MAGAnomic Winning – U.S. Steel Announces Restart of Illinois Granite City Steel Works – 500 Immediately Recalled Jobs…

500 high-wage manufacturing jobs might not sound like a big deal, but for the community of Granite City Illinois it is a VERY BIG DEAL. Their blast furnace was shut down in 2016, and today they happily hear the news of its reopening… GREAT NEWS !

ILLINOIS – U.S. Steel announced it will restart a blast furnace and steel-making operations at its Granite City Works plant in southern Illinois near St. Louis as a result of the announced tariffs of 25 percent on all steel imports.

The Pittsburgh-based steelmaker shuttered parts of the mill in late 2015 and early 2016, largely, it said, as a result of a glut of imports that depressed prices and made steel mills less profitable. U.S. Steel plans to bring 500 steelworkers back to work if President Donald Trump goes forward with plans to act on a Section 232 investigation that concluded a surge in steel imports was eroding the American steel industry and threatening national security.

“Our Granite City Works facility and employees, as well as the surrounding community, have suffered too long from the unending waves of unfairly traded steel products that have flooded U.S. markets,” U. S. Steel President and CEO David Burritt said. “The Section 232 action announced by President Trump last week recognizes the significant threat steel imports pose to our national and economic security.” (read more)

Appearing alongside Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross on CNBC, U.S. Steel CEO David Burritt announced that his company is bringing back 500 workers and restarting a blast furnace in Granite City, Ill. Burritt cited President Trump’s decision to issue tariffs on steel imports as the reason.

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207 Responses to MAGAnomic Winning – U.S. Steel Announces Restart of Illinois Granite City Steel Works – 500 Immediately Recalled Jobs…

  1. Minnie says:

    Thank you for this information, Sundance.

    This is why I cannot get enough of the Treehouse 🇺🇸

    Liked by 47 people

    • 🍺Gunny says:

      bet a donut it doesn” make the mainstream😎

      Liked by 14 people

      • Sayit2016 says:

        That’s ok the money these people will be making from this plant reopining will hit their bank accounts and that is what matters !

        Liked by 14 people

        • Sayit2016 says:

          re-opening * ugh !

          Liked by 6 people

        • Those 500 jobs will not only support the job holders, but the ancillary spending from it helps to support the entire community. That money will be spent locally in restaurants, stores, etc. I would bet that everyone in the local area is excited by this news.

          Liked by 19 people

          • jeans2nd says:

            And not just the community. Our now-itty-bitty town in Ohio supplied all the overhead traveling cranes for that plant – and a great many other steel plants.
            All those machines will need to be restarted as well.
            The amount of jobs affected is mind-boggling.

            Liked by 15 people

            • Minnie says:

              ⭐️⭐️⭐️

              Liked by 2 people

            • GB Bari says:

              Yes – that’s the multiplier effect of every plant that re-opens or every new plant that is built and opens. Both the jobs in B2B businesses but the local community commerce that receives the spending by the re-employed or newly employed. So when the Democrats poohpooh the “paltry few” jobs in any one plant, they deliberately ignore this multiplier effect in the communities where these plants start operating…

              Liked by 8 people

          • And contribute to the tax revenue.

            Liked by 5 people

          • kroesus says:

            typical manufacturing and heavy industry has a multiplier effect of 8 for downstream jobs so those 500 jobs will create/support a further 4000 jobs from their direct economic impact ……I am sure Granite City will be happy with the increase in local economic activity

            Liked by 6 people

          • Newt Love says:

            > ” … the ancillary spending from it helps to support the entire community. … ”

            Economists call it “The Money Multiplier Effect.” For every $ coming into that small community to the recently re-employed Steel Worker, there is a bigger impact on that small community.

            The recently re-employed Steel Worker (with new income) might buy some steak instead of hamburger. They might buy a new car, instead of driving their 15+ year-old car. et cetera.

            The Grocer and Car Dealer (et cetera, have more income than before. They use it to give raises and buy new equipment, et cetera. Those purchase spur a residual effect.

            Until the money is sent out of the small town, it creates the Money Multiplier Effect (web search for it).

            In general, in America’s small towns, the Money Multiplier Effect is 2.35. So, for every $ that US Steel (or the Aluminum smelter) inject into an American town, the local economy experiences $2.35 benefit!

            This is so cool!
            The (D) Party let the Steel and Aluminum industries wither on the vine, claiming that it was inevitable. President Trump took on the UnFair Trades, and implemented tariffs against Steel and Aluminum (China pays their steel workers $30/day. US Steel workers earn $30/hour, and China subsidizes their steel to make the prices even lower.

            Trump puts a tariff on steel and aluminum, which make money for the US government, while making the artificially low steel and aluminum prices from places like China more expensive, making US produced steel and aluminum to be price competitive, which makes American Industry able to compete with the unfair foreign competition.

            Liked by 4 people

            • JP says:

              “Trump puts a tariff on steel and aluminum, …, while making the artificially low steel and aluminum prices from places like China more expensive, making US produced steel and aluminum to be price competitive, which makes American Industry able to compete”

              So US US steel and aluminium prices rise, helps if work in US producing those metals, but if part of rest of US industries, the cost of production rises, costs more for Boeing to make a plane, more for GM or Tesla to make a car, all the rest of US industries consuming these metals are made LESS competitive, profits and sale fall, people will lose jobs. One sector of US Industry is favored and the other using aluminum and steel hurt and less competitive both domestically and for exports, plus consumers pay more for higher priced domestic output. It is not as rosy as some assume if look at effect on the industries using metals as inputs or consumers. That is why almost universally agree among economists that imposing tariffs are a bad idea, even if no retaliation, and including the redistribution to gov of revenue or taxes paid by consumers which also means less they spend on other stuff. There is no way you can show me any model where imposing tariffs do not cause net harm to society (unless say replacing some other tax with even larger deadweight losses). It is a blind eye to look at jobs gained in one area (metal production) and completely ignore more diverse job loses in all other sectors where metals are an input or consumer demand falls since they are spending more on items made with steel and aluminum and less on everything else.

              Liked by 1 person

              • brh82 says:

                You are discounting the number of Americans who will gladly pay more for products made here, rather than imported from other countries, beginning with the assurance that American Made is better quality. Name me a foreign-made product you’ve bought in the last 8 years that isn’t inferior to the same product you bought when it was made here. Are you suggesting we keep on being ripped off by China and Mexico?

                Liked by 1 person

      • littleanniesfannie says:

        Pic showed CNBC

        Liked by 2 people

      • 🍺Gunny says:

        That is true. The smile on the families faces when they hear the news would be heart rending.

        Thank God for our President. I know tonite 500 families probably are.

        Merry Christmas. In March😎

        Liked by 6 people

    • kinthenorthwest says:

      Lets see wasn’t/isn’t Illinois Obama’s state. Hmm Trump does more for Illinois in a bit over a year than Obama did in 8. Oh wait…I think that Chicago now has a bigger gang problem with Obama friends and the train kids being send there. .

      Liked by 12 people

      • Janie M. says:

        kin, our RINO governor, signed a bill last year making IL a sanctuary state. It is my understanding, he and Rahm Emanuel (Schitcago’s mayor) have been business partners in the past.

        Liked by 7 people

        • kinthenorthwest says:

          So many cities I used to want to sight see in America are now places I don’t think I’d be safe even at the airport.

          Liked by 8 people

          • Janie M. says:

            Kin, Chicago proper (the Loop and the shopping district) is still a somewhat safe area. A lot of suburbanites commute into Chicago for work. Most of those shootings you hear about are on the South side which is predominantly black neighborhoods. Chicago is a huge city, it covers 234 square miles. Zurich Mike visited Chicago (last year I believe) and loved the restaurants. He was, in all probability, in the Loop and nearby area.

            Liked by 1 person

            • kinthenorthwest says:

              But you have to admit if you visiting and don’t know your way around it is scary
              Having survived LA for 20 years, I know how easy it is to get lost or how easy it is to go from what is a safe area to a bad area in just minutes. .

              Liked by 3 people

              • Janie M. says:

                Yes, I understand what you are saying. And, unfortunately, when people (not from this state) read the stats for the murder/shooting rate for Chicago, they tend to consolidate the South side with the whole of Chicago which as I explained previously is HUGE. I worked in Chicago for 3 years, commuted in by train. As such, the Loop and the shopping district are areas I am most familiar with and know to be safe.

                Liked by 1 person

                • kinthenorthwest says:

                  I visited Seattle about 5 years back
                  Came across two fights between homeless people in daytime in tourist area. 2nd fight one of them pulled a crocodile Dundee type knife. I ran the other way calling 911.
                  When I told a store clerk about it, they told me that was normal and usually pay no attention to them or call the police. Police only seem to get involved if they are there to see it. 😮 😮

                  Liked by 2 people

                • Janie M. says:

                  Oh, geez, kin. That’s terrible. I’ve never seen anything like that in downtown Chicago. Chicago Police always patrol the downtown area in their squads. At the worst, you would occasionally get male teenagers near the train station panhandling. They’d tell you they “lost” their train ticket/money and need to get home. I’d say, “sorry” and keep walking. They don’t keep bugging you.

                  Liked by 2 people

                • kinthenorthwest says:

                  I thought the first one was a fluke–Oh well just walk into nearest store.
                  2nd one I didn’t realize I could run that fast…

                  Liked by 2 people

                • Janie M. says:

                  Yup, you never know what a crazy person will do.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • kinthenorthwest says:

                  weird

                  Liked by 1 person

      • Ferret2 says:

        Who is Barack Obama?

        Liked by 9 people

      • dayallaxeded says:

        Remember 0bunghole was “working” in and “representing” Chi for a good decade before he usurped and abused the presidency, so it’s more like 18 years of negatives versus 14 months of positives.

        I’ve argued with folks in the past that the current POTUS couldn’t reasonably take credit for current economic conditions, because the US economy is likd a big ship–it doesn’t turn on a dime. Usually, what we see during any given presidential administration, at least until the 3rd year, is really the effect(s) of the prior administration or earlier actions. However, the shift from the lawless, authoritarian, anti-growth, oppressive, malicious regime of 0bunghole to the “rule of law,” free and fair market, pro-growth, pro-freedom, benevolent VSG presidency of PDJT has been so dramatic that it is releasing massive pent-up capital and capacity, as well as reversing on a dime, the destructive policies of prior admins. We have never seen anything like this, at least not in my lifetime, and it is wonderful!

        May God continue to guard and guide VSGPDJT and all who support and help him, as well as guide and turn those who have failed to see God’s will in the past to His will and His way, that we and our nation may once again be His light on the hill, a beacon for the world! Let the people say, AMEN!

        Liked by 11 people

        • kinthenorthwest says:

          We all must pray for Trump, the VP, their families & all the good people under them.

          Liked by 8 people

        • ladypenquin says:

          “However, the shift from the lawless, authoritarian, anti-growth, oppressive, malicious regime of 0bunghole to the “rule of law,” free and fair market, pro-growth, pro-freedom, benevolent VSG presidency of PDJT has been so dramatic that it is releasing massive pent-up capital and capacity, as well as reversing on a dime, the destructive policies of prior admins.”

          Precisely because America was being harmed by foreign/globalist policies, unfair trade deals, oppression of our own economic potential, etc. etc. is why President Trump’s quick and astute economic policy moves are essentially releasing the dam. A dam holds back water unnaturally, so when the gates are opened, watch out. If Obama’s policies had continued, under Hillary and the Uniparty, we would have been finished and totally dependent on the globalists.

          Liked by 5 people

        • Lucille says:

          Barack CLUELESS Obama…no wonder he got on so well with Justin Trudeau….

          Liked by 6 people

          • covfefe999 says:

            I LOVE watching this video. Yah right, Barry, the people need to be retrained to do other jobs because the ones they’d been doing aren’t coming back. Except now they’re coming back thanks to Trump. Have a good day, bye. lol

            Liked by 4 people

        • Cheri Wiinter says:

          I’m a closet-praying-tree-branch-fan of huge proportion
          Wanted to say kudos to one of the myriad of TRUE posts
          Feel a bond and a actual love for my Tree House family!
          Wish we could have a 3 day reunion on the front lawn of WH someday…
          If not; I’ve asked for one of those paved-with-gold streeets to be named
          SONDANCE!

          Liked by 5 people

          • Ad rem says:

            Welcome to the Tree House Cheri! The thought of a 3 day reunion of like-minded Treepers sounds awesome. If we each pitch in and carry a branch, it might be totally doable. 😀

            Liked by 1 person

            • MontanaMel says:

              Been saying: We need a march on DC this summer!!!
              I’m in…. Where can I park the Bar-B-Q pit and wood pile?…
              Give me 8 hr to get cranked up and I’ll have a line 1/2 way to Georgia!
              Dry Rub or Sauced?….cheezeMac is at the next table.
              Check-6

              Liked by 3 people

    • Fire Dog says:

      Very true! This news answers the prayers and lifts the hope of the first 500 unemployed men in Granite City.

      I think Americans are finally feeling Father God’s light upon them thanks to His anointing of President Trump whose mission is to Make America Great Again. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Pam says:

    Liked by 16 people

  3. Gil says:

    Look at the grin on that man’s face! Anyone of those jackals who dont support US steel need to go into the cities and homes of these steelworkers and say it to their faces. The interview was great!!!!!!

    Liked by 18 people

  4. Pam says:

    It’s great to see these people being able to go back to their job. Hopefully, we will see more stories like this in the coming days and weeks.

    Liked by 8 people

  5. steph_gray says:

    So does this mean that instead of only 2 manufacturers left of the 18 we used to have, there are now 3?

    Not that this isn’t fantastic even if it’s only one of the same 2 – so far.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Cisco says:

    500 today, a 1,000 tomorrow, 10,000 next week.
    Get ‘er done Mr. President.
    MAEA
    Making America Employed Again.
    🚂🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

    Liked by 20 people

  7. TwoLaine says:

    For those of you who don’t know, this is a YUGE WIN for St.Louis! A metro area DEVASTATED by The Kenyan and his terrorist social justice a-holes, along with a DIM Governor. THINK FERGUSON. Since it is on the Illinois side of the equation, this would be considered the East St. Louis quandrant. The IL DIMs should be jumping with JOY!

    Granite City is a city in Madison County, Illinois, United States, within the Greater St. Louis metropolitan area.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granite_City,_Illinois

    Liked by 21 people

    • joshua says:

      what happened to “hands up. Don’t shoot”……lol

      Liked by 4 people

    • booger71 says:

      Funny thing is that Ferguson was the world headquarters of Emerson Electric back in the 70’s . Lots of good paying jobs in that town…back then.

      Liked by 5 people

    • churchmouse says:

      Fascinating history. Thank you for the link, TwoLaine.

      Recommended reading.

      Liked by 3 people

      • TwoLaine says:

        I tho’t so too. It is Everytown USA. A long and proud history ALMOST snuffed out.

        I can’t wait to see how they turn the town around. And to think they didn’t need riots, looting, or to burn the town down numerous times to accomplish a goal of bringing back jobs.

        I have driven through there many, many times over the years, and also had a long-time church friend that lived in Troy, not far away.

        On the other side of the state, while not new news, the Harley plant is closing. 800 more jobs gone and many more ancillary businesses and jobs affected.

        Harley-Davidson will close KC plant by summer of 2019, eliminating 800 jobs
        30 Jan 2018
        http://fox4kc.com/2018/01/30/harley-davidson-will-close-kc-plant-by-summer-of-2019

        Liked by 2 people

        • dayallaxeded says:

          A lot can change in a year–look at what just months of VSGPDJT did with Carrier, Ford, etc., who’d planned to move to MX, but reversed or modified those plans to keep more manufacturing in USA. Re: HD in particular, someone needs to do something about that company’s allergy to innovation, modernization, and QC in their products. Jap bikes beat the carp out of them in the market and on the track for good reasons. A company that limits its market to people who want a bike with a historic label and a “potato potato potato potato….” sound is barely worthy to be a footnote in history.

          Liked by 2 people

          • TwoLaine says:

            I agree on a lot can change, and that HD needs to do a lot of things. They’ve outsourced a lot overseas and people just aren’t going to stand for that anymore. Vets are a big part of their past and present audience, and outsourcing to them and most red blooded Americans is a red line you don’t wanna’ cross.

            Like

        • churchmouse says:

          Please keep us posted of progress. I will certainly pay attention.

          I’m sorry to see that the Harley-Davidson plant will be closing on the other side of the state. I figured a new administration would herald better news. Perhaps management decided not to listen?

          Yes, in all these cases, businesses nearby close. I know of a town in New England where a shipyard closed many years ago. It was their lifeblood. All the mom-and-pop businesses nearby also shuttered. It’s sad.

          Senior management and outside consultants understand next to nothing about local communities.

          Liked by 1 person

  8. kinthenorthwest says:

    More Jobs for Americans.

    Liked by 8 people

  9. TrueNorthSeeker says:

    Woohoo !! Winning! Those 500 jobs and the American families they represent will contribute to our national security while at the same time provide for a good living. And the ripple effect in that community will multiply the positive impact if those 500 jobs. America First!! Thanks for this feel-good moment Sundance. Good news indeed !

    Liked by 9 people

  10. Linus in W.PA. says:

    Thank the Lord for a return to COMMON SENSE!!!

    Liked by 5 people

  11. Here we go with EU responding with ..” We’ll respond to U.S. tariffs in a “ tit for tat manner”. No, Europe, you have ‘nursing’ on our’s for decades… it is time for us to give you the “tat”.

    Liked by 7 people

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      I am still waiting to give them the bill for their NATO defense for the last 40 years. When I was a teenager in high school in the mid-1970’s, during the Carter years I thought it was STUPID for the USA to be [mostly] paying for the defense of all those freeloaders. I could not understand how our elected representatives were allowing that to happen.

      Liked by 5 people

      • kroesus says:

        I think you have a slightly incorrect view of the money “owed” from NATO members…..the charter calls for all members to contribute to the defense as a whole by expending a minimum of 2% of GDP for the OWN militaries…..while it can be argued we shared a bigger burden by covering for their known shortcomings it can also be argued that our role as world protector would have seen those same defense budgets anyway

        Liked by 1 person

    • Cisco says:

      👍🌟🌟🌟🌟👍

      Liked by 2 people

  12. hpushkin says:

    Makes my heart sing.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. deepthinker says:

    if you listen closely, at 7:28ish, a commentator quietly says “that’s bullshit” in the background in response to the US Steel guy’s comment. ridiculous, these people are.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. MIKE says:

    This is great news. Just had a discussion yesterday with one of my Pa. transplant buddys who lives here now(he’s from Liverpool, Pa.) about the the metals tariffs. His family’s prior generations all worked in Steel mills. He himself used to manufacture automobile parts. I told him these tariffs are going to bring these jobs back, with the benefits of higher quality end-user product. Can’t wait to share this with him.
    Still however I am perplexed how most don’t get the MAGA plan. Nobody I know lives on Wall Street

    Liked by 5 people

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      “how most don’t get the MAGA plan”

      You mean “most of the elites” & MSM don’t get the MAGA plan.

      The vast majority of middle America “gets it”. They (MSM) are not asking us and we don’t control what they are putting out.
      FAKE NEWS in an attempt to keep controlling us!

      Liked by 6 people

      • corimari2013 says:

        Paul Ryan with a jumbo egg on his face: yesterday he slammed President Trump for imposing the tariffs.
        The mask continues to be peeled off this globalist.

        Liked by 7 people

        • 🍺Gunny says:

          These people still don’t realize we are onto their game. We are awakened. Ryan says something like this and he just continues to look like a fool.

          Real Americans, real Americans, love to hear about other Americans success. That is how it has always been. We tell our children: “Don’t you want to be successful just like them?”

          We don’t tell our children; “You should be like Paul Ryan”

          Ha….I made a funny…..Bwaaaaah😎

          Liked by 3 people

      • Rhoda R says:

        Oh the elites get it alright – it just isn’t in THEIR best interests. They’re firmly invested in globalization.

        Liked by 1 person

    • mcclainra says:

      It’s the MSM!! Too many people only read/see that.

      Liked by 2 people

  15. Sayit2016 says:

    MORE winning and I’m STILL lovin it ! Thank You President Trump for another promise kept ! We support you to MAGA to infinity !

    Liked by 4 people

  16. keeler says:

    More Rust off the ol’ Belt

    Liked by 8 people

  17. JP says:

    Does this offset the expected job losses in Auto and Aerospace (takes 350 lbs of aluminum to build
    car, Boeing worse for planes), cancelled new US factories (Electrolux – no profit in US, better to manufacture overseas and export to US than make in US because of tariff), and consumers paying more for everything? Smoot–Hawley Tariff of 1930 also “fixed” things “MAGA” leading to an higher trade deficit, and neither senators were reelected. Tariff of Abominations 1828 almost lead to South succeeding from Union, or what would have been an earlier Civil War, if not repealed since it just protected special interest Northern industrialists and manufacturer profits from competition costing the South in terms of higher consumer prices and lost exports. No wonder the stock market had a sharp sell off on the news.

    Liked by 1 person

    • keeler says:

      This reads like bad copypasta, which it probably is…

      Liked by 5 people

    • sundance says:

      Seriously. You should study more.

      Smoot Hawley Tariffs (and all before 1976) were when the U.S. was massively exporting and running large trade surpluses.

      When you enter a tariff query and YOU are the exporter (manufacturer), there is a danger of losing position to your customer. However, when you enter a tariff query, and YOU are the customer, you control the entire dynamic.

      THE U.S. is the customer in almost every trade deal. Current trade deficits run over $800 billion per yr. As the market all others need access to, we hold the leverage.

      [Worst case scenario based on epic pessimism – Any export gap (losses if retaliation would be applied) will ultimately mean lower domestic prices; as the supply and demand variables play out inside the U.S. But that is extremely unlikely]

      Liked by 11 people

      • Minnie says:

        Thank you for another epic lesson. You break things down to where even I begin to grasp the concept.

        Gratitude, Sundance 🇺🇸

        Liked by 4 people

      • dayallaxeded says:

        Wow! Epic explanation indeed, SD! Hope JP appreciates the education even half as much as I do! Many thanks for this and all you do!

        Liked by 3 people

      • amwick says:

        So, we made bad deals?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Cetera says:

        When looking at the formula for GDP, imports are subtracted. Yes, that is correct, the trade deficit is subtracted from GDP. If the U.S. were somehow to actually stop 100% of imports, and that $800 billion per year didn’t leave the country, what happens to GDP?

        It rises, by $800 billion per year.

        How many extra planes or vacuums or toasters can $800 billion per year buy? More than enough to offset the gargantuan TARP bailouts that were thrown away each and every year.

        Think that one through, and then see where “free” trade gets you.

        One can argue that GDP isn’t terribly meaningful. But one can also argue that keeping the money “in the family” so to speak, is very much in the interests of our country and our citizens, and very, very much against those who make they money moving numbers around and skimming off the top.

        Liked by 1 person

        • kroesus says:

          actually the “stimulus bill” passed and signed in Feb 2009 was $870 THAT year and with baseline budgeting it got a YEARLY increase with the rest of the appropriated funds……I do not know the exact total today but you can figure it out at 4% COMPOUNDED annually for 10 years and it is over $1T a year now easy

          Liked by 1 person

      • JP says:

        “Seriously. You should study more.” – done enough of that, need a mathematical model? We sort of proved in 1817 that free trade was a good thing, but the mercantilistic rhetoric still plays to the masses, similar to how min wage increase sounds good to some despite lowering their incomes through loss of jobs (of which we have repeat empirical data of how min wage harms low income workers). It is pretty well universally accepted among economists who spend about 4 years studying this stuff that tariffs result in net JOB LOSSES and LOWER REAL INCOMES. You will still get the confirmation bias when a job announcement is made ignoring the massive job losses other places, would not want to be working now at GM or Boeing or Harley Davidson who will see layoffs. You can check this post a year from now if DT 232 tariffs are not rescinded.

        “Smoot Hawley Tariffs (and all before 1976) were when the U.S. was massively exporting and running large trade surpluses.”
        1930 US Exports $4.4 Bil out of $92.2 Bil GDP or 4.8%
        2017 US Exports $2.3 tril out of $19.4 Tril GDP or 12.1%
        So on per capita terms, exporting roughly 2.5x now. (above nominal, no inflation adjustment)

        Smoot Hawley enacted June 17, 1930.
        1929 US Exports $5.9 Bil, Imports $5.6,Trade Surplus $383 Mil. = 00.37% GDP = $104.6 Bil.
        1930 US Exports $4.4 Bil, Imports $4.1,Trade Surplus $323 Mil. = 00.35% GDP = $92.2 Bil.
        1931 US Exports $2.9 Bil, Imports $2.9,Trade Surplus $1 Mil. = 00.00% GDP = $77.4 Bil.
        1932 US Exports $2.0 Bil, Imports $1.9,Trade Surplus $43 Mil. = 00.07% GDP = $59.5 Bil.
        Would not call less than 1% GDP “large trade surpluses.” But imposing a 60% tax on imports in 1930 did not stimulate the economy nor increase trade surpluses, in fact trade surplus shrank after enactment. The tariff was very unpopular and the Democrats cashed in on that in the next election.

        Sorry, I like free markets, not corporate cronyism and protectionism at a net loss to society, nor gov. managing trade. The founding fathers knew tariffs were bad and eliminated them between the states via the US Constitution. (and before comment, national tariffs back then before sales taxes and income taxes for most countries on planet were to raise revenue, not to create jobs nor manipulate/plan/manage trade [<-socialism].) The founding fathers did not like the Stamp Acts too which were tariffs or taxes on imported items, no new New England manufacturing jobs created, only created smuggling jobs and cost consumers more to buy stuff, remember the Boston Tea Party against the tariffs? MAGA like 1773 (BTP) and 1788 (ratification) – get rid of tariffs. Ok- Congress did enact a national tariff in 1789, about 5%, also tonnage duties, you can call that replacing inter- and intra- state tariffs with national one, some say it was to favor Northern interests, Southern states which net paid for the taxes did not like, some warned against economic war with Great Britain, but was more generally a common national revenue source in that age. The economy also had a financial crisis and went into recession in 1789 which lasted 4 years. A recession also followed the 60% 1928 Tariff of Abominations (most southern states voted against), and Nullification Crisis That tariff back fired on Pres. J Q Adams since intended favored Northern manufacturing was hurt instead of helped, yes protection from foreign competition in imported textiles, but the higher imported wool prices screwed textile manufacturers, then DT favorite Andrew Jackson was elected who eventually reduced the 1828 tariff in compromise thus avoiding succession and a possible much earlier civil war. While is is almost universally accepted that tariffs result in a net loss to society, and that is trivial introductory econ 101 stuff, it does help producers at higher cost to consumers, you can look at change in welfare for net loss if do welfare economics – combined producer and consumer surplus changes are negative, which translates to lower real incomes. Back in 1828 the nation was divided with producers theoretically gaining in North versus in South where consumers bore cost paying more for both Northern made domestic and imported manufactured stuff plus Southern exports hurt, the South unequally paid the nation's taxes. Today producers, manufacturers, and consumers more dispersed than then. Tariffs helping a nation are a mirage for the gullible who see the job gains but not the job losses and cost to consumers with a net loss to society. Tariffs move around or redistribute the pie by political means, but the pie gets smaller.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Cetera says:

          I used to think that way, back when I was young and impressionable. That’s not an argument proving you are wrong, but I do understand the appeal.

          The only issue turns out to be with the actual results. “Free” trade isn’t. It costs a lot, in jobs. If you are willing to move to China or another third world nation to keep your job, then great. If you aren’t, it is a terrible idea. We have had real-world experience for the last 25 years with NAFTA, and watched exactly what it has done. It was absolutely worse than every single opponent’s worst predictions.

          As far as the rest, it is completely fallacious. For more info, you can read this very site:
          https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2018/01/24/wilbur-ross-shreds-globalists-at-davos-we-dont-intend-to-abrogate-leadership-but-leadership-is-different-from-being-a-sucker-and-being-a-patsy/

          This is a good part:

          Secretary Ross also challenged the panelists, including World Trade Organization Director-General Roberto Azevedo and Cargill Inc. Chief Executive Officer David MacLennan, to name a nation that’s less protectionist than the U.S.

          He got no responses.

          Wolverine Ross then cited a study of more than 20 products that showed China had higher tariffs on all but two items on the list, and Europe all but four.

          “Before we get into sticks and stones about free trade we ought to first talk about, is there really free trade or is it a unicorn in the garden,” said Ross.

          Free trade has never existed at any point in the history of the world since the creation of nations.

          The formula for calculating GDP is:
          GDP = C + I + G + (X – M)

          Money that is not spent on an import will either be spent on a domestic product or service, in which case C will rise, or it will be saved, in which case I will increase. In EITHER case, GDP increases. Stopping all international trade entirely, no imports, no exports, and $800 billion in trade deficits would be routed right back into our own GDP, instantly growing the economy an additional 4%+ each year.

          The entire premise of free trade and the free flow of capital is completely flawed and flat out false. There isn’t a frictionless economy, nations MUST protect manufacturing at home to protect the nation, even at additional cost, or face the prospect of aggressive wars to claim production when necessary,

          Here is an excellent treatise on the fallacy of alternative uses for resources that economists are always falling for:
          https://americanaffairsjournal.org/2017/08/ricardos-vice-virtues-industrial-diversity/

          Globalization and “free” trade makes the wealthy oligarchs who grease the wheels of the trade rich, as they skim off the top. It hurts literally everyone else.

          Oh, and regarding your revisionist history of the Founding Fathers and Tariffs: HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

          That, more than anything else, proves you are flat out lying. The Founding Fathers set up tariffs and excise taxes as the only means of revenue for the federal gov’t, and it worked wonderfully. The income tax didn’t become part of our nation until just over 100 years ago, in 1913. They Founders objected to no taxation without representation, NOT tariffs.

          The Federalist papers are clear that there should be no tariffs between the states, as free trade internal to the nation was good, and would grow and strengthen the economy. Strangely enough, they thought the exact opposite when it came to international trade. Why might that be? Because they understood exactly how “free” trade worked, and the movement of populations required to support it.

          Taxation always has a negative effect on the economy. Tariffs are the least objectionable, least negative forms of taxation for a nation.

          Finally, we aren’t interested in globalist shills here. We’re very much pro-nationalism. It requires secure borders, and secure trade, and not losing our jobs overseas.

          Liked by 3 people

      • JP says:

        sundance, you say “THE U.S. is the customer in almost every trade deal. Current trade deficits run over $800 billion per yr.”
        It is more there is free exchange where it is not “The US is the customer” like some big collectivist corporation, but rather “There are millions of customers in US” with the free right to buy aboard which now will be taxed which hurts them.
        We in the US 2007 import $2,915.3 billion in goods and services and export $2,344.3 billion for a trade deficit of -$571.1 billion, not $800 billion. So there are also foreigners “customers” buying $2.4 trillion of stuff we produce. For every $1 spent by US citizens for stuff bough from foreigners, foreigners are the customer for 80¢ US sold stuff. https://www.bea.gov/newsreleases/national/gdp/2018/xls/gdp4q17_2nd.xlsx
        There should not be any trade deals managed by government as in socialist countries, I do not want the government managing what I can buy (or forced to buy like Obummercare), blue jeans were pretty damn expensive in Eastern Europe during cold war, some more textile jobs while consumers there paid up nose for blue jean, manged trade really helped stimulate those communist economies for years buying domestic.

        I and my neighbors have a trade deficit with the local mechanic, so what? The mechanic has a trade deficit with the local restaurant owner, who gets his car fixed for $100 and the mechanic buys $80 in meals a year, so what? Should we tax the mechanic’s services because of the trade deficit to even things out which also ends costing and hurting the restaurant owner to get her car fixed? Is a MAGA tax mechanics a solution? Or maybe gov can threaten to get some concessions. Leave the restaurant owner and mechanic alone. (Also see comment somewhere below on family jobs created by going only buying in-house and think about it.) I do like DT on most things, Obummer was a complete disaster, and HRC was perhaps the most corrupt person ever to run for president who would of made things worse, but DT is not God, gov should not be deal making, and this tariff protectionism thing is something he is completely wrong on which will hurt US.

        Liked by 1 person

        • dayallaxeded says:

          You are arguing theory against reality with a giant gloss of anachronism on top. Seriously, you’re beclowning yourself. Stop. There is no free international trade in the world. Every other nation imposes tariffs, import/export controls, etc. There has never before been the level of highly industrialized, international competition that exists today. There has never before been a massive, predatory, communist/tyrannical command economy, like China. Reality blows your anachronistic theorizing out of the water.

          We’ve read your comments; we get what you’re saying; and most of us strongly disagree, because we’re looking at actual modern conditions and strategic goals beyond pure economic growth numbers. So please quit regurgitating History of U.S.Tariffs Cliff’s Notes, sit back and either put your investment money where your mouth/keyboard is or wait and see what develops in the next couple of years. Following some current and practical experience, let’s revisit these issues then.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Cisco says:

      1828! OMG!
      It’s 2017, check the calendar.
      The North was a industrial the South agriculture.
      Can’t fight a war with cotton.

      Liked by 3 people

    • bleep21k says:

      @JP – Lol C’mon maaan!

      In the simplest terms: expect somethings to get “worse” before “better” in the immediate.

      Be willing to “pay the price” or get off the train – now!

      What argument can you make to these 500 re-employed workers FOR the previous administrations Trade dealings? F**k “Smoot–Hawley Tariff of 1930” – too much of this happens on a daily basis, where we have “experts” try to “explain” why President Trump cannot do exactly what he IS doing!

      “…the expected job losses in Auto and Aerospace (takes 350 lbs of aluminum to build
      car, Boeing worse for planes)…” How many jobs were lost during the previous Three administrations that “weren’t coming back”? Why are 500 back today?

      Smoot-Hawley me this…

      This gets too me – bigly

      Liked by 4 people

      • 🍺Gunny says:

        bleep21k Boom ……target hit! Target Destroyed. Nice

        Liked by 2 people

      • JP says:

        We can easily get 500 oil worker jobs in Texas by banning imported oil or placing tariffs on it if you want that plus say $10 gal gas and more than 500 jobs lost other places in economy as domestic consumers using incomes to buy higher priced gas instead of other domestically produced stuff. Sorry, socialism is favoritism and redistribution, and tariffs and trade manipulation management if a form of socialism, but if I was an unemployed oil worker in Texas I would vote for the tariff screwing all gas consumers in US lowering their real income so mine is higher with a net loss to society.

        Liked by 1 person

        • bleep21k says:

          @JP – If I understand correctly, your argument against the steel and aluminum tariffs is the “loss” of other jobs within the economy. The US needs to continue the current trade imbalances, otherwise gas will cost $10 per gallon, and more jobs will be lost because of this increase in the gas prices making other domestically produced goods unaffordable.

          And you would like to also equate free and fair trade with “socialism”.

          I disagree with you on all fronts.

          How about we call the steel and aluminum tariffs “protectionism”. You know, MAGA, America First.

          IF you were unaware that America First has been and is President Trumps guiding policy position, well…

          Liked by 2 people

          • JP says:

            “JP – If I understand correctly, your argument against the steel and aluminum tariffs is the “loss” of other jobs within the economy.”
            – Yes you understand that, but the true cost it the economic inefficiency and lower standard of living, some gain and others lose, net loss for society, simply e.g. oil workers win by tariffs on imported oil, consumers who buy gas lose.,
            ” The US needs to continue the current trade imbalances, otherwise gas will cost $10 per gallon, and more jobs will be lost because of this increase in the gas prices making other domestically produced goods unaffordable.”
            – No, the domestic price of gas rises if we impose tariffs on imported oil, has nothing to do with trade imbalances. It is better to import oil at say $60 a barrel if it costs $80 to produce domestically. If you he free trade it results in a lower price of domestic gasoline benefiting consumers.
            “And you would like to also equate free and fair trade with “socialism”.”
            – No, free trade is no tariffs, no government managing, it is mutually beneficial voluntary exchange between buyers and sellers, no government taxes or regulation to manipulate the market or guide it, more a free a competitive market. Socialism is government planning and control of the economy. Tariffs and protectionism are not free trade but government manipulation favoring one group at cost of another. Trade policies and protectionism planning trade in former communist countries helped decimate their economies besides the normal inefficiency of government run production.
            Sorry for being admit on this, but the most simple econ101 economic analysis of protectionism proves without a doubt that it results a lower standard of living. The cheers here on a few jobs in one industry is just confirmation bias completely ignoring the costs and lost domestic jobs elsewhere. Maybe there is some factory making aluminum beach chairs in america, due to tariffs the domestic cost of aluminum rises (a few jobs a aluminum mines an d smelters created) but the chair factory has higher costs due to higher domestic aluminium prices, it may go bankrupt and lay off workers, it cannot sell as many chairs as consumers buy fewer domestically produced chairs at higher price. Consumers are hurt (same for anything made of aluminum like cars now days). We import more foreign manufactured aluminum beach chairs since the imported aluminum tariff gives imports a cost advantage over domestically produced chairs. In a free market, government should not be trying to produce jobs, it is not the responsibility of government, it usually screws things up at cost of some at benefit of others.
            It is impossible to get a higher level of real output or income without more resources or technological advance or an increase in economic efficiency. It is a (socialist planner’s) mirage that tariffs somehow “fix” things when it only introduces inefficiencies relative to free markets which tie costs to benefits. Plus the government managed trade allows rent seeking in the process, say pay off politicians for some protectionism. A reminder – Boston Tea Party was about Americans revolting over the Stamp Acts or tariffs on imported stuff into USA. Those who think tariffs are good for an economy and create jobs are socialist government planners without knowing who do not have the most rudimentary understanding of economics. Do you think a trade embargo to North Korea limiting their imports (same as tariffs do) somehow helps the North Korean economy creating jobs there? Aluminum and steel mills in NK say booming as a result, more jobs, great for their economy, laughable. Aluminum and steel tariffs for America only serve to lower the standard of living here and do not help, such government planning ends destroying more jobs than it creates. Was the 1973 Arab Oil Embargo good for the US economy? It definitely created some jobs for the domestic oil industry and in Texas. We could do the same by putting a tariff on imported oil similar to aluminum and steel now and see all the new jobs again just like 1970s in oils (while ignoring all jobs destroyed). It is a mirage that somehow that would be good for the economy unless you lie in Texas or work at a oil well. A sure recipe for screwing up the economy, is government trying to create jobs and manage it.

            Like

        • dayallaxeded says:

          Were you not sentient during the last 40 years of fluctuating oil and gas import/export controls? Where in the USA during any of the periods of greatest limitations on oil imports did we have $10/gal gasoline? During the domestic offshore “oil boom” periods of the 1970s, ’90s, and early 2000’s vastly more than 500 jobs were created in the E&P industries alone. Support industries and services made the jobs impact exponential. There is no indication that any jobs were lost in any other sector as a result of greater focus on domestic oil and gas E&P.

          Liked by 1 person

    • booger71 says:

      Russell 2000 (American companies) up 4.5% in the last 5 days…..hmmmm

      Liked by 3 people

  18. rasser says:

    From the youtube video, 7m 29s, someone saying ‘That’s Bullsh!t’ in the background to U.S. Steel CEO David Burritt, too funny

    Like

  19. wheatietoo says:

    This is Great News!

    It’s a shame that big blast furnace isn’t in a Right-to-Work State, though.
    Let’s hope the Unions behave themselves.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Alison says:

      Rank & file vs union leaders is sorta like Deplorables vs Uniparty. It’ll be interesting to watch.

      Liked by 3 people

    • spren says:

      Isn’t it so interesting that when union members are granted the freedom to choose or not to be conscripted into their union, they choose not to join by the droves.

      I remember back during the steel industry demise in the 80s, that many non-union mini-mills opened in western PA. Their base pay was below union scale, but they were paid bonuses based on their productivity which put their ultimate pay way ahead of their union counterparts. All you had to do was do your job to the best of your ability rather than just being another cog in the machine.

      I agree so much with you Wheatietoo as to concern about how unions will respond. I hope more states enact right to work laws granting workers the freedom to choose.

      Liked by 3 people

      • wheatietoo says:

        There are now 28 states that are Right-to-Work…so forced-union states are in the minority.

        I totally understand the cost advantage of re-opening this existing blast furnace.
        But the unions should understand…that if they close down this steel mill over their unreasonable demands, the manufacturer can just pick up and move to location in a Right-to-Work state!

        Liked by 2 people

    • Oldschool says:

      Agree wheatie. Worked in the industry. Some of the biggest mills in PA. Unions killed them. Have spoken many times with my state senator to bring legislation for right to work. Even when we had repub gov, both houses, he told me flat out, they won’t touch it.

      Liked by 3 people

  20. Look, I don’t mean this in any kind of derogatory fashion, I am just telling you the reality of what I see every day working directly with the public, most of whom are unhealthy, uneducated and really lack the kind of ability to do little more than factory work. But this is why we need factories. Factories are places that are productive, where the average person, whether or not they have a large or small IQ, or are fluent in English or not, or are in good physical health or not, can go every day and run a machine or work an assembly line, and make decent enough money to have self respect and earn a living. Decades ago we had plenty of factories and everyone could find a job. Now, I see people who have zero chance of working at any kind of a retail job where they would have to deal with money, or computer job, or anything that deals with the public, stressing out all day, filling out applications and getting rejected. They are wasting their time. But they are being forced to do it because the rules are changing to collect benefits (which is a good thing, but…).
    My point is, most of the American public needs simple, but steady jobs in order to make a living. Trump is trying to give that back to them. Yes, some jobs like a steel company require high skill, but I’m talking about basic low level factory jobs. I believe those will follow.

    Liked by 3 people

    • todayistheday99 says:

      Funny how they snear at 500 manufacturing jobs or belittle a $1000 bonus, but when it when it comes to welfare or food stamps ever possible entitled recipents needs to be notified to insure that every possible vote will be cast their way.

      Liked by 4 people

    • amwick says:

      I call those jobs respectable. Honest work, yup.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Blacksmith8 says:

      The sad reminders from the industrial revolution. Our public masses weren’t any smarter then.

      I live on the right side of the street. I don’t mind if the plumber makes so much money his kids go to whatever college without debt. I don’t mind that factory guy or gal working for a while and getting enough together that their retirement means they don’t qualify for SS.

      Call me crazy and old school. I think that’s how you play the game. Find what you CAN do that pays well enough so you get to do later what you can’t afford today. Along the way you should try not to really mess things up.

      Liked by 3 people

    • GB Bari says:

      Your post is quite accurate in so many places. And unfortunately the schools lately have been graduating far too many students who are barely qualified to do even factory work in many cases. That’s because of the kids’ over-inflated sense of self-worth, a lack of work ethic and perseverance, and horrible attitudes towards any authority (i.e., bosses in a work environment). I have seen this up close and personal.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Clara says:

    Granite City, IL is my hometown. I grew up there, and I still have family living there. It has become an increasingly depressing place to visit these past three decades, as more and more residents lost their jobs and livelihoods. It will be wonderful if Trump can begin to turn it around.

    Liked by 13 people

    • Minnie says:

      It’s happening, Clara!

      🙏Faith and Trust🦁

      Liked by 7 people

    • ladypenquin says:

      Many people might not realize this, but I think it…

      Americans of all ages will be able to return to the workforce, not just the average working age Joe or Jane. Lots of folks were pushed into retiring early, or did retire early, but would like to work. Demand for workers will give experienced, mature people opportunities that companies will be glad to respond to. IMHO.

      Americans want to work, President Trump just had to remind people of what we were before the socialist locusts came.

      Liked by 8 people

      • Oldschool says:

        There are many retired aged people I know that have to work, want to work but can’t find real work. Every reopening or new factory will help.

        Liked by 7 people

        • ladypenquin says:

          Schucks, Oldschool. I thought you’d make a comment that you liked my “socialist locusts” label. 🙂
          Yes, real jobs mean a lot to people who want them.

          Like

    • Serena says:

      My older sister and her family lived there in the late 60’s and I have several relatives that worked at the steel mill.It was a great little town.I loved visiting her across the Mississippi river from St. Louis. I was a teenager then and had a lot of fun there with friends I had made. There are some good hard working people in that area.I am so happy that they will get their jobs back. It would be awesome if this all American town can come back to the way it once was. Thank you President Trump.

      Liked by 5 people

  22. Dangerous Fallacy: “We must transition into a service economy.”

    Who or what will you service? Does the coffee maker service the lawn cutter who services the pool cleaner who services the house keeper who services the paper shuffler?
    You can’t just service the servers. Somebody has to create the original wealth, who then requires services.
    The only creators of original wealth are the makers. Grow or raise or dig up and make.
    If a nation does not have enough makers, then you’ll never be able to sustain those who service.

    Furthermore, by definition, those who service must make less than those who create and make.
    Therefore, even if ‘maker’ nations like China allow us to service them (which they don’t) we can never earn more than they do. By default we become a poorer nation.

    We were sold a bill of goods when we were told that we must become a service economy. The truth is, becoming a service industry is impoverishing yourself.

    Liked by 8 people

    • That last line should be ‘The truth is, becoming a service economy is impoverishing yourself.”

      Liked by 4 people

      • ladypenquin says:

        I knew instinctively that a service economy was a serfdom path. If we don’t make or build things we have no solid foundation to the economy. In fact, during economic hard-times, the first thing to go are the luxuries. People stop going to Starbucks, eating out or hiring household help. They start mowing their own lawn and going without.

        Waiting on people, which is what a “service economy” is – isn’t a real economy, but it certainly was what Obama and his cronies were passing off as they created 29hr/wk low-income jobs, and expanded welfare to take up the slack. People were fooled into thinking they didn’t want REAL jobs.

        Liked by 1 person

    • GB Bari says:

      And then the same people who helped bring on that service economy complained piously about the “rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer with a disappearing middle class.” Well, geez, no wonder.

      Like

    • G. Combs says:

      Well stated ARREST SOROS, I am stealing it.

      Like

  23. spren says:

    This is very heartening news. I feel so good for those employees, their families, and the community. I lived through the demise of the steel industry back in the 80s and saw the tragic effect on the community which went well beyond just the steel workers.

    I worked on a railroad for US Steel for 13 years, experiencing both the boom times and the ultimate collapse. In 1982 US Steel acquired Marathon Oil and changed their name to USX. It was a classically bad decision as that was exactly when the price of oil collapsed from $33 a barrel down to around $11. The company was devastated and started to close facilities including the one I worked in. We made tubular products for the oil and natural gas industry. The deteriorating market, coupled with union recalcitrance in agreeing to changes in work rules, did our plant in. We had a sister plant in Loraine, Ohio and the unions said “solidarity brother, they won’t break us.” One day I went into work and found that our “brothers” in Loraine had agreed to the concessions and that our plant would be shut down. I was in management but that didn’t protect me. Within four years of the acquisition of Marathon our plant was done. I was the last manager left and supervised the cannibalization of the mill around us where we shipped it down to the barge where it would be taken away as scrap steel. We used to sardonically joke that we were “X-ed” by USX. It’s so great to see people get chances to get good lives for themselves, their families, and their community back.

    Liked by 13 people

  24. “We need to become a service economy..” Would you like a ‘hot apple pie with that Supersized order?”

    Liked by 6 people

  25. MTK says:

    To the MSM it is simple, “It’s called WINNING”
    NOT
    WHINGING.

    Hopefully their first major procurement order is a contract for border wall steel.

    Liked by 4 people

  26. Bob Thoms says:

    God Bless President Trump. And God bless the American people who had the gut instincts to put this man in the White House = against all odds.

    Liked by 9 people

  27. FL_GUY says:

    Every day, by his actions and accomplishments, President Trump exposes the lies of the media-rats, the CoC, the Globullists, the rinos and the D-Rats.

    There are MILLIONS of people who are enjoying the “crumbs” of President Trump’s hard work; more jobs, higher wages and more security.

    The D-Rats did NOT want the tax cuts or tax reforms. A campaign slogan for 2018: If you like the crumbs that are in your paycheck each month, vote for the party that gave them to you, vote. REPUBLICAN all across the board.

    Another slogan: A vote for a D-Rat is a vote for poverty for your family.

    Liked by 8 people

    • spren says:

      Maybe we should redefine them as the Dimmigrant Party since their primary focus is on those who come here from outside our borders, and they don’t seem to have any interest in focusing on the interests of actual Americans.

      Liked by 2 people

  28. AmericaFirst says:

    I’m in St. Louis and this is huge for Granite City and the surrounding area. This was a very prominent steel production area, after Pittsburgh, and the final closing of the last factory was devastating. 500 jobs, and that is just to start.

    Also, in KY, an aluminum factory is creating another 300 jobs. At $90,000 per year, these jobs are nothing to sneeze at, and, as someone up thread mentioned, all of the support jobs, and even the local cafes and coffee shops will be in better shape economically.

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2018/03/paul-ryan-will-hate-us-aluminum-manufacturer-announces-300-new-jobs-kentucky-following-trumps-tariff-announcement/

    Liked by 10 people

  29. Oldschool says:

    Just spoke with my NPR listening, PBS, NBC watching highly edumicated neighbor yesterday who swore it’s impossible to ever bring the steel industry back here. I told him “just watch”.

    Liked by 9 people

  30. Publius2016 says:

    Back breaking steel and iron and hard work! But they love it and they are looking to rise up!

    Liked by 8 people

  31. TreeClimber says:

    Having my husband unemployed slightly over half the year last year, with myself pregnant and working and struggling to make ends meet – remembering what it was like when he came to me with the news “I start Monday,” I know very well the utter relief and joy and tears these employees and their families are experiencing. A huge thank-you to PTrump and his administration for making it possible.

    Liked by 14 people

  32. arete55 says:

    The 500 returning steel worker jobs likely represents a capital infusion of $10s of millions into the direct local economy annually, supporting a revived goods and services sector in that community.

    Many more jobs will be created as these healthy incomes generate predictable consumption.

    Liked by 6 people

  33. simicharmed says:

    Check out the google map of this place, it’s enormous! Then zoom in and look at all the support shops and business connected to it via road and rail. These 500 jobs will likely and quickly lead to 5000 support jobs and each of those equate to even more jobs! I Like This!
    https://www.google.com/maps/place/Granite+City+Works/@38.6965234,-90.1395745,4490m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m13!1m7!3m6!1s0x0:0x0!2zMzjCsDQzJzA0LjAiTiA5MMKwMDcnNDYuMCJX!3b1!8m2!3d38.717778!4d-90.129444!3m4!1s0x87df5260c020d727:0x8d4d941bb89e3146!8m2!3d38.6961617!4d-90.134325?hl=en

    Liked by 6 people

    • andyocoregon says:

      Success stories like this will make it very difficult for the Dems this fall and in 2020. All they’ll have is juvenile criticism of President Trump. Republicans will have our now bustling economy to promote.

      Liked by 6 people

      • GB Bari says:

        Yes. Small wonder why the Stormy hooker is re-opening her lawsuit against the president. Dems realize they have nothing left but to ramp up their attempts at character assassination. Expect more of these.

        Like

        • G. Combs says:

          Character assassination…. YAWN….

          As one reporter said “Trump could shoot someone on New York’s Fifth Avenue and still not lose voters”…. ESPECIALLY if that someone was The Hilderbeast. 😂

          Liked by 1 person

      • brh82 says:

        I’m sure by tomorrow the Liberals will have thought of a myriad ways the steel plant will pollute the area, wreck the kids and send housing costs sky-rocketing. Their talking points will be distributed by Michael Moore as fact. Twitter is where we’ll fight back!

        Like

  34. 196ski says:

    It isn’t just the steel mills. It’s the iron ore mined in Michigan and Minnesota, the limestone mined in Michigan and the transportation systems used to get these raw materials to the mills. This is an industry that we should dominate due to our natural resources, energy and workforce but can’t because of unfair trade practices and government subsides in other countries.

    Thank you President Trump!

    Liked by 9 people

  35. booger71 says:

    We have 2 large subdivisions near me breaking ground this week. The developers have been sitting on this land since 2009. Glad my concrete work on my new house has been finished and our framing lumber has already been bought. Never would have happened without President Trump

    Liked by 6 people

  36. daughnworks247 says:

    Overwhelming urge to buy 10 kegs of beer and run it up to Granite City!
    Think I might need a bigger truck……

    Liked by 5 people

  37. Gary Ingle says:

    One word, MAGA Trump! I’m so ready to buy tools and metal parts made in USA! Plastics and molded parts are next using made in USA oil products are next! 😊

    Liked by 6 people

  38. elricviii says:

    If the 500 jobs average $50,000 per year that’s $25,000,000 per year pumped into the local economy. That isn’t a government handout, it’s money earned. Plus US Steel is making a profit, the city, county, state, and federal government are increasing taxes collected. Everybody wins. MAGA.

    Liked by 5 people

    • calbear84 says:

      U.S. Steel stock is up 65% over the past six months! Amazing what can be accomplished when the Administration is pro-American.

      Liked by 2 people

    • JP says:

      No it is not, those 500 jobs pumping money into local economy are completely offset by more than 500 jobs lost in rest of economy being more spread out and marginal and pumping less into economy elsewhere. If steel and aluminum cost more for those industries using it, a car cost more and they sell less, a beer can costs more, you are just redistributing jobs and income from one sector to another.

      Local government often plays this trick advertising jobs and money pumped into a local economy by say build a football stadium or subsiding one to developers who kickback campaign donations say for property tax breaks. However, if property taxes rise for city residents to pay for building a public stadium, all those taxes are equivalent less money spent taken out of rest of private sector economy, local restaurants, the bowling ally, the local dry cleaner, consumer goods not bought since paying higher taxes instead for building a stadium. Money gets spent somewhere directed by government and less somewhere else with no net job creation nor money pumped in raising incomes by building the stadium. One side is sold ignoring the other. The tariff thing is the same, with job losses as consumers pay more for steel and aluminium items and spend less for other things where job losses collect abet spread out more. Absolutely no net job gain, the inefficiency in production or resource allocation by not using a free market also lowers real income. We can ban or place tariffs imported grapes from Chili in US winter and use electricity in greenhouses to produce domestically at $50 a lb creating local grape growing jobs pumping money into economy. If US consumers a spending more on grapes, they spend dollar for dollar less on everything else in economy destroying jobs. Being myopic about MAGA and grape greenhouse growing jobs is turning blind eye to what happens in rest of economy.

      Maybe I should ban importing anything into my house, grow my own food, cut wood for heat, import nothing and shoot or tax or fine any family member who tries to buy from neighbors abroad outside the house, massive massive job creation in my house growing food and cutting wood for my family, and they then just pump all that income back to family members. – Now does my family’s standard or living or real income rise or fall?
      (I can use the same family job argument for my neighborhood block, or local city, my state, or the country as a whole, works out the same.)

      Like

  39. tuskyou says:

    Yay for Illinois!!! We need some good news in this state.
    Granite City is in Madison county. According to this the voters went for Trump 55%:
    https://www.npr.org/2016/11/08/501076420/illinois-2016-presidential-and-state-election-results

    Liked by 3 people

  40. covfefe999 says:

    Congratulations to all of the people who are getting their jobs back! I’ll bet that announcement brought tears to many of their eyes.

    Liked by 3 people

  41. Bill says:

    It looks like our Lion has reversed that sucking sound Perot was talking about as NAFTA was being set up.

    Now it is the MAGA USA that is sucking all those jobs back with a TRUMP powered vacuum!

    Liked by 2 people

  42. hillbilly4 says:

    Perhaps, one industry at a time, Bruce Springsteen’s wrenching ballad ‘Your hometown’ can be a thing of the past. Trump KNEW he could do these things, he KNEW the American worker can ‘get ‘er done’. He is simply trying to level the playing field for all of us. I hope his next target is textiles, and then IT tech jobs. There is virtually no reason why we have to import so many IT-tech workers…we have the means to train our own people….much more than we do now. Some IT-tech will need to be imported, but not at the killer pace we have now. MAGA!

    Liked by 3 people

  43. The Devilbat says:

    Its not just steel that is going to be melting. You can bet that slime ball Barry and his little communist friends are going to be in full melt down mode.

    Liked by 2 people

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