It Begins – The Knife Baltimore Prosecutor Mosby Said Wasn’t Illegal, is Actually, “illegal”….

Marilyn Mosby 2Watch how quickly this case begins to collapse as the ‘real evidence’ begins to come to the surface.  Activist, and State Attorney, Marilyn Mosby originally said:

[…] Officer Miller and Nero then placed Mr. Gray in a seated position and substantially found a knife clipped to the inside of his pants pocket. The blade of the knife was folded into the handle. The knife was not a switchblade and is lawful under Maryland law. These officers then removed the knife and placed it on the sidewalk. 

[…]  Lt. Rice, Officer Miller and Officer Nero failed to establish probable cause for Mr. Gray’s arrest as no crime had been committed by Mr. Gray. Accordingly Lt. Rice Officer MIller and Office Nero illegally arrested Mr. Gray. (link)

This was the statement she made when announcing the charges to the media.  Essentially, an oral citation of the probable cause Mosby used to file her ‘take-my-word-for-it’ Direct Action charges.   However, it looks like she was, well, stretching the truth again.

From an article last night – and note how the Baltimore Sun buries the lede deep inside their article:

[…]  Meanwhile, a police investigation continues as Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby builds her case. The separate investigations have some conflicting findings.

While Mosby said Friday that the officers had made an illegal arrest because a knife Gray was carrying was not a “switchblade,” a violation of state law, the police task force studied the knife and determined it was “spring-assisted,” which does violate a Baltimore code.

The officers remain free on bail.  (link)

Important to note this “task force” is the hand-picked Baltimore City Sheriff’s Office task force previously mentioned.  Mosby is being deconstructed by her own personal investigative unit.

Janice bledsoeSheriff John Anderson

Go figure !

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This entry was posted in Abusive Cops, BGI - Black Grievance Industry, Conspiracy ?, Cultural Marxism, Dem Hypocrisy, Freddy Gray Death, media bias, Notorious Liars, Police action, Professional Idiots, propaganda, Typical Prog Behavior, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

307 Responses to It Begins – The Knife Baltimore Prosecutor Mosby Said Wasn’t Illegal, is Actually, “illegal”….

  1. mikeH says:

    Anybody else bugged by the “spring assisted” knives being illegal? That stupidity needs to be repealed.

    Liked by 2 people

    • John Galt says:

      (1) I don’t think that they are illegal in Baltimore. (2) I am bothered by all libtard infringements of the 2nd Amendment.

      http://online.wsj.com/public/resources/documents/knives.pdf

      Liked by 2 people

    • czarowniczy says:

      Laws limiting access to ‘assisted opening’ knives were largely a knee jerk reaction to the 40s/50s Hollywood movies featuring leather-jacketed thugs using switchblades to cause immediate death to anyone even touched by one. I can remember switchblades for sale, in the 50s, in 5-and-dime stores in downtown West Palm Beach. In Germany in the 60s all the cool kids in high school (until we were caught) carried them. In the military I carried on in the neat little pocket on my flight suit’s leg – as long as I left it in my locker and didn’t carry it off-base.
      The stated reason for banning assisted-opening knives was the fear that the user could get it deployed before the intended victim could…what? Most are so shoddily made that the main reason for not carrying one is to protect the person carrying it. But, like the solid-plastic undetectable handgun that has been legislated against – a truly functional one does not exist. I say that the Crocodile Dundee scenario where the thug pulls out a knife and Dundee pulls out that short sword (or a Glock) would serve the cause more effectively than legislation.

      Like

      • michellc says:

        Oklahoma just repealed their switchblade law.

        I heard an attorney and one of the people who had been pushing for the law to be repealed on the radio talking about it. One of the things the pro-repeal guy said was that it was a knee-jerk, antiquated law. The attorney said that 90% of our federal and state laws are knee-jerk laws and over 70% are antiquated laws, but that you don’t go repealing laws without careful consideration just because they were knee-jerk reactions or are now antiquated.
        The pro-repeal guy cracked me up when he replied, “yeah because repealing those laws aren’t good for liberal attorneys’ business.”
        The attorney said it actually was because usually there is another law in the books that contradicts the new law.
        The pro-repeal guy said then maybe we needed to throw out the books and start over from scratch using only the U.S. Constitution as a guideline and put the lawyers out of business.
        The attorney being an attorney said, “the Constitution was only as good as the judge or lawmaker interpreting it, so lawyers would always be in business even if the only laws on the book were the Constitution.”

        Our founding Fathers I don’t think realized someday people would become stupid and not be able to read and comprehend plain English.

        Liked by 2 people

    • manickernel says:

      I agree the law is antiquated. It is still the law though and cops use these “nuisance” charges to pull in someone they cannot hold otherwise, in this case someone running from a drug deal.

      On the other hand, you can openly walk around in MD with a Samurai sword as long as it is not concealedt, so what’s the issue? 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Anton says:

      Gray was a felon.

      Liked by 2 people

    • DimFizz says:

      That’s not the point (hee-hee). If the prosecutor bases her case on a false arrest because the knife illegal… then her whole case crumbles.

      Like

  2. georgiafl says:

    Is it true that Freddie Gray, because he was a convicted felon, was not allowed to carry a weapon (gun or knife)?

    Liked by 2 people

    • BobNoxious says:

      Felons are usually only prevented from carrying firearms (and ammo; yes, they do charge felon in possession of ammo only) but not knives.

      Like

      • manickernel says:

        Now in DC the laws are a bit different. Angry wife.

        The police found no guns in the house, but did write on the warrant that four items were discovered: “One live round of 12-gauge shotgun ammunition,” which was an inoperable shell that misfired during a hunt years earlier. Mr. Witaschek had kept it as a souvenir. “One handgun holster” was found, which is perfectly legal.

        “One expended round of .270 caliber ammunition,” which was a spent brass casing. The police uncovered “one box of Knight bullets for reloading.” These are actually not for reloading, but are used in antique-replica, single-shot, muzzle-loading rifles.

        Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/oct/23/miller-dc-businessman-faces-two-years-jail-unregis/#ixzz3ZHecVGlj
        Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter

        Like

        • czarowniczy says:

          Lists of seized items are frequently expanded on as it gives the search a nice finished touch to much of the public that doesn’t have the foggiest about what the items are. The items above I DC the expended case of a cartridge is considered a round of ammunition for ‘throwing your butt in jail reasons, and the bullets (even though sold for loading into a black powder arm) could be loaded into shotgun shells or metallic cartridges. This is one of those cases where the police make an arrest under their interpretation of an existing law and it’s up to a judge to decide if their decision meets his interpretation of the laws. DC’s laws are purposely vague allowing activist judges to apply them as they will. Constitution!? We don’ need no stinkin’ Constitution.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Anubis says:

        If on probation or parole no knives can be carried. Otherwise see the law in your state.
        http://www.akti.org/state-knife-laws/

        Liked by 1 person

  3. nivico says:

    https://campaignfinancemd.us/Public/ViewReceipts?theme=vista

    If you check William Murphy’s campaign contributions, he didn’t just donate money to Mosby’s campaign, he gave substantially more money to Mosby’s campaign than any other candidate except for Anthony Brown (Lt. Governor).

    Liked by 2 people

  4. nivico says:

    The family’s attorney was interviewed this morning about the conflict of interest… he claims there is no conflict and invites someone in the press to point the conflict out to him.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/05/morning-joe-billy-murphy-freddie-gray-mosby-conflcit_n_7212224.html

    Like

    • talkaftercarefulthought says:

      just a little food for thought that I didn’t understand until halfway through the trayvon fiasco.. Huff and Puff is able to charge more for their ads based on the number of hits they get. Not only are they a flaming source of frustration but everytime anyone visits any huffpo page they’re putting money in their coffers.. I quit cold turkey the second I understood that

      Liked by 3 people

      • Justice_099 says:

        Yep. All I get from going there is high blood pressure. I self-banned myself a long time ago. There is absolutely nothing of value on there that I couldn’t read somewhere else.

        Liked by 1 person

      • nivico says:

        Make an exception this time 😉

        The video of the hosts grilling the Gray family attorney, Grandpa Munster, is priceless… the one host jokingly remarks under her breath that the attorney should be working for the Clinton’s.

        And she’s right… for an attorney as experienced as Murphy is (he used to be a judge, too, for gosh sakes) to feign ignorance about the appearance of impropriety and conflict of interest is very much an “It depends on what the definition of ‘is’ is.” moment.

        Liked by 1 person

        • realitycheck says:

          It is also interesting : ” His father, William H. Murphy, Sr. was one of the first African American judges to preside in Baltimore, as well as the state of Maryland. The elder Murphy was a staunch civil rights supporter and a test case for integration at the University of Maryland Law School. “Even as the son of a judge, segregation was an up-close and personal thing for me,” says Judge Murphy. The injustices that he experienced as a young man were formative, inspiring him to undertake a lifelong fight for the rights of under-represented communities.”

          He seems to walk the old “pass as white” line sometimes, as well

          Like

  5. manickernel says:

    The story about Lynch going to Baltimore. I have a feeling we are about see some more “children” get slapped. 🙂

    Like

    • JohnP says:

      There will definitely be some lecturing going on behind closed doors. Obama has got everything working the way he wants it to, and no two bit prosecutor is going to spoil it by mishandling this case.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. TNman says:

    Well if that info is correct then that knife was ‘illegal’ according to Baltimore laws per the above info. Of course that law is completely asinine but it is the law. And this whole debacle has been handled in an ‘assinine’ manner by the racist politicians pandering to the bgi. Big zero and accomplices make events much worse and racial divides much wider by their actions and statements.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. oldiadguy says:

    The charging document shows Gray was charged under Baltimore’s City/County Code 19 59-22 and not Maryland State Statute. The District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City is the court where the offense would be heard. The charging document was signed off by a Court Commissioner with ID #1347.

    The charging documents for the officers shows they were charged under Maryland’s criminal code. Their charges were also going to be initially heard in the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City. Their charging document was also signed by a Court Commissioner with ID #1169.

    The following is from the Maryland Courts website.

    “File a police report – File a report with your local police department. If the police file charges, the court and Office of State’s Attorney will become involved automatically.”

    http://www.courts.state.md.us/legalhelp/criminalcases.html

    This is from the Baltimore City’s State Prosecutor’s website.

    “The Office of the State’s Attorney for Baltimore City is responsible for the investigation and prosecution of all crimes committed with the confines of Baltimore. This includes everything from traffic violations to homicides.”

    http://www.stattorney.org/resources/how-the-system-works

    If you go the Basic Criminal Justice Flow Chart page, you will see the following under Police Make Arrest column.

    “States Attorney either agrees to formal charges against the arrestee or signs for charges to be dropped and the person released.”

    The point I’m trying to make is Mosby’s office was involved in Gray’s arrest hours after Gray was arrested. Someone from her office reviewed the case against Gray, found probable cause and approved charging Gray for violation of the Baltimore City Code – Switch Blade Knife. I don’t know the procedures in Baltimore, but in St. Louis, if it was a knife charge, the officer would bring the knife to the warrant office to confirm it met the statutory requirements.

    Now weeks later, she acts like the charge was just now being reviewed for the first time. It was her office that approved the charge in the first place!

    SMH

    Liked by 4 people

    • BobNoxious says:

      Was Gray considered to be “in custody” once he was taken to the hospital?

      I honestly do not know the answer the answer to the question. Have any of the docs surrounding Gray’s arrest been been released?

      Like

      • oldiadguy says:

        I would have to believe once he was arrested and charged, he would remain in custody until released on a summons or made bond.

        When we arrested a subject that was confined to the hospital, we would x-book them, showing they were confined at the hospital. An officer would remain with them until the charge was “issued” at which time the prisoner would become the responsibility of the Sheriff’s Department.

        In some cases when the prisoner, such as in Gray’s case who was not an escape risk, we would place a hold order on him with the hospital, who would contact the Department when he was going to be released, so he could be taken to processing and physically booked.

        Since this was a Baltimore City charge, I suspect Gray was released on a summons, at least on paper.

        It would be helpful if we had a Treeper from the BPD who would have direct knowledge concerning their procedures.

        Like

    • True Colors says:

      If someone in Mosby’s office did approve criminal charges to be filed against Gray for the knife, then that would obviously undermine her public claim that the knife was legal.

      TC

      Liked by 1 person

      • oldiadguy says:

        That’s what I think. We had “warrant officers” from the prosecutor’s office who would review the case and make the decision to file a charge or not. From what I’ve read, I suspect the Baltimore City State Attorney’s Office has something similar.

        Like

      • Her claim has no validity whatsoever.

        Like

    • jc says:

      Logically the person in Mosby’s office that approved the knife charge should be also charged with an illegal arrest,maybe conspiracy too LOL.

      Speaking of conspiracy , how about some conspiracy charges for bringing false charges against the 6 cops. There must have been people in Mosby’s organization saying “you can’t do this”. We need some whistleblowers.

      Liked by 1 person

      • oldiadguy says:

        Here is something to think about. Remember how the warrants for Alicia White and Brian Rice had the wrong pedigree information. The name and pedigree information was for none involved civilians and not the officers involved in this case.

        When were those warrants cancelled and new warrants issued with the correct information. The reason I’m curious is we know the officers surrendered, were booked and made bond. On what warrant were White and Rice booked on.

        The warrants showing a different person as being wanted or a new corrected warrant. I suppose they got a new warrant issued before booking, but what if they didn’t catch the error. Would that make the arrest of Brian Rice and Alicia White illegal.

        It would be interesting to know.

        Like

      • bofh says:

        “Logically the person in Mosby’s office that approved the knife charge should be also charged with an illegal arrest,maybe conspiracy too LOL.”

        Not just conspiracy. Based on the nonsensical charging of the bike cops, this person should also be charged with manslaughter, bad performance, loss of services, and a balk.

        Liked by 2 people

    • DT says:

      Excellent point.

      Like

  8. dizzymissl says:

    Baltimore’s Hasty Prosecutor

    http://pagecroyder.blogspot.com/2015/05/baltimores-hasty-prosecutor.html

    Author: Page Croyder spent nearly 21 years with the Baltimore State’s Attorney’s Office before retiring from that agency in January, 2008.

    Liked by 1 person

    • jc says:

      excerpt from above – she can be sued, she don’t need no stinkin immunity!

      How about Mosby’s own mistake? Her case against the two arresting officers rests upon an “illegal arrest.” She says the knife for which Freddie Gray was arrested was legal. But the police task force examined it and said the officers were indeed correct, the knife was spring-assisted and therefore prohibited. Mosby herself appears to have made an “illegal” arrest, and could be arrested under her theory of false imprisonment. And sued to boot, since she forfeited her immunity from civil action by doing the charging herself.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Justice_099 says:

        Even if the knife were legal, “False imprisonment” is a civil action that could result in termination or other disciplinary action perhaps, but as far as I can tell, there is no criminal “false imprisonment” applied to officers of the law.

        Those two officers were not citizens. I have no idea where she got the idea she could charge them with that.

        Like

      • True. The difference is, even if the cops were mistaken about Gray’s knife (and they weren’t), they had probable cause to make an arrest. Mosby lied about the lawfulness of the arrest to make her unlawful arrests of Gray. Even if she didn’t lie about the knife (she did), and even if the knife was legal under MD law (maybe it was, maybe not), she lied about the relevant BALTIMORE law and the probable cause the cops had for arresting Gray. She’s a liar and a criminal.

        Like

      • Andy says:

        JC,
        It should be noted that a spring assisted knife and a switchblade are two different types of knives.
        A switchblade utilizes a button to release the blade that is spring loaded. The average switchblade can only be opened by pressing the button. I’m not going to discuss other types of automatic knives.
        A spring assested knife has a spring providing pressure on the blade and no release button but relies on a pre-set distance of blade travel from the closed position. I use a “pocket” knife that is faster to open than an automatic or a spring assisted knife and is much more secure and better built.
        In Maryland my pocket knife and spring assisted knives are both legal to carry, I have a few automatics that stay in my home as part of my collection. This is also legal in MD.
        Did the knife in question qualifiy as an automatic, requiring a press of a button or slide of a release mechanism. If so it is illegal to carry concealed or open.

        Like

        • Technically a switch blade is spring opening knife. It’s the degree of assist that varies. Switch blades use 100% spring energy to open. Other knifes use less that 100 %, which is what defines them as spring assist.

          A spring assist knife can be designed to require less user energy to open than a switch blade requires to be applied to its switch to release the blade.

          Like

    • Starrdustt says:

      This is an excellent article, worth the read. Thanks for posting it.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. John Galt says:

    Justice for Freddie! Repeal Fascist Knife Laws! Justice for Freddie!

    Like

  10. BobNoxious says:

    AG Loretta Lynch met w/ Gray’s family and the family attorney today.

    SMH.

    Like

  11. triper57 says:

    There are enough laws on the books that anyone arrested can be charged for a crime even though they may not have been originally arrested for that crime.

    And if you look at the fleeing from the officer, that confirms that the officer has probable cause to suspect that a crime has been committed and give chase.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Justice_099 says:

      Technically aren’t you arrested first and then charged later? That’s supposed to be the whole 24 hour thing. Since Freddie never reached the point of being charged at all, I’m not sure what the police can be charged with.

      There are numerous examples of people arrested at political protests and then simply let after 24 hours. They were never intended to be charged, they just wanted them out of the way for a while.

      People can sue for that, but because of the way the law is structured, it is not criminal.

      Like

  12. strat4evr says:

    When an individual is hired e.g. a police officer etc. or elected e.g. a politician or State prosecutor, these individuals are elevated to a position of power “over” an average working, tax paying, american citizen. The key word here is power. I am white, by color, and have in my 66 years of life have encountered a few of arrogant police officers whose attitude toward me was not only unjustified but quite literally abusive. I ended up saying yes sir no sir to avoid a no win situation for me even though I had legally done nothing wrong. The point I am attempting to make here is that no average working, tax paying american citizen regardless of color is immune to abuse by those who will use their power to abuse simply because they can. In the failed attempt of abuse of power in the Trayvon Martin case, in the failed attempt of power of abuse in the Michael Brown case and now in the failed attempt of power of abuse in the Baltimore fiasco is solid proof that elected or appointed officials who have the “power” to ignorantly effect stupidity and lies on our own national United States of America homeland all the while ignorantly ignoring the fact that Democrats aka Obama cares less about the average working, tax paying American citizen than any patriot, kind hearted,, intelligent and informed american on this planet.I thank you Sundance and all of your protectors of your tree.,

    Like

  13. Justice_099 says:

    I point out that the whole “false imprisonment” is a civil thing and not a criminal thing to demonstrate that one major factor in her charges is to set the stage for a wrongful death case. Those false imprisonment charges won’t be on whatever she submits to a judge. They would probably laugh at her.

    Liked by 1 person

    • nivico says:

      I’m pretty sure ‘false imprisonment’ would be a criminal violation under the 5th and 14th amendments… no person shall be deprived of liberty without due process of law.

      Findlaw states that it is both a criminal and civil offense and that “Even the police may be charged with false imprisonment if they exceed their authority (such as detaining someone without justification).”

      Like

      • Justice_099 says:

        http://injury.findlaw.com/torts-and-personal-injuries/false-imprisonment.html

        “Police Privilege
        In all states, police officers have the right to detain someone they have probable cause to believe has engaged in wrongdoing, or when they believe a crime has been committed.”

        Notice how that is worded. If the knife could even be debated for more than a minute to have been legal or not, it means he had probable cause. That’s for the court to decide, not the cop. There is a knife law. If there had been absolutely no knife laws and he arrested him for having a knife, THAT would be without justification.

        Every cop who ever arrests anyone that turns out later to be proven innocent would need to go to jail if we tried to apply this.

        “Conversely, things that do not constitute false imprisonment may include:

        A claim that you were falsely imprisoned simply because you were found innocent of a crime”

        It would be nearly impossible to ever charge a cop for flase imprisonment, unless like I said above that there was no law at all for what he was arresting you for.

        False imprisonment is also defined this way:

        “an unreasonable amount of time” the law defines that unreasonable amount of time for the police to be beyond 24 hours.

        Lastly, Freddie was never actually charged with anything because he didn’t make it that far.

        Put simply, these charges will be immediately thrown out. They have no reasonable chance of meeting the burden of proof for them.

        Like

        • goodoldboy66 says:

          It seems I’ve come across reference(s) to there being expanded probable cause considerations for known drug or crime areas/ locations. If he ran from LE while in a ‘known zone’ and being a known recidivist that seems to provide the requisite probable cause for chase.

          Upon finding a knife with plausible undetermined legality, the police should error on the side of caution and bring him in. Then if it was determined to be legitimately ‘legal’ at booking or station by other powers that be – it could be addressed by subsequent dropping of charges and release.

          As a recidivist criminal with possible parole conditions (unconfirmed) – it may well be 100% legitimate to arrest him for carrying any weapon (regardless of whether it was legal/ illegal for Joe Schmoe to carry the same weapon).

          Liked by 2 people

          • Justice_099 says:

            Right. The whole point is that she would be a fool if she brought these charges before a judge. The amount of effort required for he to prove they illegally arrested him would be a terrible waste of time and resources. Especially given that they aren’t suggesting he was injured during the arrest.

            The streets are not a court. I’d hate to see the bickering over a 3.9″ knife when the law says 4″ is illegal. That’s what we have courts for. But in that case, the person charged would be found not guilty. Does that mean the cop should then be charged with false imprisonment?

            It’s pretty clear to me what false imprisonment means when it comes to police. If they arrested them something for which there was no law at all, that would be a good example. This is not even close.

            It will hurt her more than help her if she tries to take those charges to court. But the goal was simply to come up with something to arrest them on for optics.

            Maybe they should charge HER for false imprisonment for all the charges she drops before the trial.

            Liked by 3 people

            • doodahdaze says:

              But Sheppie on FOX is thrilled “the city is much calmer now.”

              Like

            • A Thinker says:

              One other benefit to Mosby, every one of those officers had to pay to post bail. Bonds aren’t free. So not only did their reputations get trashed, and their families put at risk, they also suffered direct monetary damages. Yes (and this makes me happy), the groundwork is absolutely laid for civil suits against Mosby (false accusations of criminal action is defamation per se, no?), not to mention false imprisonment etc.

              Like

        • nivico says:

          I’m not saying these officers were guilty of false imprisonment… I’m just pointing out that police officers in general can be guilty of false imprisonment.

          The concept of false imprisonment actually used to strictly apply to only law enforcement, but has since been extended to cover the acts of private citizens as well (kidnappers, hostage situations, mall security, etc).

          Like

        • bofh says:

          “Lastly, Freddie was never actually charged with anything because he didn’t make it that far.”

          I don’t know – is that true? They can do bedside arraignments in the hospital, and he didn’t technically die for at least several days after the arrest.

          Like

    • BertDilbert says:

      By making it an unlawful arrest, Gray has a right to resist and action by the officers becomes assault and false imprisonment. By claiming the knife to be legal, Gray did nothing wrong. Gray is now an angel with a halo on his head. Dindunuffin and murdered in cold blood.

      Like

  14. John Galt says:

    Panther Trading Company, Inc. is located in the heart of southwest Baltimore right down the street from the famous Patapsco Flea Market. We are surrounded by other warehouses and a ton of commerce. We ship 99% of our orders out the same day you order them. Any returns should be shipped to the address below.

    Panther Trading Company, Inc.
    2672 West Patapsco Ave.
    Baltimore, MD 21230
    Email: thepanther@pantherwholesale.com
    Phone: 1-866-644-0134
    Fax: 410-644-0136
    Hours: Monday-Friday 10 AM – 7 PM

    http://pantherwholesale.com/kershawknives.aspx

    So can we expect an immediate raid by the BPD ?

    Like

    • Amy says:

      I am trying to catch up on comments, what is this about?

      Like

    • BertDilbert says:

      But you can see why the officer would call that knife a switchblade no question.

      Like

    • BertDilbert says:

      Here is a better spring assist video showing Knife openings. Basically the only difference is between a button and a lever to operate automatic opening. If I was a cop, I would call it a switchblade under Baltimore law.

      Liked by 1 person

      • BertDilbert says:

        Note both knives have clips on them, like the officer described in his report. .No problem clipping in the pocket.

        Like

    • Deadhead says:

      Isn’t the false imprisonment charge a way to make it Federal? Violating Civil rights?

      Like

    • nivico says:

      John…

      If I’m understanding the situation correctly, I think they’re legal to own but not legal to carry concealed (clipped inside the pocket).

      And even a perfectly legal knife becomes illegal if there is probable cause to believe the owner intends to commit an illegal act with it. Remember the whole brouhaha over whether Trayvon’s screwdriver was just a screwdriver or a burglary tool. Under the totality of the circumstances, i.e. being found along with stolen property, it could reasonably be inferred that the intent was for use as a burglary tool. (though I do still wonder if the officer who nabbed Trayvon in the school parking lot actually caught him in the act of trying to break into a vehicle with the screwdriver)

      Under a similar totality of the circumstances evaluation of the Gray knife… he was a known drug dealer carrying a concealed knife. I think we can draw many reasonable inferences from that.

      Liked by 1 person

      • John Galt says:

        “If I’m understanding the situation correctly, I think they’re legal to own but not legal to carry concealed”

        The code section in question makes it unlawful to “sell, carry, or possess” and makes no distinction based upon concealment.

        Baltimore Code

        § 59-22. Switch-blade knives.

        (a) Possession or sale, etc., prohibited. It shall be unlawful for any person to sell, carry, or possess any knife with an automatic spring or other device for opening and/or closing the blade, commonly known as a switch-blade knife.

        (b) Penalties. Any person violating the provisions of this section, shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined not more than $500 or be imprisoned for not more than 1 year, or both, in the discretion of the court.

        Like

  15. Wayne Whitney says:

    Is a seat belt actually required under the new policy?

    I cannot find the original document but the quotation that keeps appearing clearly does NOT require a seat belt but instead says “all passengers, regardless of age and location, shall be restrained by seat belts or other authorized restraining devices”. The last five words keep getting ignored, but they change the meaning of the policy completely since if we include them the failure to use a seat belt does not, by itself, establish violation of the policy unless there were no “other authorized restraining devices”. But from what I’ve read, it certainly sounds like Freddie Gray was “restrained”, and so the real question is whether or not the restraints used were authorized or not.

    Has anyone seen a copy of the document describing the recent policy change by the Baltimore Police Department, and if so, can you determine whether or not the new policy is being applied correctly?

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Amy says:

    What gets me is:
    No one is acknowledging (not here, I mean on TV or even the prosecution) Freddie ran–that right there gave the cops probable cause to chase him because he was arrested before for drugs and that is what the cops were there for. Any cop will tell you: if someone makes eye contact with you and start running of course they are going to chase you.
    For the left nuts, no one is saying what happened to Freddie is not a tragedy. Once again, whole situation could have been avoided had he not ran.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Betsy Ross says:

      I’m with you in the scratching-my-head camp, Amy. Why run if you’re innocent? It’s almost automatically going to make law enforcement suspicious. That’s just a given no matter if you’re white/black/purple/yellow/rainbow.

      I was sitting on the sidewalk of my very nice neighborhood, taking a break after a long walk because the weather had turned hot. A policeman asked me why I was sitting on the sidewalk and I told him I had been taking a walk, showed him my I.D. (to show who I was and that I was very near my own address) and he let lie down in the back of his patrol car to cool down.

      People need to understand that a world without a police force watching out for our neighborhoods would be one scary place to live.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Anton says:

    Consider Obama lit the ME and created to Arab Spring for the Refugee Resettlement Program…where already 100,000 from Syria, Home of ISIS, with no ID….are being imported into the USA, on the backs of the Taxpayer…It Is the TROJAN HORSE to the TRANSFORMATION

    Tonight, Dr. Christina Jeffrey will be interviewed on Blogtalk Radio’s Andrea Shea King Show about the involvement of Spartanburg, S.C. in the Refugee Resettlement Program and Dr. Jeffrey’s work to shine light into the darkest corners of the program.

    The show will broadcast from 9-10:30 PM (EDT) tonight, Tuesday, May 5, 2015.

    http://www.blogtalkradio.com/askshow/2015/05/06/the-andrea-shea-king-show–dr-christina-jeffrey

    The show will be available in Andrea Shea King’s archive following the live broadcast. The archive can be accessed through the above link.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. James F says:

    Funny how no national big media is reporting this.

    They all reported and broadcast Mosby polluting the jury pool when she falsely declared the officers made an illegal arrest. The knife being declared legal was on of their biggest talking points,

    Liked by 1 person

  19. nivico says:

    Ooh, I should have known to look at the ABA’s stance on lawyers giving donations to elected judicial officials 😉

    E. The Commission finds that when judges make decisions that
    favor contributors, they may be accused of favoritism.

    The judge who accepts a “contribution” in exchange for giving the contributor
    favorable treatment in a specific case, has committed a form of bribery that will
    subject the judge to disciplinary action for violation of the code of judicial conduct,
    criminal prosecution and removal from office. Such cases of outright bribery are
    rare, but situations in which members of the press or public call attention to what
    they regard as a suspicious correlation between a judge’s campaign contributions and
    the judge’s subsequent, favorable treatment of the contributor, are more common.

    F. The Commission finds a pervasive public perception that
    campaign contributions influence judicial decision-making.

    From the perspective of the public, the media, and many court reform organizations,
    the old adage that “money talks” is accepted wisdom when it comes to assessing
    whether judges are likely to be influenced by the campaign contributions they
    receive. The perception that judges are influenced by the contributors to their
    reelection campaigns is widespread. This “perceived impropriety” does not
    accompany all private contributions. Contributions of inconsequential amounts are
    insufficient to create a reasonable concern that they are capable of buying influence.
    More sizable contributions, however, are a different matter.

    http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/migrated/judind/pdf/commissionreport4_03.authcheckdam.pdf

    Like

  20. bbb says:

    Was Freddie on probation?? If so in most states the possession of a weapon/ knife would be a violation, he would have forfeited his 4th amendment right and should not be in company with know criminal elements or involve in criminal activity. He must submit to questioning at anytime by probation officer or any other law enforcement officer….If so would the officers that first made eye contact known this???? and is this why Freddie ran………ie: probable cause????

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Annie says:

    One of the Baltimore police officers who arrested Freddie Gray wants the police department and prosecutor to produce a knife that was the reason for the arrest, saying it was an illegal weapon.

    http://time.com/3847891/freddie-gray-death-police-officer-baltimore/

    Like

  22. lepanto says:

    Take a look at this knife …

    Like

  23. Annie says:

    More details about Officer Edward Nero’s motion to produce the Gray knife.

    http://www.wbaltv.com/news/officer-files-motion-contending-gray-arrest-was-legal/32824182

    Like

    • John Galt says:

      Sporting goods store guy gets it right:

      “Many knives have these spring-assisted opening mechanisms but are not the automatic knives prohibited under Maryland law, said Michael Faith, marketing director for Henderson’s Sporting Goods in Hagerstown.

      “An automatic knife means all you do is push a button and the blade pops out,” Faith said. “A lot of knives will have a little spring assist so when you push it open with your thumb, the knife will open up pretty much by itself.”

      Like

  24. James F says:

    He specifies state law. I am guessing Hagerstown does not have their own law like Baltimore.

    All fireworks are legal for sale and discharge in my state but almost none are legal in my city, but cops usually look the other way or give warnings on the Fourth of July.

    Like

  25. rumpole2 says:

    Apologies to: Rocky Horror Picture Show – Freddie

    Chorus : When Freddie said he didn’t like his teddy
    You knew he was a no good kid
    But when he threatened your life
    With a switch blade knife

    What a guy

    Makes you cry

    And I did

    Like

  26. Fallen says:

    oldiadguy: “The point I’m trying to make is Mosby’s office was involved in Gray’s arrest hours after Gray was arrested.”

    No, it wasn’t. That flow chart you’re looking at is a tad misleading. 🙂

    “Someone from her office reviewed the case against Gray, found probable cause and approved charging Gray for violation of the Baltimore City Code – Switch Blade Knife.”

    This is incorrect. Quite often, police officers are free to seek charges on their own as the complainant and don’t consult with anyone else ahead of time before heading to the district court commissioner, and that’s what happened here.

    “It was her office that approved the charge in the first place!”

    No, that’s incorrect.

    Like

  27. Pingback: The B&R Tuesday Skim - Black & Blonde Media

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