Sunday Talks: Darrell Issa Discusses FBI and DOJ Administrative Stonewalling of Congress…

Congressman Darrell Issa appears on Sunday Morning with Maria Bartiromo to discuss the ongoing issues with FBI and DOJ officials stonewalling congressional oversight.

One of the interesting aspects noted by Issa is the people underneath the top-tier of justice management, the careerists, who are the ones actually running the operation, defending the administrative state, and protecting the previous conduct of their organizational embeds.

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104 Responses to Sunday Talks: Darrell Issa Discusses FBI and DOJ Administrative Stonewalling of Congress…

  1. FofBW says:

    When an organization is that corrupt there is really one way to clean it up, IMO.

    Shut it down, start from scratch. The fall out would not be nearly as bad as the corruption.

    Liked by 18 people

    • RDCinPA says:

      Agree, and the conspirator’s against our country and our Constitution must pay heavily for their crimes with public humiliation, prosecutions, convictions, fines and long prison sentences.

      Liked by 23 people

      • Newt Love says:

        > “… the conspirator’s against our country and our Constitution must pay heavily for their crimes with public humiliation, prosecutions, convictions, fines and long prison sentences.”

        Don’t forget the frog-march perp-walk that Rudy Giuliani invented and perfected while he was the US Attorney for SDNY!

        Liked by 7 people

      • motreehouse says:

        I love Maria. A magnificent package of beauty and intelligence.

        Liked by 4 people

      • mkgplus5 says:

        I agree. Minion #1 is told to produce the docs by Friday or he he walks the plank. Friday, your bring in Minion #2 and you say, see what happened to Minion #1? You have until Tuesday. Then Minion #2 walks the plank. Then you say, now we’re going to speed things up. The first minion to produce the docs gets to keep their job The others will be investigated for obstruction of justice.

        Like

    • sDee says:

      Clinton purged the DoJ attorneys when he took office. Sessions knows this well, he was one of them.

      Liked by 7 people

      • deqwik2 says:

        Sessions did the same thing. These are not the people in DC at the Justice Bldg. These are the US Attorneys that are in the different states. Huber would be an example.

        Liked by 7 people

      • dd_sc says:

        That’s always the case. Ashcroft was going to clean house and bring in is pwn people but Democrats (led by Schumer, I think) pitched a fit. Team GW Bush caved and a lot of those Clintonistas remained.

        It’s one of the reasons Obama made it easier for these appointees to transition into civil servant jobs. They get embedded in the system and work their way up the food chain.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Blade says:

        Clinton purged the DoJ attorneys when he took office. Sessions knows this well, he was one of them.

        Where you going with this sDee? Seems like you’re missing a sentence after that which might read And he did the same when he became Attorney General

        [ Wikipedia ] On March 10, 2017, Sessions oversaw the firing of 46 United States Attorneys, leaving only his acting Deputy Dana Boente and nominated Deputy Rod Rosenstein in place after Trump declined their resignations.[87]

        Liked by 3 people

        • Konamon says:

          Why he did that?

          Like

          • Blade says:

            Why he did that?, Howie wait, quick translation, you’re asking why did he do that? Correct?

            It’s called draining the swamp. And it’s customary at this level anyway. You are better off without 46 ( 44 in this case ) extra Obama sleeper cells than with them. They weren’t doing anything useful upon a cursory check into the past few years’ work product. They hate Trump. They are connected leftists. Many reasons to do so and no reason not to.

            Isn’t the real question we should be asking: Why wasn’t Rosey fired too?

            Liked by 2 people

          • Blade says:

            Howie, quick question. What happened to your comment in A HREF=”https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2018/05/12/hindsight-revelations-devin-nunes-april-22nd-there-were-no-official-intelligence-channels-used-to-start-trump-investigation/comment-page-1″>the ‘Hindsight Revelations’ thread that contained …

            Sessions is loath to prosecute anyone in a prior administration in his own words.

            That comment of yours and all replies below seem to have vanished. Any idea why it got nuked?

            Like

          • Blade says:

            [whoops, trying again ]

            Howie, quick question. What happened to your comment in the ‘Hindsight Revelations’ thread that contained …

            Sessions is loath to prosecute anyone in a prior administration in his own words.

            That comment of yours and all replies below seem to have vanished. Any idea why it got nuked?

            Liked by 1 person

            • I pretty much understand former acting AG Boente as I did an enormous amount of research(every DOJ release with his name for the last 15 years plus – every public statement and public news conference) on him over the course of the last year… I was keyed to him after he was re-inserted into the line of succession to be acting AG right after Trumps inauguration. -and because of Boente — I determined Rosenstein is either a good guy or was set up where he is in order to watch him/allow him to further incriminate himself.

              Liked by 2 people

    • 4sure says:

      Agree. Trump should eliminate the FBI.Turn over only basic LEO functions to the Marshals service. Do away w/the rest. Eliminate the CIA and NSA. Turn over some of their basic functions to the Military. Do away w/most of the CIA/NSA functions which are unconstitutional.

      I googled if POTUS could do this. Here’s ans.

      The answer to your question is Yes, Trump can shut down or render ineffective any agency within the federal government;

      https://www.quora.com/Can-Trump-shut-down-the-FBI-the-CIA-the-NSA-or-any-other-federal-government-intelligence-law-enforcement-agency

      Liked by 8 people

      • Blade says:

        The answer to your question is Yes, Trump can shut down or render ineffective any agency within the federal government;

        The answer to that question is NO. Even agencies created in the past by executive orders are now backed up by statute ( aka law from bills passed by Congress and signed by a President ) and cannot be uncreated by magic EO. Imagine for a second a system where the President can erase laws. That would be unConstitutional, a new power created without an Amendment. A kind of retroactive veto. That’s not how it works.

        And the link you cite doesn’t really support this non-existent power anyway, despite that incorrect answer that they end with! Here is the first sentence ( which is correct ) …

        Trump cannot directly shut down these agencies by EO.

        Then they inexplicably wind up with this conclusion …

        The answer to your question is Yes, Trump can shut down or render ineffective any agency within the federal government; and many state level agencies.

        In between those opposite statements they wander off into space filling meanderings that add nothing. The first is stating the obvious in that the President can appoint directors to somewhat shape them to his will ( but not really, since Congress defines all lesser offices in law ). Then the absurd proposition that he can veto any bill containing funding, but that ignores the fact we no longer have bills of particulars as we did in the early years when Presidents could veto a particular item ( because it was the only item in the bill ). We now have mammoth spending bills or monolithic continuing resolutions with no line item veto. And finally, the article beats the drum for recess appointments, despite the fact that these are dangerous to the President in practice. First of all, there rarely are recesses anymore, and when a President takes advantage of them they end up at immediate loggerheads and the President often loses on other fronts later in retaliation. Courts do not like recess appointments despite the Constitutional authority because it is seen as a Presidential power of last resort for extraordinary circumstances and they have issued rulings to rebuke it, even as recently as with Dumbo in 2014.

        This is not good strategy for a President to listen to. But apparently that won’t stop reckless advice from handwringers dwelling in perpetual battered angst and demanding he just do something. That kind of thing leaves us far worse off than before. It is what occurred in the 9/11 aftermath when firewalls were broken down between domestic and foreign intelligence operations, and empowering domestic cops at the federal bureau of incompetence to act like spooks. It is what got us here today.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Jedi9 says:

          Good write up!

          Following along in the same thought process it is hard to conceive any efficient measure to change the current discourse of our system of governance. The slow, bogged down chariots in the swamp, relegated it to a crawl, thus any meaningful legislation that needs to be implemented is played by the ones who control the clock, especially if it works against representatives interests of the lobbyists, thus running out the clock on almost any matter is a common strategy used. IMO, if change can not be properly applied to the institutions in which said problems need to be addressed, then slowly those same institutions become eroded of public trust over time. It may not happen today, but it is evident that trust in both Governments and various institutions such as the CIA, FBI, DOJ are at an all time low but eventually the countries demise will be tied to the perception that our government is a plutocracy and will suffer the same fate as all other civilisations did before with similar hierarchical ruling class that disparages the working class, except in the modern era such said institutions now act as the petorian guard to do as they wish to bend the rule of law to their favour and that is the crisis we in angst currently await to be addressed! Anything short of equal measures being applied to the ones who violated the law, will no doubt have long term negative ramifications to the future of our country! It can not survive if the rule of law is not upheld!

          It is evident in this time that Politicians don’t have the solutions, but only to hide behind the institutions in which to rob the public coffers while playing the public optics of being a public servant. A major change needs to happen in a fundamental way to insure a more efficient and expedited application for addressing societies ills within transparency of the agents that are elected to implement such change can lead to effective governance. As of right now those agents do nothing more than do what they are told at the behest of the oligarchy currently controlling the worlds wealth, the government institutions and that goes against the principles in which this country was originally founded on!

          Liked by 1 person

      • Pyrran says:

        Remember that Kennedy wanted to shut down the CIA, but then he ended up on the wrong end of an Italian sniper rifle. Nowadays, they use lawyers and computers, but I’m guessing they always have that final solution in their back pocket.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Blade says:

          Remember that Kennedy wanted to shut down the CIA, but then he ended up on the wrong end of an Italian sniper rifle.

          Two things.

          Whether JFK really said this is unknown, though I can believe it because he was so embarrassed at the Bay Of Pigs failure which was of course mostly his own fault. You would think his stable of media fanboys and camelot fiction writers Bundy, Sorenson, Schlesinger and others could have proven this quote by now. Regardless, if he actually believed that, he was too cowardly too commit that thought to history in a speech or in sponsoring a bill in Congress. We’ll probably never know.

          I still laugh out loud at the proposition that the inept central incompetence agency who couldn’t manage to take out a smelly flea ridden dirtbag like Castro could be seen as brilliant enough to assassinate an American President on USA soil in broad daylight while forgetting to create an evidence trail back to a designated patsy that makes sense. Oswald is not a proper patsy, nor are the Soviets who he is tied to ( the Agency would not want to ignite World War III in retaliation as that serves no future purpose because there is no future for anyone after that event ).

          The proper perps to frame are either Castro or North Vietnam at that point in time, and there is no evidence trail to either unfortunately ( forget the stupid pro-Castro lobbying by Oswald, that is too far removed and isolated from the regime ). If the assassination of JFK was a Langley op, it is hopelessly pointless because they gained nothing while risking everything. And when I say risking everything, I mean maintaining a perfect conspiracy where when found out because one person talks the Agency is burned to the ground and every person involved knows they will swing from a rope like the Lincoln conspirators did.

          Liked by 1 person

          • I question why Hoover’s main concern… was that the Public believe Oswald was the only shooter… his words…
            From a memo released late last year.
            We also have the hole in the front windshield, which has now been acknowledged in government memos and notes… The question is WHO would have the ability to compel witnesses to testify or not to testify?
            Castro? North Vietnam?
            OR
            US Intel? .

            Liked by 2 people

            • Blade says:

              From Hoover’s standpoint, once he had determined Oswald acted alone it makes sense that he is concerned that the public believe there was just one shooter. You are assuming he put the cart before the horse and reversing cause and effect.

              And we do *not* have a windshield bullet hole. This is yet another old piece of “evidence” being recycled by JFK assassination newbies and/or stubborn oldtimers. We were tossing this around decades ago on USENET and probably others were tossing it around decades before that. IIRC it was a plain old cracked windshield from an object like a stone and not a hole. I’m surprised they didn’t pull down every street and store sign in a 10 mile radius too, as they all probably had legit bullet holes as they do all around the country, especially the deep South like Texas!

              One of the reasons that JFK stuff was held was that it contains raw data collected in the fog of the event from eyewitnesses who never agree on anything anyway, and are scribbled onto pieces of paper by highly fallible human beings and then transcribed into permanent records ( and further on, get OCR scanned by into digital images and/or transcribed yet again by more fallible human beings into a searchable text file ). Keep in mind that we are currently still talking about FBI 302’s written by corrupt or inept agents to this very day.

              This is not a sane method of recording historical events let alone evidentiary material used to prosecute or acquit any person. People who want to believe it is should imagine themselves sitting in the dock of a courtroom facing a zealot like Jim Garrison tossing around this “evidence” to a jury of sheeple who’d rather be playing candy crush on their smartphone.

              BTW, I mentioned Castro and North Vietnam purely for reasons of what the central incompetence agency might provide in a desired patsy. Otherwise, what is the point of a JFK assassination? What does it serve except probable agency suicide and a certain date with the hangman? If you as member of some smoky backroom conspiracy literally gamble everything on a goal, then what the hell is that goal? At that point in time we were mostly all united in a few things, defeating Communism was one and those two commie “nations” were ground zero in the JFK White House. But nuking the USSR was not a goal even of the most insane member of an alleged conspiracy since they just lived through the Cuban missile crisis and knew full well that the cocktail party circuit in Washington DC would end mere moments after the launches began. Yet the purported “patsy” Oswald in fact *was* a defector to the Soviet empire and that means they picked a dangerous patsy for their alleged operation.

              I remember those days, months and years after the assassination and all the many alleged perps thrown around in the media of that era. Everyone from the mafia and South Vietnam ( both plausible since the former had obvious ties with JFK/RFK/Langley, and the latter since Diem was just assassinated prior to and thanks to JFK ), to Cuba/Castro, every Soviet leader and satellite. It’s funny how it even morphed into LBJ or Democrats or Texans or Nixon or Republicans or Anarchists or maybe Martians. See the progression? That’s from Soviet propaganda ( self-preservation really ) plus JFK lionization from his sycophants, that combine to twist American discussion away from the likely alternate perps into kooksville. Anyway, Oswald was the shooter, and most likely worked alone before that day, and nothing substantial to the contrary has IMHO ever been unearthed. JFK was as human as Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley, King, and RFK and could be murdered by a solitary nutjob.

              Liked by 1 person

    • dd_sc says:

      At the very least, fire everyone down to the divisional (field office) level then promote a couple of the more competant ones to start rebuilding.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Michael says:

    Tyranny of Bureaucracy is why Term Limits is not the answer.
    Possibly if the Bureaucrats were term limited things would improve.
    IMO Gvt should not do anything that can be done by private enterprise.

    Liked by 13 people

    • Twinkletoes says:

      Absolutely! Every time I’ve done contract work for the government at local or state levels, there has been needless duplications, silly assignments, and time wasted on all projects and all during the work day. I can’t imagine how much worse it is for the federal bureaucrats.

      Liked by 7 people

      • Michael says:

        I say with first person experience with all the above FedGov is much worse.
        At the local or even state level one can often find an elected official who is concerned about keep his phoney-baloney job next election to plead one’s case.
        At the FedGov level unless you have serious connections/favors owed you are SOL.

        I tell F&F do NOT go into gvt work as it will suck the soul from you……..

        Liked by 3 people

    • JX says:

      “Tyranny of Bureaucracy” – that is an excellent phrase! It concisely describes “deep state”.

      Liked by 7 people

    • Firefly says:

      Unfortunately private enterprise isn’t a good solution either. Large Private enterprise dictate to government employees and threaten going to congress if they clamp down on their behavior. Government SES then pressure civil servants to give in to private enterprise. Private companies get access to competitor proprietary information and use it for their own profit. The problem is both private enterprise that work with the gov and government employees have become corrupt, lazy, and greedy. There’s a pervasive attitude that they’re not accountable to anyone. Honest and good people are driven out because when they discover the problems they try to do right.

      Private industry had an attitude that they’re entitled to a particular contract money- but don’t have to deliver. The thing that happened with the obamacare software company that was buddies with Michelle Obama not even delivering working software. They just get paid again to do the same work. That happens all the time in the government. 25-30 years ago the buddy companies at least delivered because gov civil servants had contractual recourse and the companies didn’t have this bizzare entitled to be paid but not deliver attitude. Private enterprise isn’t the solution- it’s made the government even worse.

      Like

      • JmKNY says:

        Firefly, I don’t know what contracts you worked on where the contractors threatened government employees but I know from first hand experience that on the federal contracts I had experience with, the government employee always dictated the terms because at the end of the day a contractor cannot be in charge of the contract. Now, 90% of the time the government employees were incompetent or incapable. They typically would want things that were beyond the scope of the project or completely irrelevant. As a result the contractor had to make recommendations but at the end of the day the final decisions rested with the govies.

        Liked by 4 people

        • Newt Love says:

          > “… I know from first hand experience that on the federal contracts I had experience with, the government employee always dictated the terms because at the end of the day a contractor cannot be in charge of the contract. …”

          Federal Contract Law forbids “personal services” to “govvies,” which means that the Government says what they need, and the Contractor Company supplies (human) resources to perform the work required.

          The reality is that the “govvies” violate the “personal services” law, and demand that the approve each person, and they fire them on a whim. Being a contractor is He11!

          JmKNY is right, that most “govvies” are incompetent, and I would add that they believe that they can squeeze blood, Pepsi-Cola, and ham sandwiches from a stone, if they just squeeze hard enough.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. BobBoxBody says:

    When this all comes out Trump will use the outrage to dismantle the Federal Government Bureaucracy. We’ve talking about draining the swamp, now it’s time to prune some trees….

    Or cuts some of them down entirely.

    Liked by 10 people

  4. Pat says:

    New ways they have to stop the public from speaking against the liberal lunacy in California at the local level. No when we try to speak we are not only racist or sexist for disagreeing with them but they have come up with even more clever ways to stop public debate and comment. Look at the new tactic the liberals are now using.

    Liked by 5 people

  5. Sporty says:

    Why do we need the FBI? All they do is protect the swamp.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Newt Love says:

      > “Why do we need the FBI? All they do is protect the swamp.”

      The FBI is incompetent to perform any crime investigation. They can’t even keep up with tips on High School shooters, and do their job.

      That is because the FBI for a decade has shown, by who they promote, that only Liberal (Communist?) Agents have a career at the FBI.

      Peter Strzok excelled at getting promotions, based only on his demonstrated willingness to prosecute (R) Party people, while letting off completely free, criminals in the (D) Party.

      America as a Representative Republic?
      Heck NO!
      The FBI wanted to set up a (D) Party Dictator, only we Deplorables elected PDJT.
      The FBI wanted to set up a permanent spying operation on the (R) Party, only we Deplorables elected PDJT.

      I’m not a Demlican or a Republicrat. I quit the (R) Party when G HW Bush lied to the American People with “No New Taxes.”
      But I’m still a Conservative.

      I want the American Representative Republic back, and if necessary, I will take up arms and even die trying to restore it.

      Freedom is a holy word!

      Liked by 5 people

  6. Trumpismine says:

    Patience and Prayer

    Like

  7. alliwantissometruth says:

    Too bad Republicans aren’t in charge of Congress & the Senate, then we could clean up this mes….

    Oh wait. Never mind

    Liked by 10 people

  8. Scott says:

    Issa is correct to a degree that the careerists are a big problem, but that means Sessions and Wray must clean it up and not ignore it. It has to be a big priority to clean it up or get rid of whole bureaus if they don’t want to play.

    Liked by 3 people

    • The Boss says:

      It seems the careerist problem is primarily Main Justice and FBI HQ. That’s where the dismissals need to begin. In the interim, I wouldn’t be surprised if someone with ultimate authority gets the unredacted documents flowing in about two months.

      Like

  9. quintrillion says:

    There are 500 attorneys in the DOJ that run the Senior Executive Services…this is all deep state embeds and corrupt to the core and this SES was set-up for that purpose

    http://www.federaljobs.net/ses.htm

    https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/the-press-office/2015/12/15/executive-order-strengthening-senior-executive-service

    Liked by 8 people

    • Firefly says:

      The SES Force the civil servants to give contracts to their pet contractors and those civil servants who don’t comply with the corruption are harassed or marginalized until they get fed up and leave. The remaining avoid work or don’t mind doing the dirty work for the SES. Private enterprise then cops an attitude that they get paid but don’t have to deliver. Companies who don’t deliver get paid again to try to deliver. Sometime they often get 2 and even get 4 of 5 times to get paid for the same work until they finally deliver. It’s profitable to screw up or not deliver because they get paid again.

      Like

    • brh82 says:

      When Trump arrived, he “accepted the resignation” of “all” the attorneys. All complied except Preet Bharaha. So he fired Preet and will pay dearly forever after! I wondered why the attorneys, and how many were there, and why did Preet refuse to comply? Does anyone here know? I always have thought all Obama holdovers would be gone by 1/20/17. Why not?

      Like

  10. “we had a very constructive meeting”, wtf does that mean?
    Issa pushing the narrative that DoJ stonewalls Congress all the time and it’s nbd, what an embarrassment he is.

    Liked by 3 people

    • BakoCarl says:

      “we had a very constructive meeting” is the expected politspeak of the GOPe or other career politicians when they are unable or unwilling to speak openly and honestly like Mike Pompeo and other members of the Trump Team.

      Recall the B.S. that flowed freely from the Issa investigations and the clear result . . . crickets and B.S.

      Liked by 6 people

    • tdaly14 says:

      Issa went thru this for years with Benghazi, FAst and Furious and IRS. He’s been working on getting the emails for Fast and Furious. He sure doesn’t like Eric corrupt Holder. Said he should have his law license taken away and disbarred.

      Liked by 3 people

  11. AH_C says:

    Careerists need to be moved around. About 5 to 7 years then moved to another department that is organizationally separated from one another. They also need to move to another city and state so that there is no power base to develop.

    If you want to settle down on one place and raise kids, then the federal GS/NF career might nor be the place for you as you’re liable to move everything every 5 years or so. Those at HQ can only stay 3 years.

    And no more generous relocation plans, like buying your house. You get a moving van and 3 months storage. Period.

    Liked by 12 people

    • wendy forward says:

      Right on.

      Like

    • wheatietoo says:

      How about just…Term Limits.

      10 years and they’re out of there.
      No Pensions.
      Bureaucrats should have to go out into the private sector and be around all those people that they tormented.

      Only govt jobs not subject to Term Limits/No Pensions, would be the jobs where people put their lives on the line.

      We’ve got 2nd & 3rd generation bureaucrats now, who have never had jobs in the private sector.
      This has created an Us-vs-Them mentality.
      And ‘Them’…is we the people.

      Liked by 11 people

      • Coast says:

        The result would be an even a less desirable work force. Govt does have its rightful function.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Coast says:

          Let me try that again…the result would be a less desirable less effective work force than what we have today…and today isn’t all that great to begin with.

          Liked by 1 person

          • wheatietoo says:

            I don’t think so, Coast.

            “Can’t be fired” + Pensions = Tyranny

            By ‘tyranny’, I mean this results in a You-Can’t-Touch-Me attitude.

            It is supposed to be The Govt Serves the People.
            But the opposite exists now.
            We are in servitude to the Govt…and they know it.

            Why should they get Pensions?
            Most govt work is easy…and geared to the lowest common denominator.
            Yet these people are paid more than their counterparts in the private sector, for doing the same sort of work.

            People in the private sector, who do not have pensions, are busting their butts to make a living & pay their taxes…so that fat bureaucrats can get their pensions.

            Our tax dollars even pay for govt workers’ SocSec/Medicare taxes.
            That’s because our tax dollars pay their salaries.

            So in addition to their pensions…they are also getting taxpayer-provided SocSec/Medicare benefits, when they retire.

            No, Coast…the current situation has already fostered ineffective and undesirable govt workforce.

            If we can’t fire them, then at least we should impose Term Limits on them.

            Liked by 6 people

            • Coast says:

              They can be fired.

              Like

            • Michael says:

              There are no consequences to what they do.

              If I as a rank and file Union member get greedy and my employer fails I have no income.
              I as a business operator I fire anyone not bringing value to my business.
              I have been both simultaneously and the first thing I did with a new hire is put them in the office for a couple of weeks sorting out work orders so they understand just what happens if they don’t do their own paperwork in the field.

              Privilege, authority, and responsibility must all exist or you have an open loop with no feedback.

              Liked by 1 person

        • Rita Camp says:

          I worked 34 years in the private sector in Washington. During my career I watched the federal workforce grow, grow and grow during Republican and Democratic administrations. As it grew, the bureaucracy became more and more disfunctional. Employees slowly forgot that they worked for “the people.” They created their little pockets of power and used it to enhance whatever policy initiative they agreed with and killed those they didn’t agree with. The federal workforce is bloated beyond belief. That’s how we end up with corrupt people, e.g., McCabe, Strock and Page, to name a few current bad actors. Government does have its purpose, but I can guarantee you that a reduction in force of 50% wouldn’t be noticeable. That’s how bad it truly is.

          Liked by 3 people

      • Michael says:

        “The Idle Rich” as my late father would say.

        Like

      • Higgins says:

        One very surefire way to reduce the government is to cut the salaries. Max out the SES at 125K and cut the rest 5% per year for 5 years. This will more align the government with the private sector, save some dollars, and get a work-force more aligned with private industry salary levels and motivation. Start using some AI/robots in appropriate positions.

        Like

    • The Boss says:

      The military moves families around all the time. So careerists better get used to the idea that they’ll be relocated, or their positions “redacted”.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Risa says:

        There used to occasionally be an action called RIF, a ‘ Reduction in Force “, where fed employees were laid off or offered early retirement packages. Does that not ever occur these days?

        Like

    • svenwg says:

      If those that defend the freedoms that all Americans can do it, why not the lazy careerists working in the protected environment of the Deep State. Maximum stay in any department and city 24 months, then onto a new assignment!

      Liked by 1 person

    • mopar2016 says:

      I’d reassign them to study banana farming in Alaska.
      All this corruption is being financed with our tax dollars.
      Multi million dollar “run out the clock” witch hunts too.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. White Apple says:

    Seriously, have we ever seen anything positive come out of a “constructive” meeting? Why have meetings at all if they are not “constructive”?

    Liked by 1 person

  13. ZurichMike says:

    Now up to 29,000 sealed criminal cases in federal courts as of April 30th since Trump became president. The average per year is about 1,500. Peeling the layers off of this putrid, institutional onion and jettisoning the filth of the body politic is a task surpassing Hercules cleaning the Augean stables.

    Sessions has been in place a little over a year, and despite being handicapped by the very agencies of the Executive branch that are supposed to be helping, despite the monstrously lazy and grandstanding House and Senate, a hostile media, and an audience used to having things wrapped up like a one-hour episode of CSI: New York, he has done amazing things to get the nation ready for CONVICTIONS of the guilty, not toothless INDICTMENTS.

    Keep your powder dry. All will be well.

    Liked by 17 people

    • G. Combs says:

      Mike,
      Do you have a link for those 29,000 sealed indictments?

      Thanks, Gale.

      Liked by 1 person

      • ZurichMike says:

        It’s regularly posted on Twitter, but archived online. When you open the link, you’ll see the table of cases by state, and you’ll see the twitter usernames of volunteers who go through the laborious process of looking up this information.

        Information source at pacer.gov

        Information on total cases at http://tinyurl.com/yd5vn9ou

        Liked by 7 people

        • 4sure says:

          How would all those sealed indictments in 50 states plus DC have any relevancy to draining the treasonous bastards in the FBI/DOJ who are located in DC? There could be a million sealed indictments in 57 states but who cares, if they are not in the states or district courts where the swamp critters reside or committed their crime,

          I see this sealed indictment stuff posted here from time to time to “prove” that Sessions is busy draining the swamp. It is just not valid. If it were, I am sure the genius SD would have already referred to it ling ago. He has not. So, as far as i am concerned, it is BS and proves nothing about the Treasonous people SD is covering so well. .

          Liked by 1 person

          • ZurichMike says:

            But the 50 states are where politicians reside, conduct business, and/or have sufficient contacts. This would include members of their staff. Maxine Waters could be sued in DC or California, for example. Pedophiles in California and New York; corrupt payments to politicians in Illinois or Virginia.

            Then how to you explain a 10-fold increase in sealed indictments within a one-year period?

            Please note that Sundance is not the only person covering the draining of the swamp, and contrary to your assertion, he has reported on grand juries convened outside of DC. In addition, I and others have frequently commented at length about the grand jury process, the time needed to impanel grand juries, who do not meet 40 yours per week — more likely once or twice per month — and are scattered far from leaking mouths and prying eyes in DC, the time it takes to gather and present evidence, and then actually write, approve, and file the indictment with the court.

            No one knew about Huber (in Utah, not DC) for almost a full year — and it was Sessions who confirmed this long after Huber had progressed in his work on behalf of Sessions using referral of the IG.

            Liked by 10 people

        • G. Combs says:

          Thanks again Mike.

          Liked by 3 people

          • SteveT says:

            What are the chances that any of the 29,000 sealed indictments refer to candidates for election in the mid-terms. Can they continue and/or be successful if facing indictment/arrest?
            Now that many of the nominations and primaries have been decided/run, they cannot be replaced with alternatives. This would leave the field open for “clean” candidates.
            Still think the Demonrats can make overall progress?

            SteveT

            Like

    • Rita Camp says:

      I’m praying that you are correct, ZurichMike.

      Liked by 3 people

    • MustangBlues says:

      Well Said. Let Sessions Move At His Own speed. Support Trump. MAGA.

      Liked by 2 people

  14. thedoc00 says:

    The majority of the problem still circles back to Mitch McConnell not allowing the president to install the middle level of appointed management needed to focus on house cleaning. The size of government is so great at this point that the presidents lean team either focusses in cleaning house or executing policy/agenda. Additionally, part of the problem may also reside with Trump who needs to understand he may need those “extra” appointments (i.e. big government) to clean house before re-leaning out the team to execute.

    Like

    • thedoc00 says:

      By the way Mr. Issa, you are also part of the same McConnell problem for not supporting the president, in getting appointments made or allowing the president authority to make appointments when congress is in recess.

      Like

  15. biggierat says:

    Issa “the guy that never gets his man” when he ran government oversight committee. He had a lot of investigations with zero results.

    Liked by 3 people

  16. Sharon says:

    “One of the interesting aspects noted by Issa is the people underneath the top-tier of justice management, the careerists, who are the ones actually running the operation, defending the administrative state, and protecting the previous conduct of their organizational embeds.”

    The obvious, primary problem.

    The entire federal bureaucracy needs a scorched earth cleansing.

    If the career criminals are not removed, nothing will change.

    The only way it could change with them still in place if some non-careerists (Congress or administrative people) were smarter and quicker on their feet than the careerists. That’s not likely to be the case any time soon.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Time to restaff the Anchorage and Fargo governmental offices……………..

      Liked by 3 people

      • G. Combs says:

        And all those old decrepit Army bases. Make sure they are energized by CARBON NEUTRAL solar panels and wind mills. Rebuild with hand tools…. No mechanized equiment allowed.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Apollo says:

      It would also help to get true Trumpian political appointees in place at all levels, as opposed to standard GOPe swamp creatures. Might have to look outside DC for the candidates, but that’s a good thing.

      Like

  17. Coast says:

    If Congress has a right and responsibility for oversight of the FBI and DOJ, then they also have a responsibility to take the appropriate action when that effort is blocked. I’m ashamed that crap like this has gone on for well over a year, with essentially no one being fired..or prosecuted for obstruction in reference to this oversight responsibility. What does it take?

    Like

  18. TMonroe says:

    Watch Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister to see that there’s nothing new under the sun. What was grown and nurtured as far as the bureaucratic vise-grip on an ever-growing government was just a little slower-growing here, but is now well-entrenched like a thatch of weeds.

    The show is like watching the current drama unfold. All of the damning information is a matter of security, so it can’t be seen, strategic leaks are everywhere, and everyone is often covering for the other guy and thus can’t do the real reforms. What the civil service fears is anyone rocking the boat, so they set about with distractions and misdirection aplenty until they run out the clock on the politicos, while they stay entrenched and do as they please. Sound familiar?

    Liked by 1 person

  19. MontanaMel says:

    What the hell happened to search warrants from a judge? (based on a contempt of congress finding from the related committee)???
    Call up the US Marshals service and tell them to go grab XX number of trucks and XX number of helpers…kick in the doors 2 hr later and put everyone found on the floor… load the trucks and leave!… “We’re going to need some bigger trucks” sounds like the next words heard.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Bullseye says:

    Why doesn’t PDT just declassify the docs and make them available to the public ?

    Like

  21. snellvillebob says:

    I suspect that Ex-senator Sessions going along with Rosenstein’s refusal to give unredacted document to Congressional leaders in a timely fashion is to force Congress to reassert their control over the DOJ, FBI, CIA, NSA ad nauseam. Nunes should get some backing, sit down with Sessions and tell him he will lose at least 25% of the department funding in next years budget unless of course he wants to shoot for more like 50%. This will allow Sessions to lay off the most tainted of the obama additions staying with a LIFO (Last In, First Out) procedure to make the union happy. Survivors will cooperate more with Congress in the future. Its like spraying your house for bug every now and then.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Greg says:

    I posted this comment in another story, but I think it’s very worthwhile to bring to peoples attention.

    This guy has consistently presented a plausible and unique narrative view on the Mueller, Trump Russia Investigation. He has 4 videos here that outline his take on it. He’s an ordinary guy so his videos are not professional, literally just him talking in his house. But I urge you to check them out…Because he makes a lot of sense and he steps through the entire timeline to build a quite different picture to what a lot of people might expect.

    https://gab.ai/tv/watch/13719
    https://gab.ai/tv/watch/13735
    https://gab.ai/tv/watch/13731
    https://gab.ai/tv/watch/13739

    Like

  23. woodstuff says:

    Government should have only three functions:
    Protect our shores, deliver my mail, and leave me alone.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Michael says:

    Mail is better privatized IMO. Fedex vs USPS no contest.
    What I do believe in is strict accountability.

    Have you read “Freehold” by Michael Z Williamson?
    If not based upon your comment I think you would enjoy the “Freehold” series.
    I would warn you first time I read it I read straight through – all 500+ pages as I could not put it down. 😉

    Like

  25. Piggy says:

    The FBI is part of the Executive Branch. It is not an independent entity. It was created by big government progressive Teddy Roosevelt.

    https://www.fbi.gov/history/brief-history

    The FBI needs to be assessed on its viability now and the future. They are a political organization. Local police do all investigations ask any local police investigator.

    Clean house or shut it down.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. CNN_sucks says:

    The stench of the conspiracy by Mueller is emanating. Muh Russia investigation is a farce. His buddy Deriskapa is now his enemy. Cooking up crimes and pressuring someone to flip to get Trump.

    Like

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