Nine Killed During Terrorist Attack in Cairo, President Trump Calls Egyptian President el-Sisi…

Two gunmen opened fire on Coptic Christians Friday at church south of Cairo.  Coptic Christian holy celebrations begin next week.  Egyptian security forces killed one of the terrorists and captured the second outside the church of Mar Mina in Helwan district according to state TV and state news agency MENA said.

President Donald Trump called Egyptian President Fattah Abdel al-Sisi to offer support and condolences:

WHITE HOUSE – President Donald J. Trump spoke today with President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi of Egypt to offer condolences to the people of Egypt after the attack on worshippers and security forces in the city of Helwan, which is located south of Cairo. President Trump condemned the attack and reiterated that the United States will continue to stand with Egypt in the face of terrorism. President Trump emphasized his commitment to strengthening efforts to defeat terrorism and extremism in all their forms. (link)

Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman (Saudi), and Egyptian President al-Sisi are the fulcrum of stability for the current reform movement in the mid-east.  Both are working to eliminate Islamic Extremism. Both are targets for Islamic terrorists who thrive amid chaos.

 

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67 Responses to Nine Killed During Terrorist Attack in Cairo, President Trump Calls Egyptian President el-Sisi…

  1. Pam says:

    It really has been amazing to watch the friendship that has developed between Al-Sisi and president Trump. Al-Sisi can take comfort in knowing he has a friend he can count on in times like this. May God be with the families of those who lost loved ones in this horrific attack.

    Liked by 21 people

  2. I’ll bet the one who was captured wishes he was dead right now!

    Liked by 9 people

    • scott467 says:

      Except the afterlife is not likely to be any better for him (or her).

      I am not his judge.

      Just saying that premeditated murder of nine people (innocent, non-combatants) in cold blood seems incompatible with any understanding of going to a better place when this life is over.

      Liked by 10 people

      • Being “interviewed” by the Egyptian police is no picnic, I’m sure!

        Liked by 3 people

      • The Devilbat says:

        Just saying that premeditated murder of nine people (innocent, non-combatants) in cold blood seems incompatible with any understanding of going to a better place when this life is over.”
        NOT IF YOU ARE A TRUE MUSLIM. The Quran tells its followers to kill the infidels. It amazes me that the Quran has not been labeled as a hate book. There are over a hundred places in that book where it demands its believers to kill unbelievers.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Sayit2016 says:

      I am sure that can be arranged……

      Like

  3. Muthaucker says:

    Be nice if Egypt wouldn’t vote against the US in the UN.

    Liked by 8 people

  4. Kaco says:

    I just would like to know why Egypt voted against the U.S. in moving the embassy to Jerusalem. Like Amb. Haley said, we will remember.

    Liked by 6 people

    • MouseChop says:

      Excellent question Kaco. Can anyone shed some light on this, please?

      Liked by 2 people

      • patternpuzzler says:

        I think there are two reasons. If Egypt voted in favor of establishing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel it would be operating against its own best interests and religious dictates. Islam, Christianity and Jews hold Jerusalem as their sacred site. All claim “ownership” of sorts. Secondly, if Egypt is to be able to act as a mediating factor against Islamic Extremists in their neighboring Middle Eastern Islamic nations, it cannot vote to hand over Jerusalem to the Israeli State.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religious_significance_of_Jerusalem#In_Islam

        Just my guess.

        Liked by 6 people

        • georgiafl says:

          Jerusalem is not mentioned at all in the Koran.

          Liked by 4 people

          • patternpuzzler says:

            “The Dome of the Rock is an Islamic sacred shrine in Jerusalem, built on the Temple Mount. It is believed this is where Muhammad ascended into heaven and was given the second pillar of Islam, to pray five times a day, from Allah, which is still used today.”

            Liked by 1 person

            • Craig W. Gordon says:

              Its also where Abraham was commanded to sacrifice Isaac (his legitimate son with Sarah) in a test of faith. The reason we have islam is because Abraham didn’t trust God would give him a son with Sarah. Abraham went off an sleep with Hagar and bore Ishmael.

              This is the nexus of Dome of the Rock controversies.

              Liked by 8 people

              • patternpuzzler says:

                Thank you, Craig. I hadn’t realized this.

                Like

                • Craig W. Gordon says:

                  You are welcome. In the end, the Dome of the Rock is just a place with great history associated to it. The real significance is the story of faith in God (through Jesus) whose bloodline is tied to Abraham and Isaac (not the counterfeit religion islam and Ishmael).

                  Liked by 3 people

            • skaebne says:

              … and that belief was first put forth in 1928 by Yasser Arafat’s uncle, a founding member of the Muslim Brotherhood!

              If Mormon scholars determine that the Book of Mormon is referring to the Vatican as one of their sacred sites, does that mean the Vatican must be divided?

              Who has the authority to expropriate the shrines of one religion and bestow them upon another that was founded millennia after the shrines were established?

              Liked by 2 people

              • patternpuzzler says:

                I think the saying “to the victor belongs the spoils” applies pretty completely wherein the Holy Land is concerned, based on the history of its wars. It is the land of the Crusades. I think there were likely some delicate negotiations to have delineated the Temple Mount’s “sharing” arrangements, but I do know the contentiousness of the arrangements aren’t getting any smoother.

                In religious wars, the victors always claim the vanquished’s Sacred Sites. Islam is/has been no different. If the Mormons vanquished the Catholic church, I’d say the Vatican was up for grabs. However, realistically…

                Liked by 1 person

          • Jerusalem is know by another name by the Islamic nations, but for the life of me I cannot come with it right …. need a little help here.

            Like

      • Craig W. Gordon says:

        Muzz voted against USA/Israel

        Liked by 2 people

      • jrapdx says:

        As I wrote below, seems likely the Egyptian vote in the UN reflected Egypt’s internal status. It will be some years before Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Jordan can be open about an alliance with Israel, but that’s bound to happen. After decades of anti-Israel positions, several wars (that Israel won), public sentiment in those countries has to be taken into account by leaders.

        Liked by 5 people

        • Craig W. Gordon says:

          In the end, who cares? We moved the embassy anyway. This is what sovereign nations with solid leadership do.

          Liked by 4 people

          • jrapdx says:

            Of course, Egypt and other countries voting for the UNGA resolution didn’t really think it was going to stop the US from moving the embassy. As you say, I suspect Egyptian leaders don’t really care, but probably decided to vote for it to placate the public back home. My hunch is this was discussed by US/Egypt prior to the vote, there were no surprises there to either side.

            Liked by 6 people

      • WSB says:

        Domestic consumption. An attempt to disway riots.

        Like

      • jello333 says:

        All I know is that the vote must have been in Egypt’s own self-interests… and it was NOT intended as some kind of slap-in-the-face of the U.S. I believe the same goes for Russia and some others. And I totally believe that each of those countries let Trump know in advance what they were gonna do, and WHY. So for the most part, I don’t think that vote (at least that of certain countries) is gonna harm our relationships with them at all. Most of the somewhat harsh words from Haley were, I think, intended as a slam at the U.N. itself, rather than specific countries.

        Liked by 2 people

    • If Egypt votes in favor of Jerusalem, then they will have a riot of his hands. Trump has a good relationship with Sisi, and with many Egyptians. But not all. There is a huge fundamental islamic side to the Egyptian people.

      I am sure Trump knows, and Sisi is happy for Trump to take the blow back, and not him. There is only so much they can do.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Just like Clinton. Vanity Fair had a negative piece on her. Look at the fundamentalists come out to protect her, and attack Vanity Fair. They all KNOW she was a bad candidate. They all know she is a crook. You’re just not allowed to say it, if you want to remain part of the gang.

        Liked by 3 people

    • sundance says:

      Kaco, stop it with the obtuse nonsense.

      You know the answer to that question. You pretend not to know the answer to that question in an effort to sow discord.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Hoosier says:

        The term is DumbDumb.

        Like

      • Kaco says:

        Why would you say I am trying to sow discord? I’ve been extremely fond of El-Sisi since his bonding with Pres Trump and in wanting to clean up Egypt and what I think is sincere admiration and gratefulness of Pres Trump. I took Amb Haley’s words to heart, though, and also our President’s, saying we will not forget the countries that voted in condemning this move. If you have a deeper analysis than what was given about the incident and why some supposed allies voted why they did, please share. That’s why I asked the question here. El-Sisi is probably the only Muslim leader I really trusted, so this was a bit of a snag in that trust.

        Before that vote, I had heard on Fox someone saying that France, UK, and Egypt were all on our side on this issue, that’s why the votes surprised me.as well.

        “But this vote will make a difference on how Americans look at the UN and on how we look at countries who disrespect us in the UN. And this vote will be remembered.”

        I am not as angry as I am at others I thought were trustworthy, like Bannon and AG Sessions. I suppose we shall see how any further actions are with Egypt, if this vote was then just a cover, which is what I think you are implying. Bannon has proven to me, that he isn’t really on our President’s side, and I suppose the jury is still out on Sessions, if appropriate actions will finally be taken.

        Like

    • Sunshine says:

      Use your brain. Why did the Europeans vote against Trump? Answer: to preserve stability and avoid mass rioting in their country. They know, but will never admit, they are terrified of their Islamic community.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. SharkDiver says:

    Wife and I headed to Egypt in March for a vacation. Things have actually gotten much better with Al-Sisi replacing the MB terrorists.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Lived in the Sinai for 2 years. I left when it got noticeably tense at the beginning of the 20th century. I was non military. Worked in tourism, of sorts.

      I loved it, but the people are either great, or awful. IMO. It made up my mind that that Islam is need of a reformation. I may even be going through it right now. I recommended it to a friend. He got killed there in a bomb in Dahab. 2005 I think. Four killed, many injured. I felt terrible. Personally, I would never go back. I’m too old, and too wise. I would advise you not to go back either. You are a massive target. But I also get it, why people do. I’m glad I did it when I was young.

      Glad you are not only home safe, but that you enjoyed it too. Everything is great and fantastic, right up to the point when it isn’t. And then it all goes south very very rapidly.

      Liked by 2 people

      • WSB says:

        So true, TDB. I studied there for a bit in 1982/3, after Mubarak had been in for a bit. Ticket offices were being blown up then. And the extremes of Islam were pretty much everywhere.

        I am so fortunate to have seen the country but would never even THINK of going back there now.

        Like

      • Hoosier says:

        Reformation my butt. They need an extermination. Their holy book is a book of hate as are the side notes. Their “preachers” are the scum of the earth. Their leaders are evil. Call Orkin.

        Like

  6. Dennis Leonard says:

    Sap,Muth,Kaco’
    Please get off your soap boxes.You do not know the reason and it really makes no difference what the UN did or the vote taken.We will do what is supposed to be done.

    Liked by 2 people

    • MouseChop says:

      I understand we are going to do what needs to be done. The question Kaco posed was why Egypt voted the way they did. Wasn’t soapbox.

      Liked by 3 people

      • MaineCoon says:

        That was my impression also. In fact it was a question I had and pat’s response made sense from Egypt’s religious perspective. The discussion brought clarity.

        Liked by 4 people

    • jrapdx says:

      Very likely the Egyptian vote in the UN was for internal consumption in Egypt. It will take time before Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Jordan can openly recognize and ally with Israel but I think it will happen. AIUI there is already some “softening” of commentary about Israel in these countries. OTOH I understand where the commenters above are coming from, “in transition” is a hard place to be.

      Liked by 3 people

      • scott467 says:

        “OTOH I understand where the commenters above are coming from, “in transition” is a hard place to be.”

        ______________

        That’s because ‘in transition’ is usually where things stay. ‘In transition’ is an excuse to not do anything. We were ‘in transition’ to moving the embassy to Jerusalem since 1995, lol!

        Nobody trusts ‘transitions’, because it is just politi-speak for kick the can down the road, and the only reason they kick the can down the road is for reasons of personal greed or personal cowardice (or both).

        I see a lot of similar commentary about ‘awakening’ the American People slowly to the immense corruption that has infested our government and extends all over the world… that if the truth was just revealed all at once, ‘people’ couldn’t handle it, they would go insane, yada, yada, yada.

        I don’t believe it for a second. Stop treating the People like they’re snowflakes, and they’ll stop acting like snowflakes.

        Nobody cared how people would react when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Nobody cared how the people would react when Kennedy was assassinated. Nobody cared how the people would react when a bunch of islamic terrorists flew planes into the World Trade Center.

        The powers that be didn’t give a rat’s backside when those and many other things happened, and We the People didn’t melt.

        But NOW, it is the government’s turn to be exposed, in all its filth and shame and corruption.

        Don’t soft-peddle it. No need to give snowflakes time to rub the sleep out of their eyes.
        Just RIP the band-aid right off.

        Trust me, I can handle it, and so can everybody else.

        Making excuses that people need to be slowly ‘awakened’ to the vastness of the corruption around us is just that… and excuse.

        Liked by 3 people

        • On this issue, as many others, Trump has definitely, very positively, almost certainly, completely absolutely, STOPPED kicking the can down the road. Our embassy, as we have said these past 25 years, is going to be in Jerusalem.

          Where in Jerusalem is a different question, but one that provides Trump an enormous amount of leverage. For free.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Dave says:

          Excellent post, Scott467! I’m sick of the wimps’ excuses!

          Like

        • jrapdx says:

          I was looking at it from the perspective of Egyptian leadership. The de facto alliance with Israel is by all accounts going on for some time and considered to be strengthening. But the Egyptian public isn’t accepting the idea.

          The “transition” to a new stance won’t occur overnight under ordinary conditions. Under extraordinary circumstances it might be different, like if there was some compelling need for Israel and Egypt to fight off an imminent and overwhelming common enemy. But that extraordinary case isn’t happening.

          What do you think President Trump is going to do or say re: Egypt’s vote? Likely not much at all. ATM Egypt has its hands full dealing with the terrorists, and the long-term questions will be tackled gradually. Some things do take time, others better not be delayed in any way. Leaders have to know which is which.

          Sure, saying some task is “in transition” can be an excuse to kick cans down the road. In other cases it’s recognizing the reality that some processes do take time. The key difference is whether we’re talking about dictates of Mother Nature (or the subset of Nature called “human nature”), or merely our own dithering.

          I wasn’t talking about other “transitions”, false or real. I’m all for exposing corruption of our government, always have been. But evidently it’s a process that has to unfold according to legal and political constraints that I can’t say I fully understand. Considering the depth of the problems I’ll be glad to see progress in that direction partial though it may be.

          Seems natural we’re impatient with the pace of progress rooting out the corruption. Patience has never been my greatest virtue. But there’s nothing we can directly do to change the course of justice ever so slowly unwinding the systemic evils embedded in our national government. IMO raising awareness as we do in this forum is a positive contribution, albeit not bringing about an immediate resolution.

          We will have our chance to have a great impact on the course of events. The elections next year are the opportunity to make a difference. Electing people to Congress who will carry out the MAGA mission as we see it relies on our participation. There are concrete steps we can take to assist getting the best people into office.

          Question is will we the people who care just sit on our rear ends and watch the parade go by? Or will we get out there and do what it takes to win?

          Liked by 1 person

          • jrapdx says:

            The above assumes an optimistic view of what’s happening with Egypt’s leadership, which may not be the reality, and in that case Egypt is not the American ally it’s been portrayed to be. The truth is elusive, either version is possible. Whatever’s said, healthy skepticism is warranted.

            Like

        • sejmon says:

          Thank you scott…ppl deserve know truth even if it mean -melt down of snowflakes and jail for resistance “leaders” current situation can not continue forever PDJT know it..

          Like

  7. Coldnorth says:

    Trying to sign in to comment. God be with the Egyptians they have had it pretty rough the last quite a number of years. Hope this works.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Sunshine says:

    I have a non-practicing Christian friend in Egypt. I can tell you what’s really happening.

    They don’t dare speak out, they walk on eggshells for everything and avoid religion at all costs.
    It’s an atmosphere of total submission, even when friendly with the secular Muslims of which 99% hate the Jews and control the Christians.

    My friend has no regard for El Sisi. He says ‘beware’.

    If one looks at El Sisi’s forehead, the huge zabiba (prayer crust) speaks volumes. Also, El Sisi is powerless since Islamists control the judiciary and El Sisi isn’t attempting to reform the Judiciary. The Parliament and and the army are loaded with Islamists. When one reads that Egyptian Muslim soldiers kill Christian soldiers, one understands.

    I think El Sisi wants stability and an improved economy but he enjoys his power among world leaders. So, he’s trying for HUDNA, which is a temporary truce in Islam.

    That said, El Sisi knew of the warnings against the Coptic churches. He did nothing to protect them. And the Copts are cowards. My own friend dislikes them.

    END: Go back to the beginning and El Sisi’s ZABIBA (Islamic piety). Compare to Saudi Arabia’s King Salman (no zabiba) and the Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman (no Zabiba). I think President Trump understands.

    http://english.alarabiya.net/en/business/technology/2016/06/22/Saudi-s-Deputy-Crown-Prince-meets-Facebook-founder-Mark-Zuckerberg.html

    Liked by 6 people

    • Craig W. Gordon says:

      Never trust the prayer crust. Your friend in Eygpt knows.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sunshine says:

      Please, don’t misunderstand me. I do like El Sisi. But that zabiba equates to an awful lot of years of head-banging on the ground. It’s quite possible he started questioning his own ideology, as seen in his courageous speech at Al Azhar University.

      But how to explain he didn’t give any protection to the churches?

      Liked by 1 person

      • fleporeblog says:

        Sunshine I have a lot of respect for you but the evidence pertaining to President el-Sisi shows something very different.

        https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2017/05/21/egypts-president-al-sisi-to-president-trump-you-can-do-the-impossible/

        SD wrote the following in the post linked above:

        More than any other Arab leader Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi has led the way in confronting Islamic terrorism.

        It was President al-Sisi who exiled the Muslim Brotherhood and formed a coalition of Arab nations to confront the extremist elements promoting violence.

        President al-Sisi’s call to confront extremism was joined by King Abdullah III (Jordan) in 2014; and that eventually led to Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States uniting and forming an anti-extremism Arab coalition.

        President al-Sisi delivered a 2015 New Year speech to the the most influential Islamic scholars and faith leaders calling upon internal reform to confront the radical elements within the Muslim faith. Saudi King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz honored President al-Sisi for his efforts at creating a stable coalition for peace just prior to his death a few weeks later in late January 2015.

        After taking power in 2015 Saudi King Salman took up the cause for al-Sisi’s peace coalition, and that was the beginning of a series of events that culminated in this 2017 Arab Islamic American Summit. If regional peace is achieved, history will show how significant Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi was in that result.

        Liked by 4 people

    • This. Right here. This.

      This is the reality of Egypt. This is why both Trump and Sisi are practical men. Both have a bond. That bond is that both understand that they are there to be pragmatic, practical, and do what deals are possible. Both understand what it is they are working with. IMO.

      Liked by 2 people

    • scott467 says:

      “That said, El Sisi knew of the warnings against the Coptic churches. He did nothing to protect them. And the Copts are cowards. My own friend dislikes them.”

      _____________

      But it sounds like the Copts are practicing, even and especially in that oppressive and dangerous environment, while your friend is not.

      Why are the Copts cowards?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sayit2016 says:

      What is a prayer crust ??

      Like

  9. czarowniczy says:

    Nothing new here, Egyptian ‘terrorists’, more than a few of them empowered and encouraged by the Egyptian government (or members of it) have been shooting, bombing, burning or otherwise murdering Copts for a very long time. Periods starting from around the Christmas Fast in late November thru their Christmas in early January are murdering Egyptian fav times as they can get more murderous bang for their buck with full churches and associated events.

    Liked by 4 people

    • David A says:

      “empowered and encouraged by the Egyptian government (or members of it)”

      The qualifier is good and necessary, as El Sisi is likely battling a deeper and more entrenched “deep state” then Trump. And that is saying a lot.

      Liked by 2 people

      • czarowniczy says:

        Since Nasser the Egyptian government’s been controlled by the Egyptian General Staff. El Sisi was a Field Marshall and in him we see a return to their line of military rule.
        I think that El Sisi is fighting all factors that want anything other than a military rule. Like it or not the military in Egypt, as in Turkey, is the only faction strong enough to keep the
        Islamists at bay. Attaturk realized this when he made Turkey a secular government with its secularity constitutionally protected by military oversight.
        The Egyptian military undoubtedly has members who hate Copts and provide things to actors who burn churches and kill parishioners. There are fundamentalists in Egyptian government who do the same too…look back at the murders of Copts and the burning of their buildings in Egypt and see how few have been ‘solved’ and how even fewer actors have been prosecuted.

        Like

  10. joeknuckles says:

    The despicable top of the hour propaganda radio newscast described this as a “shootout”.

    Like

  11. jeans2nd says:

    May those departed rest in peace. Jesus is waiting with love and open arms. May their families find peace.

    Liked by 2 people

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