Krauthammer On Baltimore Prosecutor Marilyn Mosby: “It looks like appeasement of the mob”…

Charles Krauthammer, aka Captain Obvious:

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This entry was posted in Abusive Cops, Agitprop, BGI - Black Grievance Industry, Cultural Marxism, Freddy Gray Death. Bookmark the permalink.

88 Responses to Krauthammer On Baltimore Prosecutor Marilyn Mosby: “It looks like appeasement of the mob”…

  1. “Charles Krauthammer, aka Captain Obvious”

    The problem is, how many people needed to hear it laid out like that, even if it is obvious to us?

    (Though admittedly, a lot of those people may not watch Fox News…)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. canadacan says:

    You can call him Captain Obvious all you want ,sometimes it takes a dignified erudite person to restate something on Fox News.
    Charles is not perfect but I like him.He brings dignity and class to crazy situations.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Agreed. I don’t agree with everything he says, but he brings a calmer voice to certain issues, unlike Jeanine Pirro or Megyn Kelly, both of whom I like, but also have differences of opinion with from time to time. They speak strongly, sometimes TOO strongly, and tend drive away some potential viewers.

      I was surprised to read that Pirro actually praised the Prosecutor for charging these officers, and wonder if this isn’t just another example of how Fox management is leaning more and more to the left..

      Liked by 2 people

  3. auscitizenmom says:

    Yep, I have NO doubt that is exactly what it is. Oh, along with whatever other nefarious plans they have.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. FoxInTheHenHouseNews.

    Like

  5. Re: Fox got lost:

    Jeratol Reveria:

    He gets an actor from an acting school.
    He gets a TV crew.
    He gets to Baltimore.
    He has his security guards all about.
    He fakes to try to start a bar fight with one of the protesters (the acting school kid).

    Not, it was a sham.
    If he did that in a real world deal, he would hot have his glasses still on unless he wanted to be blind for life.

    Like

  6. Margaret-Ann says:

    I’d like to weigh in to say I adore Krauthammer. I read his last book and think he is a brilliant man. And I love his sense of humor. Yes, he has a grand sense of humor that often goes unnoticed. I enjoy seeing him up against O’Reilly, who I rarely watch.

    Liked by 1 person

    • barbi says:

      He IS brilliant and no, I don’t agree with him on everthing either. He’s human and has his biases, but all in all, he uses empiricism to draw his conclusions, and as he has said, he does change his mind when it’s clear the facts are in. He’s one of the few commentators on either side of the political spectrum that uses quality research studies with large samples, done over many years and repeated by others, to inform him.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. auscitizenmom says:

    I have a lot of respect for his opinion.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. JohnP says:

    It needs to be said over and over again until the brain numb media start to worry it may be true.

    Like

  9. skeptiktank says:

    There is a rumor emanating from BPD that Gray was an informant. That they would pick him up while he made a show of resisting, and if anyone else was in the van he would make a fuss in there as well. Then, when he got to the police station a select individual would interrogate him. Most of the police officers in the station house didn’t know what was happening, This would explain the eye contact business. I just heard this on CNN, and don’t put a lot of stock in it, but if true that would sure change things. I would think the prosecutor would have been informed if this were the case.

    Liked by 1 person

    • auscitizenmom says:

      That is what the anonymus coworker of the cops said on The Kelly File last night.

      Like

    • oldiadguy says:

      I find that what whole story line to be suspicious. That’s not the way one would normally run an informant. Sounds more like something you see in a movie or a television show. As auscitizenmom states here, that story line came out during the Kelly File video. I’ve conducted probably over 200+ interviews with police officers as an IA investigator. That interview sounded pre-planned and coached, with the “co-worker” wanting to cover certain points. I would have to interview the “co-worker” in person so I could watch his reactions to questions. Something about that whole interview is not sitting right with me.

      Remember the bogus story about the auto accident settlement and the spinal surgery a week or so before the incident, it appears to have come from a pro-police site. The van driver’s relative, also anonymous, the City Magazine story and the story Sundance reported on earlier today concerning the Jane Miller report with the “other occupant” in the van. I don’t know. This story is getting weirder and weirder. You just can’t script this stuff. SMH

      Like

      • Dixie says:

        I really appreciate what you have to say, and listen intently when you comment. Even though you are typing and not talking….figure of speech. You are only second to Sundance.

        Like

        • oldiadguy says:

          Thank you for your kind comment. There are many here that are better than myself. This just happens to be one of those occasions that I have some insight.

          Take Care

          Like

        • Angel Martin says:

          i agree, i have learned a lot about police procedures and police thinking from iadguy. he is a huge asset to this site.

          i definitely agree about the strangeness of this case.

          we have these “anonymous” police sources who are anonymous to us but can’t be a mystery to those knowledgeable about the case. what are they doing? is this a way of doing pr without it being usable in court ?

          then we have the sinister accusations about who is and is not a police informant, which is doubly dangerous given the anti-police sentiment in baltimore.

          Like

  10. Janie M. says:

    I love Charles. And I can’t help but feel that Mosby is thinking long term for her political aspirations – springboarding to higher office.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. starfcker says:

    Not so fast. I’m very pro cop, but this one might be exactly what the prosecutor says it is. Lay him facing forward, face down, get some speed up, and stand on the brakes. Broken neck. That’s why the driver has the big charge. The rest have been overcharged, to assist them in the race to cut a deal.

    Like

    • doodahdaze says:

      How can that be proved? A stray Possum could have run in front of the Paddy Wagon. Small chillin’s an chile’s may have been running after it to avoid Moochie Meals at school.

      Like

      • smiley says:

        what bothers me is the fact that they waited so long to get a medic to him.

        Liked by 1 person

        • John Galt says:

          Freddie died days later, following surgery. Assuming that the cops unreasonably delayed getting a medic, how was that the proximate cause of Freddie’s death?

          Liked by 2 people

          • smiley says:

            it bothers me b/c they’ll make an issue of it.
            Mosby repeated it at least 3 times.
            so far, they haven’t revealed any proximate cause at all.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Dixie says:

            What bothers me is the number of people who are lying to cover their a$$es, including the hospital.

            Like

        • skeptiktank says:

          I’m not a cop, but I have known a lot of cops. Some are still active, like my son in law. They tell me that many of the resisters claim to need medical attention, and unless the cop thinks they are really in serious need they pretty much ignore them. If they are talking they are breathing. That sort of attitude.

          Like

          • Dixie says:

            I’ve read that before….that the perps always act like they need medical help, like the little boy who cried wolf….I’m sure it gets old after a while.

            Like

          • janc1955 says:

            This will sound ridiculous, especially given that so many here don’t watch teevee, but I’m not kidding when I say that one episode of Cops will convince even the casual viewer that more often than not, perps are drama queens who start lying, whining, crying, denying, retching, falling, yelling, etc. as soon as they’re caught.

            Like

    • Dr. Bogus Pachysandra says:

      Well, we’ll have to see the van’s GPS to prove that. And the driver, knowing about the GPS would have to be crazy to risk his career doing that.

      Like

    • barbi says:

      to buy that explanation, a jury would have to be shown the record of that particular driver, shown that he’d exhibited cruelty before.

      Like

    • John Galt says:

      “but this one might be exactly what the prosecutor says it is. Lay him facing forward, face down, get some speed up, and stand on the brakes. Broken neck. That’s why the driver has the big charge.”

      Please provide a link to where Mosby made any such assertion.

      Like

    • striket1977 says:

      Then why did the other guy say it was smooth ride?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Angel Martin says:

      the problem with that theory is when you hit the brakes, Freddie is going to crash into the front of the cage. but the medical examiner says freddie hit the back door.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. doodahdaze says:

    A couple years late and a trillion dollars short. Some of the major cops and semi literate media are finally catching on to what the CTH has said for years about the BGI and leftist extremist media. We told ya so.
    http://www.breitbart.com/video/2015/05/01/clarke-freddie-gray-charges-duke-lacrosse-case-all-over-again/

    Like

  13. John Galt says:

    Cop suspended for 4 days for failure to seat belt unruly heroin addict during transport in squad car:

    http://www.brookfieldnow.com/news/brookfield-commission-upholds-officers-suspension-ai7udr8-182456351.html

    New Jersey case extrapolating seat belt violation into criminal liability (in view of a statute making it a crime to violate a public safety law) :

    http://www.njlawattorney.com/blog/2012/08/criminal-defense-is-the-seat-belt-law-a-public-safety-law.shtml

    Not sure how they get from failure to seat belt unruly heroin addict during transport to second degree murder.

    Like

  14. True Colors says:

    Yeah, Mosby’s actions are politically motivated. She was pandering to an angry mob. It could not be more obvious.

    Mosby saying that she chose to pursue charges, in part because she heard the mob calls for “no justice, no peace.”

    Mosby said that this is “our” time. Our? Really? Who does she mean by “our”?

    Mosby said that she was going to “get justice for Freddie Gray.” She did not say that she was going to get justice, period. The implication there being that the officers are already guilty.

    TC

    Like

  15. skeptiktank says:

    If all six of them would insist on a speedy trial, most of the charges would be dropped immediately.

    Like

  16. JohnP says:

    Another law professor chimes in.

    Law Professor: Baltimore Officers Were Overcharged, Charges Will Likely Be Dismissed
    http://dailycaller.com/2015/05/01/law-professor-baltimore-officers-were-overcharged-charges-will-likely-be-dismissed/

    Keep ’em coming boys, we are nearing the tipping point. Has any law professor endorsed the charges?

    Liked by 3 people

    • John Galt says:

      Affidavit of Probable Cause – Second Degree Murder

      Freddie ran from some cops. The cops arrested Freddie and put him in a police van, but didn’t fasten Freddie’s seat belt. Freddie requested an asthma inhaler, but the cops didn’t get Freddie an asthma inhaler. Freddie was beating his head on the wall of the van. Freddie’s head somehow hit a bolt in the van and something somehow severed Freddie’s spine. Freddie died days later after surgery in a hospital, therefore the cop driving the van is guilty of second degree depraved heart murder cuz cops are all evil and stuff.

      Like

      • JohnP says:

        Sounds absolutely silly doesn’t it. Using this logic the corrections officers monitoring Ariel Castro when he committed suicide, should have been charged with manslaughter because they didn’t take away his sheets.

        Liked by 1 person

        • John Galt says:

          The cops didn’t fasten Freddie’s seat belt.
          The vast majority of prisoners are transported safely without fastening their seat belts.
          Freddie died.

          Causation

          An act causes (injury/) if the (injury/) is the direct, natural, and probable consequence of the act and the (injury/) would not have happened without the act. A natural and probable consequence is one that a reasonable person would know is likely to happen if nothing unusual intervenes. In deciding whether a consequence is natural and probable, consider all the circumstances established by the evidence.

          Like

      • bitterlyclinging says:

        You need a doctor’s prescription for an asthma inhaler. In order to get a doctor’s precription you need to find a physician. The only exceptions were Bronkaid and Primatene mist, neither of which were very effective and may no longer be on the market.

        Like

  17. zephyrbreeze says:

    Heather McDonald at City Journal does a masterful job of reviewing a book about the criminal lifestyle. The author spent several years living among the criminals in a Philly neighborhood.

    http://www.city-journal.org/comments/index.php?story=11365#comments

    Like

    • zephyrbreeze says:

      Here’s what one of the commenters wrote:

      What is described in Goffman’s book is exactly what a lifestyle of crime looks like. There is nothing admirable, glorious, or beautiful about it. It is ugly and consumes all who pursue it.

      I”ve spent time with offenders, been on the street, and have conducted any number of statistical studies on offending behavior. I’ve seen children murdered, young men executed on the street, and mini-riots break out–including a full fledged race riot. The men and women who live this lifestyle do so because the choose to. They enjoy their risky behavior, they enjoy their status on the street, and they enjoy playing the game.

      At the sake of sounding reductionistic—it really is that simple. Honestly, you just cannot believe the depths of human pathology until you see it, experience it, and learn to appreciate it for what is is: the ultimate destructive force.

      And Heather is correct, too, that academics are loath to discuss this in direct terms. Goffman is the perfect example of academics trying to protect lifestyle criminals from public and academic scrutiny. There are many other academics, too, who prefer the Noble Lie to the ugly truth.

      Like

      • zephyrbreeze says:

        From the article:

        To her credit, she devotes a chapter to “clean people”—individuals who have no dealings with the criminal-justice system. A group of young men on Sixth Street try to steer as clear as possible from the “dirty people.” They remain at home at night, playing video games together. They drink beer, rather than smoke marijuana, because there are drug tests at their jobs, which include security guard, maintenance man, and convenience-store clerk. If they lose their jobs, they don’t start dealing drugs; they rely on friends and family until they find another position. When they break traffic laws, they pay off their fines and recover their driving licenses before they start driving again. Their unassuming rejection of criminality comes as an enormous relief after the squalid behavior of Goffman’s closest associates. Their respect for the law should be celebrated and studied, as Robert Woodson has long advocated.

        Liked by 1 person

    • wondering999 says:

      Thank you Zephyrbreeze. Good link

      Like

  18. starfcker says:

    Look, nobody has been better on this cop stuff than sundance. Nobody. But this one may be legit. A broken clock is right twice a day. His spine was in one piece when they loaded him in the van. Not true when they took him out. And they made a lot of stops to ‘check on his condition’. Not good.

    Like

    • Angel Martin says:

      given that Freddie hit the BACK door of the van, one thing we know is it was not wild driving by the police, because a police van can’t accelerate anywhere near fast enough to throw someone into the back door.

      that’s why i am confident this case is bogus.

      Like

      • John Galt says:

        If Mosby had any evidence of Death Proof style driving, she would have filed first degree murder charges and she would have been trumpeting it to the media. Instead, there are apparently 22 and / or 38 year old van passengers attesting to a smooth ride.

        Like

  19. starfcker says:

    Dr
    Ben Carson, being a neurosurgeon, and certainly not an agitator, says an injury like this can only come from direct trauma, and he applauds the prosecutors actions

    Like

    • James F says:

      Bashing ones head into a steel door or wall is “direct trauma” as well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Rodney Plonker says:

      …and Dr. Michael Baden and the highly qualified “Pathology Assistant” / ‘Professor’ Parcell’s autopsy present their conclusion Brown was shot from behind. Later autopsies (including one by the Feds who had direction to nail Office Wilson if they could) showed a more objective picture that backed up the cop.

      Let’s see what the evidence is.

      Like

    • mimbler says:

      Dr. Carson has also weighed in on Trayvon’s side. I like and admire many of the things he says and stands for, but IMHO he is not objective when it comes to these BGI cases

      Like

      • auscitizenmom says:

        I love Dr. Carson and I think he is really a good man. But, I think he is a little naive about criminals and I think he really wants to see good in people.

        Like

  20. mimbler says:

    Yes, I was excited when he came on the scene, and thought he would make a good candidate, but I’ve come to believe he is just too naive in a number of areas.
    Mike

    Like

  21. mimbler says:

    As I told the guys at lunch a few weeks ago. “I no longer want him as president, but I’d love to have him as a next door neighbor!”

    Like

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