Super MAGA-Nomic Winning: Atlanta Fed Predicts 5.4% First Quarter GDP Growth…

It can be a little confusing to listen to business or economic news analysts discussing the current state of the economy.  They are all generally positive, but the inherent delivery of their forecasts is cast against the backdrop of their experience.  Almost no-one, currently in the business of economic analysis, has experience, life skills, analytical training or educational understanding based on anything other than a Wall Street economic outlook.

Business Schools stopped teaching the principles of Main Street economics forty years ago.  All modern analytical tools, and the data-systems therein, were structurally built upon an economic theory that establishes Key Performance Indexes based on Wall Street economic models.  Titans of industry were replaced by fast-talkers pushing paper.

The paper economy and the monetary policy therein, has been the underlying architecture of economic analysis for decades.  Within this process Main Street U.S.A., was assigned the role of a “service driven” economy. Institutionally everyone accepted this reality.  Thus, those same voices are conflicted and cannot reconcile today’s economic shifts.

The Atlanta Federal Reserve is now estimating the potential growth for the first quarter of this year at 5.4%.  This is a stunningly high projection when historic assumptions are factored.  However, in the new MAGAnomic economy, it’s high, but not out of line.

The Main Street economic engine is roaring back to life.  Real consumer spending jumped from 3.1 percent to 4 percent in the latest quarter.  Consumer spending is approximately two-thirds of our GDP.  However, the real key figure is ‘investment”.   Private fixed-investment growth surged from 5.2 percent to 9.2 percent, that’s where the growth projections should be focused.  Trump’s MAGAnomic policies are driving investment in the U.S. economic base.  The current growth in private investment has doubled.

Business are building out their capacity.  Big and Small corporations and manufacturers are building manufacturing facilities, plants and expanding capacity.  Small companies are hiring and expanding.  Small manufacturers of U.S. goods and services are expanding to become mid-size manufacturers.

This is Main Street expansion, something that has not happened in 40 to 60 years.

This specific type of economic expansion is why most economists using Wall Street analytic models cannot accurately measure or predict growth.  The capital investment is not attached to U.S. Federal Reserve monetary policy; it is attached to the consumer.  It might sound weird but that’s what’s happening.

The Wall Street economic engine, fueled by monetary policy, is disconnected from the Main Street economic engine, fueled by consumer spending and demand for goods and services.

The paper economy is impacted directly by monetary policy; but the main street economy, actual goods, manufactured goods, is driven by consumer demand, wages, earnings etc.

Today Lowes announced they will give bonuses of up to $1,000 to more than 260,000 hourly workers and will expand benefits such as adoption assistance and paid parental leave as a result of the recently passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.   Lowes is positioning itself for increased in wages and benefits ahead of a tightening job market.  Upward wage pressure is an outcome of Main Street growth.

Today UPS announced: “more than $12 billion in investments to expand the company’s Smart Logistics Network, significantly increase pension funding, and position the company to further enhance shareowner value.”  UPS is investing in capital expansion, and simultaneously increasing its wage and benefits package for the same reason.

All of the Main Street MAGAnomic policies interact with each other and create a dynamic of internal domestic growth.  Building more industry creates a demand for more workers; the demand for more workers creates upward pressure on wages; increased wages makes consumer spending grow; consumer spending growth makes industry expand to capture the demand of consumers.   See how that works?  It’s a circle of growth.

It seems simple, and in many ways it is; however, it takes a person willing to look out for the domestic needs of the American Economy (Main Street) ahead of the global Wall Street economy.  President Trump is the first president in over a generation to actually put economic nationalism into place as the driver for economic policy.

Back in late 2015, and early 2016, when candidate Trump announced the outline of this America-First agenda, we predicted rapid wage growth would be triggered in the second quarter of this year (2018).  We stand by that prediction.

President Trump has aligned the economic planets; taxpayers are keeping more of their income; consumers have more to spend and the best play for business and manufacturers is to invest in America to capture that spending capacity; their investment drives even more jobs and higher wages… and the growth continues.

MAGAnomics.

It works.

 

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This entry was posted in Economy, Election 2018, media bias, President Trump, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

179 Responses to Super MAGA-Nomic Winning: Atlanta Fed Predicts 5.4% First Quarter GDP Growth…

  1. Old Lady says:

    My gosh, what can we do for this man?

    Liked by 8 people

  2. Pam says:

    Liked by 19 people

    • As long as we can emphasize AMERICAN workers before increasing immigration. The bigs Companies hire immigrants first to get the tax break from the Fed. for American Immigration Reform which is cheap labor.

      Like

    • fleporeblog says:

      Had to steal this from SD:

      …”Hold on to your economic britches peeps – throw dem ju-ju bones out the windows – grab hold of the young-un’s, squeeze em tight and introduce them to ‘capitalism unchained’. We are in uncharted MAGA territory now.”…

      Liked by 9 people

      • Ditch Mitch says:

        Fle, I was wondering where your periodic Atlanta Fed report was. Thanks for all the details.

        I read this morning and nearly fell out of my chair (morning coffee was all over the table). And to think 4Q17 GDP came in much lower than estimates. I still say 2 revisions of 4Q17 is going to get close to 4.0%.

        By the way, FBN yesterday reported imports/trade deficit had been reduced considerably in 2017. Didn’t catch a number.

        Liked by 3 people

        • fleporeblog says:

          Red I had the same experience! I was pleasantly shocked. The data I referenced a little further down the thread leads me to believe we are going to see a big correction for the 4th Quarter l I see it coming in between 3.4% to 3.6%. What is super exciting is that it will be the first time since 2004 with 3 consecutive quarters of 3% or higher GDP. It will also allow the Annual Rate to be adjusted at the end of July from 2.3% to 2.5% or 2.6%. A full point better than Barry’s miserable 1.5% in 2016.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Peg_C the Deplorable says:

          I wonder what if anything CNN, MSDNC and the rest will report about this. LOL

          Like

      • Ditch Mitch says:

        Full time jobs up 2.2 million. Part time jobs down 304k as reported this morning by FBN. I was asking about those stats yesterday. Need one more, labor participation rate.

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Peter says:

    Give him our full support at every opportunity!

    Liked by 8 people

  4. Trump will be remember as one of the greatest American presidents.

    Liked by 15 people

  5. Vera says:

    This makes the 4th Q of 2017 GDP ( BEA guesstimate) of 2.6% look even more “curious”.

    Liked by 7 people

    • stats guy says:

      yeah, that was an advanced estimate or something. According to both the Atlanta and NY Fed models we’re looking somewhere around 3.6 for the 4th Q.

      A full percentage point. The only way the left will survive this is if the MSM goes full Pravda and spikes these stories.

      That said, I’d say the Atlanta Fed’s numbers have always looked a little too variable to me…however, the NY fed’ model is in the high 3’s. I’ll take the average of say 4.5. With the midterms the left better start re-planning that Blue Wave of theirs

      Liked by 1 person

      • Some Old Guy says:

        Prepare for deep spiking. The so-called media are in truth, propagandists for Leftism.

        Liked by 1 person

        • GB Bari says:

          One simply wonders how much longer they will, with a serious face, explain the economic boom as being the result of Barry Soetoro’s “wonderful” policies.

          Like

          • svenwg says:

            Funny how Barry Obozzo was the only president to fail to reach 3% GDP in his eight years in office, but is now responsible for the fact that the economy is almost, if not actually at 3% ( seeing that they removed 1.9% from the 4thQ) after a single year of President Trump’s Presidency!!!!

            Like

  6. Trump is changing the American Political landscape towards the Republicans for the first time in nearly 100 years.

    FDR created a Democrat majority that has lasted nearly a century.

    Trump is turning the country Lincoln red again. The jobs president. The growth president. The stock market president. The america first president.

    If the GOP will get on board with his trillion annual infrastructure reinvestment, they will keep the house and senate for a hundred years.

    Liked by 13 people

  7. Matt Transit says:

    Is the Atlanta Fed low balling their estimate, or could it actually be higher?!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Matt Transit says:

    Is the Atlanta Fed low balling their estimate, or could it actually be higher?!

    Liked by 2 people

  9. LBB says:

    Americans for Tax Reform have been keeping track of all the companies and their commitments. They update the list everyday. Here are a few testimonies from that source.

    “I’ve got a vehicle I’m trying to get ready for my daughter. She needs transportation, so it [bonus] will help me out in that instance very much.” [Link]

    “I’ve never really had anything like this happen before,” said 24-year-old Brian Robertson, a mover with Broadway Express. “It’s the first job I’ve ever had to get any kind of bonus or anything.” [Link]

    “Anytime your paycheck increases, it’s definitely a good thing for your family,” said Kristi Stoddard. “It’s nice to see they’re putting money back into the middle class.” [Link]

    “We’ll be able to pay more bills,” said Rich Stoddard. “We might be able to go out for dinner. Do the little things we might not be able to do until this kicks in. Honestly, your paycheck, you know where it’s going even before you get it. Now we have a little extra.” [Link]

    https://www.atr.org/ryder-system-inc-give-23-million-tax-reform-bonuses-employees

    Liked by 10 people

  10. The problem with being a service economy is: Wherever you export jobs you import their standard of living. Manufacturing is vital to our future and we are lucky that Trump gets it.

    Liked by 9 people

    • thluckyone says:

      Meadowlands, I don’t really have anything but anecdotal evidence to back up my supposition but I believe the financial health of the middle-class and of manufacturing are also vital for our Churches.

      And, I also believe that’s part of the reason our manufacturing and our middle-class have been under attack for the past 50 or so years. The vitality and the missions-outreach of our Churches was making some people VERY uncomfortable. I hope now we can make that discomfort even WORSE!

      Liked by 5 people

    • mimbler says:

      And also the problem of an immigrant economy. We’ve heard about the remittances of illegal immigrants, but today I saw the number for remittances of foreign born workers in the US.
      Just because we give someone a green card or even citizenship, we don’t necessarily keep their salary in the US. Around 150 Billion dollars is sent out of the country by foreign born workers.
      So even though they live here, we are still exporting the salaries abroad.

      Liked by 7 people

    • Mike Haubert says:

      “Manufacturing is vital to our future and we are lucky that Trump gets it.”

      As Chuck Harter always preached: “Value Added”

      Liked by 1 person

  11. South Col says:

    Just shows to go you.
    None of this money printing QE Keynsian socialist rubbish is necessary for the functioning of an economy.
    You just have to reduce company taxes and the market rebounds. PDJT being a street businessman understood that.
    Obvious really, but kryptonite to a Democrat because it destroys the narraative of the State uber alles.

    Liked by 13 people

  12. MisterPasta says:

    Titans of industry were replaced by fast-talkers pushing paper.

    What a great line.

    Thanks Obama! /sarc

    Liked by 7 people

  13. Alison says:

    Our warrior Treeper, Fleporeblog aka Felice, deserves a Treehouse-size round of applause with this news. As he did with state-by-state voter registration stats during the primary/Presidential election season, he has continued by providing us with updated, reasonably optimistic (b/c based in factual analysis) economic projections.

    I am thankful beyond measure for the corps of Treepers who put in countless hours to bring us analyses we cannot find elsewhere. I salute you especially, Felice, on this amazing economic outlook. Between you and Sundance, we are empowered with ways to enlighten ithers.

    Liked by 18 people

  14. Whitehouse Clown says:

    The Democrat Party will not exist in 2020.

    Liked by 5 people

  15. Marksb_2000 says:

    I hate to be a little bit of a Debbie Downer but with the economy beginning to roar back, be prepared for some inflation and higher interest rates. Gas prices are starting to move up even though American oil production is way up. I am as big a Trump supporter as anyone, and I would not change anything he is doing, just throwing that out there.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Michael says:

      Are you one of those people who would complain if we hung you with a brand new rope?
      (sheeesh some people)

      Like

    • maga8978 says:

      Reality. The Good with the Less Than Good. Give a bit to gain a lot in the big picture. I can handle a bit of inflation and higher prices at the pump to overall MAGA. Like from me for your comment.

      Liked by 1 person

    • The higher the price, the more frackers will produce.
      The proven reserves are there.

      Supply will surge until it balances against Demand.
      Then prices will recede and the cycle will repeat.

      “Capitalism”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dennis Leonard says:

      I do not think you hate being a Debbie,actually supply and demand will determine gas prices,as they went up a little ,now they are going down.Dollar value is determining barrel oil price now.Also the new refineries coming on line are going to drive prices down.And if you had read anything SD has said inflation,interest,and the Fed are on the sedelines in this new economy.Happy trails Debbie.

      Like

  16. crazydawgg says:

    I always strive to remember that our President Donald J. Trump is doing what he’s doing because he like me wonders what happened to the America we grew up in. We were raised knowing what a privileged life we had living in America. We were raised to respect our elders, veterans, and our flag. We wondered what we could do the help our fellow man not hurt him. President Trump felt all this and learned business capitalism & political finess in tbe world making him fully aware of those that believe socialism is good. He’s is an above average intelligent man with a heart for this country. He has fault but so do I.

    It wouldn’t matter if it was Republican, Independent, or Democrat he would fight them all to get us back on the path government has driven us off of.

    God Bless this man. Protect him and keep him safe. Keep your hand on his heart Lord. We know in Christ ALL things are possible.

    Liked by 13 people

  17. Monadnock says:

    One of my co-workers phoned me last week asking if I’d looked at my direct deposit draft – “Why?”

    “Go look at it and tell me if you see anything different.” “Ok.”

    So I pulled up my online bank account and compared the last two direct deposits…..

    Holy crap. It was up. WAY UP. Like I got a raise – UP….. Four figures UP.

    Salary adjustments don’t happen where I work until the beginning of March every year…. if they happen. There has been no announced accounting changes from HR, etc…..

    Am I ALREADY looking at the impact of the tax cuts?

    Because if I am, then wait till all of you guys see what’s coming – MAGA!!!!!!!

    Liked by 11 people

  18. Pam says:

    Liked by 8 people

  19. trapper says:

    Not all the expansion will be in building new plants. Much, if not most, will take the form of adding second and third shifts. That was the form expansion took in the 50’s and 60’s. No new building or machine tools necessary.

    Just add a second shift and you double your output overnight. Of course, that means your local manufacturing payroll doubles overnight as well, triples if a third shift is also added. It’s that second and third shift payroll flowing through the economy that veritably lights the economy on fire, because those new workers are now buying goods produced all over the country. A second shift in Peoria means people there will buy more cars made in Detroit and air conditioners made in Indiana and shirts sewn in Massachusetts.

    Here it comes. Hold on to your hats. 6% GDP growth for 2018 Everyone says I’m nuts. Watch.

    Liked by 15 people

    • Monadnock says:

      trapper, I think you’re seeing things clearly – I personally want to run through town yelling “We’re gonna make stuff HERE again!”

      I am SO looking forward to seeing all the Made in the USA stuff that will start appearing – solid, lasts-forever items that we used to build over 50 years ago. Stuff we could be proud of – it’s coming!

      Liked by 9 people

      • trapper says:

        I am willing to pay double the price for items made in America instead of any piece made in China or Mexico or Viet Nam. I am now actively looking at the origin labels, searching out “Made in U.S.A.” And I refuse to buy Mexican made Oreos after they moved the production line to Mexico from Chicago and laid off hundreds of Chicago workers.

        Liked by 5 people

        • Randy says:

          I simply want a shop vac that does not burn out from cheap chinesium windings and brushes. I tried three different brands including Craftsman..all made in China because..no choice..and all three burnt out with less than 20 hours on their motors.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Michael says:

            I use a central vac motor that has a bag (made in Canada) on a rolly cart with a centrifugal separator mounted on a 5 gal drum. Separator pre-cleans air before vac motor. Works way mo better than most shop vacs and is holding up well against drywall dust.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Adding extra shifts is a temporary fix for an economy set to grow for years to come. It will also be harder to get workers to commit to those extra shifts unless their pay is increased substantially.
      Operating plants around the clock also increase maintenance costs and accelerate the capital depreciation of the equipment.
      A competitor can easily under-cut you if they don’t have to operate around the clock.

      With interest rates low, and the Trump tax law which allows the capital costs of new plants to be deducted as expenses, it makes sense to open new plants.
      A second plant makes it harder for a competitor to establish itself against you.
      A second plant also ensures a better flow of produced product.
      A second plant is much better for the economy as a whole.

      Liked by 2 people

      • trapper says:

        The economy is not producing at capacity until manufacturing plants run three shifts. Most people today have no memory of three shift plants and can’t comprehend how beneficial it is. Leaving production facilities idle 8-16 hours a day is not cost effective.

        Liked by 3 people

        • GB Bari says:

          Having retired from the facilities department at a large high tech manufacturing plant in the mid Atlantic that’s been operating for over 65 years I can attest firsthand that trapper’s observation is spot-on. Basic tenet of manufacturing facilities is that unless there are some local or external restrictions on operations after normal daylight hours, it is ALWAYS more cost effective to use the fixed asset as many hours per day as possible. In most circumstances, cost of maintenance of tools and machinery remain less expensive than the amortized investment and start up costs for new square footage. Premium (night turn) labor is generally 110% of regular labor so thats not as big an impact as one might think. In the past three or four decades, the costs for a new building have been astronomical (avg $200 to 300/sq ft in the East coast megalopolis) along with the environmental impact costs, permit delays, etc. So use what you have to capacity first, then when you’re bursting at the seams, go for additional square feet.

          Liked by 3 people

          • tcjudi says:

            This could be good for some towns that have been dying over the past few decades as their manufacturing base dissolved. A few big new or upscaled plants could generate many smaller niche companies to supply the materials and services needed by big manufacturers.

            Like

      • piper567 says:

        ARREST…I agree with you in principle.
        But it does, dontcha think, depend upon the size and age of the company?
        Young and new businesses will decide what’s best for them, whereas a Co. w/established distribution, etc., will grow differently.
        Also, shift differentials are often given to compensate for the issues acquired in working particularly night shift.
        It seems to me that certain companies would benefit from building on extra shifts, while learning depreciation etc., which you mentioned, but surrounding/supporting businesses will benefit from either.
        It will be interesting to see how the growth evolves.
        But evolve it will…
        Its all pretty exciting.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Yes I agree with you, it most certainly does depend on the nature and size of the business.
          There are so many factors that go into making these decisions. That’s why I wanted to offer an alternative to the generalisation that extra shifts are always good.
          Especially since capital is so cheap at mo and labor will be getting more expensive with the unemployment rate down so low.

          Like

    • TwoLaine says:

      Another thing that is being reported is that a lot of employers are moving people from part-time to full-time too.

      Liked by 7 people

    • Bruce Fauth says:

      And I thought I was the last person in America that really understood economics. All those fast-talkers tried to tell us of the “New economics”. Well, the old one isn’t out of date, it was just neglected. Trump understands econ, finance and people.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. It’s called “Positive Feedback”.
    When people (workers, consumers) feel like they’ll still have a job in 12 months time, that’s when they’ll spend money. New furniture, updated car, stuff they’ve been wanting to get for their kids etc etc.
    Businesses were buoyed by Trumps rhetoric and regulations cuts and went into high gear after the tax cuts. Business confidence leads to consumer confidence leads to further business confidence etc etc.

    This is why The Kenyan’s ‘stimulus package’ didn’t work. Despite hundreds of billions of borrowed fed money being spent, people knew it was a one off. They didn’t feel like they’d still have a job in 12 months time. In fact they felt the exact opposite because just about everyone knew of someone who was laid off or whose hours were cut.
    The Kenyan’s economic policies led to “Negative Feedback”. Higher taxes, fees and charges and more regulations led to lower business confidence which led to lower consumer confidence which led to further lowering of business confidence.

    I have no doubt whatsoever that the American economy will grow at well above 4% rates and the biggest problem will be how to put a lid on it to keep inflation and a high dollar at bay.
    These are good problems to have. Inflation can be kept in check by lowering regulations and red tape (and reducing immigration to keep demand down a little) and a high dollar can be controlled by quantitative easing, with the extra money used to pay down debt. (why not? the Europeans and the Chinese do it all the time. Instead of calling it what it is…printing money…they call it ‘Quantitative Easing’ and get away with it).

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Gaius Gracchus says:

    Not tired of winning!!!!!!!

    Like

  22. Hotlanta Mike says:

    More Obama corruption revealed publicly today…

    Liked by 6 people

  23. NONE of these Yellen-Fed Morons thought to tap into DATA that shows Mainstreet Economy changes that MATTER in a SPACE-SHUTTLE TRUMPONOMICS TAKEOFF.

    So obvious to Treepers reporting on the Takeoff in real time, and so readily available:
    • Highway Toll Data
    • Highway Vehicle Counter Data for Large-Vehicle Traffic
    • Highway Truck Weigh Station Data
    • Railway Freight Data
    Etc.

    Like

    • lokiscout says:

      It’s one thing to have the data and another to know what to do with it. After two to three generations of FED number crunchers modeling and managing a global paper economy they have no idea how to analyse a goods and services main street economy. SD told us this would happen a year ago and his predictions are almost dead on for effect and timing!

      Liked by 1 person

      • And Market Analysts raised on “technical analysis” of program trading and hedge-fund market manipulation have NO CLUE where the market is going. They’ve resorted to commenting on the rear view mirror that they don’t know how to read.

        Like

  24. Michael says:

    I see obama’s plan to fix the economy is (finally) working!

    Liked by 4 people

  25. maggiemoowho says:

    Thank you President Trump!!! 🇺🇸#MAGA🇺🇸 😃👍👍👍👍👍

    Liked by 4 people

  26. StanH says:

    Wow! This is how you vanquish your enemies.

    MAGA!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  27. TwoLaine says:

    Now if we could only offload the USPS and Amtrak onto the free market and off the gubt dole. NOW is a good time!

    Liked by 1 person

  28. PgtSndThinker says:

    I like the improving economy, but today while listening and feeling the low booms from the apparently expanding gravel mine a mile away, I thought, “oh, dear and the infrastructure legislation hasn’t even passed yet.” I wonder if structural damage from such mining activities is covered by homeowners insurance?

    Like

  29. fleporeblog says:

    As the world waits on the release of the memo & Nancy Pelosi screams for Paul Ryan to remove Devin Nunes, the ECONOMIC TRAIN continues to steam along the US without a worry in the world.

    The data released today shows 2018 is shaping up to be an incredible year for our Economy.

    Everything else is just chaff & countermeasures from hiding the economic reality from the American people. Regrettably for the Democrats, MSM, CoC, Big Club, Globalist, RINOS etc. Americans are seeing it & feeling it in every aspect of their lives.

    From the article linked above:

    The number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits unexpectedly fell last week, pointing to a tightening labor market and strengthening economy at the start of the year.

    Initial claims for state unemployment benefits slipped 1,000 to a seasonally adjusted 230,000 for the week ended Jan 27, the Labor Department said on Thursday.

    Data for the prior week was revised to show 2,000 fewer claims received than previously reported.

    Economists polled by Reuters had forecast claims rising to 238,000 in the latest week.

    From the article linked above:

    The U.S. Census Bureau said construction spending was estimated at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $1,253.3 billion, up 0.7% (±1.0%) from the revised November estimate of $1,245.1 billion. The gain is 2.6% (±1.3%) higher than the December 2016 estimate of $1,221.6 billion, and follows another solid 0.8% gain in November.

    The value of construction in 2017 was $1,230.6 billion, up 3.8% (±1.0%) from the $1,185.7 billion spent in 2016.

    From the article linked above:

    The Institution for Supply Management (ISM) Manufacturing Index (PMI) continued to show extraordinary strength with a reading of 59.1% in January.

    Of the 18 manufacturing industries, 14 reported growth in January in the following order: Textile Mills; Fabricated Metal Products; Plastics & Rubber Products; Primary Metals; Machinery; Transportation Equipment; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Chemical Products; Computer & Electronic Products; Paper Products; Petroleum & Coal Products; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; and Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products.

    – “Sales nationally and internationally are strong in Q1. We are increasing our CapEx spend by 30 percent to 40 percent over [the] previous year.” (Chemical Products)

    – “We have heard reports of additional business due to the recent reduction of tax rates.” (Machinery)

    – “Business outlook is positive on all fronts right now with our customers. Budgets are being approved for new projects, and component prices from suppliers have temporarily stabilized.” (Computer & Electronic Products)

    – “Our usual winter slowdown has not occurred, and we are very busy with new orders.” (Furniture & Related Products)

    – “Slow start to 2018; pricing on metals is heading up and quotes/orders are picking up as well.”
    (Fabricated Metal Products)

    – “Overall, business remains steady. With several key programs to begin ramping up in the industry, outlook looks good for calendar year 2018.” (Transportation Equipment)

    – “Employment is very tight in our area.” (Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products)

    – “Business continues to strengthen.” (Paper Products)

    – “Business is starting the new year strong. Consumer confidence seems to be driving a lot of our customers’ order requirements higher.” (Plastics & Rubber Products)

    Liked by 4 people

    • piper567 says:

      Wow Felice, may I call you by your name?, This is TERRIFIC news!
      Thanks for your work here.
      I gotta say, a Bigly wish of mine is that our President can send the CoC off a cliff, public enough so that we can all watch and cheer!! PLEASE.
      That crash-and-burn + asset forfeiture + The Prince cutting off sourSaudi funds, at least has the potential for reducing Congress’ dependence on graft.
      If Congress won’t do it, perhaps the President can add this to his ever-growing list of achievements.
      He does, after all, have another 7 yrs to do it, ha!

      Liked by 1 person

  30. fleporeblog says:

    Liked by 6 people

  31. kallibella says:

    NOT tired of WINNING!!!!!
    MAGA is indeed a beautiful thing! 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸👍👍👍👍😍😍😍

    Like

  32. eagle1965 says:

    Started to watch the speech just now, and ABC literally said “shut it down” and feed went down. I literally heard them say it! Now, it’s just music an saying they hope to get it back up!

    Like

  33. Disgusted says:

    Did everyone here see the fun responses /comments on blogs the night of the Speech of a Lifetime? #1. was “How will they get his HAIR right when they add him to Mt. Rushmore?” and #2. was someone had been disappointed because he hadn’t fit the word “shithole” into the S of the U speech. It was such a wonderful night, so thrilled with his speech plus loving reading wonderful comments all night!

    Liked by 4 people

  34. fred5678 says:

    “private investment 5.2 to 9.2”

    PRIVATE investment is done much more carefully and wisely than PUBLIC investment.

    5.2 to 9.2 — almost DOUBLE.

    How do you like THEM magic wands, Obama??

    Liked by 3 people

  35. fred5678 says:

    Just saw Ryan running after POTUS as he left the stage to get a MAGA hat autographed.!!

    Only about 15 months ago Ryan DISINVITED candidate Trump to his WI campaign rally.

    Liked by 1 person

    • MAGADJT says:

      Rush predicted prior to inauguration, that all the DJT naysayers in Congress would be begging to be in the same photo op as him before the end of his first year. We are almost at the point of seeing that. The VSG has a spine of steel and has just plowed ahead amid attacks that would have caused any one of the other 16 GOP candidates curl up in the fetal position after a week.

      Liked by 4 people

  36. PaulM says:

    For the economy to really boom accross all sectors, a priority will have to be removing the communists from control of the schools and get us back to where high school graduates can spell words that have more that four letters instead of just political indoctrination. My nephew and I were going fishing and he emailed me asking if he should pick up the “bate”. Incredibly, he’s a superintendent of schools for a major district in one of the most left wing states and he has a doctorate in education. His monthly family trips to San Fran to “celebrate the culture” has got him “exempted” from my will.

    Liked by 2 people

  37. arizona1717 says:

    I expect GDP to continue growing due to Trumps policies but I think quoting the Atlanta fed without other sources for context is a bit deceptive. The Atlanta office uses a methodology that is often wrong and was off by 2 full percent in 1st quarter 2017.

    Like

  38. Minnie says:

    Hostess (home of the Twinkie) has announced $750.00 cash bonus for all employees and extra $500.00 in their 401k’s (per Ed Henry on Hannity)

    #MAGA

    Liked by 1 person

  39. NJF says:

    I remember when Trump first won, Steve Forbes would go on Varney & say “4-5% GDP is definitely possible” and the panel would be in complete disbelief.

    #WinningBigly

    Liked by 1 person

    • piper567 says:

      NJF, Steve was an impossibility as a candidate for any office in this Country.
      But about 15 yrs ago, I listened to him quite a bit, and he’s a pretty sharp cookie.
      Doesn’t surprise me he can see the forest for the trees.
      Thanks for reminding me of him.. am interested now in reading his thoughts on a few topics.

      Like

  40. Trent Telenko says:

    The USA is now a net exporter of Liquefied Natural Gas and is at 11 million barrels a day of oil.

    We are headed towards net energy export levels in two years and net oil independence in three more.

    Each lng shipment or domestic oil displacing foreign energy represents a “two fer” on gross domestic product.

    We replace a dollar or imports with a dollar of domestic production for her plus two for the economy.

    Liked by 1 person

  41. Minnie says:

    https://www.nasdaq.com/press-release/ups-boosts-investments-by-12-billion-on-favorable-tax-law-impact-20180201-00971

    ATLANTA, Feb. 01, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — UPS today announced more than $12 billion in investments to expand the company’s Smart Logistics Network, significantly increase pension funding, and position the company to further enhance shareowner value.

    “This $12 billion investment program is an outgrowth of the opportunity for tax savings created by the Tax and Jobs Act,” said David Abney, UPS Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. “We will increase network investments and accelerate pension funding to strengthen the company for the long term, so that we maximize the benefit to our global customers, employees and shareowners.”

    “Through our current and future actions, we will enhance UPS’s position as the leading logistics provider by expanding capacity and technology investments to help customers meet their needs for dependable, day- and time-definite service with enhanced visibility and flexibility,” Abney said.

    The company plans to raise future capital spending above its previously committed six-to-seven percent of annual revenue. UPS will invest an additional $7 billion over three years for the construction and renovation of facilities, to acquire new aircraft and ground fleet vehicles, and to enhance the information technology platforms required to support the network, manage the business and power new customer solutions.

    “We applaud President Trump and Congress for their bold action to improve the U.S. economy,” Abney continued. “Our investments will create new jobs, secure existing jobs and expand opportunities for our people. We are committed to remaining a preferred employer by continuing to provide industry-leading compensation and excellent career opportunities.”

    UPS also recently made a $5 billion tax-qualified contribution to the company’s three UPS-sponsored U.S. pension plans. This represents about $13,000 per participant. The voluntary contribution raised the funding level to above 90-percent, securing retirement benefits on behalf of union-represented and union-free employees eligible for UPS-funded pensions.

    “Tax reform is a tremendous catalyst,” said Abney. “We will continue to evaluate additional actions that benefit customers, employees and shareowners as we progress further in the year.”

    Liked by 1 person

  42. dufrst says:

    The infrastructure bill will be a big component to growth in wages and employment of Trump can successfully just start those projects within the two years he talked about. If that happens, we may witness an unemployment rate that we’ve not seen since the roaring twenties!

    With the tax cuts (in particular 100% expensing), infrastructure spending, and military investment spending and energy dominance this economy will take off tremendously. The GOP will reap the benefits of this aggressive economic approach and I predict they will keep the House and expand their majorities in the Senate. The Dems are lost! They are too far Left! Trump will vanquish Pelosi and Schumer once and for all. MAGA!!

    Like

  43. EJ says:

    Sundance, it has been a while since you posted on this. There are fears of inflation today. Can we assume that this is due to economists not understanding true growth? There is no real fear of inflation today is there?

    Like

  44. TreeClimber says:

    My husband traded in his 2010 Toyota Corolla last Friday for a 2013 Dodge Durango. We’ve got a $400 a month payment now, supposedly for five and half years (but we’re going to be putting our tax returns in it, neither of us cares for being in debt.)

    Like

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