UPDATE: TS Gordon Approaches Mississippi Coastline – Anticipated Landfall at Hurricane Strength….

Gordon is anticipated to strike the Mississippi coast as a category one hurricane. Current wind-speeds are 65mph, with strengthening anticipated.

[National Hurricane Center] At 100 PM CDT (1800 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Gordon was located near latitude 28.9 North, longitude 87.3 West. Gordon is moving toward the northwest near 15 mph (24 km/h), and this general motion is expected to continue until landfall occurs tonight along the north-central Gulf coast. A northwestward motion with some decrease in forward speed is expected after landfall, with a gradual turn toward the north-northwest and north forecast to occur on Friday.

On the forecast track, the center of Gordon will move across the northern Gulf of Mexico today, and will approach the north-central Gulf Coast within the hurricane warning area late this afternoon or evening, and move inland over the lower Mississippi Valley tonight and early Wednesday.

Reports from an Air Force Reserve Unit reconnaissance aircraft indicate that maximum sustained winds remain near 65 mph (100 km/h) with higher gusts. Some strengthening is expected later today, and Gordon is forecast to be a hurricane when it makes landfall along the north-central Gulf Coast. Rapid weakening is forecast after Gordon moves inland. (link)

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48 Responses to UPDATE: TS Gordon Approaches Mississippi Coastline – Anticipated Landfall at Hurricane Strength….

  1. Ziiggii says:

    LOTS & LOTS of water gonna be coming with this guy…

    BE SAFE! Don’t drive into deep or fast moving waters.

    Liked by 7 people

    • rf121 says:

      Yep. Don’t win an award.

      Liked by 11 people

      • dayallaxeded says:

        I should get royalties for that pic!

        Not really, but I did experience a miracle under vaguely similar circumstances. A few years back, I was setting up scaffolding by my rather tall house (about 35′ ground to soffit/gutters)–by myself. Dumb, I know, but wanted to get going and no family or friends were available at the time to spot. I got up three stages, so @ 18′, then pulled up the next stage with a rope. Got one side stabbed, then went to stab the other side and it’s weight pulled me just far enough out of balance that I couldn’t recover. I was headed for the sidewalk face first. But suddenly, there was a calm, I pushed against the loose scaffolding I was holding, throwing it away; kicked my legs forward; then I felt a hand on my left wrist, pulling my hand back up over my head, where I caught the top rail of the third stage, stopping my fall at the last possible moment. A passing car stopped and the people yelled out, “Are you an acrobat? Are you OK? That was amazing!” All I could say at the time was, “Thanks, yeah, I think I’m OK.” I was and am definitely no acrobat. Though terribly unworthy, I had an angel on the scaffold who grabbed my hand and brought it to the one bar I could possibly grab. No other possible explanation. I said some prayers. I don’t know why God was so merciful to me, but I hope and try to make it worthwhile!

        Re: this storm. Keeps shifting a little east, so NOLA is looking pretty good. Thanks for all prayers and keep ’em coming for poor little Dauphin Island–looks like she’s getting hammered again–and friends in AL and MS.

        Liked by 5 people

  2. Shark24 says:

    Praying it stays under 65 mph and the surge is not overwhelming. Over and above the prayers: be prepared and stay safe to all in the path! God bless.

    Liked by 6 people

  3. Ziiggii says:

    Liked by 4 people

  4. Ziiggii says:

    GOES 16 is just cool as crap!

    Liked by 9 people

  5. Rockie Mtn. Dweller via the MS Gulf Coast says:

    Thanks Sundance for posting this. This former Landmasser appreciates your letting treepers know that although being between Alabama & Louisiana, Mississippi is often the target of hurricanes and is often overshadowed by the close proximity to New Orleans. Remember Katrina? Hancock County, Mississippi was ground zero for the storm.

    Liked by 8 people

  6. L4grasshopper says:

    The “good news” is that the storm is barely at 70 MPH as it starts to hit the coast right now.

    Still — that’s a high wind and there will be lots of rain and a storm surge. Hope the folks are ready.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Truthfilter says:

    We live about 45 minutes south of NOLA so we are no longer in the projected cone. BUT it has been raining here every single day for the past 2-3 weeks. Our ground is saturated, our canals, ditches, and bayous are already full. We anticipate heavy rain and some flooding over next two days. Oddly enough, we had more sunshine today than we’ve had in a week or two.

    Liked by 8 people

  8. Scott says:

    I just want to extend my gratitude for CTH. Yes, most of us come here for political discussions and benefit from the awesome research that Team Sundance conducts, but putting a very important message about such imminent danger on the site just adds to the relevance and importance of having a place like the CTH to visit while we’re surfing. Please heed these warnings and stay safe if you are in the projected path.

    Liked by 8 people

  9. ck says:

    Oh hell, in bad storms Sundance takes off in a pickup with chainsaws.

    Liked by 10 people

  10. dawg says:

    “Current wind-speeds are 65mph, with strengthening anticipated.”

    Says who, Sundance?

    Intellicast saying 45 mph.

    http://www.intellicast.com/National/Wind/Current.aspx?location=USLA0338

    Like

    • dawg says:

      Ok, answered my own question:

      “Reports from an Air Force Reserve Unit reconnaissance aircraft indicate that maximum sustained winds remain near 65 mph (100 km/h) with higher gusts.”

      BUT these are wind speeds IN the hurricane, at elevations of thousands of feet.

      But wind speeds at those elevations are not what define a “hurricane”.

      According to the NWS,

      “Hurricane- A tropical cyclone in which the maximum 1-minute sustained surface wind is 64 knots (74 mph) or greater.”

      http://www.nws.noaa.gov/directives/sym/pd01006004curr.pdf

      Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale:

      “The maximum sustained surface wind speed (peak 1-minute wind at the standard meteorological observation height of 10 m [33 ft] over unobstructed exposure) associated with the cyclone is the determining factor in the scale.”

      https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/sshws.pdf

      Can anyone explain this discrepancy?

      Like

    • jeans2nd says:

      We have relied on Sundance for hurricane info for years now.
      Those who have decades of experience living in these conditions are much better predictors than those who use climate models, which are only as good as the id10ts who wrote the programs and input the data.

      Will stick with Sundance, tyvm.

      Prayers for those in harm’s way. God will watch over and keep you safe.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Daniel says:

    Should we care if this storm, “TS Gordon,” thinks it’s a boy or a girl?

    Liked by 2 people

    • DCP says:

      I have lived on the Florida Panhandle coast all of my life (born in Pensacola). Good luck to all.

      Liked by 4 people

    • dawg says:

      Its actually a transgender tropical storm being misappropriated by fake news weather media as a hurricane.

      Liked by 3 people

      • truthseeker39525 says:

        If it was in FakeMediaLand, they would call it a SuperStorm (I think they made up that term for that NYC storm some years back, to make it seem like something horrendous (and they were some kind of big heroes for living through it) when it wasn’t even a hurricane.)

        By the way, 8:18 Central time as I write this, it’s a beautiful calm evening right now….. but we’re battened down and ready. Expect some heavy weather later tonight, although it appears that the worst of it is headed east of my home in Hancock County, MS.

        Liked by 2 people

  12. kea says:

    Always amazed how far inland these can go.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I live in western nc and gulf storms bring rain…lots of it….to us. We already are way above average in rainfall this year, but this is a temperate rainforest….this year the forest is soooo beautiful..so green and lush…I really like it.

      Liked by 3 people

  13. MontanaMel says:

    One big wet water hauler….Check that 12″ of rain color print….wow!
    When you get the NWS trying to “define” something and someone else trying to “define” a “scale” for their own purposes….you are bound to have slight differences…
    ie: The “standard” height for taking a “true NWS” wind speed reading is “10m” or about 33ft above ground (unobstructed ground beyond the tower base)….and, simson wants that to be a 1-min sustained speed…not some 3-sec gust value used by most tower/building engineers…
    ie: Surface winds are “local winds” and are reported by most airports from a sensor/windsock located near the main runway touchdown zone/end… Besides….winds are always reported in Kts. or knots….ie: nautical mile length per hour speeds….

    ya’ll should have your order for 1200 buffalo wings and 24 cases of JAX/PEARL/LONESTAR order placed and about to be delivered…..if not…..you be foolish.

    Check 6

    Liked by 2 people

  14. BillRiser says:

    We could use the rain here in Mo. we been up til last week, in a three month drought. Hope no harm comes to anyone in this storm.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pegm says:

      We desperately need rain here in Norcal, we have fires that need to be put out. Kindly send it here, by the time it gets here the rainfall should be just about right.😀

      On a more serious note, prayers for those in it’s path, stay safe and hang tight to your branch!

      Liked by 3 people

  15. jnearen2013 says:

    7:41 pm. Orange Beach AL. Got quite a blow underway. Lost power at 7:13 pm. Frogs seem pretty cheerful though.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. jnearen2013 says:

    7:41 pm. Orange Beach AL. Got quite a blow underway. Lost power at 7:13 pm. Frogs seem pretty cheerful though.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Deplorable_Infidel says:

    SPRITES FROM TROPICAL STORM GORDON

    Later today, Tropical Storm Gordon is expected to reach the southeastern USA, possibly intensifying to hurricane strength just before it makes landfall. Unlike many hurricanes, which cross the Atlantic before reaching the states, Gordon formed nearby in the Caribbean. On Sept. 1st, Frankie Lucena of Puerto Rico trained his cameras on the tropical wave and caught sprites leaping up from the cloudtops:

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    SPRITES FROM TROPICAL STORM GORDON: Later today, Tropical Storm Gordon is expected to reach the southeastern USA, possibly intensifying to hurricane strength just before it makes landfall. Unlike many hurricanes, which cross the Atlantic before reaching the states, Gordon formed nearby in the Caribbean. On Sept. 1st, Frankie Lucena of Puerto Rico trained his cameras on the tropical wave and caught sprites leaping up from the cloudtops:

    “These sprites were captured over the tropical wave that later became Tropical Storm Gordon,” says Lucena. “At the time, the wave was generating numerous lightning strikes per minute just west of Puerto Rico.” In the video, red arrows show the location of his camera with respect to the growing storm, while the sprites are inset.

    For years, Lucena has been observing sprites and their big cousins Gigantic Jets leap up from passing storms. Interestingly, he says, weaker systems often produce stronger sprites. “Based on my observations so far, I would say that intensifying tropical waves have the most sprites. Often these systems go on to become hurricanes.”

    However, once storms become hurricanes, sprite activity seems to subside. “I tried to capture sprites over Hurricanes like Maria, Irma and just recently in July over Hurricane Beryl with no luck,” says Lucena. Sprites above Hurricane Matthew in 2016 are a colorful exception.

    According to NASA, hurricanes produce less regular lightning, too. Horizontally swirling hurricanes typically lack the vertical winds required to charge up a storm and unleash powerful bolts. Perhaps sprites subside for the same reason. Lucena plans to get more data as hurricane season gains steam in the months ahead.

    http://spaceweather.com/

    Like

  18. dawg says:

    Any updates from anyone in the area of this storm?

    Like

    • It was mostly a non-event with storm surge predictions pretty far off thankfully. The storm veered East the last few hours before landfall and stayed away from the more heavily populated Harrison county. It did however cause power outages in Jackson, George, and Greene counties. The bottom line is that it was a nuisance and never became a hurricane or a surge producer.

      Like

  19. Nanci Peters says:

    Prayers for the needs🙏

    Like

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