Butte County Updates: Death Toll Climbs to 83 – Missing Persons 563…

Latest updates on the situation in Paradise, CA, from Butte County Sheriff and Cal Fire. Few in media are adequately quantifying the scale and scope of this horrific and ongoing event.  County officials are still trying to count the number of homes lost.  That number jumped by almost a thousand homes yesterday alone (now 13,631).  Each of these houses is added to the list to be checked for human remains.

A Sobering Perspective – See Here

  • Yesterday two more bodies were located bringing the death toll to 83.
  • There are still 563 people confirmed missing (mostly elderly).
  • Six bodies were identified yesterday and next-of-kin notified: •Teresa Ammans (82); •Richard Brown (74); •Marie Wehe (78); •Kimber Wehr (53); •Joseph Rabetoy (39); and •Ms. Joan Tracy (80).   Please pray for comfort over these families.
  • Of the 83 fatalities, 58 people have been identified.
  • There are currently 563 people missing.
  • As search teams get further into the community the number of homes destroyed jumped yesterday by almost 1,000.
  • The current estimate is 13,631 single family residential homes are completely lost. [472 homes are damaged]
  • Additionally 275 multi-family residences destroyed and 514 commercial buildings.

This entry was posted in Fire Crime, Paradise Fire. Bookmark the permalink.

110 Responses to Butte County Updates: Death Toll Climbs to 83 – Missing Persons 563…

  1. sundance says:

    Liked by 8 people

  2. MaryfromMarin says:

    The rain we’re having is a mixed blessing. It has really cleared the air around here and all over northern CA (and the fire is 90% contained now) but it could make the on-site searching for remains more difficult.

    Liked by 12 people

    • distracted2 says:

      Or, more likely, impossible. The ash will turn to paste.

      Liked by 2 people

    • notasmidgeon says:

      Your home is intact?

      Liked by 1 person

      • MaryfromMarin says:

        Thank you for asking. I live in Marin County (hence the screen name). The effects felt here were extended, very elevated unhealthy air quality numbers (which translated to face masks, air quality warnings, and school closures)–similar to all over most of northern and central California.

        Like

    • TrumpFanFLA says:

      Later link from CTH’s twitter:

      The official update 11/22/18 @7pm:

      …says:

      __84 civilian fatalities; -0- injuries.

      __3 firefighter fatalities; -0- injuries.

      __Fire 95% contained; 100% containment expected by 11/30/18.

      __Provides breakdown of all bldgs but nowhere (that I can see) does it mention people still missing.

      Like

      • LULU says:

        Official reports count the actual. Fatalities, injuries, etc. The missing persons list/count is not an actual, but is based upon citizen reporting of those they believe could have been there during the fire, persons they cannot reach, etc. It is (as we have seen) fluid, changing upward almost daily as concerned persons added names and downward as duplicates were removed or persons on the list found out they were on it and reported themselves not missing. It has now gone down significantly without a commensurate increase in the death toll. A good thing.

        Like

    • southernsue says:

      calif(sodom and gamorrah)
      the fires and the dam that burst,about a year ago=mostly republican voters
      calif is getting rid of the opposition,such that it is
      also i read that the train that they want to build needs those areas to build the tracks

      in other words,if you are a republican in calif and live in a populated area that votes republican,better get out

      calif is desperate for money because they are broke
      the gov of calif wants that train system
      so what better way to kill two birds with one stone
      start fires and sabotage dams in the republican areas
      declare national emergency
      recieve billions from the US gov and viola,money for the train and getting rid of republicans

      vile and evil california that houses all the evil you can want

      Liked by 1 person

      • LULU says:

        Native Californian here. Misinformation abounds… Rumors swirl. What fun for some. And how nice on a thread about such losses to declare all of the citizens of the most populous state in our Union “evil”.

        There is no way in God’s earth that Paradise, a mountain community, would be anywhere near any train route of any kind. And the likelihood of that Jerry Brown train ever seeing completion is slim to none. But outsiders are enthralled with the idiocy of his train. Great conversational fodder.

        It is tiresome on such a somber thread to read such rumors. Such vitriol. The same old anti-California rants. California has problems. Every state has its problems. We are working hard to fix ours with nearly zero support from so many who tar Californians – all Californians – with the brush that only the majority Democrats deserve. There are over 5 million registered Republicans in California. How many in your state? How much does your state depend upon federal dollars? California is near the bottom of that dependency list.

        Enough. Good people should be praying for those who lost lives. Those who lost all their worldly possessions. Those who find themselves – some at very advanced ages – homeless. Those who are not so good should at least have the grace to keep quiet.

        Liked by 9 people

        • Pegm says:

          Mary, thank you. Some just have CDS I guess. Lots of good folks here.

          Like

          • LULU says:

            “Mary”?

            Liked by 1 person

            • MaryfromMarin says:

              Pegm is just confusing you with me, LULU. Easy to do with these drop-down comments.

              Thanks for your post (from a fellow Californian). An ex-firefighter and current fire analysis friend who lives near the Camp Fire area told me that the “aberrations” seen by conspiracy theorists are nothing more than the wide variety of fire anomalies always seen in large fires. I trust his take.

              Liked by 1 person

        • rioosodog says:

          You missed the point LULU. Any extra money goes to the $80 Billion dollar train. Governor Brown vetoed a bill that would have started the process of managing the forests.

          Like

      • Ron Jaeger says:

        I am from 80 miles away in Redding Calif. That is total hogwash about Paradise being in the route of Brown’s idiotic train . Starting fires and sabotaging dams was not what what happened . Just plain old stupid greed and very bad judgement .by liberal morons .

        Like

      • Carol Joy says:

        Once all us nasty Republicans leave, the areas where the homes have been incinerated can be re-built to provide low income housing for the incoming migrants who need jobs. The railroad can then be built cheaply, while the politicians continue to stick it to the tax payers. And there will be slush funds for all in government from Maxine to Nancy to Gavin! Oh boy!

        Like

    • Southern Son says:

      Prayers Up!, Mary.

      Liked by 2 people

      • MaryfromMarin says:

        Thank you, on behalf of those who live/lived in the Paradise area, and all the responders and care-givers (Salvation Army, etc.) Prayers are very much needed.

        Like

  3. Deplorable_Infidel says:

    ‘Camp’ Fire UPDATE 20 Nov. 2018 Drive Through Devastated Paradise, Ca.

    Using video shot by Nurse Dean Strait as he drives up to the Feather River Hospital and back through the town of Paradise on Sunday 11 Nov. just 4 days after the fire. I will have the complete interview with Dean soon. He was part of the team that successfully evacuated ALL the patients from the Feather River Hospital.

    DONATE LINKS FOR FIRE VICTIMS:
    United Way https://www.norcalunitedway.org/camp-

    North Valley Community Foundation https://www.nvcf.org/fund/camp-fire-e

    Red Cross https://www.redcross.org/donate/donat

    ++ The following locations are in need of clothing, towels and personal hygiene items, the Placer County Sheriff’s Office said in a tweet Friday:

    The Salvation Army in Chico: 530-342-2192
    Butte County Fairgrounds in Gridley: 530-846-3626
    Yuba-Sutter Fairgrounds in Yuba City: 530-674-1280
    Church of the Nazarene (FULL) in Oroville 530-533-7464

    Liked by 9 people

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      This is from Juan Browne, a nearby resident well known for his reporting on the situation and progress of the situation at the Oroville Dam & reservoir over the past two years.

      Liked by 9 people

    • Uncle Max says:

      Juan just posted a 52 minute interview with the nurse who shot this video, so check that out.

      Liked by 5 people

    • I watched thisacouple hours ago..
      seems it was NOT a “Crowning fire”, but strictly a “Brush Fire” due to **envirowackos** of NOT clearing the underbrush..

      Liked by 4 people

      • TrumpFanFLA says:

        Can’t remember where I saw the link yesterday (somebody’s twitter as twitter feeds are my main news sources, maybe CTH or Drudge), but it was an article by a retired “Fire Forensic” expert.

        He also said it was a “Structure To Structure fire” & a “Surface (earth’s floor/vegetation) fire” & NOT a “Wall of Flames Fire.”

        Even the official Butte County form that they regularly update, in the “Type of Fire” section, it says “Vegetation Fire.”

        The word “Vegetation” sounds like it would mean “no big deal” compared to the phrase “WALL OF FLAMES” fire, yet that’s not the case at all but the opposite!

        Liked by 1 person

        • LULU says:

          Those who view the videos and read the reports of those having to drive out through walls of fire would disagree with that official form.

          Like

    • olderwiser21 says:

      Thank you for this post, DI – very sobering.

      Like

  4. Deplorable_Infidel says:

    Feather River Hospital Wildfire Evacuation Paradise, Ca. Interview with Nurse Dean Strait

    (An interview conducted by overseas air pilot Juan Browne, his YouTube channel has gone up to 50K followers this week)

    blancolirio
    Published on Nov 22, 2018

    Here is Dean’s harrowing story of how the staff at the Feather River Hospital were able to successfully evacuate all their patients while risking their own lives. ‘Camp’ Fire, Paradise, Ca.

    Liked by 12 people

  5. God bless them all. So heartbreaking.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. montanamel says:

    God be with all souls here.
    “HOW” does a known city misplace or miscount nearly 1000 HOMES as MIA???
    (Not to mention the “near 1000 more” from multi-family units and businesses)…

    They still do not have containment…only 90% is claimed… 1,800+ still on the fire lines/camps.
    And, this is only one fire…. Nice work, Moon Beam….what a swan song, eh? your legacy???

    This “much touted” timber bill is nearly worthless due to the acreage limitation!…
    What is the STATE DIV OF FORESTY going to be doing, eh?….eh????
    Where is the indemnification of land owners from BS Eviro Wacko lawsuits ???

    The lack of news coverage, slamming the Moon Beam, is criminal to boot….
    Where are the torches and pitchforks down in the Sacramento streets???

    Rant – off… Check-6

    Liked by 5 people

    • Eric C. says:

      Not the “city”, and there not “misplaced”: within the incident command team there is a group that does damage assessment and puts in GPS coordinates of each lost structure.

      How long wound it take you to mark the location and input nearly 20,000 structures and outbuildings?

      These updates only contain verified, factual information and not “estimates”, the numbers represents specifically counted buildings/out buildings that have been physically viewed and “mapped”, pretty impressive when you view it through that lense.

      The CAL Fire Incident Management Teams can tackle any scenario and know the information is being updated as swiftly as possible.

      Liked by 3 people

      • bertdilbert says:

        They could add vehicles destroyed too.

        Like

      • LULU says:

        These structures/homes burned to the ground. Virtually nothing showing above ground. And the access to a burned out area is limited for a time for a number of reasons. It is the official count that is revealing new numbers. Nothing was “misplaced”.

        Like

    • Eric C. says:

      Also, declaring the fire “100% contained” eliminates some funding.

      Putting the fire out is only one task for the Incident Management Team, I bet people are assigned to the incident well into next year.

      The hand crews will need to do some rehabilitation of the control line to help with potential flooding issues.

      The fire report alone will require data entry for the 20,000 exposures (I hated doing fire reports with just a couple exposures).

      Liked by 3 people

  7. Doug says:

    It is heartening to see the missing # fall without a correlating rise in the deceased.
    My friend in Chico just yesterday located one of his employees who had been “missing”.
    There is much sadness yet to come as more victims are found.

    Liked by 5 people

  8. jahealy says:

    Agree with Sundance that “Few in media are adequately quantifying the scale and scope of this horrific and ongoing event.” That may actually be an understatement. If I wasn’t being reminded daily here at the Treehouse, it could drop right off my radar for complete blackout of coverage elsewhere. That means it hasn’t even made it onto the radar of the majority of the U.S.

    Praying for the dead, the injured, all the families involved, and to end the suffering of all the animals caught up in this – utterly innocent victims. Praying for all the first responders and healthcare workers.

    Praying California wakes up.

    🙏

    Liked by 7 people

    • starfcker says:

      Think how little you hear of hurricane Michael. They call these things disasters for a reason. The suffering is almost unlimited. That’s why we need the strong to rise to the top in our society. Natural disasters are going to happen. As are many things in life beyond our control. Those are the times we need strong leadership.

      Liked by 3 people

  9. G. Combs says:

    The complete blackout of coverage is because the Yellow Stream Media is providing cover for Governor Moonbeam and the environazis.

    Can’t have the peasants question the “patriarchal, idyllic relations… the motley feudal ties that bound man to his ‘natural superiors,’…” ― Karl Marx, The Communist Manifesto

    Liked by 5 people

    • Rynn69 says:

      But millions are still voting Democrat. Insanity.

      Liked by 1 person

      • redridge45 says:

        The democrats cheated on the vote; keep watching, more will get caught…

        Like

      • Carol Joy says:

        How do we know who is voting for whom? One theory by those of us who feel the fires were deliberate is that by having such catastrophes, who among us has the energy to question the election held earlier this month. So every single district in Orange County went from being Republican to Democrat, in just two years? And has anyone at all questioned who was able to put placed on the new voter rolls? *** Plus it was very suspicious to me and people I know on both sides of the aisle that the tax surcharge on gasoline was upheld by voters. Very few people like it. Yet the measure passed?

        Like

    • tessa50 says:

      It’s all over the internet news sites. There is no blackout that I have seen.

      Like

  10. Peoria Jones says:

    How can it be that the media will blather on for weeks hyping a tropical storm which may never even become a hurricane with widespread impact, and yet after an unpredictable widespread disaster with tremendous loss of life and property such as this…crickets.

    The story is ongoing. It is not over. This is a horrific event of enormous proportions. I didn’t think I could be further surprised by the media’s lies of omission, but I’m shocked how quickly they all dropped the coverage on this one.

    Jahealy, I will join you in your lovely prayer. Heartbreaking.

    Liked by 5 people

  11. jahealy says:

    Heroism is everywhere. This is an on-the-ground update from the editor of the Whole Dog Journal who lives near the fire and is involved in the rescue work.
    Camp Fire: Notes from a Disaster Zone, Part Two
    https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/blog/Camp-Fire-Notes-from-a-Disaster-Zone-Part-Two-21960-1.html?ET=wholedogjournal:e319668:1453180a:&st=email&s=p_Blog112218

    Liked by 5 people

  12. Sepp says:

    Several major newspapers in the USA for days and weeks printed short obituaries or life accounts of many of those who perished on September 11, 2001 due to the muslim attacks. And fittingly so.

    Unfortunately, the same is not likely for these fire victims as the national and regional news outlets are providing minimal information to readers and viewers.

    I hope that the names and obituaries or life accounts of these fire victims will be shared thanks to kind and diligent Treepers – besides Sundance – who are able to locate that kind of information.

    Lord have mercy.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Sepp says:

    A few of the earlier lists of the Missing included a Paradise resident named Helen Glines, age 101.

    Her name is not on today’s list of the Missing.

    I am hoping and praying for the best outcome.

    Like

  14. What I find “funny about this”..
    WE are hearing about “record drought”.. YET…
    The**Record rains** last year that had Oreville Dam/Lake at record levels..
    YET were are told, ..
    A 5 year drought with “record snows in the Sierras” last winter..
    So which is it???

    https://www.livescience.com/59887-oroville-spillway-emergency-leads-to-gold-rush.html
    **It’s not just Oroville: Record rain is straining California’s whole flood control network**
    https://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-oroville-floods-norcal-20170216-story.html
    **Has this year’s record rain finally ended California’s epic drought? **
    A lot of news Stories.. Of RECORD RAINS going into March..

    Liked by 3 people

    • Stillwater says:

      I’m not expert on this but I wonder if some of the areas that had record rainfall lack adequate infrastructure or proper water management to retain the water for use during dry periods.

      For those areas that lack this infrastructure I would imagine that a larger snow pack (built up during colder months) in the mountains would be preferable to a large rainfall (for a shorter period) as the water (from snow pack) is released slowly over time (lasting longer to cover lower precipitation periods) as the snow pack melts.

      Also, I believe that Oreville Dam is probably keeping water at lower levels while they continue to repair/replace the spillway. So there wouldn’t be as much water retention even if they received a lot of rain.

      Like

      • Deplorable_Infidel says:

        “Also, I believe that Oreville Dam is probably keeping water at lower levels while they continue to repair/replace the spillway. So there wouldn’t be as much water retention even if they received a lot of rain.”

        You are correct, Juan Browne has done regular YouTube reports on the Oroville situation since it first began. His outstanding reporting has been recognized by those involved in the work there.

        https://www.youtube.com/user/blancolirio

        He has done more comprehensive and truthful reporting than the Main Sewer Media. The reporting was a pastime of his, as his primary job is flying a Boing 777 on international flights.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Stillwater says:

          Thanks ~
          I was thinking the dam’s water level lower needed to be kept lower while replacing the spillway and then I saw someone post Juan’s Oreville dam update video the other day. It’s the first time I heard of Juan. Maybe you were the one that posted the link.

          Like

          • Sharon says:

            Juan posts on a variety of things and always does great investigative work. He’s generally knowledgeable to begin with and that’s a breath of fresh air in today’s nonsense. He did a great video on the collapse of the overhead walkway/bridge in Florida.

            Such a fine man and a natural teacher – and loves his two children and his wife. Some of his videos feature, with sweet fatherly acknowledgements, his son and daughter. His 6 year old son, Petey, is occasionally the co-pilot when Juan takes Mighty Luscombe up for a looksee around the area.

            Liked by 1 person

      • LULU says:

        Stillwater, the snowpack provides far more water than the rainfall. And I understand that you are right about the water level at Oroville Dam. That said, we really haven’t had much rain. We usually get our biggest rains in SoCal from late December-January through March. Instead, in recent years we have gotten occasional rains that are characterized as “showers” and those have not even lasted a day. We had one the other night. Didn’t even hear it. Enough to wet the pavement. Soon gone. Our climate along the coast and for miles inland is not desert, but part of what is called “Mediterranean”. Mild. Temperate. Great for plants and trees when there is water.

        Liked by 1 person

    • rf121 says:

      CA rain is heaviest in the north. So the State overall can still be in drought with some areas doing ok. The south primarily relies on water transfer from the north via aqueduct and from the Colorado River to the east. The other issue is the aquifers in the Central Valley have been heavily drained through well pumps and that needs to be replenished.

      Also, that good rain year helped more brush to grow which contributed to this fire.

      Liked by 2 people

      • LULU says:

        The rain brings the rapid growth of seasonal grasses that then dry out. That provides the tinder. The fuel. Prolonged hot temperatures, humidity in the single digits for days, high winds. A spark can be from something as simple as a vehicle exhaust pipe. (A fire along a California highway a few years ago was caused by a vehicle that had pulled off the road into a patch of dried grasses. When they restarted the car, a spark started a fire.) Wildfires have been tracked to someone using a power tool in their yard. It doesn’t take much. If it happens amid the right fuel, wildfire.

        Like

    • joeknuckles says:

      The drought narrative is complete BS. We had a three year period that was well below average, that period ended 3 years ago. We had one year of slightly below average, one year of slightly above average and last year was well above average. This state has had 3 year “droughts” every 10-15 years as far back as I can remember. The drought narrative is being perpetuated for political purposes, of course.

      We also almost always have “Indian Summers” here, where it remains hot and dry well into fall. The weather we have been having here can best be described as “normal”. The rest is BS.

      Liked by 2 people

      • LULU says:

        California is a very big state with a wide variety of climate zones. For perspective, when I lived in Santa Barbara it was said to have 5 microclimates. We have had a drought. There may be an occasional rainfall, but not the sustained rain required to support water needs. And the lack of snowpack in the Sierras seriously affects our water supply. Occasionally there is heavy rainfall. There may even be records in some parts of the state. What happens is that a one or two day rain will pass a previous record for a particular area.

        I believe some cannot envision the vastness, the varied climates, in our very, very big state.

        Liked by 1 person

        • LULU says:

          The damage that drought does to trees and other vegetation lasts for years. Overly dried out trees are stressed and more prone to the beetles that have attacked even yard trees in California. (I know. I had to remove a beetle-infested tree. The mountain areas are full of them.) Shrubs that would normally exhibit some fire-retardance become too dry to withstand a fire.

          Like

    • Carol Joy says:

      You are right to be concerned. Apparently the politicians especially Jerry Brown have some ‘splaining to do. On the one hand, Jerry declared back in the Spring of 2018 that the drought was over. I have been told that the drought is now measured by snow pack. Since both the ski resort people and the county of Sacramento, or its main utility, spend one million bucks each winter on cloud seeding, the snow pack has been adequate. But no longer are reports made county by county about how much each county had as its measured winter rainfall. We all know almost all other counties have had very inadequate amounts of rainfall. But they now measure the drought only by snow pack levels. Why is that?

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Sunshine says:

    This video shows the cars destroyed within.
    Amazingly, some animals survived.

    At the 5:10, a goat was removed from a pool and reunited with other goats.
    And at the 10:00, hens, a rooster, and a deer.

    The destruction and deaths are so macabre, it’s uplifting when you see survivors.

    Liked by 5 people

    • wondering999 says:

      Stunning level of destruction.

      I have many question while watching this. Obviously I’m not a firefighter, but I remember a time when a hillside near my childhood home caught fire. Dad and some others put it out. I don’t know much about what people should do in this situation besides run like crazy.

      There are many places where there are small fires burning. It’s a dangerous environment with all the lines down etc. but obviously some people are moving around in the aftermath, like the person who took the video. I read that in the Woolsey fire near LA, some people had stayed in their neighborhoods, and firemen advised them to put out all embers which could have caught even more houses on fire.

      There are a lot of smoking, still burning embers in this video of Paradise. Would shoveling dirt or sand on some of those fires, put out the fires and help reduce the smoke?
      What would put out those burning power lines? Would throwing dirt on them put out the fire? Obviously you wouldn’t throw water but would dirt help? Or is it the best thing to simply leave the small fires to burn out because it’s too much work and hazard to try and put them out?

      Like

      • Sunshine says:

        Same here. Once, about 40 years ago, a Rambo-style guy I was with experimented with controlled burning. The fire spread fast and furious. We were 20 people in a panic but we put it out with water and foot-stomping. Never again.

        One solution might be for all homes built in forested areas to have an indoor/outdoor/rooftop automatic fire suppression system just like buildings have water sprinklers.

        It seems to me people just decided to buy and build where they chose and how they wanted without thinking.

        Some 35 years ago, embers from my fireplace spread to the wall-to-wall carpeting. There was fire spreading! I ran for the cylinder fire extinguisher and stopped the fire. Loads of foam everywhere but, miraculously, my carpet was quite intact. I vacuumed the foam.

        Fire needs oxygen to survive. Cut off the oxygen supply. The foam will do it.

        IMHO: Governor Jerry Brown, at 80-years old, is 100% indoctrinated into climate change and failed in his duty. You can indoctrinate many people at that age, it doesn’t take much. He and the Mayor of the area should be made to walk the entire devastation and live with it.

        POSITIVE NOTE: some animals did survive on their own, quite amazing.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Carol Joy says:

          Jerry’s belief in Climate Change is because it gives him power and money. As long as he agrees with his masters and handlers at the United Nations, he will be very well taken care of. His belief in the “Climate Change” theory is a feature, not a bug. *** He is also responsible for my having vitaligo, from his insistence on spraying malathion in residential areas so a buddy of his could make a major profit on some produce deal with the Japanese. Kids in utero during the spraying ended up with abnormal stomach linings, all detected by the time the kids were six. I imagine many of them have died from stomach cancer or else been ill with that or other cancers all through their lives.

          Like

  16. jackphatz says:

    You look at the videos and pics and you read about this just like other horrible events and unless you’re actually there it doesn’t compute. I’ve seen the aftermath of a tornado, house explosion, car accidents. There are basically singular incidents. Something of this magnitude is too hard to fathom.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Guys…they are NOT telling us the truth about the fatalities. Tonight, we had a guest over for Thanksgiving. She said her daughter was caught in the fires. She lives in Malibu. In her neighborhood alone, they lost 51 PEOPLE. In one neighborhood!

    Like

    • mikebrezzze says:

      We the American people still haven’t heard the truth about the JFK asasanation ! The elite seem to tell lies and half truths and we peons play right along with them, but the truth has no agenda!

      Liked by 1 person

    • TrumpFanFLA says:

      I don’t doubt it, that TPTB may not give truthful figures. Has MSM mentioned the 51 in the Malibu neighborhood?

      Like

    • LULU says:

      It’s my guess they lost 51 homes in their neighborhood. I am in Southern California, near Los Angeles, and there were not 51 fatalities.

      Like

      • I was sitting next to her. I asked he clearly. I will believe a first person account, before I believe the lying MSM.

        Like

        • LULU says:

          Don’t mean to be argumentative, but I thought the person with you was relaying what she heard her daughter in Malibu say had happened in her neighborhood. Sometimes people misunderstand. Also, in a fire like the one there, rumors do abound. Logically, there is no reason to conceal that many deaths. Or any deaths at all. These are official counts, no media reports. We have heard nothing from our friends in the Malibu area about 51 fatalities. Mistakes do happen.

          The fire did not start in Malibu but moved there via the heavy winds from further inland. People in Malibu had more warning, thus more time to evacuate.

          The first two fatalities there were concerning because they were found together in a car on a mountainous road. There was a question as to whether they were homicides before the fire or had been caught by the fire and died. Their deaths were finally attributed to the fire. That was fairly early on. Then another body was found, not many days ago.

          The Paradise fire was quite different. Paradise is located in a mountainous area – the fire swept through so fast that they had to make a run for it. Often through the fire rather than away from it. Many did not make it. Mostly the elderly and disabled, it appears.

          Like

  18. Rowdyone says:

    I find it rather inconsistent when you compare rules within city limits versus rules for rural residents. Cal Fire requires rural residents to pay a fee yearly for fire fighting coverage and requires a 100 ft. clearance of fuel from around your home or they will move on to the next home to save. Yet inside the city limits of Paradise scrub brush and dead trees from drought or beetle infestation were allowed to proliferate. And what about similar cities to Paradise throughout California like Grass Valley, Nevada City etc.? Do they realize they are in similar danger? Are State authorities taking note and making recommendations from lessons learned in Paradise? Why do we always wait for a tragedy before we take action?

    Like

    • Sunshine says:

      It’s California, environmentalism on steroids. They have dried out bushes near their home but won’t bend down to chop them. This fire is a precious lesson for all. It’s terribly sad that it took a tragedy of this magnitude to awaken them.
      God closes one door but opens another that leads to improvement.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. wodiej says:

    A horrible tragedy that could have been avoided. It was started by a campfire? Who are the morons who did not start it in a safe spot nor extinguish it properly? And as I have said before, the environmental kooks go nuts if there is any attempt to clear old, dry brush. Do they think life is worth that? If that then they should be locked up in a psych ward because they are too dangerous to live in society.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. smiley says:

    FWIW…..some sort of aerial “footage” from (it looks like) 11-8 to 11-9-2018…

    published by “Mike Morales”…no idea who he is…an independent news person..?

    no idea of what, if any, value this…but…if it’s legit…or verifiable…it does suggest something.

    I’m not promoting it as any “conspiracy theory”…

    but there are too many unanswered questions…and possible “motives”…related to those fires.

    and I thought this was very interesting.

    maybe you will, too.

    Like

  21. Donna in Oregon says:

    Canadian news crew goes back to a woman’s home where her mom’s remains were found. It shows the destruction. The second video after this one is a conspiracy theory. IDK. I just know that my childhood friend and her family survived and I am extremely grateful.

    Smiley and others from Florida worry about hurricanes. Here on the West coast, we worry about fires. The wind makes them move fast…..in a flash it’s completely out-of-control.

    Like

    • smiley says:

      I haven’t watched your video…yet…(can’t stand it !)…but I just want to tell you that my heart goes out to you..

      as I’ve said many times here, I can’t even begin to imagine the gamut of intense emotions and sorrow you and all the survivors and victims are feeling over this tragedy.

      Like

  22. smiley says:

    wondering if single-family homes on private property are now becoming a thing of the past, in California.

    Liked by 1 person

    • LULU says:

      No, they are not.

      Like

      • smiley says:

        I wouldn’t be too sure about that..

        no doubt, you are aware of “sustainable development” ?

        part of that involves what’s being called “affordable housing” Big Development in many areas..

        …such as in California.

        something called SB 827…initially introduced by Senator Wiener, but it flopped …too much opposition..

        it was dreamed-up by activist Brian Hanlon who says “…the planet’s ability to sustain a large human population…” is seriously “threatened”, and that “…there is no way California can meet its aggressive greenhouse gas emissions reduction target…
        unless we get a lot more people living near jobs and transit in multi-family housing .”

        long article…left-wing site…worth the read…from their perspective..

        https://www.vox.com/cities-and-urbanism/2018/2/23/17011154/sb827-california-housing-crisis

        from April 2018

        but that’s not all..

        Senator Wiener has gone on to a new version of SB 827 which he wants to introduce next year, in 2019…a new version of that same “transit density bill”….since the original one has been so “hotly contested” and failed to get enough votes…

        …and one of its “challenges” is that “nearly half of all development land in the city of Los Angeles…is zoned for single-family .”

        article posted below..

        Liked by 1 person

    • redridge45 says:

      In SoCal, current construction is 3-story & up apartment complexes mixed in with industrial property. Irvine is one example; I guess there are no more earthquakes planned (/s), 2-story is about all you will catch me in overnight – maybe because I was born here, these immigrants have no clue.

      Like

      • smiley says:

        you should (or maybe shouldn’t ?) see what’s going on in south Florida…and southwest Florida.

        BIG Development and getting even bigger …and here where I live (Collier Co.), a lot of it suddenly is that so-called “affordable housing” cr@# .

        one huge mass of it about 2 miles away here…I’ve been watching it…watching the cr@# as it’s being “built” .

        like it’s constructed out of match sticks and dry wall stapled together…and going up so fast !

        looks like barracks enough to house thousands of people on top of each other.

        Like

        • smiley says:

          and just to clarify that a little…in this town “affordable” is anything that sells for under a million dollars and rentals that go for under $3,500/month.

          and I’m being only mildly sarcastic.

          but b/c the developers are now marketing their plans as “affordable housing” under the Sustainability rules, they get away w/ the development even tho there’s nothing really “affordable” about it.

          Like

  23. Molly Pitcher says:

    After watching the vid something came to mind. Now that we mostly use cell phones with contact list…we don’t always actually know family and friend’s numbers. Back in the old days we memorized everybody’s number but now…we scroll to a name and tap.
    If the phone is lost in the mayhem it might be hard to get ahold of loved ones.

    Like

  24. gymcy81 says:

    …hmmm…the anti-thesis of the dems russian collusion, spygate, post is not showing on CT.

    Perhaps it was too close to the truths, for some folks comfort?
    ( and continued obfuscation is preferred…for the time being?…and then, more time..? )

    The prior linked video was found elsewhere:

    … Love thy neighbors …

    Like

  25. FreeMan says:

    These perpetrators must be apprehended before they kill again. This medieval “burn them out” CA op war tactic involves spraying nano-aluminum accelerants over everything for years, so everything burns faster, plus geoengineering an artificial drought for years, hiring teams of mercenary arsonists wearing fake uniforms, using incinderary directed energy weapons (DEWs), and exploding “smart” meters. How clever. Then superimpose an Agenda 21/Agenda 2030 map of the areas marked “wildlife”. Voila! A matchup! The surviving displaced people who weren’t vaporized can just drink their fluoride and shut up. And get a flu shot.

    Like

  26. Steve Tabor says:

    In recent days we have heard little of missing persons; numbers seem to have been going down. Reports during the fire said that 52,000 residents were under evacuation orders, 27,000 in Paradise itself and 25,000 in surrounding suburbs. Did they all get out? If so, where are they? I’ve read that 7000-10,000 have been put up in shelters or are camping out. Where are all of the others? It seems like census records could be used to get some clarity on this. Census records should be compared to known survivor lists.

    It could be there is an order to downplay the immensity of the event. If the inhabitants had been burned in an actual forest fire, remains would be charred, more recognizable, not just little bits of bone.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s