Hurricane Michael 2018 Haunting Similarity To Hurricane Andrew 1992 (Just Smaller Geography)…

The parallels between Homestead after Hurricane Andrew in 1992 and Mexico Beach after Hurricane Michael are stunning.  There are remarkable similarities including the first 48 hours of media incomprehension due to their inability to gain access.

For those who might not remember, immediately following hurricane Andrew (’92) no-one initially realized the scale of devastation in/around Homestead, FL, because all eyes were focused on the more well-known Miami area.  It took a few days for people to fathom where the real devastation took place.  Homestead was almost entirely obliterated.

Fast forward 26 years and the exact same scenario exists near Mexico Beach, FL.  The difference between Michael and Andrew is the width of the devastation.  Andrew was a much wider storm than Michael; but the aftermath is eerily similar.  Seriously, it’s PTSD flashback central…. stunningly so.

Just like the area around Homestead AFB ’92, the area around Tyndall AFB in 2018 is identical. Complete devastation.  Amazing. I mean the comparisons are spookily similar, right down to the displayed fighter jets being torn from their concrete pedestals.

This is probably the only time I will ever agree with Senator Bill Nelson:

As you go east of Panama City, that’s where that wall of water on the eastern side of the eye wall is,” Sen. Bill Nelson said. “You are going to see a lot of destruction when the rescue crews get into Mexico Beach. … That’s where you’re going to see the extreme, extreme devastation.”

The coastal community is gone.  There’s maybe a handful of houses and structures that did not have structural failure.

Further inland, with each mile traveled the number of livable structures seems to increase.  Buy the time you get around 15 miles away things look more like typical hurricane damage.

However, the roadways and transit hubs are a mess, without a heavy duty 4×4 it’s impossible to move around.  Forget about trying to get power crews in here. Some roads are completely impassable – just like Andrew in ’92 that makes rescue and recovery efforts slow down dramatically.

It will take days for the main arteries to be cleared; and that only then starts to get access to the secondary inbound roadways.  Once this process is complete (48 hours) that will allow a more thorough evaluation, the scale of the damage, to be possible.

That said, like Andrew, this post-Michael recovery effort is going to take a long time and a very long-term commitment.

No-one inside the impact zone is reading this because there is complete infrastructure failure.  No power, no water, no cell towers, no communication, etc.  It’s the old fashioned relay system…  who are you?  what is your status?  who do you need us to contact?  write it down….. then you travel 30 to 40 miles, find a network, and sit down and start making relay calls.

My friends and readers please remember this.  When we shared the importance of setting up a communication hub as part of your hurricane plan, this is exactly why.

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Tyndall AFB:

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310 Responses to Hurricane Michael 2018 Haunting Similarity To Hurricane Andrew 1992 (Just Smaller Geography)…

  1. cripto says:

    Many people posting unbelievable videos of the destruction showing roofs blown off, buildings ripped apart in realtime.

    Prayers for the safety of those caught in the maelstrom.

    Liked by 21 people

    • sundance says:

      Someone was asking about condos.

      Liked by 16 people

      • Brant says:

        I was recently talking to a guy who managed condo units. In the Panama City area actually. He had several 100. If I understood correctly, historical insurance policies had some reasonable deductibles, $5-10k. Kinda sorta affordable. He said after several big storms, the insurance companies got a 25% deductible inacted. So, imagine a $10-20 million (or more) condo building. Now imagine a $2.5-5 million plus immediate assessment on the owners to get work started. Most owners/retirees maybe buy a little 1-2 bedroom beach condo for $100k maybe. They don’t have maybe several hundred thousand cash on hand for their part of the repairs. What do they do?

        Liked by 2 people

        • rf121 says:

          It is all about risk. California is the same with earthquake insurance. Very high deductibles. You want to live in a place prone to certain type events then there is a price to pay. Insurance companies need to manage their risk and they know historically what they will have to pay out for certain events. Things that they cannot control will come in at a higher price.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Will says:

            “High” deductibles, as in 25% – 35% of the value of the house. $300k deductible for quake insurance on my house? I’ll pass, thanks.

            Liked by 1 person

          • yy4u says:

            Where can one live w/o risk? California has earthquakes, fires and mudslides. Northern states have blizzards. Midwest has tornadoes. East coast, Gulf and Florida has hurricanes. We all can’t live in Arkansas.

            I don’t know the answer, but it seems to me that insurance companies pay huge amounts in salaries for CEOs and upper management. Maybe the companies could make a profit and yet pay claims if their CEOs werent making a killing

            Like

  2. Joe S says:

    Wow, those poor peoples lives were just washed away. I hope and pray for a complete recovery for them.

    Liked by 16 people

  3. kinthenorthwest says:

    Hoping this is not true-but the Democrats are so selfishly ruthless.
    Look Who’s Behind Left-Wing Hurricane Relief Scam
    http://americanactionnews.com/articles/look-who-s-behind-left-wing-hurricane-relief-scam#cbroydeoEmIBLt8b.99

    Liked by 6 people

  4. Will says:

    Is there a need for more outside volunteers or are there enough in the region already?

    Liked by 1 person

    • agesilaus says:

      My church is organizing a convoy down for Saturday. There is be plenty of others.

      BK

      Like

    • sundance says:

      Liked by 5 people

      • Jimmy Jack says:

        Curious Sundance. What safety issues are the biggest cause for not allowing people to return? Are there objective standards or is it decided locally?

        Like

        • prenanny says:

          Roads must be cleared, no live wires or gas leaks.
          Inspection of dwellings to make sure no corpses the orange spray paint you will see on houses has 4 areas that describe what was checked/found.
          As you can see from photos there is little to go back to in many areas, the power grid is gone and will be for some time, purely residential streets are not a top priority emergency services, government, gas stations, groceries and places like WMT and Lowes are.
          They need to prevent lookie-loos or looters.
          Residents will go to mourn their losses, Praise God that they are safe and take pictures for insurance.
          Mold and other shite is growing as we type on everything.
          Strict curfews will be in place.

          Like

          • Derek says:

            Yeah think what we had here in nola after katrina.. with the Xes .. thats what they will have to do … but damn 155 mph is just going to destroy almost anything.

            Like

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      I’m sure they’ll need volunteers for a long time but I’d think they are t ready for a large influx of people yet. My BIL does disaster relief work and I expect he’ll be leaving NC for FL soon.

      Like

  5. MM says:

    Heartbreaking seeing the destruction.
    I can’t imagine the horrors to come when search and rescue get into the area..
    Prayers for all in Mexico Beach…..
    Stay Safe Sundance……….

    Liked by 16 people

  6. L. Gee says:

    I’ve been waiting for your update all day today, Sundance, while praying for you, other rescue workers, and those affected. Thank you so much for giving us an on-the-grounds report! We appreciate everything you do!

    I saw one news report that said that the death toll is 6 so far. I suspect that to increase based on your report and images. Dear God in heaven, that is horrific!

    Liked by 9 people

  7. twingirls (@twingirls49) says:

    There’s a photo of an Air Force jet. Why would’t the Air Force fly that jet to another location?

    Like

    • rf121 says:

      It was just a display one typically found near the main gate.

      Liked by 3 people

    • JAS says:

      That jet was mounted on a stand, a pillar, as in a life size model. AFBs do that.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Monticello says:

        A real aircraft just gutted and mounted on a pillar for display. No engines etc.

        Liked by 1 person

        • blondegator says:

          In the Tyndall video, there were several jets still in the demolished hangar. I’d have guessed they would fly out everything that was airworthy. That surprised me.

          It’s so utterly sad to see people’s homes, boats, RV’s destroyed, the things that make their lives happy. So much rebuilding to do. I hope they all keep their heads in the game and think “safety first” at all times. A friend’s sister north of there put a nail through her hand today picking up debris. Things like that just make it all the more difficult to cope.

          Like

          • John Bosley says:

            Those planes were probably in for repair or outfitting.
            The older uncertified ones are refitted and used as unmanned flying drones for weapons practice.
            Like old Navy boats used as target practice.
            Tyndall AFB is home to the F22’s of which I am sure all were flown out of harms way.
            That base is going to require alot of repairs , I just hope the runways are serviceable.

            Like

      • Rhoda R says:

        In 1995, Eglin AFB left evacuating their planes until it was almost too late – I mean by minutes too late (take off conditions were marginal for the last of the planes) when Opal suddenly ramped up over night. I suspect that EVERY AFB base and Naval Air station have gotten their planes out in plenty of time since then. (Legend has it that Eglin evacuated their planes for Erin which later turned west and hit Pensacola instead of the Ft. Walton Beach area. And because the Eglin commanders responsible for that decision were chewed up by DC for ‘panicking’ they held off making the Opal evacuation decision until it was almost too late.)

        Liked by 2 people

        • annieoakley says:

          Sounds like the Military i grew up in.

          Liked by 1 person

        • cdquarles says:

          Yikes. Damned if you do and damned if you don’t. I remember Erin. By the time she got near me, she wasn’t much; unlike Ivan. I remember Opal, which was another big October storm. Opal passed well east of me, at the time. Family was still affected by her. I’ve seen what an F5/EF5 can do … trees stripped of leaves and bark or broken into pieces or both, grass stripped from the ground, strong buildings demolished and more. Mind you that’s just a few hundred yards wide. Where the eastern eye wall came ashore, you are going to have miles of that kind of destruction. Bah, DC jerks. My family has Army, Navy and Air Force vets in it.

          Like

    • agesilaus says:

      That’s an old display jet almost certainly gutted

      Like

  8. WeThePeople2016 says:

    In Southeast Virginia, it is pouring buckets of rain right now from the storm, and we are in a flash flood warning. Thousands are without power, including my daughter. I am holding my breath that we don’t lose power.

    Liked by 7 people

    • WeThePeople2016 says:

      We are also under a tornado warning.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Monticello says:

      It’s finally winding down over here in western parts of Virginia, rough day! Evidently it tracked a bit further west than predicted and compressed against the front moving in from the West. Lots of flooding. We’ve with out power since 1415 hrs but we have the old reliable Coleman stove, oil lamps, kerosene lanterns and plenty of flashlights and batteries. Hopefully it will abate soon for you guys east of us.

      Liked by 4 people

      • WeThePeople2016 says:

        Yes, I have family in your area who are without power and their basement is flooded as well. I hope that you don’t have too much damage and that you get power back soon.

        Like

  9. Rachelle says:

    I lived in Homestead when Andrew hit. The devastation was impressive, instant Dark Ages, but it did not have as much water as expected…went through too fast. About 2 weeks later a tropical storm came through and caused a lot of water damage because of missing roofs.
    The police were encouraging people to stay armed and vigilant because they didn’t have enough resources for all the problems. Most of the looters were black so far as we could tell, some swarming into damaged stores even before the wind died down. Some contractors who came in later were crooks who were after insurance money. I suspect they stole more than the looters. We evacuated. A few neighbors stayed and said they would never do that again…leave the targeted area, maybe leave the state, maybe go to center of the country. Andrew made quite an impression on everyone who stayed to greet him.

    Liked by 8 people

    • Akindole says:

      We were 40 miles North during Andrew, and coconuts (belonging to a neighbor that was warned) still blasted through the neighbor’s CBS walls. About 3 weeks later we towed a boat to the Keys and there were still couches and furniture on the interstate medians in Kendal.

      From what I saw near Florida City, “Looters will be shot”, spray painted on most of the houses, helped a bit to control the ferals–I suspect that artwork will re-appear up North soon. Cops can’t get into the areas, so you’re on your own in the dark.

      Ya learn a little bit from each one, and from what I saw of some of the shoddy structures starting to disintegrate before the eye wall hit, and the structural damage up there afterwards, they may end up like us down here grudgingly embracing the four words…”Miami Dade Building Codes.”

      Liked by 7 people

      • Rachelle says:

        Our neighborhood started armed citizen patrols at night. I phoned the police and asked if they could please just drive through once in awhile. They couldn’t but did say to keep up with the armed patrols at night. NBC did a movie about the storm some months later and got everything off except that there was a storm. Idiots.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Jimmy Jack says:

          I’m still shocked there was gun confiscation after Katrina in NOLA. I’d be terrified left behind unarmed and there’s no was police can patrol everywhere. It’s a good warning moving forward. Hide some weapons and ammo if you can in a confiscation situation.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Beverly says:

            N’Awlins is run by Leftwing Cretinous Totalitarian jackboot types, so they Always disarm the good guys and let the ferals (their clients) run wild.

            Shame, that. My daddy was a New Orleans boy, loved the city but said of the state, wryly, “There’s a reason they call it ‘Lousy-anna.”

            Liked by 1 person

          • 7delta says:

            Fortunately, New Orleans’ gun confiscation caused quite an uproar. The good news is that there were National Guard troops that refused to follow an order that infringed on citizens’ rights to self-defense. Of course, they didn’t get any acknowledgment from the MSM. The lockstep media’s narrative was that it was necessary to protect “responders.” 

            I’ve never participated in such rescues, but it’s logical to me that “help” makes a lot of noise announcing who they are and why they’re there, in hopes someone in distress will hear and answer. They listen carefully, then look for anyone who can’t. New Orleans was one of those “teachable moments” the left so loves. They clearly showed everyone else that the gun grabbers’ priorities are never about citizen safety, no matter how they meme it.

            Other good news is that a lot of people sued over the blatant infringement and won big. I don’t know if all got their personal property back, but some did.

            Liked by 1 person

      • blondegator says:

        I’m in your neighborhood….and was here for Andrew as well. We took all of our hurricane supplies, ice, gas, chainsaw, propane, etc. down to Kendall to some friends a few days later, and it took about two hours to find what was left of their house. No street signs, no landmarks, no stoplights, etc…just debris everywhere, and not a green leaf to be seen for miles. Policy numbers painted on houses, and “You Loot, We Shoot” on the front walls of homes with occupants.

        We also took our boat to the Keys about two months later, and returning it at night was black as pitch, not a light for miles and miles. Two months later! Then again, there were blue tarps here after Wilma for at least six months. That’s just the way hurricanes are.

        The one saving grace about this storm is that the direct hit was over relatively unpopulated areas, but the damage is going to be pretty epic. It will take a year or three before they’ve fully recovered from this storm. I truly hope people will learn that when you’re staring a monster like this in the face, LEAVE!

        Like

        • Jimmy Jack says:

          I got banned on twitter on a new account for saying looters should be shot on sight. That used to be the law. Now it’s hate speech.

          Like

        • IHTF place says:

          “Blue tarps for months after a storm” isn’t inevitable. It is, at least in part, a result of government action. That guy from Ohio isn’t going to pack up his tools, his camper, food and supplies for several weeks, and a couple of helpers, if he can’t charge a premium for the work he does while living self-sufficiently, away from family. They always blather about “unexpected negative consequences” of legislative action, but those consequences are only “unexpected” by idiots (often Dhimmicrats) who don’t think things through.

          YMMV, of course…

          Like

    • Somebody says:

      Looters 😡 We evacuated for Matthew, but many of my neighbors rode it out. Same thing, before the winds died down the looters were out. They were taking generators people were using…….well until they came to our cul-de-sac. My neighbors caught them, police were already in the neighborhood came quickly and arrested them. Happy ending, everyone got their generators back quickly.

      Liked by 7 people

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      I remember those photos in Newsweek. Apocalyptic. I was thinking of Andrew reading about Michael but didn’t know how similar the situation is until this piece. Gut wrenching.

      Like

  10. jahealy says:

    I realize life is more important than belongings, but I can’t imagine starting all over in one’s retirement years, or losing all of one’s meager belongings with no hope of replacing them. Prayers up for all who are suffering in Michael’s aftermath. 🙏

    Liked by 18 people

    • David C. Parker says:

      I grew up in Pensacola, five minutes by bicycle from the Bay. My Uncle lived out on Pensacola Beach, a barrier island. He lived less than 60 ft from and less than 4 ft above the high tide line. He always had an old beater P/U truck and a trailer and his wife had a fairly new Buick or Oldsmobile with a big trailer hitch. They kept a notebook that listed everything they owned that the insurance company couldn’t replace – pictures, documents, jewelry, etc.

      They could load that stuff into their trailer, hook it up to her car and be headed inland in an hour or less. They had to cross two bridges to get to the mainland so they didn’t wait till the last minute.

      He always said that you had to take the good with the bad in living at the coast. The bad was that roughly once or twice a generation there was going to be a better than even chance that your house was going to be floating in the Gulf. The good was that you got to live in just about the most beautiful spot, ever.

      You pays your money and takes your chances.
      DCP

      Liked by 18 people

      • jahealy says:

        Great story, DCP! I was trying to explain (unsuccessfully, I think) to my husband yesterday as Michael was doing his thing why people live in Florida “anyway.”

        Liked by 1 person

        • David C. Parker says:

          Yeah, I still live in Tallahassee. I work in NC and was supposed to fly back down there today, but we canceled that. The whole city is without power (100K people). My three kids live there and all three of the houses are without power. The generator is running. I decided that going down there today, I would just be adding to their problems and worries. We will head down next week.
          DCP

          Liked by 2 people

          • Deb Schroeder says:

            We live south of Tallahassee in Wakulla County and consider ourselves very lucky being only 12 miles inland. The storm moved so fast that we barely got any rain here just lots of gusty winds. Lost our power much earlier than with Hermine in 2016. Just got our power back on after two days out. Seeing lots of crews heading towards the coastal areas but still hearing that so much of the roads are either washed out (parts of Hwy 98) or with lots of debris that it is hard to get any where yet. Our cell service is still out as some of the cell towers were either damaged or the generators have run out of fuel.

            Like

            • David C. Parker says:

              Yeah. The problem in Tallahassee is the trees. LOTS of trees down on Power Lines. Another hurricane that hit years ago washed out part of US98 so badly that they moved that section some distance inland.
              DCP

              Like

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      I agree. My heart hurts for those on the margins especially older folks. The psychological impacts are awful for them.

      Liked by 2 people

      • cdquarles says:

        Not necessarily so, though. Old folks are often tougher than they look or than what too many think they are. Old folks, particularly, are survivors who have seen much and had to do stuff they wouldn’t always want to have to do; but did it. Praying for those in FL affected by this storm.

        I have come to believe that we should stop coddling our youth. They not only need to grow up; but sometimes have to be made to grow up and accept that reality just is and stuff happens, which doesn’t mean that it was anyone’s fault.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Curry Worsham says:

    I fear they will find bodies far from what’s left of their houses.

    Liked by 4 people

  12. Sandra-VA says:

    I immediately thought of Homestead, FL when I saw the first pictures from Mexico Beach…. devastating destruction!

    😦

    Liked by 3 people

  13. It’s time to up the ante when it comes to infrastructure.
    I’m always dumbfounded at the the flimsy houses and grid in potential disaster areas like this.
    Wooden utility poles are only seen in 3rd world countries and not the sign of a Number 1 economy.

    They will build it all up again and it will all be down again some years from now.. Rinse and repeat.
    Kind of crazy.

    If you visit a country like Germany they have their grid made of steel or underground all over the country. You never come across a wooden pole.

    Liked by 2 people

    • L. Gee says:

      First of all, we have plenty of non-wood poles all around the country, and lately I’ve seen cities replacing the wooden ones with more substantial, steel-constructed ones. As far as burying lines, some places are just not suitable for that.

      P.S. America’s not a third-world country, and no amount of wooden pole counting will make it so!

      Liked by 5 people

      • I know but somehow the steel poles are not where they are needed the most.
        Same goes for other structures where you know they wont stand a chance vs. a hurricane.
        And it truly -looks- like 3rd world in some parts and not like high end 2018. Not saying that that it -is- 3rd world 😉

        Like

        • blondegator says:

          FPL does it (wooden poles) on purpose! Believe it or not, a week before Hurricane Frances in 2004, I woke up on Saturday a.m., no coffee, no electricity, nada. I looked out the kitchen window, and the power pole between my house & the neighbors was down…on the neighbor’s 10 day old brand new red truck. It fell over from old age and dry rot. The entire bottom of the pole was rotted and eaten up by termites.

          When the repair guys finally showed up, I asked them about this. They told me flat out that they didn’t even bother to inspect the poles, it was just cheaper to replace them as they fell over. I was appalled, what if a family had been walking their dog or something in the early morning hours? CRAZY! And the same applies to ancient transformers. They patch them and patch them and patch them until finally there is no more patching. Too bad for you, customer, that your power goes out every time there’s a rain shower or a slight breeze. It’s appalling.

          Like

          • prenanny says:

            My cousin MHRIP was electrocuted by corroded wires while hanging cable wire in Florida, am very sad to see little has changed.
            Dog walkers, joggers bike folk could do visual inspections of poles on their path/route and call in anything troubling and neighborhood watch groups can add pole inspection as a monthly box to tick.
            Homeschoolers could do a project on bugs and energy.
            We are not invalids that rely on others to do everything for us be proactive and take care of your neighborhood. As we can see nobody else will ;(.

            Like

      • Walt says:

        Population density. In dense areas (Europe) that are substantially rebuilt (Europe again) it’s practical to put electric utilities underground. But doing so is several times more costly than stringing them in the air, especially when they’re already up there from the 1940’s or earlier and the area beneath has subsequently built up. With low population density as in much of the U.S. it’s simply unaffordable.

        The wooden utility poles through our rural property were put up in 1948 and most of them are original. The one at the house was new when we moved in and redid the electric service (requiring a new pole transformer) in 1998.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Beverly says:

          True! burying all of them underground is in most cases unnecessary and impractical for exactly those reasons.

          Besides, I have fond memories of being a little girl and riding in the back seat, going to the beach on 2-lane country roads (oh, bliss!) and the hypnotic rhythm of the swooping telephone lines along the way….

          Like

        • Cuppa Covfefe says:

          You don’t have water, natural gas, and sewage lines in the air, so what’s the big deal about burying power lines? As long as they’re not directly next to the gas lines, that is…

          And here in Germany we’ve had utilities underground for pretty much as long as utilities have existed. Including in sparsely-populated areas. It’s not so much a matter of cost, as a matter of “will”. Trenching equipment is better, faster, and cheaper than it’s ever been; and fault-detection equipment is better and cheaper, too. Finally, if you’re going to rebuild everything, it would be a good time to do it more “sustainably” (oh, how I hate that word, but it fits here).

          The only power failures I’ve experienced here in Germany in over 35 years (after many in Kalifornistan the previous 30+) were due to grid imbalance thanks to “renewable energy” (read: bird-choppers and solar panels) not providing consistent output…

          Like

    • Sharon says:

      “Wooden utility poles are only seen in 3rd world countries….”

      Sheesh. Who knew.

      Guess I better recheck my address cuz I have one of those wooden utility pools (with a transformer) in my back yard,

      Liked by 5 people

    • WSB says:

      This should all have been underground or integrated into smart sidewalks.

      Like

      • Underground cables. Expensive but worth it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • WSB says:

          If I could tell you how many times in a blackout, our electrical company tells us they are repairing the same equipment, my antique clock would still be working properly, our water heater would not have been compromised, and we would have gained about twelve days worth of bliss in the last five years.

          And, other than the tornadoes this last summer (we were not affected directly), we have not had any catastrophic events, other than snow.

          Liked by 1 person

        • blondegator says:

          Not sure that would work in coastal Florida, as the water table is really shallow. That’s why we have to pile drive 40′ pilings for swimming pools, so they don’t pop out of the ground.

          Like

    • sundance says:

      There is no dirt in Florida.

      it’s sand.

      Underground utilities don’t work well in Florida.

      There’s no dirt in Florida.

      Liked by 16 people

      • James Wilford Howard says:

        Underground utilities are fine in Florida sand. Problem is economic. More expensive to install, more expensive to maintain, and much more expensive to repair upon the inevitable failure.

        Like

        • Carrie says:

          I thought there was a big stand off between FPL and some other groups about whether it made financial sense to do it or not. One group said it paid for itself if Florida had even more more storm as bad as Andrew, the FPL disputed that. I can’t remember the details anymore. But I remember a lot of opinion columns were written about it going back and forth.

          Like

        • daughnworks247 says:

          We lost 7 million telephone poles in an ice storm in ’94, same year as we bought the B&B. We had the debate about underground service in our little city. Cost prohibitive, inaccessible, not worth it.

          Like

      • theresanne says:

        And, when you dig down 6 feet, you hit water. We used to make ponds all the time when we were kids, just by digging a shallow hole.

        Liked by 2 people

        • agesilaus says:

          Depends on where you are in the state. Down in S. Florida that may be true but I have a 40 ft deep pit behind my house that is bone dry here in N. Florida.

          Like

      • Rachelle says:

        I think our phone lines in Homestead were underground and they worked just a day or so after the storm. The phones would not work inside the house because everything was too wet but they would work if you went outside and plugged the phone directly into the connection that connected to the underground line. Didn’t know we could do that until a neighbor showed us. If you were there you know the problems of bugs coming in broken windows (also little frogs in our case) and soaked drywall falling from the ceiling in the night, and going over insurance papers and contracts by battery or Coleman light and cooking Beenie Weenies on a Coleman stove, and living rough for weeks.

        Like

      • Beverly says:

        And doesn’t the salt water get down in there? would play havoc with Electrical equipment, methinks.

        Like

    • Rhoda R says:

      Underground is not the answer to a lot of Florida simply because the sand moves and the water table is high. There are some concrete power poles in my city, I just hope that the foundation is deep enough to hold them upright in the sand if and when we get another direct hit.

      Liked by 1 person

    • James Wilford Howard says:

      These would not survive a near cat 5 hurricane either, says an electrical engineer.

      Liked by 2 people

    • nimrodman says:

      Reasonable points, Seb.

      But that photo of nice steel towers is a compelling visual but isn’t necessarily support for your main point.

      Those likely are high-tension, high-voltage transmission lines. Not neighborhood power distribution.

      America uses those too. Flying by airplane, one can look down on the landscape and notice cleared, grassed utility corridors cut through forests – they’re utility right-of-ways for long runs of those lines and towers.

      I grew up with one of those towers in my back yard.

      In the 50s

      Liked by 1 person

    • JX says:

      Don’t be ridiculous. That photo is of “high tension” lines, high voltage long distance distribution. Those are not for residential drops.

      Like

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      Our Marshall Plan tax dollars paid for a lot of that modern infrastructure in Germany.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Beverly says:

        True!

        Like

        • JohninMK says:

          That Marshall Plan money was not a gift, it was a loan and came with 3% interest. We in the UK finally paid our loan off in the 1990s. I suspect that the view of the ‘benevolence’ of the USA at that time is quite different this side of the Atlantic to your side, WW2 and the years after were ruthlessly exploited by bankers for profit.

          Like

          • JX says:

            We saved Europe twice, spending our blood and fortune. When Europe has its next family squabble we won’t bleed for you. How’s that sound?

            Like

            • Beverly says:

              You said it, JX. We could have left them to deal with Hitler on their own and concentrated on the Empire of Japan, which was plenty.

              Like

          • Alligator Gar says:

            Geesh, dang Pom’s got a hair up his caboose, no? My 1st mortgage carried 14% interest. 3% is a steal to get your entire continent rebuilt. And then you Euro-azzholes have the temerity to act superior to we in the US? The opportunity cost of lending f-ing Europe and Japan $$$$ was the modernization of our own country. Never again!

            Like

  14. lettruthspeak says:

    If they knew it was coming why weren’t the planes moved. Why is anyone surprised with hurricane damage? We have over a century of proof of the devastation hurricanes can cause, but we are all supposed to act surprised when they do what we know they can do. It’s silly. I’m not belittling what people suffer throught, but come on. “Twas a foolish man who built his house upon the sand.” It’s beyond frustrating to listen to this every decade or so. I get that people lose everything, but when the big one comes in California, are we going to be shocked?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yeah the infrastructure in these places is akin to some poor places in Africa or Asia pacific.
      It’s shameful. You see these houses and facilities who you know beforehand that they will be destroyed.
      Some might say its insensitive but right now is the time to talk about it and act about it.
      This is where the gov needs to leverage money and laws instead of putting it time and time again into disaster funds and insurance.
      Trump already lowered the red tape a lot. Time to change something right now!

      Like

      • Somebody says:

        Florida’s building codes have been strengthened since hurricane Andrew a couple of times. Many of the homes in this area pre-dated those codes.

        Like

        • Rachelle says:

          The builder makes a difference too. A community called Country Walk (I think built by Lennar, but maybe not) was wiped clean by Andrew, nothing left but concrete slabs but another development nearby, by a different builder, looked from the air as if Andrew never went by at all

          Liked by 1 person

      • 7delta says:

        Seb, modern building codes are certainly important, but in a really bad blow, even well built structures can be swept away or severely damaged. Just depends… Understanding the history of many of these coastal areas is also important. People in southern U.S. States tend to be history oriented. I’m not talking about flags. I’m talking family and community history. Maybe long hot summer days have traditionally given our fore-bearers, then us, more time reflect on how we got there, while sitting under a shade tree with a paper fan from the church or a local mortuary. That kind of history is passed down as reverently as Grandma’s biscuit recipe. It’s also why beach communities preserve old houses…until nature takes it out.

        When Hugo hit the SC coast in ’89, we had a wonderful little beach community near Charleston, with big old wooden houses that had been in the same families for many generations. The outside walls were mainly the inside walls. They were very well kept, but the thought of modernizing was nearly sacrilegious. Pawley’s Island was proud of it “shabby elegance” and worked to retain its original charm. Hugo didn’t care. Lots of houses built to code now. Old Pawley’s is history.

        The houses on Pawley, like many in small old beach communities all over the Southern coastlines, were built a century or more prior to THE Big Blow that took them out and for the same reasons. The houses weren’t intended to be hurricane worthy. The ones on Pawley’s, like other southern beach communities, were built in horse and buggy days by people who lived in Charleston or in the Low Country as summer homes to escape the inland heat and diseases that spread during hot wet summers in populous areas. If a storm came, they expected some or all would be completely wiped out. They rebuilt. It was cheap. Beach real estate was cheap then too. Entire communities, with opera houses, stores, etc. sprang up for the summer folks. Few people lived there year around, but when they did, generally they lived in “better” built permanent homes, usually away from the beach on farm land.

        One such community, built away from the oceanfront, behind marshland, was wiped out on Edisto Island, SC, in a hurricane in the late 1800’s. It wasn’t rebuilt (post Civil-War.) After that, houses were rebuilt on the beachfront and the surrounding areas. Most of those old spartan wood frame houses have been replaced by million dollar, very well built houses now, usually in the McMansion Beach Style that’s unique to their specific southern coastal area. During Hugo, some of the existing to-code houses on Edisto were damaged severely, a few were lost and never seen again, as were some of the old ones, but both old and new generally fared better than poor Pawley’s and other houses, built to code, that took the direct hit. Edisto was on the left side of Hugo, about 60 miles south of Charleston. Just depends.

        Perhaps these old houses look like 3rd world shacks to some, but I assure you the history of those simple structures were worth more to the owners and the community than a brand new hurricane-rated fort, with all the modern bells and whistles. They know eventually THE Big One will come. For as long as nature permits, they love these physical representations of their history. Now how smart all people are when it comes to evacuation…just depends. Sorry for the length. History and culture, by their very nature, tend to be long in the making. :>)

        Like

        • Beverly says:

          7Delta: been going to our Blessed Isle since I was a baby, back in 19__… 😉

          Great thing about the old beach bungalows: they were built on pilings, which gets you through about 35 years worth of storms; and they were furnished with cheap but comfortable beach furniture, and inexpensive dishes, etc. With the idea that you don’t want to put anything in the beach house that you can’t watch floating out to sea without crying. Same thing for the houses themselves: wooden, basic, and not expensive to rebuild. Sometimes you could even retrieve one from the salt marsh after a ‘cane and get it back up on the pilings. Might be a bit whomperjawed, but hey, it’s the beach!

          An oceanfront lot on the island in the 1950s would cost you about $5000. Now it’s more like a million. I really hate the beachfront McMansions: they’re hermetically sealed against the sea air and sounds of the surf: why not build them on the mainland?
          Crazy.

          Liked by 1 person

          • 7delta says:

            Exactly, Beverly. The 20th Century brought a stronger middle class. Ordinary people discovered “vacations.”  More people bought a plot on the beach, then put up simple bungalows. The wind, sun and at least a ton of sand in every nook, cranny and bed every summer, wet towels and bathing suits, and the threat of a big blow made them practical. And, since most people no longer spend entire summers at the beach, the houses became rentals when the family wasn’t using it to help offset rising costs.

            The growth that brought increasing property values, the need for more essential services/personnel, businesses, higher taxes, building codes, expensive insurance… The expense also effects permanent residents. For many, it’s been home for generations, but their incomes are too ordinary or limited to keep older homes up to code or to even own a house. Coastal living and property ownership is expensive now.

            There’s something to be said for both sides of the argument. With more people living permanently on the coast and industries/businesses locating closer to ports, codes are especially important, but it’s sad to see the simple family-oriented beach become so complicated and commercialized it’s lost its unique charm.

            The old beach communities are fading away, replaced by upscale hotels, condos and multi-million-dollar houses that look like they were copied from an issue of Southern Living. They’re beautiful, but in their own unique way, so were the weathered bungalows, set high on pilings, with added-on rickety showers, big porches, oddball furniture, open windows, standing fans and kitchens stocked with old mismatched plates, utensils and big boiling pots. I admit I like modern comforts, but I still love the old houses where electricity, plumbing and an electric stove/frig was all the convenience you needed. It’s the beach! We had plenty of sand to dig, waves to jump, crabs to lure with chicken necks, sweet, briny oysters to crack, shrimp to net and big dinners with island fresh produce. And, nothing was ruined by dropping my wet, sandy bathing suit or towel on the floor, until I could hang it on an outside rail…or suffer the wrath of Mama, who didn’t care it was just an old beach house somebody else owned, you were to be a good guest. My dad was even known to find a hardware store to repair screens, locks and burned out stove eyes. We were good renters. LOL.

            Great memories, Beverly. Thanks for sharing yours. We must have played on the same beach.

            Like

    • WSB says:

      The one jet shown upside down was a gutted display plane. I would have hoped the real ones were flown out of the area.

      Like

    • Somebody says:

      It was an old plane up on concrete as a display at the base gate. Pretty much all air bases have similar displays. The real planes were flown out ahead of the storm.

      Like

    • Derek says:

      These were planes mounted to poles as displays i think not actual functional planes.. many airforce bases have that as an entrance welcome.. someone ckrrect mw if im wrong

      Like

  15. starfcker says:

    And yet I’m still reading stories in the media about how the storm was overhyped. Like you said, it’s incomprehensible. And even more incomprehensible if you’re stupid. I’m actually reading people saying that this was not a major hurricane. After the fact. This thing was still a category 3 when it crossed into Georgia. This is an Andrew type event.

    Liked by 5 people

    • visage13 says:

      That is because people who do not live in a hurricane state, like FL, don’t know what the heck they are talking about. Last year, Irma came though Orlando as a CAT 1 and I was terrified. I cannot imagine a cat 4 almost 5 hurricane. I will tell you this the next time a hurricane comes near me i am flying out for a few days.

      Here is what people do not understand, who do not live here. I moved here in 1982, the first time I ever remember hearing about a hurricane was Andrew. After, that there was a tropical storm or two and then I moved. While away, Charlie & Frances hit. It is ALL cyclical. The media acts like this is something new because of “climate change” it isn’t it is just now were are in a cycle of storms and then for the next 5-10 years there could be nothing.

      I pray that people didn’t ride out the storm in Mexico Beach because if they did, they probably did not live to tell the tale.

      Liked by 5 people

      • blondegator says:

        And the cycles have a name, El Nino and La Nina, the prevaling currents in the Pacific Ocean. This year was a transitional year from La Nina to El Nino…….which is good. I expect we’ll be back to very few storms for the next eight or ten years. At least I hope so.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Beverly says:

        Carolina girl here — you’re right, Visage. We count on getting walloped every 35 years or so, regular as clockwork. Been going on for as long as the ocean’s been there.

        Liked by 1 person

  16. L. Gee says:

    This looks like the aftermath of Ike where the barrier islands were swept clean of all but one or two badly damaged houses. Lots of unnecessary deaths in that one, too, when people foolishly decided to ride out the storm.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Minnie says:

      When Sandy (yes, it WAS a hurricane although TPTB termed it “Super Storm”, so as to make it difficult to submit insurance claims) hit New York several years ago, large portions of Howard Beach and the Rockaways were completely decimated – everything swept clean 😐

      Like

  17. VickyD says:

    My brother-in-law, a USAF retiree and Purple Heart recipient, has lived for several years in Panama City just north of Tyndall AFB. He and his family had very wisely evacuated to Birmingham, AL before the storm hit. Of course, they’re not able to return home yet, and I pray to God his home has been spared. Stay well, Frank, stay well.

    Liked by 8 people

  18. Red says:

    Absolutely heart breaking. Thank you Sundance for ALL that you do. My first Hurricane was Betsy, I was a little girl. We moved to Lake Charles, La from the Gulfport/Biloxi area the year before Camille hit. We traveled back through Gulfport/Biloxi a year or so after Camille to get to my Grandmother’s house……it was surreal, even after a year, just absolutely unbelievable…. my heart breaks and all of my prayers for these my fellow Americans.

    Liked by 3 people

    • The Tundra PA says:

      I lived in Gulfport when Camille hit. August of ’69, about to start my senior year of high school. It changed our lives.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Red says:

        Wow, I can’t imagine what you went through Tundra, I was about 7 or so when Betsy hit, we had one or two more smaller storms. Betsy scared me to death. Later we moved from Louisiana to SE Texas had a couple of small ones there, then I went back to Louisiana. We got Andrew after it wiped out FL. 100 MPH winds, took out some trees, lost power for a week, no water for a few days….August in Louisiana….uhgggg……but Camille? I remember watching the news, what a nightmare….the small pines grew in the direction that the wind blew them, I can’t imagine going through that….

        Liked by 1 person

        • The Tundra PA says:

          Camille was massive. There just aren’t words big enough for it. What I remember most was the torential, endless rain, and the thundering wind. It was like standing next to a freight train going past at 60 miles per hour for about 3 hours. Our house remained intact, thank goodness. But the storm surge was about 20 feet. We lived on Gulfport Lake, which connected directly to Biloxi Bay. We were on a ridge about 15 feet above the lake, and water filled our downstairs above my head. Snakes, nutria, and all manner of disgusting creatures were swimming in it. My brand new car (a sweet little VW fastback) was submerged in brackish water, and was totaled. Big pine trees were snapped off halfway up, and entire pecan groves wiped out. The price of pecans was sky high for years afterward. Yeah, it was intense. Took years to rebuild, and the Gulf Coast was never the same.

          Like

  19. JAS says:

    I flew over Homestead on my way to the Caribbean for a business trip less than a week after Hurricane Andrew. It was a crystal clear morning. From about 25000 feet the sight was incredible. There was nothing left, and I mean NOTHING. Not even debris.

    The only thing I could see out the window that told me there were homes down there before the hurricane were the swimming pools. That was the only thing that survived. Everything else was just flat light brown earth, No debris even visible.

    That one was a lot worse than Michael. At least from 25000 feet.

    Liked by 2 people

    • sundance says:

      I was 25,000 feet closer.

      Liked by 12 people

      • JAS says:

        Touche 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

      • Carrie says:

        My family was lucky, we had recently moved from Saga Bay in Cutler Ridge (nicknamed Soggy Bay for a reason) to Pinecrest. My parents still lost part of the roof which flew down the street and landed in a tree with no leaves (really weird photo). That was the odd part, there were no leaves and even the blades of grass were gone and the yard was just full of other people’ s debris ( a lot of pool chairs, swan chlorinators, etc.) And the house had no electricity for 2 and half months. I was in Boston watching the news from school and I kept yelling at the TV screen- oh my gosh- Homestead, Homestead! The newscasters kept talking about how lucky Miami was and glossing over how it would impact the other areas…

        Like

      • Joe S says:

        Devastating, and I can’t imagine it. I lived in Coconut Creek at the time, and had friends in South Miami. But what they described, and what we saw on TV from Homestead-wow-just wow!

        Like

      • sobriquet4u says:

        We may have been neighbors…I’m glad you survived.

        Like

      • Aubergine says:

        Me, too.

        My brother-in-law at that time had moved to the area a week prior to the storm. I lived in Fort Myers, so he and his kids came across the state to ride out the hurricane. The next day, I kept the kids while he went to see what had survived. The answer? Not much.

        The whole family went over a few days later to salvage what we could. I have never seen such devastation. I have been through several BIG tornadoes, but that is nothing compared to what I saw after Andrew. Complete, utter destruction. It is almost unimaginable what nature can do.

        I live far away from there now. God bless you, Sundance, for what you are doing to help those people. They need all the help they can get.

        Like

    • sobriquet4u says:

      We were enroute to our new base of transfer. Homestead AFB. We decided to delay our arrival for a couple of days to visit relatives. We watched as Andrew devastated Homestead…there was no base, no base housing no nothing. Our household goods had arrived before us and we realized we had lost everything we owned. Stranded and in limbo the Air Force advised us to check into the nearest base to await orders. They called back after two days to let us know our household goods had been diverted to a storage facility in northern Miami. I think about what would have happened if we had went straight to Homestead and checked into our home.

      Liked by 15 people

      • sundance says:

        Wow. That’s divinely inspired luck.

        Liked by 5 people

        • sobriquet4u says:

          I consider my life just that. 1972 – 8 months pregnant living on the banks of the Susquehanna River in Havre de Grace MD. – Agnes blows through and the Conowingo dam is about to overflow. National Guard knocks on our door at midnight asking us to evacuate. We were young, poor military with no place to go. He stays at the door ready to evacuate us if the dam goes. Blessed we were.
          1979 – stationed in Washington, D.C. during The Presidential Snow Storm – protesting farmers with tractors helped clear the streets. Blessed again
          1982 – arrived at Altus AFB Oklahoma the day after two tornadoes ripped across the base. We pulled into the gate and witnessed devastation. Blessed again.
          Snowstorms and earthquakes in Alaska for 10 years
          2011 – Massive Haboob in Phoenix –
          Now living in the N.E. corner of Florida’s Big Bend for last 5 yrs…sigh. They told me no hurricanes had been here in 100 years.

          Like

  20. Sunshinesam says:

    My grandparents are in Gordon, Al (Houston County.). Their town and surrounding towns are devastated. My uncle took pictures. It’s terrible. Their house made it, but not any of the trees. Trees have demolished almost every vehicle they own. My grandma has stage four breast cancer, we are hoping she does not run out of oxygen.

    On a lighter note, my aunt was with them, and the eye of Hurricane Charlie went over her too. Now, no one wants to be anywhere near her when the next one comes. Lol

    Prayers for all the communities impacted by Michael.

    Liked by 10 people

  21. Matt Transit says:

    Almighty and ever living God, In your mercy, hear our prayers for the victims and survivors of everyone affected by this hurricane.
    Grant unto those who’s lives in this world are ended, prompt admittance into Thine Heavenly Kingdom.
    And we further ask for those who still walk this earth, amidst tragedy and devestation, in this vale of tears, a steadfast Hope, and temporal assistance to do thy Holy Will.
    We ask this in Jesus’ Name. Amen

    Liked by 16 people

  22. sundance says:

    Liked by 7 people

  23. Hurricane proof Infrastructure needed. No way around it. Period.

    Like

  24. sundance says:

    Liked by 2 people

    • andyocoregon says:

      Imagine how eerie it would be to be living in one of the few still intact houses in a neighborhood where there is no electricity, no cell or landline phone service, no restaurants or fast food outlets, no open gas stations and no other basic services.

      Liked by 1 person

      • prenanny says:

        Imagine their view when all the houses around them are rebuilt on stilts to 100 year standards. They should buy the lots on either side of them if they ever want to see the sun again!

        Liked by 1 person

  25. osugagal says:

    My husband was in the Air Force for 20 years. All of our long term friends are Air Force retirees and many of them live in the Panhandle, from Pensacola, through Panama City, to Mexico Beach. All live inland about 5- 10 miles. All evacuated and so far all have reported their homes are still standing, including our friends from Mexico Beach. No one knows when it will be okay to return, but all know it will be a long time. Most all of us had friends stationed at Homestead, many of whom still had blue tarps and damaged houses 18 months after Andrew. Thank you to Sundance and all of the Treepers for updates and prayers.

    Liked by 3 people

  26. Chickficshun says:

    I’ve been busy today and haven’t had much time to surf the net (dont have cable tv). Has PDT been involved communicating info or speaking about the hurricane. I’m concerned the media will do a Katrina on him. I hope he gets down there to show the people he cares.

    Like

    • osugagal says:

      The difference is that the Governor of Florida knows how to respond – totally unlike the dumb bunnies who were running Lousiana and New Orleans when Katrina went through. Gov Scott ordered evacuations, put resources in place, and has the recovery already underway. The Katrina aftermath disaster is the fault of the democrats- it was not the fault of President Bush.

      Liked by 11 people

    • Blind no longer says:

      Chick, people LOVE President Trump in the Panhandle, or redneck riviera as we call it! Before the election, there were Trump signs everywhere, every bumper sticker..Trump Pence. They know he cares about them.

      Liked by 6 people

      • Chickficshun says:

        i know the pandandle loves PDT. The panhandle is very important area for Florida voting. I hope election voting sites get spooled up and running for election day.

        I’m from Florida, been thru 5 major hurricanes. While not on par with this devastation from Michael, the power outages and clean up is a terrible toll on morale. I hope PDT gets down there and brings some love to the people.

        Liked by 3 people

  27. Blind no longer says:

    I have been glued to the TV and any social media since Wed. I am happy to report that our house is still there, with the roof in tact! We had a friend who stayed, and he was able to ride his bike over, and send us a short video! We lost our fence and a palm tree, but other than a lot of debris, it looks like we came out so blessed. Some of neighbors were not so lucky! 5 miles east of us, looks like lots of destruction on the east end of the beach. They won’t let us in the area to check on our house yet, but just knowing it’s still standing, is a God send.
    I am praying so hard for the people in Mexico Beach, and all the Military members and their families! Tyndall AFB looks like it was totally devastated. My husband and I would sit on the beach and watch the “fly boys” come over the beach with an occasional turn and burn!
    I am praying for everyone who is involved in the clean up and helping all those people who have just had a life changing event! God Bless them all. Makes you realize what’s really important, when you might possibly lose everything!

    Liked by 12 people

    • MM says:

      Glad to hear “Daddy’s Money” weathered the storm…………
      Loved the name of the beach home BNL……….

      Like

      • Blind no longer says:

        Thanks MM!!! I threw my hands in the air to praise Almighty God above when we got the video and knew it was still there! It’s so weird to see all the landmarks we know so well destroyed. When we were putting the plywood up, I was telling my husband, it’s hard to imagine the possibility it might not be here tomorrow!

        Like

        • Melanie says:

          Plus, you are extra blessed that the temperature in the Pan Handle this morning was in the Sixties.
          Friends down in The Keys, who were not allowed to return to their homes after Irma last year, eventually came back to tons of Mold!

          Like

  28. Minnie says:

    First and foremost, our fervent prayers for the safety and well-being of the approx. 280 people who chose to stay in their homes during this storm.

    Mother Nature is brutally unpredictable.

    Utter destruction of countless structures while others appear untouched.

    I had to manually enlarge the pictures to clearly see many buildings lifted off their foundations and yet, again, others appear intact.

    God be with all struggling to be found and for the Search & Rescue Teams there to help them.

    Totally surreal.

    Liked by 2 people

  29. osugagal says:

    Dear Blind: “makes you realize what’s really important, when you might possibly lose everything”. You are so right. We had to evacuate Jacksonville Fl for Hurricane Floyd. 18 hours before making landfall, and about 12 hours before making a turn towards North Carolina, we were under mandatory evacuation since we lived on a barrier island. It does make you stop and think when you realize that the only things you can take with you are things that can fit in a car. You quickly realize that their are only a very very few precious things that matter.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Minnie says:

    One more thing – where does it all go?

    The entire contents of a family’s home, appliances, furniture, personal effects, automobiles, blown away, the ground clean as a slate – where does it go?

    Reality check if I ever have thoughts of riding out a storm on Long Island – we stick out into the Atlantic like a sore thumb 😐

    Like

    • Rachelle says:

      If Andrew is any guide a lot of it ends up in a gigantic garbage pile. I think we called it Mount Andrew as it grew day by day. Maybe still there or perhaps levelled into land fill.

      Like

    • David C. Parker says:

      I don’t remember the name of the hurricane, but the last one that hit Panama City Beach (before Michael), had a storm surge that hit a row of beachfront hotels/motels. These were not high rise units, they were two or three stories. The winds took the roofs off and then the water came in through the glass sliding doors that faced the water.

      When the surge withdrew, it took EVERYTHING with it. Glass and wooden doors, windows, furniture, everything. It even took the carpet that was glued down to the concrete floors. All that was left was a three sided concrete box, 2 or 3 stories tall with no roof. It looked like Berlin, circa 1945.

      DCP

      Like

  31. Texian says:

    Mexico Beach.. 280+.. There had to be survivors out there.. There now may be some MIA’s..

    I wonder if rescue teams did at least a few flyovers over the waters up to a few miles off the coastline offshore..

    This should be an immediate first duty included in Job 1.. Coast Guard choppers scanning the coastline offshore.. What if a person held onto their floatie.. And is still out there.. (I’m not kidding either).

    Like

    • sundance says:

      Liked by 3 people

      • wheatietoo says:

        It’s amazing how many structures survived, with little or no damage.

        Maybe that is because of newer construction?
        But some of them look like older construction, too.

        The fact that Michael was a fast-moving storm could also be a factor.
        It didn’t slowly grind away as it moved onshore.

        We see that out here in the plains with tornadoes.
        The fast-moving ones often skip over some structures while wiping out others.
        The grinders, which are slow-moving, scour the countryside and leave nothing unharmed.

        This was a devastating storm, though…even though it was fast moving.
        Those poor people.

        We should probably be bracing ourselves for the death toll to climb, as people search through the wreckage.

        Liked by 2 people

        • MM says:

          Wheatie have you seen any post from Alligator Gar??
          He was trying to get his family to leave the night before the storm hit but his father didn’t want to leave… He said his father was suffering from dementia…
          He was worried about leaving his horse and chickens behind…
          I hope he made it okay..
          Little worried because he said he lived in a mobile home…..

          Liked by 4 people

          • wheatietoo says:

            No, MM…haven’t seen anything from Alligator Gar.
            But then I haven’t read through all the comments on every thread.

            I remember that post from him…so heart wrenching.
            Let’s hope he and his family made it through okay, including his animals.

            Liked by 4 people

          • deqwik2 says:

            I have thought about him too. Hoping he will check in with us but it may be a while before we hear from him due to the communications being down.

            Liked by 1 person

            • prenanny says:

              He never mentioned what town he was in did he?
              Can’t get him off my mind either.

              Like

              • deqwik2 says:

                I found a post from the other night & he said he was in Wakulla.

                Alligator Gar says:
                October 10, 2018 at 3:29 am
                I’m in inland Wakulla. I got my eye on this thing, but I’m not near enough to even a sink hole to ………

                Liked by 2 people

              • deqwik2 says:

                Here is another one that has been on my heart & wondering if they are okay.

                carolweekleylmt says:
                October 9, 2018 at 11:57 pm
                Good Lord! I left Mexico Beach yesterday for a stopover in Georgia before heading to ATL then JFK and Israel. My sister, bro-in-law and a few neighbors are staying in the townhouses where we live which is only a quarter mile from the beach. I don’t think they realize what’s coming at them.

                Liked by 3 people

      • andyocoregon says:

        I heard only about half the residents of Mexico Beach evacuated.

        Liked by 1 person

        • IMO says:

          Wow didn’t know about half residents in Mexico Beach stayed behind.
          Originally Pensacola was the direct hit than it was changed to Panama Beach. I’ve got family in Pensacola, at the last minute they decided to stay.

          Like

  32. Judith says:

    I hope these residents were evacuated to safety! Outsiders can’t yet navigate their way in, so they are on their own right now. Category 4- Oh my God!

    After Superstorm Sandy, the locals all stepped up to organize relief efforts. It was neighbor helping neighbor, going door-to-door, seeing who was still there, and what their immediate needs were.

    First responders were homeless like everyone else. There were two hundred displaced families from our school district alone.

    My heart goes out to the unfortunate people whose homes, lives, and livelihoods were devastated by this powerful storm. God speed! May they be comforted and protected by His Angels until outside help arrives!

    Liked by 3 people

  33. Doreen Scott says:

    John Stossel did a story on the large beach front homes that get destroyed by hurricanes. He owns one himself. He said they are vacation homes of the well to do and when they are destroyed the goverment pays to fix them. He said the goverment paid for his. That’s why they continue to build them so close to the shore.

    Like

    • Somebody says:

      The bulk of the cost falls on private insurance. Yes many well to do live on the beach, but this wasn’t limited to ocean front houses. Many of the homes destroyed belonged to people of modest means. Stossel often takes liberties with his stories.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jimmy Jack says:

        Plus in smaller beach towns there are many average folks moving modestly. I’d guess Mexico Beach is like that.

        Like

      • Doreen Scott says:

        My sister’s house was flooded with a ten foot storm surge during the no name storm and she did not have flood insurance. FEMA paid for all her repairs and she never had to pay anything back. A friend of my husband sold her house on the shore in our little town for 1 million so living on the beach is not cheap.

        Like

        • Doreen Scott says:

          Looked up the price of real estate on the beach in Mexico beach and a lot goes for about a hundred and seventy five thousand on the beach.The homes inland made it better thru the storm because they did’ t get the storm surge.

          Like

  34. wheatietoo says:

    Storm chaser Mike Theiss discovered this train blown off it’s wheels, last night as he was making his way through the aftermath:


    .
    Then today, there was footage taken in the daylight which shows how long the train was:


    .
    Description under one of these videos says that this was in Panama Beach…but doesn’t elaborate further on the location.

    This wasn’t just a de-railing…the cars were snapped off of their wheels.
    So this is a stark testament of just how powerful this storm was, when it came ashore.

    Liked by 5 people

  35. Suzanne says:

    As we pray for all those people and their families it’s an additional sadness that along with their homes, possessions and memories they have lost something special and unique… Mexico Beach was “old” Florida

    Liked by 7 people

    • Martell says:

      Yes, old Florida.
      I live in Miami. We went through Andrew and several assorted hurricanes since then. I have been dreaming and planning a vacation in the cape san blas, port Joe, Mexico Beach area. The area is so stunning and seems so uncrowded and laid back. Its heartwrenching to see such beauty destroyed. I pray for them.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      That’s what I thought. I hate to hear that I really do.

      Liked by 2 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      So true, “Old Florida”. My grandfather was retired CPO out of Pensacola, lived in Escambia County and he accumulated a mini-empire of about 80 rental houses. Summers there were a joy. In high school, late 70’s, I can remember when my parents took the plunge and bought a place in Sandestin, “Overbuilt”, my grandfather would snear, “too commercial”. Grandpa and I would slip off to Apalachicola Bay, little fishing camp he had, all the time, camp stoves, lantern at night, and after a few days, your body falls into the rhythm of the sea… glorious memories of poker games with his buddies, endless fishing, seabirds, sunsets, and terrific food.
      About 20yrs later, after the death of my grandmother, a girlfriend invited me to spend 6 weeks at her mom’s place in Destin, for the summer. Girlfriend was younger and struggled financially. Our kids were the same age and I missed the Gulf. I packed toilet paper/granola/apples/first aid kit, and $500 worth of groceries and took a chance, not knowing what to expect when we arrived at her mom’s house. Well, mom’s house was a $7million lux extravaganza, 2 kitchens, pool, phone in the elevator, not what I expected.
      Today, almost another 20yrs later, I would prefer the little fishing camp, endless poker, hunting for oysters, the smell of eggs and bacon – outside, neighbors who were novel worthy, and the deep sleep that only occurs in a place like “Old Florida”.

      Liked by 2 people

  36. alex graham says:

    Heading back to PCB on Saturday. Power is starting to come back on. Looting has been reported in Lynn Haven. Im sure it’s happening everywhere. My boss’s dog chomped on a looters leg last night.

    Liked by 2 people

  37. Dave says:

    I was able to volunteer after Andrew did his job 100 miles south of us. Worked at the South Florida Fairgrounds loading trucks that were headed down there. Lots of us worked as hard as possible and it was quite an emotional experience to know we were able to help those poor folks. I’ve spent a chunk of my life working at the Turkey Point Nuclear Plant in Florida City, and lived down there in Homestead area. The destruction of homes and businesses was total, but not unexpected. However, I couldn’t believe all the damage to Plant structures, because I knew what went into building them. We were told that Andrew spawned off an estimated 2,000 tornadoes! That seemed kind of high, but all hurricanes do spin them off. Hope to volunteer for Michael too. Thank you Sundance for keeping us informed and motivated!

    Liked by 1 person

  38. distracted2 says:

    This is difficult to see and I’m afraid we haven’t even begun to see the destruction. The reported number of people who didn’t evacuate is 50% in some communities. I pray that is not true for Mexico Beach.

    I will be praying for all affected as they begin to rebuild their lives. And I’ll be praying that those who survived in Mexico Beach will be rescued quickly.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. JX says:

    As devastating as this is, the storm struck one of the least populated areas of the state. Irma was initially forecast to be a strong 4/possible 5 rolling up the east coast or the spine of the state. There’s approximately 5 million people in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties. Imagine Michael’s devastation in a population center like that. Apart from the destruction of buildings and difficult mobility, think about the health consequences of millions of people lacking utilities for weeks.

    Michael is a warning to everyone what these storms can do. Heed the warning.

    Like

  40. andyocoregon says:

    I just cannot fathom having to evacuate my home with just a few days advance warning only to discover it was totally destroyed in the hurricane. So many hurricane victims have no home to return to and all their belongings are packed into their vehicles. Many now have no job, no place to live and no prospects for a brighter future.
    I always fees sad for wildfire victims and storm victims who lose their homes. Many times insurance, if they had it, doesn’t begin to cover their losses. And even if their homes are covered by insurance, where do they go to live and how do they earn money while it takes months or years to rebuild?
    If I was wealthy, which I’m not, I’d contribute to these unfortunate victims. About the only thing we can afford to do is regularly donate large bags of dog food to the local Humane Society.

    Like

    • prenanny says:

      FEMA ( read taxpayers ) put up the Puerto Ricans for a year in hotels.
      They don’t do trailers anymore after all the problems with the scammers post Katrina.

      Like

  41. Whitehall says:

    When I moved to the Florida Panhandle in 1956, the locals passed on the ancient wisdom that no one but fools and damned Yankees built on the beach. Sooner or later a hurricane would arrive and wipe it all away.

    That changed when LBJ got federal flood insurance passed so that taxpayers in North Dakota and Arizona could share the financial risks against hurricanes for beach homes in Florida and Texas (as examples.)

    Certainly every hurricane making landfall causes personal tragedies but we’ve created moral hazard with our flood insurance program. Invest in property on the beach and there’s a non-trivial risk it will be destroyed. If you as investor carried that risk, rather than sharing it with innocents, there would be less death and destruction for hurricanes.

    What next? Federal health and life insurance for bungee jumpers, race car drivers, and sky divers?

    Liked by 3 people

    • Bulldog84 says:

      Flood insurance has changed in recent years, as have building codes in many of the hard-hit areas. We lived on a barrier island, and you can’t build unless you use concrete pilings of a certain width and height. In some areas, the risk is high enough that the insurance is simply unavailable; if you build, you self-insure.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Broadsman says:

        Perhaps we’re back to the “fools and damn Yankees” as owners of high risk beach properties. But maybe we’ve become so rich that too many of us can gamble with losing the price of a residential structure.

        As for me, should I return to my home town of Pensacola, I’d live on high ground well above storm surges and in a structurally sound home.

        In any case, sob stories of people losing their waterfront homes to hurricanes do not move me anymore than do people betting their paycheck on the lottery or on a weekend in Lost Wages at the blackjack tables.

        Like

    • Doreen Scott says:

      They also ruined the view. You cannot see the water anymore with all the houses and hotels and condos blocking the nice view we had back in the fifties. I remember taking rides past the waterfront on a Sunday afternoon after church. It was so nice then.

      Like

  42. smiley says:

    I hope this puts an end to all of the idiotic and ignorant comments (on the previous thread) about how this hurricane was “all hype by the MSM” and could only have been a Cat 2, as if the whole thing were some weather conspiracy against carbon taxes and conservatives .

    Liked by 2 people

  43. smiley says:

    poignant…found in the storm surge debris on Mexico Beach..

    a wedding and engagement ring.

    Liked by 3 people

  44. Bulldog84 says:

    We sold our home on St. George Island exactly five weeks ago yesterday. After the sense of “whew, glad we aren’t there” passed, we are heartbroken to see the devastation of nearby communities. It’s almost unwatchable.

    Liked by 4 people

  45. 6x47 says:

    Prayers for all those affected. I live in northern North Carolina, just shy of the Virginia border. Interestingly we got more of an impact from Michael than Florence. Been without power for about 18 hours, lots of downed trees. The reason? Michael hit the coast as a much stronger storm and held together as a tropical storm well inland.

    Hurricane Andrew produced one of the iconic sound bites of all time: A frantic woman describing the terror she and her young daughters experienced riding out the hurricane in place.

    “My girls were crying, and asking ‘Mommy, why is God doing this?'”

    But they always cut off the last part of her sentence: “The next time they tell me to evacuate, I’m gonna go!”

    Liked by 1 person

    • Fake Nametag says:

      I just left Norfolk airport yesterday, approximately 6pm as the storm was supposedly approaching. My original flight was to Charlotte, but it was delayed too much for me to make my ongoing connection. I was put on a different flight to Philly. I watched the sky become very dark and was hoping we would get off the ground before things got nasty. I did not see much significant wind or rain near the airport and we got out of there probably about 630 to 700pm. The takeoff was smooth, no turbulence.

      It was raining much harder in Philly and my flight that left there at 930pm was stuck on the taxiway for over an hour as we were probably 20th in line for takeoff. Not sure if that storm was related to Michael or just another set of thunderstorms.

      I am looking at the news today to see if the storm missed Norfolk or if I got out of there just in time…

      Like

    • TatonkaWoman says:

      Daughter and SIL are in the same area. A lot of trees down in their location. Power also out for over 18 hours. It will be a long time before they are restored. At the end of the line and trees are down on their personal line from road to house. Hit much harder from this than Flo, and they were not as prepared.

      Like

  46. dawg says:

    Please dont misunderstand me, the hurricane was awful, caused a lot of damage and loss of life, but its time to talk about this:

    https://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2018/10/11/delingpole-hurricane-michael-was-not-the-third-strongest-anything/

    I realized this was happening last year during Irma. My sister evacuated southwestern Florida and ended up in a MORE dangerous situation, returned home and found NO DAMAGE to her home or business. She said it looked like a bad thunderstorm with some palm branches on the ground.

    During the storm I was attempting to verify wind speeds from a variety of different sources and could never confirm what was being reported by the weather channel.

    Wind GUSTS do NOT a hurricane make. A hurricane is defined by maximum SUSTAINED windspeed for a duration of ONE MINUTE at a height of 10 METERS.

    NOT GUSTS AT THE TOP OF A TEN STORY BUILDING.

    https://realclimatescience.com/2018/10/something-bad-happened-so-turn-off-your-brain/

    Was the damage caused by wind or storm surge? And dont say it doesnt matter, because it does. A tidal wave from an earthquake can cause a lot of damage with NO wind. Storm surge in the gulf is going to be worse than in other areas because of the shallow depths in the gulf. A strong tropical storm in the gulf is going to create a lot of storm surge in the panhandle.

    Im just sayin’. I dont buy the BS that ANY media puts out anymore, I dont trust them in the first place and when I try to verify them, I find evidence to the contrary.

    These people cleared a crook like Hillary, spied on and attempted to frame a US citizen running for President, fabricated a disgustingly false story about a good man to derail a nomination for Supreme Court Justice, etc, etc, etc…

    Anyone who does NOT think that the left would skew hurricane data to fit their agenda has NOT been paying attention.

    The fact that we went 12 or 13 years from 2005 to 2017 without a major hurricane making landfall was DEVASTATING to the globalists climate change agenda. That had to be corrected. Now we have the narrative of “climate change making storms stronger, slower, faster, etc….”

    The dangerous part about all this is that there are lot of people down there that think they just survived a CAT4-5 hurricane. But what if it was only a Cat 1-2? Now the next time a hurricane comes through, they think “Well I survived Michael, I can handle this little Cat 3 because I know what to do.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • smiley says:

      I think the climate change agenda is just trying to take advantage of any extreme weather event to use it to justify their bogus narrative.

      I live in Naples, Fl…been thru a few ‘canes incl IRMA.

      Irma came in as Cat 3 sustained and Cat 4 gusts….there was minimal structural damage w/in this town altho all mobile homes and areas northeast & southeast worse…the main damage…and it was extreme…was trees totally wiped out, fences totally blown apart, some major roof damage, signs blown apart, utility lines down all over the place, and a lot of storm surge damage….some gated community security walls completely blown apart.

      took weeks before electricity was restored and even longer before all the massive tree damage got cleaned up…many people who did suffer structural damage in outlying areas are still in a mess from it.

      however..windows of high rises were intact all along the coast…same for the shop & store windows thru the town.

      there was nothing like the damage done to the Panhandle area from Michael.

      the damage and winds are w/in that NE quadrant of these large hurricanes…as well as any area on the eastern side of the storm.

      while I agree that there is sometimes way too much fear-mongering “hype” from certain of the “mainstream” weather channels (ratings), that is not to say that ALL of the weather sources available…and there are many, not at affiliated with Big News/climate change hype…play into that.

      locally, ACCUweather is one very responsible & reliable source (mainstream, too) for rational weather reporting…locally, they usually play it down , in fact.

      they had this as a high Cat 3 sustained, Cat 4 gusts as it approached land..and just by looking at all the radar images and the millibars, it was very clear how strong this thing was.

      sometimes it is what is…no conspiracy necessary.

      Like

      • Doreen Scott says:

        Most of the time when a hurricane is expected and you watch the news you see people boarding up their homes and businesses. From looking at all the videos of Michael in the panhandle I saw no window’s boarded up. They did not prepare like others do in florida. Once your windows break you roof will come off much easier. Also there will be alot of trees down there because they are pine trees which grow up tall really fast before the roots get very large and pine is not a hardwood like oaks trees are.

        Like

        • smiley says:

          so what’s your point.

          blah blah blah

          Like

          • Doreen Scott says:

            My point is it will look like it was a stronger storm than it actual is because people did not prep their homes like the people do in other parts of the state. If you live on the coast get storm shutters or cut plywood it may save your home.

            Like

      • dawg says:

        “they had this as a high Cat 3 sustained” I know they did, thats my point. Where did they get those wind speeds from? Have you looked into this? I have, Ive been down the rabbit hole and the data just doesnt support what they were saying. Did you read the links I posted?

        “Cat 4 gusts”? Thats a new one.

        At one point, the weather channel had this on the screen.

        Winds : 90 MPH
        Gusts: 155 MPH

        Thats straight up BS on its face.

        Im just sayin’. If someone comes up with hard, official data that supports these categorizations, Ill recant. But Ive tried to verify and its just not there.

        Remember, as sundance says, “Trillions are at stake” !

        Like

        • JX says:

          go to ftp://ftp.nhc.noaa.gov/atcf/archive/2017/
          download bal112017.dat.gz
          unzip bal112017.dat
          open the file in a spreadsheet

          column descriptions here
          https://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/atcf_web/docs/database/new/abdeck.txt

          columns G and H are lat & long
          column I is windspeed in knots

          map available here
          https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/tracking_chart_atlantic.pdf

          Southwestern Florida is aprx 80-83W 25-27N

          See the data between rows 140-166 in the spreadsheet.
          It shows 100-115kt wind (115mph 132mph, CAT3-CAT4)

          Saffir-Simpson wind scale here
          https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutsshws.php

          Like

          • dawg says:

            Correct me if Im wrong, but is that not wind speeds IN the hurricane and not at a height of 10 meters?

            Like

            • dawg says:

              That data does not show at what elevation those wind speeds are recorded. It just says:

              “VMAX – Maximum sustained wind speed in knots: 0 – 300 kts.”

              One would have to assume thats the max wind speeds anywhere IN the hurricane.

              I dont give a damn if there is a CAT 7.5 going on at 1500 ft. I want to know whats going on at ten meters, which is what defines a hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson windscale.

              This is exactly what Ive been saying “they” are doing. They are taking wind speeds recorded SOMEWHERE in the hurricane and saying “Oh well its a Cat 4 then”. Thats not how it works.

              Like

            • JX says:

              The narrative report contains tables of specific measurement locations.

              Other columns in the spreadsheet show the wind radius in the quadrants.

              I agree that the category might be misleading. If one cell in the eyewall for one minute has a given windspeed that is not necessarily an accurate representation of the overall strength of the storm, it could be an outlier, an extreme gust that occurred once in an otherwise much weaker storm. So what measure should be used? One minute? Five minutes? Thirty seconds? Reality dictates that extrapolation and estimates are necessary.

              Like

          • JX says:

            If you don’t want to wade through the data, here is a narrative report
            https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/data/tcr/AL112017_Irma.pdf#page=4

            Liked by 1 person

            • dawg says:

              Thank you!

              From page 3:

              “The hurricane reached its maximum intensity of 155 kt around 1800 UTC 5
              September, when it was located about 70 n mi east-southeast of Barbuda. As a category 5
              hurricane, Irma made landfall on Barbuda around 0545 UTC 6 September with maximum winds
              of 155 kt and a minimum pressure of 914 mb (Fig. 6a).

              From Page 25:
              05:45, 155kt, pressure of 914mb

              BUT FROM PAGE 27,

              Barbuda NOS Site

              Selected SURFACE Observations

              Maximum SURFACE Wind Speed: SUSTAINED: 105 knots

              —————————————

              Hurricanes are categorized based on surface wind speeds.

              This is the discrepancy that I cant explain.

              Like

    • Doreen Scott says:

      The news people are already saying this is the worst hurricane to hit the US in the last fifty years. They completely leave out Camille and Andrew. Another ridiculous thing was Jim Cantore telling us he is standing up in a strong Cat. 4 hurricane. Watch him on you tube(Jim Cantore vs. Cat 5 winds.)He has to be strapped up. Just like with polls they know most people will believe anything.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dave says:

        I’m sick of “look at me!” Jim Cantore! He is a competent meterologist but he doesn’t have to present himself like some sort of “superman”. His antics for years have forced me to change channels once he starts his stuff. Remember when some “guy” charged him while he was “reporting” live and he kneed the guy in the groin without flinching and interrupting his babble? Looked really like it was rehearsed before the cameras went on. This year when he was just “missed” by a flying object, he demanded one of his crew hand over his helmet, and then he ran back out into the danger zone. Cantore is the weather version of Fear Factor! But wait…there’s more! Anderson Cooper on his knees (normal for him) in a flooded street “reporting” live, while his cameraman twenty feet away on the same street is standing in much shallower water! Another weatherman bracing himself against “extreme” winds while two men walk past in the background at a normal pace and posture! A female reporter paddling in a canoe on a flooded street while two men in background walk in maybe a foot of water! Yes, this is comedy, and I love to laugh, but there’s a time and place for it. If enough of these antics continue to happen, the entire industry might lose their credibility, and then when the real truth needs to get out, it will be “the boy who cried wolf” time, putting peoples’ lives in danger.

        Like

    • 6x47 says:

      Several agendas at work in news coverage of incoming hurricanes: 1) The more alarming the coverage, the better the ratings; 2) Local officials trying to impress upon the populace that those people living in the low-lying coastal areas really do need to evacuate; 3) The climate change thingy.

      Like

  47. The scuttlebutt from friends stationed at Tyndall is that they’re not expected to be allowed to return for up to 30 days and to continue to shelter in their safe zone.

    If Airman do violate the lawful order and return to the local area they will be charged with Disobeying a Lawful Order – not good. Almost total devastation. I’ll be keeping my eyes open for any official relief vector, as it’s almost guaranteed some of the younger Airmen and Family didn’t think to secure insurance.

    Like

    • Blind no longer says:

      teajr thanks for that post. This is so sad for all the military families there. I know it won’t be same for a very long time. We would always look forward to seeing the jets flying over the beach on their practice runs! You talk about loud…the sound was really amplified off the water as they flew down the shoreline!

      Liked by 1 person

      • We’re in Utah (F-35s) currently about to PCS to Virginia (F-22s). We’ve lived on AFBs so long the sound doesn’t register anymore unless they’re pushing the jets hard, in which case, our windows rattle.

        As for the Airmen, man it’s terrible. They’re receiving a DLA (Dislocation Allowance) to help defray some of the costs of having to evacuate and seek shelter, so that helps but the real impact will be their HHG (Household Goods) having been destroyed.

        There are already AF/ DoD relief orgs but I’ll ask around for any officially targeted relief efforts, as we’ll be donating what we can for the Jr. Airmen and Families. We didn’t think to secure Renter’s Insurance for years into our AF journey, and I’ve been chatting with Troops who are devastated because they didn’t prepare/ expect for this.

        My Wife’s Shirt will most likely drop where the help is needed most, soon.

        Like

    • Doreen Scott says:

      Why thirty days. Couldn’t the military help clean up the mess. Isn’t that what our military does overseas. It’s always called nation building.

      Liked by 1 person

      • The Command will tell them what to do and when but right now they have their orders. They’re most likely trying to formulate the best plan and it’s too dangerous to have Dependants bopping around the debris and powerlines.

        Like

        • Doreen Scott says:

          I know that . But thirty days. With all the electric trucks coming in it shouldn’t take a month. Last year after the hurricane our electric was only off two days.

          Liked by 1 person

          • smiley says:

            you know-it-all.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Doreen Scott says:

              I have lived in florida since 1955. My husband’s family has been here since the 1850’s. We have seen alot of hurricanes in that time. Why are you so against telling people how to protect their precious home and possessions. Also don’t be so nasty to people.

              Liked by 1 person

          • Ordinaryman says:

            Snapped off power poles and replacing Primary wiring with transformers is not a two day fix. Think in terms of a month or more. Timing is based on Andrew experience. Wishful thinking will change into sharp reality in about a week. If you have friends in the area offer to help them relocate when roads are open by National Guard debris removal. The process of leaving your home after you stayed for the storm takes longer than you think. Defending rubble from looters is the first thoughts. In a week or so those in the eyewall damage area will realize that they are alive and stuff left over is not as important as you thought and they will be ready to move on. Besides by then they will be fighting their insurance companies that told them they were in good hands.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Doreen Scott says:

              Unfortunately the homes on the coast are total loses. They will probably work on the inland areas first. God help them working with their flood insurance company.

              Liked by 1 person

          • I dunno, but I remember after Katrina, Keesler was a mess. They recalled the single Airmen first to rebuild, but it’s pretty standard to not give Troops any room for misinterpretation.

            It’s also possible that Tyndall will be declared an unaccompanied tour, where DEP won’t be allowed to come back for a good bit and the Troops will. Lot’s of variables, but the Command will let folks know soon. I could go into greater detail, but there’s not much point here. Yes, Military Personnel will be involved in the recovery, of course.

            Like

      • prenanny says:

        I suspect TRUMP will want to rebuild the base vs just rush repair it and he will do it for the same cost. One of the many reasons we hired him.

        Like

  48. scrap1ron says:

    The power and reach of these storms is awesome to behold, makes you feel very puny and insignificant. My daughter and her family live east of Richmond Virginia and were affected by this storm. They’re not sure if it was a tornado, but the power is out. The creek that you could normally jump across has washed out the road and trees are down every where like jack straws. The roads are very narrow, more 1 1/2 lanes wide than 2 lanes, and the trees come right up to the shoulder of the road. What a mess.

    Like

  49. JPUblius says:

    Having grown up just W of Tyndall in the Callaway / Springfield area, and having had contact w family still in the impacted area, the images and reports they are giving are horrific. The media has not made it into many smaller neighborhoods and the damage is extensive. Power distribution – then entire grid is down from the EHV towers and lines down to neighborhood transformers all down or compromised. Communications is practically non-existent MARS and believe it or not AT&T are working in most areas. The conditions were so bad the coastal county EOCs (Hardened structures) were all compromised (Bay / Gulf / Jackson counties.) keep them in your thoughts and prayers, they will all get through this …

    Like

    • Doreen Scott says:

      President Trump says he wants to fix our infrastructure. He did a great job in Puerto Rico. It’s better than before the storm. So maybe congress will grant some money to make ours the best.

      Like

  50. PgtSndThinker says:

    Sundance’s headline mentions two air force bases severely damaged by hurricanes. Are there more than two? How can we avoid this damage to US Military infrastructure?

    Like

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