President Trump Announces First Step Act – Requests Congressional Support…

President Donald J. Trump delivers remarks earlier today in a White House event calling on Congress to take action and support the bipartisan prison reform legislation, the FIRST STEP Act.

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[Transcript] Roosevelt Room – 4:38 P.M. EST – THE PRESIDENT: Hello, everybody. Thank you very much for being here. Appreciate it. And thank you very much, everybody. I’m grateful to be here today with members of the House and Senate who have poured their time — and they really have — their heart, and energy into the crucial issue of prison reform.

A very respected man — Chairman Chuck Grassley — and my friend. Where’s Chuck? Chuck? Thank you, Chuck, very much. You’ve worked hard on this. And Bob Goodlatte. I saw Bob here. Thank you, Bob. Great job. Senators Lindsey Graham, Mike Lee, Tim Scott, Rand Paul, and Doug Collins — fantastic people who’ve worked so hard and we appreciate very much what you’ve done. We really do. Thank you all very much.

Working together with my administration over the last two years, these members have reached a bipartisan agreement. Did I heard the word “bipartisan”? Did I hear — did I hear that word? (Laughter and applause.) That’s a nice word. Bipartisan agreement on prison reform legislation known as the FIRST STEP. And that’s what it is; it’s the first step. But it’s a very big first step.

Today, I’m thrilled to announce my support for this bipartisan bill that will make our communities safer and give former inmates a second chance at life after they have served their time. So important.

And I have to tell you, I was called, when I announced and when we all announced together this news conference, by some of the toughest, strongest law enforcement people — including politicians, by the way — who are so in favor of it. And I was actually surprised by some. Like, as an example, Mike Lee — (laughter) — and Rand Paul, and others. No, it’s got tremendous support at every level. It’s really great.

And we’re all better off when former inmates can receive and reenter society as law-abiding, productive citizens. And thanks to our booming economy, they now have a chance at more opportunities than they’ve ever had before. It is true. Our economy is so strong, that when people are getting out of jail, they’re actually able to find jobs.

And I have three instances of companies that hired people coming out of prison, and they are so thrilled by the performance of these people. And now they’re doing it more and more and more. And a lot of people are seeing this. It’s great.

They wouldn’t have had the opportunity, frankly, except for the fact that the economy is so strong. And our job market is the lowest and best it’s been in over 50 years, and seems to be getting even better.

Our pledge to hire American includes those leaving prison and looking for a very fresh start — new job, new life. The legislation I’m supporting today contains many significant reforms, including the following:

First, it will provide new incentives for low-risk inmates to learn the skills they need to find employment, avoid old habits, and follow the law when they are released from prison. These incentives will encourage them to participate in vocational training, educational coursework, and faith-based programs — and I want to thank Paula White, very much, because I know you very much wanted that — thank you, Paula — that reduce their chances of recidivism, and, in other words, reduce their chances of going back to prison substantially.

Second, this legislation will allow federal inmates to be placed closer to their home communities in order to help facilitate family visitation — so important — because we know that maintaining family and community ties is key to successful reentry into our society.

Third, the bill includes reasonable sentencing reforms while keeping dangerous and violent criminals off our streets. In many respects, we’re getting very much tougher on the truly bad criminals — of which, unfortunately, there are many. But we’re treating people differently for different crimes. Some people got caught up in situations that were very bad.

I give an example of Mrs. Alice Johnson, who served 21 years. And she had, I think, another 25 or so to go. So she would have been in there for close to 50 years for something that other people go in and they get slapped on the wrist — which is also wrong, by the way. Which is also wrong. But I’ll never forget the scene of her coming out of prison after 21 years and greeting her family and everybody was crying. Her sons, her grandsons — everybody was crying and hugging and holding each other. It was a beautiful thing to see. It was a very much tough situation.

Among other changes, it rolls back some of the provisions of the Clinton crime law that disproportionately harmed the African American community. And you all saw that and you all know that; everybody in this room knows that. It was very disproportionate and very unfair.

Throughout this process, my administration has worked closely with law enforcement. Their backing has ensured that this legislation remains tough on crime — it’s got to remain very tough on crime — and supports the tremendous work of our police and the tremendous job that law enforcement does throughout our country, our communities. They do an incredible job. We have great respect for law enforcement.

We’re honored that seven of the major police organizations, including the Fraternal Order of Police and the International Association of Police Chiefs, have fully endorsed this bill.

We could not have gotten here without the support and feedback of law enforcement, and its leaders are here today — two of them — especially Chuck Canterbury of FOP and Chief Paul Cell of IACP. Thank you very much. (Applause.) Thank you very much. I appreciate that very much. And these are two tough cookies. (Laughter.) They want what’s right. They want what’s right.

And interesting — if you look at Texas, if you look at Georgia, if you look at Mississippi and Kentucky and some other states that are known as being very tough — these are big supporters of what we’re doing. And some of it has been modeled after what they’ve done. They’ve done a tremendous job.

My administration will always support the incredible men and women of law enforcement, and we will continue to pursue policies that help the heroes who keep us safe. They are truly heroes.

We also thank the more than 2,000 leaders in the faith community who have signed a letter of support. We have tremendous support within the faith community. Unbelievable support.

Americans from across the political spectrum can unite around prison reform legislation that will reduce crime while giving our fellow citizens a chance at redemption. So if something happens and they make a mistake, they get a second chance at life.

Today’s announcement shows that true bipartisanship is possible. And maybe it’ll be thriving, if we’re going to get something done. When Republicans and Democrats talk, debate, and seek common ground, we can achieve breakthroughs that move our country forward and deliver for our citizens. And that’s what we’re doing today. And I have great respect for the people standing alongside of me.

I urge lawmakers in both the House and Senate to work hard and to act quickly and send a final bill to my desk. And I look very much forward to signing it. This is a big breakthrough for a lot of people. They’ve been talking about this for many, many years.

I want to thank Jared Kushner for working so hard on the bill. Thank you, Jared. (Applause.) He worked very hard. He really did. He worked very hard. He feels very deeply about it.

And it’s my honor to be involved and it’ll be an even greater honor to sign.

So good luck, Chuck and Mike and Rand and everybody — Lindsey, everybody back here. Go out and see if you can get that done. And if you can, I’m waiting. I’ll be waiting with a pen. And we will have done something — (laughter) — we will have done something that hasn’t been done in many, many years. And it’s the right thing to do. It’s the right thing to do.

Thank you all very much. Thank you very much. (Applause.)

END – 4:48 P.M. EST

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This entry was posted in Donald Trump, Election 2018, Legislation, media bias, Police action, President Trump, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

313 Responses to President Trump Announces First Step Act – Requests Congressional Support…

  1. K Madison1 says:

    For God’s sake where’s the wall? Why on earth do this?

    Liked by 7 people

  2. VegGOP says:

    This is a GOOD thing, and an excellent opportunity to demonstrate bipartisanship right after the election.

    Liked by 16 people

  3. Justin Green says:

    And what – $250,000,000 of additional money we don’t have. Wonderful.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Oh goody, early release and then Florida can grant then all voting rights everywhere and the Croix-de-Guerre.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. How about first fixing out justice system so that it also applies to democrat office holders, past and present, and not just us in the serf class ???

    Liked by 10 people

  6. Zorro says:

    I would like to see a Trumpian deal. Release some currently in prison in exchange for some real dangerous criminals formerly and currently in the DOJ/FBI.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Look at the bright side. This will be good for gun sales.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. ParteaGirl says:

    “..a chance at redemption”
    Beautifully Christ like!

    Liked by 8 people

  9. Steve Schultz says:

    If there is one thing we were hoping for in 2016, it was more criminals on the streets

    Liked by 4 people

    • But think of all the money you will save. Your wife will be afraid to go out shopping.

      Liked by 3 people

      • nimrodman says:

        Already a fact of life in Europe. Women can’t leave their apartments.

        Women in Migrant-heavy Paris Area Complain Harassment Getting Even Worse
        https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2018/11/03/women-in-migrant-heavy-paris-area-complain-harassment-getting-even-worse/

        Women living in a heavily migrant-populated Paris area who complained about constant harassment from men last year are saying the situation has become even worse, with some refusing to even leave their homes.

        Last year a group of local women signed a petition in an attempt to call attention to the situation in the Chapelle-Pajol district in northern Paris, but now they claim the situation has become even worse than before, Le Parisien reports.

        “The situation has worsened. Of course, since these men are more and more numerous. Like many others, I gave up taking the metro to La Chapelle, to cross the square … Even at a running pace,” a local woman who did not wish to be identified said.

        “And do not talk about cafes. They do not say ‘Women Prohibited’ on the front, of course, but who would risk it? The police are more present, it’s true, but the fights are also more and more numerous and violent. I have the impression that these traffickers won the game: they took possession of the place,” she added.

        Liked by 3 people

      • RICHARD CANARY says:

        I had to chuckle at that one, but really, an American citizen who has served his or her time and agrees to follow the programs that will be parts of this law can never be as dangerous as the muslims crawling all over Europe.

        If this is a bad plan, we will know pretty quick;ly and it can be changed or cancelled.

        It is interesting to consider that IF the penalties for the crimes that these “releasees” were fairly and intelligently applied, then I think we can expect almost all of them to sincerely be grateful for a responsible nation’s efforts to put the finishing touches on JUSTICE with this law.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Maquis says:

          I agree. If you look at PDJT’s pardons you see a common thread, he seeks to annul injustice. If this bill wasn’t in that vein, he wouldn’t back it.

          There is a tremendous amount of injustice in our justice system. Folks can’t credibly condemn Mueller without acknowledging that he put(s) innocent men in prison. He is not alone in falsely charging and overcharging.

          Like

    • 4sure says:

      I recall hearing Lock Her UP, Not turn them loose.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Deusvulture says:

      Are you on purpose stupid. There is nothing about more criminals on the streets. No early release in Mass. It’s about the people that are realeased to NOT turn criminal again.
      Damn it the idiocy.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I must say, this is not exactly my idea of a much needed Doolittle Raid.

    Like

  11. Truthfilter says:

    I support this 100%. It’s not on my list of priorities but it needs to be done for many reasons. I love the way it slaps the Clintons in their racist faces. I also love that PDJT is hijacking the one thing Obama wanted as part of his legacy—prison reform. Most of all, I think it’s overdue. Too many non violent offenders doing long sentences under old and outdated laws.

    Liked by 17 people

    • Carrie2 says:

      Truth, I agree. This does not mean all prisoners but those with little and not vicious crimes.

      Liked by 5 people

      • oldschool says:

        In most cases those “little crimes” were already plead down from “bigger crimes”. Happens all the time. Check out those stats.

        Like

        • Donald says:

          Old School:
          An important fact forgotten by many: considerable numbers of prisoners are being radicalized on the inside, and brainwashed to take up the cause of terrorism against the US, and of course, when they are released will reflexively gravitate to the Democrat whores. However, if already-lengthy sentences are shortened because of this bill, many on the inside may feel a sentence of loyalty to this president and Repubs in general.
          We are dangerously close to a civil war. If we ever get close to it, I’d rather it was the Republicans freeing the prisoners instead of the Evil Dems.
          And lastly, mercy is a part of every great nation, and Lady Justice is not automatically just merely because it has a proclamation with a government stamp on it!
          I say all this without a clue about the terms of the new law. I presume it bears the imprint of our president’s inherent fairness in all his dealings.
          He is truly an amazing man, and a rare combination of qualities: both thinker, and doer. Both ruthless and empathetic. Both self-confident and vulnerable.
          As in a football game, his presidency comes to the close of the first quarter ( he will serve two terms, a total of 4 quarters!).
          Look, the players are coming back onto the field.
          When not scared out of my mind, or momentarily despondent, it’s been a thrill a minute.
          Who can not root for this man all the way to the end?

          Liked by 2 people

    • starfcker says:

      Yeah, great. Let’s jump off the roof and call a win.

      Like

  12. 4sure says:

    Yeah. This is a Jared, Ivanka bill. They are YUGE liberals.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Justin Green says:

    Most criminals never even make it to prison. I have personal experience with a heroin addict felon who was caught counterfeiting US currency. He’s out of jail. No charges pressed.

    Like

  14. Melanie says:

    I am shocked by these comments! I work for a prison ministry, and I am here to tell you that there are many in prison whose main crime was being poor and illiterate. Many are serving ridiculously long sentences.

    Also, this website is a strongly Christian place. I like that. Our Lord commands us to serve the imprisoned, and to have compassion for their condition.

    I too want the wall and all of the other things promised. Mr. Trump apparently has more compassion than some of you.

    Liked by 18 people

    • sickconservative says:

      Melanie, I want to thank you for chiming in as I have the same take.
      We have really murderers on the streets with less crimes than many of the drug charged.

      Liked by 5 people

    • “there are many in prison whose main crime was being poor and illiterate. “

      Being poor doesn’t cause someone to be a criminal. And with all the welfare, is anyone really poor in America today ? And what excuse does someone have in today’s America where at least 12 years of school are free?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Your questions reveal your ignorance.

        Liked by 2 people

      • TreeClimber says:

        Being poor means you can’t get a lawyer if someone doesn’t like you and accuses you of something. Yes, there are still people who are poor, who don’t qualify for welfare or have principles enough to not take it. And the so-called “free” school (that you and I are paying for) is worse than no school at all.

        Doesn’t that stick hurt when you sit down on it?

        Liked by 3 people

      • John Matrix says:

        I hate contributing to the loud, and ignorant atmosphere this story has generated but Tough guy Tom feral, until someone in your immediate family has been hurt…and you do something incredibly stupid, like say, going after that person yourself, like I did. You have no idea how permanent a record can be. Graduate degree…worthless. potential positive contribution to society…minimized if not extinguished permanently. First time offense…ever…meaningless. yes, I made a choice, legally a very very bad one, and accept that responsibility. But, reading reactive, dumb sh*t like you and other dummies have written makes me laugh. You aren’t conservatives, you’re loud mouthed bullies who talk tough and with mean spirit.
        Guess what,most people in jail are pretty dumb. A program that helps them grow up and behave doesn’t just help them, it helps all of us.
        Or, you can play tough and tell everyone how you’re gonna buy more ammo and hide in your house.

        Liked by 4 people

        • TheDAwg says:

          Wrong!
          There are no excuses. Next thing you will be making up excuses for Hillary!
          Face it, you lost control, broke the law and now you reap the rewards. If you can make your way back into society all well and good. You do NOT deserve any help! None!
          Your bleeding heart nonsense is why the country is screwed.
          You screw up again, I hope they throw away the key. I have no time for screwups and even less tax dollars to throw at YOUR problem!
          Grow up!

          Like

          • ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

            Like

          • TreeClimber says:

            I have a ten-month-old. If anyone ever hurt or killed him, the police wouldn’t have anything left to arrest. I would annihilate them.

            I feel sorry for you, not having anyone you care deeply about.

            Like

          • John Matrix says:

            First, I have to apologize for responding so late, and, probably at all, but, for anyone who now , or in the future may peruse this little dialog…
            I don’t think you actually understood my prior response “TheDAwg”, that couldbe my fault for not being clear, but more likely you are another loud mouth…
            I sure as sh*t wasn’t offering any excuses for incredibly stupid behavior on my part. The best way anyone should handle a situation like mine was to goto my local police and trust them to do the job they are trained to do. The rule of law is paramount to our culture, it makes me sick tomy stomach that I crossed that line. As much as any legal repercussions i earned.
            Bleating heart…please, Barry Goldwater seemed moderate to me at times.
            I think Joe Arpio was a great Sheriff. His deputies, and the men and women who ran, and worked in his jails were tough, good,professional people. Every one of them must have the patience of Job to deal with the assorted individuals they do, day in and out. It made me sick to see ACLU creatures skulking about, fishing for “victims ” of the evil racist sheriff while there. In fact, with the small amount of funds he was allocated, he did a great job of implementing real world life skills…you get up, at dawn and goto work, like the vast majority of grown ups in the world. It truly was, and is the best thing for many of the kids in there.
            Don’t worry dum dum,i never expected any help, especially from nasty, mean spirited fake conservatives like yourself. Yes, in reply to thinkthinkthink, I do try to let our heavenly Father guide me. I think some of the anger in the body of responses to Sundance’s story are either trolls, seeking to undermine President Trump going forward, as well as many being unnecessarily afraid of being abandoned by our President.

            Like

        • John, I’m sure your story is not as uncommon as people would think. I pray that the Lord guides you into the best place to bring increase to His Kingdom in our world. God Bless.

          Liked by 1 person

    • wendy forward says:

      Thanks, great comment. I’m a former prosecutor and defense attorney and couldn’t agree more.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Brewcityninja says:

      I agree. I want the wall and other things, but this still appears positive. If we can help convicted criminals become positive members of our society, that is a great thing.

      Liked by 9 people

  15. Stab, the unstoppable hero says:

    ATTENTION.
    Any convicted criminals wishing to participate in our early release program must sign a form declaring that they had no genuine intent to break any laws.
    After you have affixed your signature to aforementioned form… You’re good to go.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Kalbo says:

    Wow.

    Whine about First Step because we don’t have the wall. Forgive me if I am wrong, but Congress needs to fund the wall. This Congress has not funded the wall, nor will the next Congress. NOT President Trump’s fault.

    Guns and ammo sales will increase? That is an absolute plus by me. The more the better. If the insinuation was by released felons, well they buy their guns illegally on the street.

    Why is this a priority? Align those released with training and a lawful way ahead. Not ignore them and recidivism rate remains high. Wasted tax dollars if we can help folks turn their lives around.

    President Trump juggles dozens of action items or more. First Step did NOT take anything away from the wall. Congress, uniparty and MSM have blocked real progress on the wall.

    This is not rocket science.

    Liked by 10 people

    • DT2020 says:

      Keep in mind that there are shills among us posing as Trump supporters. Their intent is to discourage and disrupt.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Kalbo says:

        Thanks. Seemingly dozens of shills trolling away. Posting frequently. At times appears rather broad based.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Anyone who hasn’t gotten at least a little discouraged the last week plus hasn’t been paying attention and may well have Jeff Session Syndrome.

        Like

        • Kalbo says:

          Discouraged? Yes, but not to the core. Over the years learned to retain some spine and work my way forward. Not incessantly whine about what I cannot change or like.

          45 years working, coordinating and (I believe) leading. Work with the hand dealt as best I can. Identify solutions and create a positive way ahead. Active duty 22+. Folks I worked for required solutions with movement forward…

          Absolutely paying attention. Pissed about all the theft of seats in the election. Hoping there will be hell to pay with charges against bad players. Hoping Court action requires rules in effect on the 6th are ultimately followed. Hoping bad actors get fired, charged and tried. Results will probably be a mixed bag at best.

          An absolute positive is, Whitaker is the solution to Jeff Sessions, RR, Mueller…

          Gotta believe and hope for better. Otherwise might as well turn off all media and go for long walks, fishing, … Sort of like bury ones head in the sand. Not interested in that defeatist perspective.

          Like

          • TheDAwg says:

            Leading with hope? YOU are the problem! NOT the solution!
            Beware the troll who encourages you to do nothing and put your faith in God.
            God is there alright but he doesnt think you should be a lemming!

            “Now that you know these things, you will be blessed if you do them.” John 13:17

            “But the one who looks into the perfect law, the law of liberty, and perseveres, being no hearer who forgets but a doer who acts, he will be blessed in his doing.” James 1:23-25

            Like

        • Not a problem. If you are discouraged, take a break.
          Maybe stroll over to the posting guidelines page and re-read while you are at it.

          https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2018/11/13/reminder-guidelines-for-comments-2/

          Like

      • All warfare is based on deception. Hey, whats that behind you??!!
        – Sun Tzu’s Great Nephew, Moon Yoo Tzu

        Like

      • purpleibby says:

        DT2020…yup, it’s pretty obvious. Shills posing as Trump supporters. Sorry, but I support this bill, and I support my President who’s the most conservative President we’ve had probably ever. The shills here are either Romneyites, or democrats.

        Liked by 2 people

    • RICHARD CANARY says:

      There are too many here who write posts as if they have never read the Constitution and found out the way that laws are passed and that programs are funded. This is the highest level blog I’ve ever seen in politics, and many of these posts are simple gut reactions to a very rough election cycle and a defeatist reaction to it.

      Buck up, folks, we’ve got the best leader this nation has seen since Reagan, and we all know that if Trump could have gotten the Wall approved and built, it would have been done yesterday.

      Just because he’s not able to get it all done doesn’t mean he needs us to rebel when he ventures into other less important issues.

      Liked by 7 people

      • purpleibby says:

        WELL SAID Richard. We are so blessed to have Trump, it’s simply not going to get better than him. No one has taken on what he has.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Deplorable_Infidel says:

          “We are so blessed to have Trump”

          I have no clue to what these folks would be doing if HRC succeeded in stealing the election.

          1Timothy 2:1 ¶ I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men;
          2 For kings, and for all that are in authority; that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty.

          3 For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour;
          4 Who will have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth.
          5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus;

          Liked by 1 person

      • TheDAwg says:

        Hmmm, we all know that. You are missing the point.

        The issue is if he couldnt get jack done when the Rinos held both houses then how will he get jack done now? That is the reason for the negativity. Trump isnt the source of negativity, its the situation around him. How can the people around him be changed for him to be successful despite being in the minority?

        And more importantly, how can we help? Bleating wont cut it.

        Like

        • sssssssssssssssssssss

          Like

          • Maquis says:

            Sad, ain’t they? Slithering around and condemning Hope and Prayer and Patience and Wisdom and Love of fellow man. We’d all be in the streets on our way to prison or the grave and CTH burned to the ground were we to follow this new breed of Disruptives.

            We’ve outlasted Zombie Invasions before, many times, but this is certainly the most persistently hard-hearted and bloodthirsty lot I’ve seen yet. Not very convincing though…too little concern, too much troll.

            CTH, c’est nous!

            GBPDJT
            🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

            Liked by 3 people

  17. budmc says:

    Liked by 11 people

    • KimmyK says:

      Wow, Van Jones with a positive tweet and a democrat honored to be at the White House tweet, that’s gotta bug the Hildabeast, lol.

      Of course the fake news probably won’t even report on it, unles they can find some way to spin it.

      Liked by 7 people

      • starfcker says:

        You know it would really bug the hildabeast? Handcuffs

        Liked by 1 person

      • TheDAwg says:

        You lack so much self confidence that you delight in Van Jone’s positivity?
        Thats when you know the game is over.
        Trump gave an inch, the dems didnt hence the positivity.
        There is no MAGA win here. There is no win for anyone except a leftwing destroyer of the USA. More criminals released earlier onto the streets should be applauded?
        Your myopia is astounding.

        Like

        • Maquis says:

          Your gratuitous interpretation of another’s heart is disingenuous and pathetic. Your vicious striking out at Treepers left and right is telling and you are fooling no one.

          Like

    • mashall says:

      Hey Van Jones, I’m a divider,
      Stay off of my Lawn.

      Like

    • starfcker says:

      Boy that makes me warm and tingly. NOT

      Like

  18. DT2020 says:

    It’s a good bill that passed the House with 360 votes. It will pass the Senate with ease. Smart of Trump to endorse it in advance. It will become law and I am glad.

    Liked by 10 people

    • Stab, the unstoppable hero says:

      I can only hope Paul Manafort will be among the first to benefit from passage.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Truthfilter says:

        Paul Manafort was convicted by a jury for crimes unrelated to PDJT. I feel more sympathy for General Flynn. There are poor young men (and women) who are locked up everyday for far less than anything Manafort did. They have no resources to pay for representation. They are at the mercy of the same system that seeks to find our president guilty of crime. The system is corrupt from top to bottom but even if it wasn’t, poor folks can’t afford good attorneys to work out better plea deals for them. It seems that few people here actually read the transcript. POTUS specified that the reforms would apply to non violent offenders. I’m shocked at some of these comments.

        Liked by 10 people

        • Stab, the unstoppable hero says:

          Let’s not pretend that Paul Manafort is in a cell because he’s a tax cheat. Everyone knows exactly why he is stuck in a cage.

          Excuse me that I’m not exactly thrilled with the spirit of bi-partisanship regarding a more benevolent attitude of our justice system that (apparently) will ignore crimes of treason, unlawful surveillance, intimidation, corruption and maybe even murder.

          I understand that President Trump has to put on a show & kowtow to the uninformed & willfully ignorant citizens of this country.
          But considering what is going on right now in Florida and our southern border it’s hard to be thrilled about this First Step Act.

          Liked by 2 people

          • purpleibby says:

            So Manafort should be the hill Trump should die on? Please, he’ll get a pardon after it’s over.

            Like

          • Maquis says:

            Trump is a multitasker par excellence, surely you’ve noticed that? Attention here does not equal a lack elsewhere. President Trump cannot ignore the fact that he is the principle target of the Leftist Conspiracy, nor that his family are considered fair game by the Conspiracy.

            We all want to act, to do, fix, correct, even punish, we get it, but that doesn’t mean we should do it, or that we’d aid the cause in the doing. PDJT needs support, yes, encouragement, too, but he needs his supporters to be stable and unlikely to resort to violence or dissolution as he manuevers a political and governing minefield the likes of which none of us have ever seen.

            Some may crave “action,” but he cannot afford to have identifiable supporters going off the rails.

            We don’t really have his back if we are pushing him to rashness, or worse, by acting out and forcing him to fight the blowback. We are talking Greek Tragedy level destruction of this Administration.

            Yeah, we’re upset, POed, some contemplating, well, let’s call it alternative voting, but it is not such a time. Nor is it wise to “rally the troops” by bringing down everyone that dares raise his or her head.

            I’m not laying all of this at your feet, nor directing it all at your comment here, but there has been a purposefully destructive wave of Disruptives at work here, and those of us that love CTH need to cool our jets and calm things down a bit, make it easier for Ad Rem to clear the chaff.

            We need to avoid driving off Treepers unfamiliar with our history of surviving Disruptives, who might despair at the current level of exhortations to hopelessness. We have lost prolific commenters well-loved over the years due to such, far too many; there is no excuse for us to embrace such darkness now.

            Like

  19. Jane DeChantal says:

    I normally am so uplifted by reading this site. Some of you people are sounding so negative. Why are you putting people down who are working so hard in the administration, even without pay? What’s wrong? This is filled with sarcasm. I supported POTUS because he is a builder, not a destroyer. I believe sarcasm is a destoyer. Maybe I shouldn’t read these blogs anymore.

    Liked by 6 people

  20. datagooroo says:

    Wow, a lot of Trump bashing going on here lately. I support prison reform. I also support the efforts Republicans (because of Trump) have put forth to change the dynamic of the “black voting block.” If they are successful at chipping away a chunk of it in 2020, the ball game is over. I think black people are going to notice “my uncle is out of prison and got a job” type stuff.

    Liked by 10 people

  21. Piggy says:

    Why are so called “non violent” (Drug users?) prisoners in a federal prison to begin with? Who does this apply to really?

    Does this apply to white collar criminals? Do they get out early?

    Why are state prisons being brought up? That’s for states to decide.

    Does this include all of the illegals in the penitentiaries? 22%-25% of the population in federal prisons are illegals. Do they get deported early?

    Why are murderers on death row for years and years and their appeals not heard faster? Expedite the process, get them in and get them out one way or another.

    Why are terrorists still in prison and not ash?

    Why do laws never get pulled off the books but new ones get added exponentially?

    Are these people going to read this bill before they pass it?

    Liked by 1 person

  22. oldschool says:

    Talk about timing. Does POTUS have any idea of how his deplorables are being treated and how many feel right now? And he is showcasing this? Ask his Floridian voters if Prison reform is an urgent matter.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Maquis says:

    I’m down with bipartisan. I call for Seditionists and Traitors from both parties to swing at dawn.

    Liked by 2 people

  24. John says:

    Republicans need to break up the the democrat party and the black and Hispanic vote is the place to focus. We need to separate Americans from the populist socialists. Otherwise we can’t make meaningful changes to immigration, border security and voting laws. The voter laws are premised on foundation that blacks and hispanics are too stupid to have ID, have driver licenses or know and where to vote. Which are complete bullshit.

    We need to break the status quo with common sense prison reform, legalizing marijuana and infrastructure investment are the means to do it and get our fair share of votes in urban districts.

    Liked by 2 people

  25. stablesort says:

    Too much is illegal in this country and plea deals keep our courts operating. Eliminate plea deals so all charges see a jury trial, and we’ll find a lot of stupid laws being ignored by prosecutors. After that, maybe, our congress creatures will start to remove the BS from the law books.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. ezpz2 says:

    Meanwhile, Paul Manafort still sits in solitary confinement. For what? For white collar ‘crimes’ he may have committed decades ago?

    No, he’s in solitary confinement for the ‘crime’ of having briefly worked for candidate Donald Trump.

    He recently appeared in court in a wheelchair!

    But let’s work with the loony dems on prison reform.
    Ridiculous!

    Like

  27. California Joe says:

    No matter what you do, no matter how hard you try, President Trump, these people will still vote for the craziest, socialIst Democrat they can find. Same thing with the Hispanics! If anything, last week’s election should have taught us that lesson…the hard way!

    Like

  28. mashall says:

    “Among other changes, it rolls back some of the provisions of the Clinton crime law that disproportionately harmed the African American community. And you all saw that and you all know that; everybody in this room knows that. It was very disproportionate and very unfair.”

    How is it unfair if the African Americans were disproportionately to their percentage of the population committing cirmes?
    Affirmative Action for Black Criminals/Convicts?
    Here comes the New Yuck City

    Liked by 1 person

  29. For those who think this will be much limited, just think of the amnesty that Reagan agreed to that was suppose to be very limited and then later exploded. And nothing that was suppose to be gained in return, like border security, ever happened.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. paulmafinga says:

    In the olden days, a person served their sentence and were forgiven. No government, employer, or person had a right to jam their proboscis into anything about your past. Soon people will be able to scan your face with a phone and your entire history will be at their fingertips for $9.95.

    Like

    • mashall says:

      That is a curse of Modernity, that so many don’t see with the lightning growth of technology. They sacrifice anything for Convenience.
      The Death of Privacy

      Like

  31. 4sure says:

    Lots of liberals and dims here posing as conservatives and pubs.

    Liked by 2 people

    • oldschool says:

      yep 4sure.

      Like

    • Maquis says:

      4sure.
      😁

      Like

      • mashall says:

        Rest assured the Globalist Media doesn’t remind us of the Cramming of Muslims down the throats of the Western Christian World and it’s certain madness.

        NL NEWS

        @BreakingNLive
        Nov 13

        “Today marks the three year anniversary of the November Paris Attacks 2015 where several shootings across central Paris, three suicide bomb explosions outside Stade de France soccer stadium and a hostage situation at the Bataclan concert hall left 130 people dead & scores injured:”

        Like

    • YvonneMarie says:

      No. Just a lot of folks who are bruised from losing 1 of the 3 federal branches of the DC government. Maybe they take media opinions to seriously. People around here are sounding scared & disappointed. I put my bet on Trump all the way. Not all democrats are hateful demons. There are sure many republicans who are self serving idiots. Look at Florida.

      Like

      • purpleibby says:

        Totally agree Yvonne…..The only reason we didn’t lose it all was because of Trump….The only reason we’re not subjected to hillary and a stacked with lib supreme court is because of Trump. NO ONE else could have survived the onslaught.

        Liked by 1 person

    • vicschick says:

      And it’s been going on since last week. Lots of doom and gloom and calling the President “Trump” and President Trump’s supporters “Trumpsters.” We’ve been infected with the nattering naboobs of negativity!!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mitro roman says:

      Yeah, it’s pretty obvious. The lib/Dem trolls have been trying to separate Trump supporters from Trump since before the election. It won’t work.

      Liked by 1 person

  32. TheDAwg says:

    Donald has lost the plot.
    He just lost an election, 20000 people plus headed to the border and has 300 illegals sitting next to him on the fence!
    I thought he identified a ton of bad people in the caravans? And now his first post election loss announcement to them is “We will help you get a job after you rape or murder someone”? Is this for real?
    Mattis is as maddog as a chihuaha. Where the hell are the priorities?

    Liked by 1 person

  33. billrla says:

    Cheer-up, Treepers. It’s not prison reform. It’s locking-up the vote for 2020. Besides, not to worry. 95% of the beneficiaries will be back in the joint in no-time at all.

    Like

    • purpleibby says:

      There’s nothing to cheer up….the swamp shills are here desperate to lower Trump’s ratings so in their minds they can go for impeachment. That’s why they’re here. It’s not going to work.

      Liked by 1 person

    • mashall says:

      MK
      Border Wall Road Construction Jobs for Non-Violent US Citizen Convicts, if that helps. Anything to Stop the Invasion.

      Like

    • Purpleibby is right, those complaining loudest are likely here to stir up trouble.

      Liked by 4 people

      • I just read through the first few dozen comments and am reasonably confident that is the case based upon historical reference.

        Liked by 1 person

      • purpleibby says:

        Yup, they are either sent by, or enabling the very people they claim to be against. Trump has delivered for us, took a stand on issues no one else was willing to touch. I will vote for NO OTHER REPUBLICAN EVER if he is removed from office. The establishment sellouts are trying to claw their way back in. They are showing their backsides and it’s pretty obvious.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Indeed. They really stand out in this place. Perhaps they blend in more easily on other sites.

          Liked by 2 people

        • TheDAwg says:

          Piddly, that isnt the issue at all. Yes Trump has delivered on a few things. People are negative because prison reform should be nowhere in the list of top 10 priorities!
          What is appalling is that he befriended McConnell and Ryan for nought. Any reasonable person is asking if he couldnt get the wall funded, couldnt stop illegals, couldnt introduce voter id when he had everything. what can he do now?

          Of course Trump is the only rational choice. The negativity comes from what will he be able to do now surrounded by a GOP who have largely demonstrated that they dont give a rats about him?

          There is no point polishing a turd.

          You remind me of horrible employers that fire their employees if the employee dares raise a negative issue with them. As a business advisor, I see your type all the time.

          Take a leaf out of Sundance’s book, sunlight is the best policy! Not discussing facts in a direct manner hinders rather than enhances arguments.

          Lets talk about it and give opinions based on people’s contributions rather than labelling people with slightly different views to you as heretics!

          Like

      • Diana Allocco says:

        I have read Sundance’s posts at this site every day for a few years but don’t usually read through all the comments so I don’t know tradition or protocol here. But isn’t it possible to weed out these obvious disrupters?

        Liked by 3 people

        • Possible certainly, but difficult. Small staff, overwhelmed by the increasing popularity of the site. The bigger it has gotten over the past couple years, the harder it is for Ad Rem, SD or others to keep up. Many of us who truly care about non-emotional debate and discussion participate in self-policing our own behaviors. Plus, the “Guidelines for Commenting” are generally excellent.

          However, the “troll hunters” are a time-wasting pain in the you-know-where. They are just as counter-productive as any actual trolls, which always starve if not fed. People who politely disagree should be encouraged to participate, not labeled for shunning purposes. We learn by examining differences of opinion, not by living inside echo chambers.

          Liked by 2 people

    • TMonroe says:

      And out again. Freddie Gray and his 20-plus recorded encounters with the law (who know how many were sealed for being a minor or how many times he otherwise skated) by the time he was 25 shows a pattern. Bringing up the guys with one lapse in judgment and conflating it with the vast number of the repeat offenders is akin to haranguing about the 5-year olds approaching the border and ignoring the 800-pound charging elephant in the form of unvetted fighting-age men with unknown criminal history.

      Like

  34. jkcinsalem says:

    I would like to think a concerted effort is going to be made with corporate America to usher these folks into all those available jobs. If not, the opportunity will be lost.

    Liked by 5 people

  35. Troublemaker10 says:

    Liked by 6 people

    • Red says:

      That IS a horse of another color! child pornography SHOULD be considered a violent crime!

      Like

      • TMonroe says:

        Is that addressed in the legislation, or can they stroll up to the special hearing judge and only deal with what they pled down to? I’m sure the trial lawyers are really fretting over what clients ‘should’ be charged with rather than exploiting loopholes.

        Like

  36. Badabing says:

    No, there are too many loopholes which will put bad people back on the street. I am in favor of eliminating jail for victimless crimes, but this seems to be a step too far.
    https://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2018/11/key-law-enforcement-groups-oppose-first-step.php

    Like

    • mashall says:

      They had to change the name before it could get traction, it was first called the
      “Crime Is Okay When Blacks Do It Act.”

      Like

    • TMonroe says:

      “Representatives of the Association of Federal Narcotics Agents, the National Association of Assistant U.S. Attorneys, the National Association of Police Organizations, and the National Narcotics Officers’ Associations’ Coalition cosigned a letter in which they strenuously objected to the latest version of the FIRST STEP Act.”

      Ah, what do they know, Don’t they know that a conviction 40 years ago can really affect future hiring, and haven’t they ever worked within the system? Don’t they want churches to help change things and give people a second chance?

      Wait, is there a chance that all of those above concerns have means of redress in current jurisprudence, and that this significant bill with the weight of federal law behind it actually has a mountain of issues that invite untinended consequences that some key law enforcement people who are not fly by night on this issue see MAJOR problems with? Or are they just trolls?

      Like

  37. lydia00 says:

    The problem is people cannot discuss issues without the instant pudding drama. Trump has sold out! Please. Seriously?

    My concerns about the Bill have nothing to do with my support of the president and his agenda. I don’t blame Trump for wanting the bipartisan optics. Pelosi has to be fuming. The thinking behind the the Bill has merit. It just never seems to work out that way in practice. Jared’s dad served time so maybe that has something to do with his zeal for this since day one? He has not shut up about it for 2 years. Also, I do not view child pornographers as “non violent”. Throw away the key.

    Like

    • oldschool says:

      Doubt Pelosi gives a rat’s patootie about this bill and I don’t give a rat’s patootie about Nancy fuming or optics. Safe streets for my grandchildren is my priority. They don’t live in iron gated mansions or secured high rises.

      Like

  38. lieutenantm says:

    I DON’T WANT TO HEAR ANOTHER DAMNED WORD OUT OF THIS PRESIDENT RIGHT NOW EXCEPT FOR HIM TO SAY WHAT HE IS GOING TO DO ABOUT THIS DAMNED VOTE STEALING RIGHT NOW……RIGHT NOW.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I acknowledge your emotional commitment. Now please stop “shouting” at the community.

      President Trump can’t do much about states that are failing to regulate the orderly process of their elections. The states are granted primary responsibility for holding elections in the US Constitution, and the Executive can’t interfere with that without risk. Residents of the offending states, and their state officials, must solve these problems.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Maquis says:

        President Trump long ago signed an executive order citing election integrity as an issue of national security. Can’t remember if he called it a national emergency, but I’d support such wholeheartedly.

        Perhaps the good Lieutenant could suggest that to the White House? With fewer Caps of course…

        Liked by 1 person

  39. This is what Scott Adams calls “a new CEO move”. Trump administration is now starting in a new situation: they have a split Congress to work with. So he’s taking a bipartisan issue which nobody really can oppose ie. reducing recidivism and he’s announcing the bill. That way he shows he’s willing to work with the Dems too in order to get legislation done. When the first move of the President after the election and before the new Congress steps into office is a positive bipartisan legislation announcement, it sets a tone for the Congress to start their cooperation with the President.

    The obstructive Dems get the wind taken from their sails as they see the President cooperating with their party and being happy about the bipartisan nature of the bill proposal. The monster they planned to oppose is acting nice towards their party and issues they claim to care about. That primes them to see their future work with the President in less obstructive way.

    They have now experienced the bogeyman being less scary than they thought. So when an issue with less agreement between the parties comes up, they’re not going to have a knee-jerk reaction of “we’re Dems, we can’t work together with the evil President”, as they remember their party having already cooperated with the President successfully. Which in turn improves the chances of the President getting his agenda points accepted and laws he wants passed by the Congress

    Liked by 1 person

    • Maquis says:

      Mindy, it also helps the.public see the reality of PDJT’s willingness to work for our Country with the opposition, and thusly be more disposed to recognize and resist the false narratives the Left will be soon selling.

      I don’t think he will change many Leftist minds, but agree that he has surely taken charge of the optics, and that’s a good thing.

      Liked by 1 person

  40. emet says:

    Our justice system and law enforcement are primarily a deterrent. Yes there are crimes that can’t be deterred, such as crimes of passion, but for the most part the idea is to deter criminal activity. The deterrent is like a tripod, with each leg necessary. The parts are: The likelihood of getting caught, the certainty of consequences for getting caught, and the severity of those consequences. If any of these are weak, the deterrent diminishes. Clearly, despite strict and easy-to-understand Federal laws, Comey, Clinton, McCabe, et al were not deterred. Little chance of getting caught, even less chance of prison. So you get the Deep State. Look at illegal aliens, an entire class of people exempted from Title 8 of the US Code. So, no deterrent. In fact, the illegals have many supporters. They are considered the downtrodden. So in sum, there is no consistency, and therefore people are likely to take risks. Our prisons to many criminals are just an inconvenience. They get drugs, sex, and quality time with their homeboys. Just like on the outside. A lot of people don’t realize that in most prisons, the prisoners run the prison; the COs are just there to watch them. Gangbangers don’t like being incarcerated where they don’t have fellow gang members around, both inside and on the outside. So, in fact, this forms a deterrent. I’m just throwing a few things out there. In my opinion, this issue needs more research and thought and planning, although I think the reform is positive, especially Christian outreach. Without a relationship with Jesus there can be no real change in a convict.

    Like

  41. Perspective is a good thing. Do we want to be like the leftists and throw a tantrum because we lost the House? Or do we want to be grown-ups and make lemonade out of lemons? Not going into WHY we lost nor discussing the issue of voter fraud, which are real topics that belong in another thread.
    This legislation strikes me as helpful for a number of reasons: 1) Government should work for ALL of its citizens. The quality of mercy should not be strained. When we show people that there is a CHANCE that they can create a better life for themselves that is a powerful thing–Incentives should include positive and negative incentives.
    2) The legislation may help create alliances with the few moderate Dems, which could help in passing future, beneficial legislation. There are a number of issues that need to be addressed as the country has been poorly governed, arguably for nearly 30 years! We only have one POTUS, and only for another 6 years, so we need to improve what we can while we can.
    3) There legislation is positive economically. Reformed released prisoners that begin working are now OFF the government payroll (i.e., we don’t pay for them to be housed and fed in prison), and contributing to their communities and families as well as paying taxes. A win/win.
    4) The example of reformed released prisoners can act as the “leaven in the loaf”—when communities see their example it will impact others.

    C’mon y’all. I worked my tail off on this election, and my Congressman lost due to reasons I’ve catalogued below. But we have a choice, to help or retard progress. Constant naysaying is what I’d call negative incentive which is tiresome and annoying. If the leftist progressive power mongers and their Unimedia allies haven’t defeated me, I’ll be doggone if I’m surrendering to negativity here.

    God bless.

    Liked by 1 person

    • sorry for the typo, should say “for the reasons I’ve catalogued elsewhere”

      Like

    • TheDAwg says:

      Ridiculous!
      Trump’s platform is that the good get rewarded! Your nonsense is that he should accomodate everyone.
      Lots of people here know nothing of fighting, that is why they rub rabbits feet and “believe”.
      Trump is about delivering for “real Americans”. Many of you do not qualify.
      What is grown up about being cheated and doing nothing? Tell me. Im interested.

      Like

  42. thomaspsyche says:

    They could help build the wall? And tear down walls of prejudice! Great Bill to heal country and help communities!

    Like

  43. thomaspsyche says:

    They could help build the wall? And tear down walls of prejudice! Great Bill to heal country and help communities!

    Like

  44. thomaspsyche says:

    They could help build the wall? And tear down walls of prejudice! Great Bill to heal country and help communities!

    Like

  45. thomaspsyche says:

    They could help build the wall? And tear down walls of prejudice! Great Bill to heal country and help communities!

    Like

  46. TMonroe says:

    Prison reform has been euphemistic language for early release, pleading down violent crimes to non-violent misdemeanors, not arresting for or prosecuting a score of crimes, and generally cranking down on the crime numbers. For one thing, in lib-run bergs where they have no answer for crime, it cooks the numbers (except for murder, those are harder to finesse.) In lib areas and states, it also takes down the cost of financing prosecutions and prison-related costs. The problem is repeat offenders get impunity to raise their game, as the risk associated with violent crime plummets.

    Another problem is the GOP is buying into this on the federal level. It’s snake oil, and it’s dangerous to the law-abiding and the innocent:
    https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/president-donald-j-trump-calls-congress-pass-first-step-act/
    Quotes are from the briefing:
    “This is a true first step in creating a fairer justice system by reforming mandatory minimums, which have created racially discriminatory outcomes and increased overcrowding and costs.”
    Strawman without proof right off the top that discrimination has shaped to a measurable degree prison populations, unless one wants to factor in the PC priority of activist judges that lets the Freddie Grays of the world have two dozen convictions but still be out on the street, as this is not a new thing:
    https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/196296/does-racism-really-cause-more-black-drug-arrests-colin-flaherty
    This arrests-as-discrimination outlook can and has created a turnstile where the repeat offenders have even less incentive to not commit a crime they know will likely figure to be prosecuted as non-violent. And how many fall under that category?

    “The legislation reduces the enhanced penalties for certain non-violent repeat drug offenders and eliminates the three-strike mandatory life provision. Certain nonviolent offenders will be able to petition courts for a review of their sentence, which can be reduced only after the judge reviews all circumstances, including public safety, criminal history, and the nature of the offense.”
    Here’s the next edge of the sword: plea deals. A big part of plea deals are the presumption foisted by defense attorneys and initially Dem and now bipartisan politico consensus of a perp-focused priority on the injustices they face. They add that to using the prison system that they’ve messed up over decades in terms of inmate reform to say that the costs and ineffective prisoner rehab to argue for reducing sentences. All of a sudden, Joe’s armed robbery charge (to which he graduated after years of turnstile justice on regular burglary) gets pled down to a “non-violent” offense. All of a sudden, violent crime is “non-violent” and subject to get out of jail free sentencing guidelines and more! Even “low-level violent” offenses (the threshold mentioned under the Obama admin, which is now within easy grasp once the camel gets into the tent via this bill) can be the recipient of sentence reductions in many burgs, and you’d cringe at what they got pled down from – that is, if your eyes were ever allowed to leave the shiny toy of criminal justice reform being dangled before you from all quarters.

    Oh, and you think Mueller has unlimited funding and ability to delay trials? Not only do public defenders – especially in large population centers – have taxpayer subsidies to mount all sorts of defenses and tactics, they also are often given carte blanche to delay trials, which even in violent cases allows perps to walk because witnesses stop showing up after scores of delays. Ask a police officer how many of their arrests ever go to trial. Ask them if the delays are one factor in witness intimidation, and if witness intimidation affects a huge amounts of violent crime trials, all as the trial lawyers aid and abet with delay after delay with any omnibus reform designed to protect the victim in the offing:
    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2015/10/too_many_black_people_in_prison__and_other_fairy_tales.html

    Here’s another reality: once you have these sentencing guidelines on the fed level, it can be an absolute springboard for much of the same. Do some searches on activist politicos like Cy Vance in NY (releasing some 7000 criminals unilaterally just ‘cuz), Kim Foxx in Chicago (unilaterally refusing to prosecute carjackers just ‘cuz), the new gem in Philly (where merchants putting up bullet-proof glass in high-crime areas is now banned ‘cuz discrimination), and so forth. Look back in the TCH archives on all of the Trayvon and Michael Brown-type cases. Even the Parkland/Broward diversionary program (there’s your government reform for you) was the school leg of criminal justice reform, complete with blaming of discrimination and the costs of disciplining students as a reason to look the other way at criminality, with PC priorities at the top and the rights of those who need protection at the bottom:
    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2018/05/07/broward-county-officials-forced-to-admit-school-shooter-nikolas-cruz-was-in-diversionary-program/

    How many of our kids and grandkids are going to be touched by this codification of PC priorities? We can’t hide in the red bastions when this gets on a fed level and thus creeps into the state and local level at an accelerated rate. If past is prologue, many, and we may be welcoming back the Carter era on steroids. (Oh and ask Europe how PC justice priorities including an alternate ‘justice’ system – allowed ‘cuz racist otherwise – and no-go zones is working for them.)

    Like

    • TMonroe says:

      Let’s read through some more of the PC euphemistic language to see what’s afoot (bearing in mind that the White House briefing already used not-so-euphemistic language in blaming the current incarceration stats on a system generating “racially discriminatory outcomes”):

      https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/president-donald-j-trump-calls-congress-pass-first-step-act/

      “Prisoners will be able to earn credits that reduce the amount of time spent in prison.”

      Sorry, Johnny; we know you still don’t have the use of your right arm after your head hit the pavement, and the one guy of the group that beat you that got charged pled down to a misdemeanor charge. Turns out he’s getting bonus points and will be out next week.
      Sorry, Fifi; we know you got sexually assaulted by your stalker ex who got that plea deal. Thanks for waiting through the delays of over two years and missing work to make sure the trial actually occurred, as well as the emotional agony of testifying in front of him. Looks like he’s a model prisoner and is racking up those prison credits. He’s due out next week.

      “As a result, prisoners will gain job skills, drug treatment, and education that prepare them to reenter American communities as productive members of society.”

      Of course, if they rack up enough credits, they may test out as it were early. And just look at the education system which rubber-stamps high school diplomas to ‘students’ reading at a grade-school level. Do we really think the fed is going to have a higher standard than that in prison? What a joke. You really have to pretend not to know things to buy into this. And I don’t want to hear about pleasing Ivanka and Jared or horse-trading. Do that with milk subsidies, not something that can endanger communities and take away one of the only effective tools to have a semblance of societal justice, on the premise of PC priorities no less.

      “The legislation also seeks to place Federal inmates closer to their communities in order to facilitate family visitation.”

      Remember those battles your community had to over those halfway house legacies of the 70s that never seemed to go away or deliver on their reform goals. Welcome back!

      “Certain nonviolent offenders will be able to petition courts for a review of their sentence, which can be reduced only after the judge reviews all circumstances, including public safety, criminal history, and the nature of the offense.”

      And here’s the kicker. First, bear in mind the plea deals – and time served on previous convictions — that turn violent offenders into non-violent ones. Note that “all circumstances” lists some factors (“including”) but not all. They conveniently leave out here key factors they put elsewhere in the briefing: “racially discriminatory outcomes and increased overcrowding and costs.” Add those factors to the sentence review, and you’ll have mass releases such as those that have occurred in California and New York, with the potential to make a mockery of victim’s rights and the years they put in playing by the rules of the justice system.

      This can have a cascading effect. What sexual assault victim – primarily women and children – are going to choose to testify if the perps are going to be able to game the system like this? (See the Rotherham horror if you want a preview of PC priorities and those essentially immune from meaningful conviction and justice.) And combined with district attorneys already declining to prosecute due to the expenses involved (see the new Boston DA’s interview with Tucker Carlson), criminals are getting more and more incentivized to try their odds rather than fear punishment.

      This whole process is just one part of the criminal justice reform scam, which appears to be aimed at saving costs for other social programs by lowering arrests and convictions (lower arrests and convictions necessarily lower crime numbers, which politicos and their media mouthpieces use to claim safe communities even in places like Baltimore). It has the added bonus of making a big portion of the population which is likely to vote for candidates with PC priorities eligible to do so as newly-deemed productive members of society who have served their time (no matter how many bonus points made that time fly by). Thus, not “criminalizing” them, including at the school level, is the priority.

      “Our prisons can do much more to prepare inmates for release, addressing the fact that roughly 77% of State inmates and 38% of Federal inmates are rearrested within five years of release.”

      And this gets at the heart of another key issue. It’s the hardened criminal that will not change his ways who benefits from this and can cause crime numbers to spike in a given community. If you have a greater number of repeat offenders on the streets rather than serving time for actual crime, it doesn’t take a rocket science to see what will follow.
      With this, you also nullify the public’s ability to use the legislative process to protect itself and self-determine justice and safety matters, yet again ceding this to a judiciary that WAY too often can be arbitrary, capricious, activist, and politically-motivated rather than upholding the law. The PC priorities afforded to repeat offenders can curiously evaporate when someone dares to protect themselves or their family from an assault, often from mob-sized perps. Suddenly, weapons laws and such aren’t being pled down…

      So what happens when Dems get back (or sooner if bipartisan legislation like this hums along) and let HUD place Section 8 housing right next to you or your grown child? What happens when a grandmother lets her kids move in – one of whom likes partying and gazing over the fence at your daughter/granddaughter? What if one is a nonviolent meth cooker who gets careless with the spoons and flames one night? What if your kids who may buy into the PC bromides think nothing of approaching a party and – in a cool, non-judgmental way – ask them to turn the music down and get beaten within an inch of their life, only to have the police not exactly be super-proactive in identifying a suspect? Or maybe somebody gets arrested, and it’s just for disturbing the peace? If you think I’m being hyperbolic, check out some of Colin Flaherty’s and Heather MacDonalds’ books or take a look at some of the no-go havens in Europe and get back to me.

      Plus, how are they going to reform the Nikolas Cruzes of the world? If you can’t cut through the PC red tape to address those with mental issues effectively because you’re busy releasing everyone because of cost and assumed discrimination (with another key priority being the avoidance of “criminalizing”), at what point are you going to stop prioritizing the record of those perpetrating crime and misconduct and instead promote the general welfare and safety?

      Like

    • TrumpFanFLA says:

      I read every comment in this thread, belatedly, & as always, there are many excellent thoughts from both sides of the “peanut gallery.”

      But your above & below comments (TMonroe) are masterpieces that should be plastered all over the web (& to congress critters) wherever this topic is being discussed.

      I could tell from the original post description & Potus’ comments that this bill is simply all wrong (gut instinct) but would never have been able to break down the specifics-as-to-why so articulately. You covered every point, & the bottom line is: The “reform” is all based on “PC CRAP,” which is not an “honest” way of doing things but is just “ear tickling” to the “dreamers.”

      “Do Gooder” ideas based on PC will not change nor stop the runaway degredation of society.
      ====
      “Thus, not ‘criminalizing’ them, including at the school level…”

      Of course not. That might “hurt their fweeelings”! It’s the same reason nobody has to “flunk” a grade anymore if their grades are not up to par, as that also might “hurt their fweelings,” etc. etc.

      Haven’t we all realized YET that that type of PC-thinking is what has ALREADY ruined our society? Why agree to open the door for more of the same?

      “IS IT REALLY SO that you must do the time if you commit the crime?” (Read: Serpent-Speak to Eve who convinced her with Smooth PC-Words that she was ENTITLED to more than God had provided. And here we are.)

      Criminals & Prisoners with “ENTITLEMENT” attitudes. Just what we DON’T need. :-/

      Like

  47. paper doll says:

    The thing is, the government wants to stop paying for incarnations and investigations as much as they can, while still collecting the same or higher taxes of course. That’s the reason for the ” reform”. Having said that, it’s crazy to keep locked up nonviolent weed offenders when weed is about to go legal. The means of their criminality will be shortly gone. A lot of these long sentences for weed were handed down back in the day to fill up the private prisons. Those prisoners were real money makers. But as I say, the government no longer wishes to pay off that investment.

    Like

  48. Khyberpass says:

    What’s to reform? You do the crime you do the time. What are we supposed to do? Just let criminals off Scott free

    Like

  49. Cheeshead54016 says:

    This reform can only help, not hurt. If the stats show it isnt working after 8-10 yrs Im sure changes will be made.

    Liked by 1 person

    • TMonroe says:

      Right, just like the changes made in the 70s blamed on institutional racism saw fruit over time in changing that perception, say in cities where the police force, DA’s office and politicians bcame overwhelmingly non-white over time. Oh wait, even today’s WH briefing claims what’s in place currently “created racially discriminatory outcomes”, almost as if that rationale can be trotted out for political leverage regardless of reality.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Warrior says:

        Let’s hope Criminal Justice Reform is more successful than the Gang of Eight Immigration Reform. Usually “reform” means reducing penalties, shorter sentences, less people in prison. Just like immigration reform meant amnesty, more illegals into the country, path to citizenship for illegals, more hb visas. Yeah, we need more reforms like we need a hole in the head.

        Liked by 1 person

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