We’ve hired 400 people to study the problem!

    Art imitates life….

    Liked by 3 people

  18. Darklich123 says:

    Sounds about right 4% of our government has a functioning brain.

    Liked by 3 people

  19. RJ Dawson says:

    Excellent article. Thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Remington.....it says:

      My sister in law works for Justice in DC. She told us one day her boss came running in her office; telling her he had to spend $100 k by weeks end or he’d lose it…..
      Do you want a new desk? – NO
      How about a new conf table and chairs? – NO
      Sofa? How about a new one?- NO

      He finally took his money down the hall….

      Like

      • MrG says:

        That’s true. A dept head must spend ALL their budget or they won’t get the same amount of money the following budget year. I was tasked with the last minute purchasing of $50K worth of telecom testing equipment. I bought stuff we didn’t even have a use for.

        Like

      • Shadrach says:

        True. This happens, or the opposite (OMG, we don’t have any money to buy you a pencil) every year. The problem is if you don’t spend your entire budget, you’ll be cut next year, and next year you might need every cent. There’s no possibility of “saving for a rainy day” which is what everyone would prefer to do.

        Add this to the sink story mentioned earlier, which makes knowing your budget outlay to the penny close to impossible, and you have an end-of-year disaster every year.

        Like

  20. Crosslife Spaces says:

    Very well stated. That’s what business management went through over decades, turning from administrative process focused to profitable performance based and customers oriented. It wasn’t easy but it worked and there has been no return since. Management is a relatively very young science but it develops in acceleration. I am referring to since the time of Peter Drucker. Globally we are all watching this amazing transformation in USA to make a nation great by business model. I personally believe that we all need to be productive and accountable in management of resources. The business model is being practically applied and we hope to see positive impacts. Other nations will learn too. When business booms in a big market the positive effects will spill over to other markets too.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. visage13 says:

    Sounds just like the Mueller probe. It is just an ongoing PROCESS with no results, ever. And the process is to continue to hurt the Trump Presidency. Just like congressional hearings, from both sides, it is just a process, there are never any results. It is maddening.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. I have always worked with accountability. It is always expected. For over 2 years, the govt people have been under this new system, so they ought to be used to it by now.

    Like

  23. AbeLincoln says:

    Yea we’ll exfiltration is a process and not an event too. This crap has been going on a long time and the world has awoken. Can’t stuff the genie back in the bottle now. They will just try to push war to get the eye off the ball. Same playbook every time. Every single time.

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Let’s remind ourselves that President Trump’s “got this”:

    • EO to RESTRUCTURE Government, led by OMB Director and Chief of Staff Mulvaney.

    • EO to REVOLUTIONIZE Government Accountability criteria for Retention, Pay and Promotion.

    Liked by 3 people

  25. zorrorides says:

    At the bottom of the article Sundance placed a table of vote outcomes for District of Columbia, which cast three electoral votes for Hillary Clinton. The breakdown was 9 Hillary votes to 1 for anyone else.

    Three Electoral Votes for Washington D.C.!?!
    DC neither has nor deserves Senators nor Representatives !!! DC must have the electoral votes taken away. If that is too harsh for you, then reduce DC to One Electoral Vote.

    Liked by 4 people

  26. CubanBelicoso says:

    This government shutdown should expose more of the D.C. corruption.

    President Trump should:
    Layoff all government workers that have been out of work for 25 days. Severance and off they go.
    Privatize the TSA.
    Abolish the IRS, HUD, and departments of Energy, Commerce, Education.

    NOW BUILD THE WALL.

    Like

    • Shadrach says:

      Adding “Reinstate Civil Service Exams,” so the gov’t isn’t used as a job service for the marginally employable. If we have to pay for gov’t, let’s at least hire the best!

      Liked by 1 person

  27. William Moore says:

    I wrote this article, not quite verbatim, in 1963 when I was being taught to write propaganda by an English professor who had retired from the NYT. Shortly after receiving the highest grade in that “honors English” program, I ceased reading ALL news media. Never watched another TV news show. Spent my life utterly unaware of EVERYTHING going on in the world. Those were good years. Now I’ve started to follow the lies some call “news” again, and that was a mistake. Now I’m angry all the time.
    Nevertheless, there may have been something profound about my thesis all those years ago, but as I read it now, restated by someone who gets published, I think…have we not ALL known all these things, always? This is WHY I voted for Trump and why I support him completely.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Zippy says:

    Doesn’t the DC vote actually show that 90.9% of DC -IS- THE SWAMP? That’s amazingly in line with my estimate of the prevalence of the Deep State/Swamp as 99% of ALL levels of government if its members are defined as anyone who would not give up their job or degree of influence for the benefit of the nation. What are the odds that a one term or even two-term president is going to be able to significantly fix that? Nil, I’d say.

    Like

  29. Fat Clemenza says:

    Well put Sundance! But let’s also not forget that the first job of any Government employee, at any level, is to “make work” for oneself so as not to be finished and thus no longer needed. While federal employees surely do this on a massive scale, even in my town of 5,000 I yesterday passed one of the Roads crew members cutting grass. Were I a Florida resident, this would not be so clearly “make work” but I live in New Jersey. I’m pretty sure grass does not grow in 20-degree weather.

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