Political Protests in Iran Spread Amid Rumors of Regime Change Goals…

News of spreading and morphing political protests in Iran are beginning to surface as social media accounts are now gaining MSM attention.

Openly political protests are not common in Iran ever since the 2009 ‘Green Revolution‘ was harshly put-down by security forces carrying out the instructions of the ruling Mullahs and political class.  Iranian security services are omnipresent and looming.   However, what appears to have begun as protests over prices, inflation and the lack of economic freedom, seems to have morphed into several regional political protests directly challenging the Mullahs and the reigning political class.

Back in 2009, after President Obama gave his famous Cairo speech, the message was interpreted by the Iranian reform movement, the “Greens”, as a spark toward freedom.  However, the Mullahs responded violently, Iranian security forces attacked the protestors, several were killed and hundreds jailed and President Obama stood by, watched the brutality, saying and doing nothing. 2009 was a very dark time for the reform movement.

It is too soon to tell if today’s protests are the beginning of a similar uprising, a resurgence of those previously crushed cries for freedom, but the reform movement appears to be pushing the message: this is indeed their objective.   It is a very interesting development.

(Reuters) – Demonstrators chanted anti-government slogans in several cities across Iran on Friday, Iranian news agencies and social media reports said, as price protests turned into the largest wave of demonstrations since nationwide pro-reform unrest in 2009.

Police dispersed anti-government demonstrators in the western city of Kermanshah as protests spread to Tehran and several other cities a day after rallies in the northeast, the semi-official news agency Fars said.

The outbreak of unrest reflects growing discontent over rising prices and alleged corruption, as well as concern about the Islamic Republic’s costly involvement in regional conflicts such as those in Syria and Iraq.

An official said a few protesters had been arrested in Tehran, and footage posted on social media showed a heavy police presence in the capital and some other cities.

About 300 demonstrators gathered in Kermanshah after what Fars said was a “call by the anti-revolution”. They shouted: “Political prisoners should be freed” and “Freedom or death”, and some public property was destroyed. Fars did not name any opposition groups.

The protests in Kermanshah, the main city in a region where an earthquake killed over 600 people in November, took place a day after hundreds rallied in Iran’s second largest city Mashhad to protest at high prices and shout anti-government slogans.

Videos posted on social media showed demonstrators yelling, “The people are begging, the clerics act like God”.

Fars said there were protests in the cities of Sari and Rasht in the north, Qazvin west of Tehran and Qom south of the capital, and also in Hamadan in western Iran. It said many marchers who wanted to raise economic demands left the rallies after demonstrators shouted political slogans.  (read more)

I would advise caution not to read too much into the events and accept there are tenuously connected seeds within the larger Middle-East struggles.  History is filled with the conflicting polarity between Persians and Arabs.

Iran has been on a growing question to influence the broader middle-east ideology, and Saudi coalition members are pushing back against that influence with open support for the reform agenda within Iran.  Proxies on proxies, and sub-sects on sub-sects.  A considerable challenge for those who would support increased ‘freedom’.

Viewpoint of National Council of Resistance in Iran – SEE HERE

Another Viewpoint of Resistance Supporters – SEE HERE

Reminder, proceed with caution.  There’s a great deal of misinformation.

 

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130 Responses to Political Protests in Iran Spread Amid Rumors of Regime Change Goals…

  1. mimbler says:

    I actually think Iran, of all the countries in the Middle East, has the best chance of throwing off the shackles of Islam.
    Their general population (especially the young, of course) seem more capable of independent thought, and could well embrace a culture embracing some degree of western values.

    That’s just a long distance view (from Kansas!). I’m sure we have some treepers with more knowledgable viewpoints on this situation, and I look forward to learning from them.

    Liked by 13 people

    • Thecleaner says:

      Exactly,
      Iran is a secular country and should be a natural ally of the west, and once was.
      I know many Iranians and to a person they hate their government. If these people rise up, the west needs to move to support them quickly…the moderates will gladly give up any nuclear dreams for normalized relations with the west…Israel needs to stay out of this at all costs…the mullah’s will try to drag them in

      Liked by 8 people

    • Kent says:

      The Iranian guys I met while in submarine school in Groton CT back in 78-79 were really nice guys…they would regularly stop and give walkers a ride and were well mannered and friendly.

      I suspect they were likely executed almost to a man upon their return to Iran after dhimmi carter helped to overthrow the shah and install the islamist Khomeini……

      And we all know where that has gotten us….and millions of others…..

      I understand that parts of Iran are beautiful and that the people don’t hate America…quite the opposite.

      Liked by 12 people

      • mimbler says:

        I had a couple of close Iranian friends in engineering school back in the 70’s. Don’t know what happened to one, but the other is a great contributing American citizen with a great family now.

        Liked by 7 people

      • Thecleaner says:

        You are right about killing dissenters and expats. I guy I know really well is ex Iranian military. He fled. Owns a restaurant / bar now. He would give you the shirt off his back…he can never return home which troubles him.
        I have spoken in depth to dozens of Iranian exiles and have yet to meet one who speaks badly of the west and positively of the mullah’s.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Founding Fathers Fan says:

        Islam has been the official religion and part of the governments of Iran since the Arab conquest of Iran about 640 AD. Anyone can look it up on the Internet.

        Like

        • Thecleaner says:

          Its shiite islam…sunni is the problem (isis, al qaeda, boko haram etc)

          Like

          • Sunshine says:

            Islam is Islam. The only difference is the successor. They all worship the same God, venerate the same ideal guy, and read the same books.

            Like

            • Thecleaner says:

              If you say so

              Like

            • Covfefe-USA says:

              Islam isn’t the indignous ‘religion’ of ancient Persia. They were conquered by marauding Islamists some centuries ago. The deceased Shah’s father in the 1920s engaged in a famous horseback ride in Tehran, supposedly with sword in hand, removing women’s chadors from them, demanding they shed their coverings and adopt Western clothing. The villages remained ‘backwards’, but Tehran and the other large cities became Westernized metropolis, friendly to Western business and living. The Shah wasn’t without his faults however – the dreaded ‘secret police’ – SAVAK – engaged in abuses, especially of marxists, to maintain control. Generally, the villagers loved the Shah – he formed an organization modeled after the peace corps, which provided education, electricity and agri training for them. The queen was a beautiful and excellent emissary for Iranian made fabrics and crafts she modeled to the western world. In many ways, the Shah’s years were prosperous and contented. Christians and Jews were free to worship openly and without torment. It was the rabble-rousing Khomeni who agitated the ignorant, backwards clerical class and many of the merchant class who remained within the bazaar – merchants stuck in an antiquated, stinky, dark and dank marketplace who did not know how to relate to, let alone thrive within, a westernized system. Men who still used abbacuses. Men who demanded women remain covered. Men who engaged in the sacrifical slaughter of animals. Watch the movie ‘Not Without My Daughter’ for an incredibly realistic portrayal of this backwards, myopic way of existing. Thousands of Iranians lost untold wealth fleeing the oppressive clerical regime that now gripped a once hospitable and friendly, contented country, taking with them incredible talent and ability – which only reinforced the backwards, uneducated cesspool the culture was devolving into. Thousands of these people cry to be free, and a pox on Barry the FUBAR for enabling the murderous, blood-thirsty backwards theocracy that’s taken hold of the country.

              Liked by 5 people

        • BobbyCannoli says:

          You sure like telling people to look things up on the internet.

          It was the official religion, so what.

          Iran was a secular country in the 60s and 70s. Look that up on the internet.

          Catholicism is the official religion in Italy. How many people actually attend church there? That’s another thing you can look up on the internet.

          Liked by 4 people

      • AngelOne says:

        I have a close group of Egyptian Coptic Christian friends and Iranian Catholic friends from my school years. The anger they felt watching Obama destabilize the middle east then turn his back while the Iranian guard crushed the protestors which he abandoned paled in comparison to the rage they felt when he paid off the Iranian regime with the nuclear agreement was heartbreaking. My Egyptian friends lost many relatives as Christians & protestors were slaughtered as the Obama revolution installed the Muslim brotherhood in Egypt. These people love America and their life stories and unique perspectives have been eye opening to me. They love America but they really love Trump.

        Liked by 12 people

      • nuthinmuffin says:

        why do democrats love radical muslims so much? carter, clinton with the balkans and obama with the muslim brotherhood.

        Liked by 4 people

        • lastinillinois says:

          Because the radical muzzies rent themselves out as strong arms during times of strife, and the Dems need strong arms to implement their commie policies cuz the general American populace want nothing to do with Dem policies.

          Liked by 3 people

        • testpointwp says:

          It is a spiritual battle. The secular left and the Muslims align because they both want to see Christianity crushed. They will not succeed.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Covfefe-USA says:

          Professional courtesy. All are minions of the Evil One.

          Liked by 1 person

        • ladypenquin says:

          Because the Left aligns with fascism which is exactly what radical Islamic philosophy is. It’s not a religion, as much as it’s an ideology. Hitler and the Middle-East were aligned in WWll against the Jews.
          But to answer your question – the Left thinks they can use Islam as a means to achieving their Leftist agenda. They are clueless of how radical Islam will consume them as well.

          Like

          • JoAnn Leichliter says:

            Very perceptive, ladypenquin. The left admires Islam for its ability to control almost every aspect of its adherents’ lives. That is exactly what the “liberal” agenda requires.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Orygun says:

          They seem to love death. Every Democrat administration has been instrumental in killing Americans. They do that on a global scale also. What I see from them is literally hate for everyone.

          Liked by 1 person

      • ladypenquin says:

        Kent, I was just reading your comment to my hubby and he said he was in submarine school at he same time you were there! He remembers the Iranians there as well. He also said that many remained and didn’t go back to Iran. So maybe they didn’t meet that fate.

        Liked by 1 person

    • fleporeblog says:

      I actually concur completely with you! The folks I have met in NY that are from Iran 🇮🇷 are hard working people with a good head on their shoulders. They are also very educated. I do see a day that they run the Mullahs out of the country. There is such a disconnect between the government and its citizens. The transformation that is occurring in SA will also quench the thirst of the young Iranians.

      Liked by 6 people

      • mimbler says:

        I’m happy to hear there are so many with similar impressions that I have had. Gives me hope for a positive outcome here!

        Liked by 1 person

      • redtreesquirrel says:

        I’m wondering how McCain’s death will effect things in the Middle East? He had his hand in it there, I’m sure.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Disgusted says:

        I always have thought the people of Iran were once sophisticated and educated, usually seen in Western dress, which made me wonder why they put up with their present situation. Absolutely feel the same way about North Korean people. Questioning how they could ALL be the sheep they seem to be when the South was extremely opposite! Why doesn’t this idea occur to them? As we recently saw when the soldier escaped in November 2017, unhappiness made him brave. Why not more prevent?? Sadly it has happened but not successfully now and then in a few African countries where I naively once assumed the U.N. would be the salvation of truly oppressed people, so sad but No. Tyrants run the U.N.

        Liked by 1 person

    • bofh says:

      You are right in your assessment of the Iranian populace. Remember, they are Persians, not Arabs, and they have a long and rather sophisticated history. At least in the cities, they are quite cosmopolitan, beneath a relatively-recently imposed wrapping of islam. For instance, cosmetic plastic surgery is a big business there, which would hardly seem to be an “islamic value”..

      Liked by 3 people

    • Sunshine says:

      If they manage that, we can safely say it will be the beginning of the end of Islam. It will take many years to accomplish, expect many attacks and deaths, but in the end, no more death cult Islam.

      It’s quite strange, don’t you think, that economics is the catalyst?

      Like

      • mimbler says:

        It is at first glance.
        But if you look at Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, it shows that before you worry about ideals, loves, art, etc. you first satisfy physical needs like breathing, shelter, food clothing, etc.
        So when economics threatens the things you need to survive, you are motivated above all other goals.

        And looking at history, Japan and Germany in WWII were really engaged because of economics.
        And N Korea is definitely driven by economics.

        But, yes, my first thought also was it was strange that economics was what was driving this. Interesting times indeed.

        Liked by 2 people

    • keeler says:

      The difference comes down to this: Iranians are not Arabs.

      Persians developed one of the first high cultures in history, and one of its most persistent. The Persian Empire challenged the Greek city-states for dominance in Asia Minor. When Alexander conquered the Persians two centuries later, he adopted much of its political structure and sought to blend Persian and Greek culture. Centuries after that Persians drove the Romans from Mesopotamia, marking the beginning of Rome’s territorial decline. Islam reached Persia long after Persia had an established cultural identity, including the Zoroastrian faith.

      Arabs, Bedouins, Pashtuns, and the other peoples who adopted Islam or had Islam forced upon them did not have such a national identity. These were nomadic peoples who saw (and largely still see) the world in terms of tribes and clans. They do not possess a historical or cultural tradition distinct from Islam.

      Whereas any form of Islam acts as a primary identity for these various peoples, fundamentalist Islam seems be naturally conflict with Persian cultural identity. While Persians are not Westerners, neither are they a tribal people whose identity derives from religion. Persians are their own thing and have less cause to support the dominance of political or fundamentalist Islam. The success or failure of Islam is not existential to Persian identity. I think this is the hope many see for the Persian people escaping from the shadows of the ayatollahs.

      To some degree, I see parallels between post-Revolution Iran and pre-World War II Japan: ancient cultures experiencing difficulty establishing its role in the modern world, hijacked by militant elements able to exploit foreign interference, internal instability, economic troubles, and natural disasters (the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923, for example) in order to push an expansionist agenda putting it on a road to conflict with the West.

      Liked by 12 people

      • lastinillinois says:

        Great post.
        Thanks.

        Like

      • Disgusted says:

        Keeper, Thank you for inspiring me to learn much more about this subject tonight. It would not surprise me if you are actually a teacher or a real professor (not an adjunct or whatever O was in Chicago) Just thank you!

        Liked by 1 person

      • AM says:

        It’s this history which is why it’s so frustrating to be on the “other” side of Iran. Like Russia post communism, there should be some easy alliances in certain areas that are far more natural than with Arabs.

        Like

      • JoAnn Leichliter says:

        Very interesting historical and cultural perspective, keeler, and on target. One never knows what might transpire, of course, but history is on your side. And I think the mullahs know it, which is one reason why they clearly fear their own people.

        Like

    • farmhand1927 says:

      I have no knowledgeable viewpoints but offer the assumption these protests are most displeasing to Obama and Val Jar.

      The Iranian leadership was supported and protected during the O Regime. We even sent them pallets of cash to stay in good graces.

      Now it appears there may be a type of Deplorable movement in the wind. Happy New Year.

      Liked by 5 people

    • piper567 says:

      mimbler…I have close friends who were American Army Hospital staff when the Shah evacuated(They barely made it out in the chaos).
      It was not that long age, from a generational perspective.
      I’m thinking many of these younger adults have heard the stories of what life once was from family elders.
      For this reason, and media access, although limited, I tend to agree with you.
      Iran is different, and before the Shah’s flight, it was the most progressive/secular (in a cultural way) of any of the surrounding Countries.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Dora says:

    Liked by 10 people

  3. Some Old Guy says:

    Only God knows what will happen but my hope is that 2018 will be the Mullahocracy’s (sic) last in Iran or anywhere else.

    Liked by 9 people

  4. Lunatic Fringe, Phd. [undocumented] says:

    Iran / Persia / Persians you are in my prayers. Mullahs you can go to hell.

    Liked by 5 people

    • lastinillinois says:

      If we can stay the hell out of irans politics (CIA, this means you) – and the mullahs can be removed from leadership – I am convinced we can have somewhere between decent and good relations with Iran.

      I have a friend who was born Iranian/Persian. His parents moved the family to England when he was 7, then to the US when he was 12.

      I have known this man for 15 years. He is a good family man, married to a Christian American woman with 2 kids.

      He still communicates with relatives from Iran, and says the hatred for the US is not nearly what it was 15-20 years ago, and NOTHING like 40 years ago.
      A lot of that hatred died with prior generations.

      Younger Iranians (en large) have more of a hatred for the mullahs than they do “the great Satan” USA.

      I firmly believe that had Val Jarrett not been instructed by the mullahs (directly or indirectly) to have obama stand down during the protests back in ’09, that our world would have been a better place these last 8 years.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Some Old Guy says:

        I’m cynical enough on this to believe it is just as likely that the Obama Administration viewed this as a great opportunity to build a base if trust with the Regime in Iran for by affirmatively apprising the Iranian Regime that we would neither encourage nor otherwise support the Iranian people’s revolution in any way. I believe the Administration even then was trying to establish a foundation from which a deal with the Mullahs could be reached.

        Liked by 2 people

        • lastinillinois says:

          I agree with your assertion.

          Problem is, a deal with mullahs never should’ve ever been discussed. That was all Val Jarrett and her contacts (thanks again David Adel-F’ING-rod!).
          Mullahs are hardliners, only hardliners.

          When we hear “death to the great Satan” that is coming from the mullah leadership.

          The iranian students were right to be outraged back in ’78/’79, but their tactics SHOULD have put them in prison for a very long time OR brought them in front of a firing squad.

          Liked by 1 person

          • lastinillinois says:

            “David AXEL-F’ING-rod”

            Like

          • Some Old Guy says:

            Its my turn to agree with you Last! 😉

            Liked by 1 person

          • Kent says:

            The Iranian “students” were NOT right back in 78-9…they were islamist revolutionaries…their ‘revolutionary’ leaders were imprisoned for the good of civilized society/culture….Brzezinski, Carter…Kissinger….they were ‘political scientists’ and their experiments gone awry are still out there reeking havoc…they should be tried for crimes against humanity.

            They were wrong then and they are still wrong now…they succeeded in shackling a populace of many to the dogma of a few.

            Nothing more.

            Liked by 1 person

          • ladypenquin says:

            Using the slogan, “Death to the Great Satan” against America, is similar in concept and propaganda of what Hitler did in Nazi Germany, per wiki: “All-Germany against All-Jewry!” “world conspiracy of Judaism”. “the settling of accounts with the Jews”; implications included the removal of Jews from the German economy and society,

            Remember Russia with its “pograms” against the Jews for centuries.

            When countries hit tough times, especially economic, the leaders look for someone to project their problems on/an individual or group to blame. Historically, in Europe, it’s been Jews. In the Middle-East, Jews and Christians, though some tolerance for Christians did develop. 20th and 21st century radical Islam is now able to focus on not only Jews, but America as being the “enemy” for the same reason.
            IMO, Barack Obama intentionally aided in pushing forward this enmity toward America.

            One other point to make: The Leftist movement in America is aligned along the same lines of propaganda and agenda as radical Islam – destruction of Jews and Christians – which is why, in their eyes America must be destroyed. They have no affinity for this Great country because America’s very foundations are from Judaic-Christian tenets.

            Leftists taking over the courts, as in Washington, California, Oregon, is why a Christian baker is fined for not making a wedding cake for a homosexual couple. Of course, no one has tested this in the courts against a Muslim baker…

            Like

      • georgiafl says:

        There was no chance of a better place anywhere with Obama in office.

        Liked by 7 people

  5. Convert says:

    Is this MIGA? Make Iran Great Again? Lol…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sunshine says:

      LOL !! Cross your fingers. Something’s happening because protests are spread out. Tiny now, let’s wait.

      Like

    • I believe most leftist, or anti-anything protesters are weak wimpy opportunists available to march only in pleasant Spring or Summer weather. Serious revolutions (Russia) can and do get respect at this time of year. No pansies picking fights in the snow. Could be serious. Opinion.

      Like

    • Fe says:

      Hey that’s Make Illinois Great Again, 😂, but I digress.

      I’ve only known 1 person from Iran. She was a graduate student at NIU (Northern Illinois University) and was being hosted by a couple from our church about 3 yrs ago. Very polite, observant and sweet lady. She once came to our bible study group to observe our interactions as part of her studies.

      Liked by 5 people

  6. Sunshine says:

    They have Che Guevara posters. Where did this come from?

    Like

  7. Publius2016 says:

    It’s simple math: Rulers want to live like the Saudis but with 10x the population! Not gonna work…if they open up another STRONGMAN will RISE. It is the Persian way.

    Like

  8. Publius2016 says:

    Simple math: Rulers want to live like the Saudis but with 10x the population! Not gonna work…if they open up another STRONGMAN will RISE. It is the Persian way.

    Like

  9. joeknuckles says:

    I think that Iran is in a similar position as we would be forty years from now if Obama/Clinton had succeeded in taking away all of our freedoms and trashing our economy. The youth (those that aren’t radical Islamists) have heard from their elders how things used to be in their country before the Islamic takeover caused it to go to Hell. The same thing could have happened here, except it would be worse because it would have caused the whole world to go to Hell.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Publius2016 says:

      Maybe but their culture is thousands of years…

      Like

    • sickconservative says:

      Agree with what you said except the timeline, a decade at best before the world went to hell and an uprising would occur.

      Liked by 1 person

    • lastinillinois says:

      They “heard it from their elders”,
      AND
      they have social media.

      This might be the single useful purpose I can find for facebook:
      to help de-stabilize authoritarian governments by showing what is going on in the rest of the world and the citizenry is missing out on.

      Like

  10. fedback says:

    I feel Iran should be a close ally to the U.S.
    Wonderful people, great culture, lousy regime

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Publius2016 says:

    “Iranian Empire” before Islam. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sasanian_Empire

    Like

  12. Publius2016 says:

    Look familiar?

    Like

  13. Falcon Koch says:

    Well I pray for the people of Iran. I left Iran in Dec. of 1979 with my Iranian wife and two boys. I live there for 7 years, during the time of the Shah. We had many Iranian friends that we left behind. It was some of the best years of my live, as the people are really some great people. I have been praying for years that this day will come, I just hope it is all for the good. To my friends who gave their lives in fighting for freedom, back in those days.

    Liked by 9 people

  14. sundance says:

    Liked by 13 people

  15. sundance says:

    Liked by 3 people

  16. Beenthere says:

    Back in 2009 I was so disappointed that Obama said nothing of encouragement to those Iranians who were protesting for their freedom.

    This man,Dr. Hormoz Shariat, President & Founder, Iran Alive Ministries truly believes there are many many closeted Christians in Iran—— closeted because they are afraid for themselves & for their families. I believe him.

    Now with State Dept’s (Trump’s) encouragement & many more Iranian believers in Christ compared to 2009, I hope & pray that this current protest leads the Iranian people to their emancipation.

    Liked by 4 people

  17. saywhat64 says:

    In 2009, obama said nothing for 3 weeks and then after 3 weeks he said the US sides with the “supreme leader”. Of course we now know that obama was already cutting a deal back then that would eventually lead to his lopsided outrageous “iran deal”. I see some opportunities for Trump here and am cautiously optimistic.

    Liked by 3 people

  18. Falcon Koch says:

    I just hope that Russia will keep out of this, as the have a big interest in Iran.

    Like

  19. No-one knows when the reformation in Europe took place. It started around, well, um, uh, somewhere between 1450 – 1500. The plague, Erasmus, Humanism, John Wycliff, and many more were all signals of a people ripe for change, and the church which was out of control. But in 1517, the Diet of Worms was stapled to the church door, and the rest is history.

    It finished, well, when it finished, which was around 1700ish, and it may not have even stopped, no-one knew.
    It’s a piece of history that has no definite beginning or end. It becomes hard to see the wood from the trees when you are in it. I don’t know who coined the phrase, the “reformation”, but it was not coined as an educational phrase while it was happening.

    I am convinced that we are somewhere at the beginning of a reformation in Islam. It can’t keep functioning as a political system. Not if they want to develop. Iran is the perfect example. Tehran is very liberal. It’s leaders aren’t but the people are. A bit like New York. And the west, and christianity, will have nothing to do with it. This is an internal battle. The world that surrounds Islam, all of it, is an existential crisis to it’s very survival.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Beenthere says:

      A little correction: The Protestant Reformation in 1517 when Luther nailed his treatise on the church door. And it did not end well especially for Germany which was exhausted after decades of warring.

      Like

    • lastinillinois says:

      How awesome would it be to witness a newly, FREELY elected Iranian president – pledged to be open to communications with the west –
      before the end of Pres Trump’s second term?

      Liked by 1 person

    • DemsRTheRealRacists says:

      The Iranian revolution had vast support among the masses, and continues to hold sway among wide swathes of Persian society. The idea the elite are just holding down freedum lovin’ Iranians is a (((neocon))) myth.

      Like

  20. thesavvyinvester says:

    How is this not linked to this:

    http://www.jpost.com/Middle-East/Report-US-and-Israel-formulate-a-plan-to-stop-Iran-together-520306

    Pressure Iran, They are funding terror in Israel aka Hezbolla etc, pressure them on their own turf and their buddies the Norks, Val-Jal must be furious. This is all related, including Al-Sisi’s efforts to role up Hamas, and maybe the Saudi roundup. IMHO this all points to getting rid of the nasty players so that a peace deal can be done between the PA and Israel.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. AngelOne says:

    I’ve always loved my country but what Obama did stirring up protests destabilizing the entire middle east than abandoning Egyptian Christians and watching as Iranian protestors were beaten into submission made me absolutely heart sick and made me question what sort of wickedness had taken over our regime destabilizing CIA. Thank God for POTUS Trump and my prayers for the Iranian people.

    Liked by 4 people

  22. calbear84 says:

    So Iran wants out from under the boot of the Islamists! Hey, didn’t the USA just accomplish the same feat by defeating Obama / Jarrett / Brennan??

    Liked by 4 people

    • lastinillinois says:

      That’s right!

      So if we can assist them in their revolution – would we give the revolution a color name like the last several ‘revolutions’ just to stick it in Obama\Clinton’s faces?

      If so, what color would this revolution be?
      I offer: “The Red, White and Blue Revolution”

      Liked by 1 person

  23. keeler says:

    Let’s remember that Recep Erdogan was “fleeing” from Turkey 18 months ago, and was “nearly” shot down by rebel jets.

    How’d that one turn out?

    “Make Iran Persia Again” would be nice to see, but there are few good guys in the world and there is a notable dearth of them in some corners of it.

    “put your trust in God, but mind to keep your powder dry”

    Liked by 1 person

    • andrewalinxs says:

      Erdogan was not fleeing protests but an attempted military coup. Different scenario we have not seen a coup yet in Iran. In fact Erodan was saved by the fact people came out in support of him and overwhelmed the military elements trying to do the coup.

      This is a different, however still have to see how it plays out over the next few days.

      Like

      • JoAnn Leichliter says:

        I have always thought that the alleged military coup in Turkey was, in fact, a setup. If so, it achieved its goal: crippling the military, which has always (since Ataturk) served as the final bulwark against an Islamic takeover.

        Liked by 1 person

  24. Matt Transit says:

    These US of A should stay the heck out of the Mid-East. We don’t need to shed any more American blood for other interests in that region of the world. If the people of Iran rebel against their rulers so be it. Let’s keep US blood off of that sand.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Kevin says:

    This has nothing to do with religion or standing up to repression it is all about their freebies being cut off or subsidized items prices going up. As their oil income drops they cannot afford to give welfare to their citizens that they are used to. This is similar to Venezuela but not as bad, yet. The US need to keep fracking and drilling everywhere and keep their oil revenue down. Oil in and economic and strategic weapon that has been used against us for years and now we can wield it.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. A2 says:

    Sundance is correct in cautioning any snap judgments about these protests. Wait and see. Remember that Rouhani won his election as more economically open than his opponent. So many of the same folks protesting ostensibly on economic grounds were the same folks who elected him. Need time to see how this develops. The main opposition, MEK is not what you may think it is.

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    • Falcon Koch says:

      Some history on the MEK; During the time of the Shah MEK was listed as a Terrorist Group by him and the US. That all changed in 2012 (See article below). Correct history of events about what happened in 1979 are very important to understand the real story and who really help the over throw of the Shah.

      Department of State Public Notice 8050 dated September 21, 2012, reads thus:

      In the matter of the designation of Mujahadin-e Khalq, also known as MEK, also known as Mujahadin-e Khalq Organization, also known as MKO, also known as Muslim Iranian Students’ Society, also known as National Council of Resistance, also known as NCR, also known as Organization of the People’s Holy Warriors of Iran, also known as the National Liberation Army of Iran, also known as NLA, also known as National Council of Resistance of Iran, also known as NCRI, also known as Sazeman-e Mujahadin-e Khalq-e Iran, as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist Pursuant to Section 1[b] of Executive Order 13224, as amended. Acting under the authority of Section 1[b] of Executive Order 13224 of September 23, 2001, as amended ?>”the Order’] I hereby revoke the designation of the entity known as the Mujahadin-e Khalq, and its aliases, as a Specially Designated Global Terrorist pursuant to Section 1[b] of the Order. This action takes effect September 28, 2012.

      Hillary Rodham Clinton
      Secretary of State
      With this stroke of the pen, as it were, the United States removed from its global terrorist list an organization—Mujahedin-e Khalq [MEK]—that had been listed since 1997. A shadowy outfit, MEK’s delisting was the result of a full-court press by a bipartisan group of policy influentials, including General Hugh Shelton, former chairman of the joint Chiefs of Staff; Lee Hamilton, former congressman from Indiana; Bill Richardson, former governor of New Mexico; General Wesley Clark, former supreme commander of NATO; and Louis Freeh and Michael Hayden, former directors of the FBI and CIA, respectively.

      In a speech at a conference in February 2011, Governor Richardson urged that MEK should be removed from the terrorist list : “This is a movement that doesn’t want any money. This is a movement that doesn’t want weapons,” Richardson declared. “This is a movement that just wants to be allowed to roam, to do your democratic thing.” Equally opaquely, General Shelton said at the same event: “When you look at what the MEK stands for, when they are antinuclear, separation of church and state, individual rights, MEK is obviously the way Iran needs to go.”

      On one level, the ostensible reason for the United States’ delisting is that the Iraq-based MEK is a force in exile dedicated to removing the current regime in Tehran. As General Shelton added, “By placing the MEK on the FTO [Foreign Terrorist Organizations] list we have weakened the support of the best organized internal resistance group to the most terrorist-oriented anti-Western world, anti-democratic regime in the region.” In the zero-sum game of U.S.-Iran relations, there appears to be, then, a certain logic to the move. It is illuminating, however, to take a closer look at this movement, through the eyes of some individuals lesser known than the heavyweight list that supports their cause, but who might just be in a position to know more about it.

      These would include Ray McGovern, an ex-CIA operative, who said of the MEK: “Why the U.S. cooperates with organizations like the Mujahedin, I think, is because that they are local, and because they are ready to work for us. Previously, we considered them a terrorist organization. And they exactly are. But they are now our terrorists and we now don’t hesitate to send them into Iran….for the usual secret service activities: attacking sensors, in order to supervise the Iranian nuclear program, mark targets for air attacks, and perhaps establishing secret camps to control the military locations in Iran. And also a little sabotage.
      https://www.carnegiecouncil.org/publications/ethics_online/0074

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  27. DemsRTheRealRacists says:

    There won’t be regime change in Iran because Shia Islam is organized hierarchically, and thus can’t be infiltrated and directed like the ad hoc organization of Sunni Islam.

    Like

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