MARIJUANA! Is It Actually Good For You?

I am posting this video not only because I think it is interesting, and presents information we don’t usually see, but also because I know it will probably generate a lot of  heat (if not light) in the comment section.    But then, I’m just a pot stirrer. Enjoy!

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304 Responses to MARIJUANA! Is It Actually Good For You?

  1. georgiafl says:

    Not just NO, but HECK NO!!!
    Pot heads are exhibits #1-1,000,000+

    Liked by 1 person

    • stella says:

      Be sure and watch the video. It’s a bit long, but interesting.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Les says:

        That was interesting because they offered the usual arguments along with the scietific data. Pot smokers need to come up with some new tactics.

        I think they should give people a pre-pot IQ test. If you have 8 points to spare, you’re in! If you don’t, sorry, no pot for you. Maybe that would provide motivation for people to actually learn something.

        Like

        • Les says:

          I don’t think I could pass a typing test these days. I used to typeset entire books without error. No weed for me, I better stick to the occasional margarita or Bud Light.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Be Ge says:

          8 points off are only for folks stupid enough to start using at 13-14. If you do it as a pain relief thing aged 30+ — there is not all that much you loose.

          Like

          • stella says:

            How do you know? How many points can you safely sacrifice?

            Like

            • Be Ge says:

              Much wisdom begets much sorrow. If you don’t believe me on this one, trust Shlomo ben David, a speaker of words to the Jewish Qahal aka Qohelet aka Ecclesiastes, a king of the Jews in Jerusalem, the smartest guy to have ever lived.

              Yet and still, my point was you wouldn’t loose much or anything if you start 30+.

              Like

            • anthedohmy says:

              How do they know 8 points are shaved off? What else in their environment where they isolated from (sugar, roundup-infused wheat, prescription medication) that could cause a drop was isolated from the person?

              The whole ball of wax feels like junk science.

              The Good Doctor is evading quite a few questions about the drugs she is prescribing.

              The answer to the question “is it good for you” may well depend in the circumstances. For a person starting in a perfectly “normal” state, it might not be “good”, but for a person starting from another state it might. Is chemotherapy “good” for you?

              And in the garden God said every plant he grew was good. The tree in the middle of the garden was problematic. Was that a cannabis tree? If it was, we have a clear answer.

              There are some first person accounts of people who gained significant functionality from it, including a city councilor in LA who was bedridden-given up, from cancer, who roared back to life, and children with severe forms of epilepsy who were given a second lease. I do not use it now, but there are two time periods in my life when I have and it moved me out of paralysis, not into it.

              I’d be interested in tracking the laws that made the plant illegal to begin with, yet allow the kinds of shenanigans that Big Pharma pulls off, I say having been married to a Ph D level drug researcher and seen a few things around “FDA Approval Time”, when they bring the drug before the former company executives, now FDA members, who will be company executives on the other end of The FDA Appointment.

              Also, there are other forms besides smoke, including vaporizing and making it an ingredient in foods.

              What recipe can prozac or seroquel fit seamlessly in?

              This is a question worthy of far more vigorous debate, but I’ll lose 8 points tomorrow if I don’t go to sleep on time tonight.

              Like

      • Thought Police says:

        Been lurking at the Treehouse for the past while now. Really enjoying the editorial and commentary from everyone. Said i’d post a quick reply to this as it’s something i’ve a little bit of experience of.

        I’ve seen quite a few of my friends (i’m including myself here when i say this) dissociate over time from even light weed use. This is most common among heavier users, of whom, I feel It’s not a case of -if- they will dissociate, but by how much, and by what degree they become aware of their dissociative state over time. (I found the part where Dr. Boniface talked about the damage caused to the prefrontal cortex and subsequent loss of “self” particularly fascinating as her description seemed eerily similar to what i’ve observed in myself and others) I was lucky that i became aware of my dissociative state and quickly quit as it scared the hell outta me – but there are others who are not so lucky.

        That is one thing Big Weed is NOT oblivious to.

        Liked by 1 person

    • crossthread42 says:

      georgiafl, I’m sorry to disagree here, BUT; My wife has GLACOMA ,, and Herb Helps her, (SHE DOES NOT GET HIGH, PER SE,, ) just a couple draws off a “joint”,,, to keep pressure down in her eyeballs, and helping Her from getting very SERIOUS Headaches.. Folks Like Her need to have to laws changed..

      Like

  2. mikayla825 says:

    I’m just a pot stirrer I saw what ya did there, and it cracked me up:-D

    Liked by 7 people

  3. manickernel says:

    Pot is 1/10 as damaging as alcohol is to this country. I imagine the brewing industry opposes it as smokers drink less too. Law enforcement opposes it as it buys so many toys. I neither smoke nor drink or use any mind altering drugs these days, as I am still having flashbacks from the 70’s I really don’t need them.

    Like

    • stella says:

      Did you watch the video?

      Like

      • manickernel says:

        Yep. The issue is not just whether it is harmful, but the hypocrisy of having alcohol legal while pot is illegal. The real harm from pot comes from its criminalization.

        Liked by 1 person

        • stella says:

          Why add another controlled substance to the mix? What good reason is there? Anyway, as we see states legalizing marijuana (we have medical marijuana where I live), we see problems cropping up by the dozens. I ask again, what is the purpose?

          Liked by 2 people

          • Mr. Izz says:

            What kind of problems are coming to the surface? I am not in an area that legalizes marijuana and I doubt that I would get proper information from the media about what’s going on in those areas.

            Like

            • stella says:

              Driving while drug impaired, easier for kids to get drugs, easier for dealers to get pot – they just buy it from the licensed providers.

              Liked by 2 people

              • Ugh says:

                It’s never been difficult to buy pot. Free people will act free regardless of laws. Prohibition didn’t work with alcohol and it doesn’t with weed!

                Liked by 1 person

                • Justice_099 says:

                  Not really an argument to legalize it.

                  They get the weed illegally, we lock them up for breaking the law.

                  That’s how to deal with that problem.

                  Like

                • Justice_099 says:

                  People will always rob, rape, and steal too regardless of the laws. Should we legalize those things too?

                  Liked by 1 person

                • brometheus says:

                  Your response makes no sense at all. Smoking cannabis is something one does to themselves. Robbing someone is a crime against someone else. Simply put as a free human being I should be free to make my own choices. Your opinion of my choice is just that. If I am working 60 hours a week every week of my life and I find smoking this plant helps my joint pain. Who are you to tell me I must use something different? It is of no concern to me who else uses it. If kids get their hands on it it is up to the parents of those children to educate their own rug rats. I do not require the oppressive hand of the state to tell me what food to eat. You people say you are conservative but are all for sticking guns in my face because of how I choose to relieve pain. If you are unable to draw a line here and say “Non violent drug offenders should no longer be persecuted.” Then I say you are not for small government at all.

                  Liked by 2 people

                • Justice_099 says:

                  It is NOT a victimless crime.
                  While you may take it for ‘pain’, that is NOT the reason the majority of people use it. Oxycotin also works for pain. People also take Oxycotin for recreation. And it destroys lives.
                  Being a conservative does not mean a complete absence of laws.

                  My point was extreme, but absolutely relevant as a response to the post I was responding to. The logic that we should make it legal simply because people will always do it regardless of the law is flawed and I perfectly framed that logic with an admittedly extreme example.

                  Like

                • stella says:

                  Since there’s no difference in your opinion (of course, you offer no data to prove that there have been no changes since our medical marijuana law was passed, which was the basis for my comment), then why legalize it? Why not leave well enough alone?

                  Liked by 1 person

              • anthedohmy says:

                Then some people just grow their medicine in their back yard or basement and choose not to drive while ‘impaired’.

                Like

          • anthedohmy says:

            Why did it become a “controlled substance” to begin with?

            Why add another controlled substance to the mix?

            For the dozens of problems do you see thousands of solutions, by chance?

            I have a teenager who became one of the “problems.” Got 1800 on his SAT’s and then flunked his last semester of senior English and was not able to graduate with his class. My policy was to let it run it’s course and let him feel the consequences of his choices, once it became clear that ‘punishment’ wasn’t going to stop it. I preferred that he experience consequences when they were still on the light side. I experienced the familial humiliation of not having a perfect child, but that was on my psyche. It is a year later. He stopped on his own. In the past many months he has been working diligently to learn to code and sometimes works with me. Today was one of those days. On the way home, he identified his past “gluttony” (his choice of words) as the real issue.

            People become disabled by donuts, french fries, and Doritos through the exact same mechanism. Somebody was talking about the taxpayer expense of interventions. Let’s talk about medicare and heart disease, stroke, diabetes, all caused by lifestyle choices over time. Then take some Big Pharma drugs that cause worse side effects than the original condition and all this to the rising cost of “health” care.

            Anything, to excess, can be bad for you, and can cause unnecessary taxpayer expense. Anybody with a protruding belly and 30-50 extra pounds on who chimes in on this, including myself, ought to take a long hard look at weight gain caused by some form of addiction, and the long term cost of it.

            Gluttony is not good for us, in general.

            Like

        • crossthread42 says:

          manickernel ,,, You mean DISCRIMATION,,, look up the history of Illegalizing marijuana..

          Like

        • anthedohmy says:

          The issue is having anti-psychotics and SSRI’s and amphetamines and benzodiazepines legal and the person who prescribes them claiming a plant is bad.

          Like

          • anthedohmy says:

            Drink the kool-aid…

            Like

          • stella says:

            If what the person says is true, other things they do does not minimize that truth. Take one thing at a time and analyze it. A doctor may prescribe drugs that I consider to be bad – statins for example. That doesn’t mean his advice about weight loss and high blood pressure is incorrect.

            Like

            • anthedohmy says:

              If the doctor properly advises about the risks and benefits of one path over another, this is excellent. Most doctors don’t prescribe weight loss, they prescribe statins to their regular customers.

              Like

              • stella says:

                Doctors most definitely prescribe weight loss, not in the form of a drug, of course. Doctors do refer patients to nutritionists.

                Like

                • anthedohmy says:

                  Some doctors do. Most recent experience with male trim most of his life, gained 20 post retirement, his blood pressure went up with it. One visit to Kaiser with elevated cholesterol and they wanted to write a prescription he could walk down the hall to their in-house pharmacy and have filled. Not one suggestion about losing weight or changing diet.

                  He took his elderly mother for a visit a couple of months later. It was a new-to-her doctor. Her arms were killing her from the statins they overprescribed and the doctor tried to get her blood pressure, but the cuff hurt too much and she doth protest “leave me alone” basically, but the doctor persisted despite all protest. By the fourth painful attempt, the new young doctor was victorious and obtained an elevated blood pressure.

                  Not recognizing her potential role in elevating the blood pressure, she immediately wrote a prescription upping her blood pressure medication. When they arrived home I suggested perhaps it would be better to obtain daily readings under calmer circumstances before such a drastic measure. Lo and behold…

                  But most people don’t know that all doctors are not good doctors. I didn’t until a few almost killed me with a toxic medication soup while missing an underlying tumor. Had to figure it out myself and wean myself off the drugs. We are taught not to do these things, however.

                  In looking at the economics of it, doctors have motivation to keep regular patients, who come in for service regularly, otherwise they have to constantly hawk for new customers, which isn’t what they signed up to do (openly be salesmen) when they signed up for medical school. If they send everybody off without a prescription in hand, which ones will come back regularly?

                  Medicine is a business, too. Doctors have mortgage(s), too. There are good doctors who practice the truth and others who either don’t know it or don’t want to know it.

                  Like

                • stella says:

                  Doctors “practice”. On us.

                  Like

    • Angel Martin says:

      i never understood the ‘logic” of arguing: “our society has all these problems with alcohol, so let’s double our grief by legalizing dope as well.”

      Liked by 4 people

    • Timothy Smith says:

      I once saw a stoner on a street corner with a sign that read “marijuana is safer than alcohol” I desperately wanted to stand next to him with a sign that read “crack cocaine is safer than a bullet to the brain”

      Liked by 1 person

  4. zephyrbreeze says:

    I’m listening to it right now.

    The left is hysterical about science, science, science, and then when science comes along that show that their sacred cows like abortion and pot are harmful, they are defensive and lie to themselves about the facts.

    When I worked for a group of obstetricians, and some women were ferocious about not having any medical intervention, the doctors would say to us on the side, how important it was to have options like oxygen and fetal monitoring so “you’re not shaving off IQ points.” Very humbling to consider that.

    Liked by 2 people

    • zephyrbreeze says:

      The co-founder of NARAL, Dr. Bernard Nathanson, Jewish atheist, says that after committing 15,000 abortions, and overseeing another 60,000 as director of the world’s largest abortion clinic, did not become a pro-life Catholic, until 10 years after he stopped doing abortions and became anti-abortion. He became opposed to abortion based on science.

      He came to his conclusions as a scientist studying the fetus via ultrasounds, reading the research in the emerging field of fetology – the study of the fetus. He said when he started doing abortions there were only 4 articles that year on the fetus. By the times he was a pro-life Catholic there were 4000 articles on fetology. When the science changed, he changed.

      That’s a commitment to science integrity.

      Liked by 2 people

    • GomeznSA says:

      “not having any medical intervention” – gee whiz lady, then why in the heck are you taking up a room in the OB?GYN ward? Just go out into the parking lot (or wherever) and have the kid all by yourself. NOT trying to be mean to the moms but the point is, (as it relates to pot) I cannot force anyone to try it or not, that is an individual decision. What I can do is try to restrict those who choose to use it from having negative impacts on me – like not driving when under the influence. Another poster said something about pot being less of a problem than alcohol use/abuse – such use costs us thousands of lives and untold economic damage. But what the hey, keep on supporting that industry.

      Liked by 1 person

      • zephyrbreeze says:

        So when parents are using it, and the kids are being neglected because mom is zoned out, and the house is dirty, and the kids complain to the teacher that there is no food in the house. The teacher reports it which

        Triggers a “welfare check” by a POLICE OFFICER – Taxpayer funded
        which triggers a report to the CHILD PROTECTION WORKER, – Taxpayer funded
        which triggers a referral to the DIVISION OF CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES WORKER – Taxpayer funded
        which triggers involvement from the county ATTORNEY GENERAL, Taxpayer funded
        which triggers involvement from the GUARDIAN AD LITEM ATTORNEY FOR THE CHILDREN – Taxpayer funded
        which triggers the involvement of the COURT APPOINTED SPECIAL ADVOCATE FOR CHILDREN (CASA) SUPERVISOR – Taxpayer funded, although the CASA workers are volunteers

        And of course there is the judge. Taxpayer funded

        This for ONE CASE, and the case drags on for a year, while mom and usully the boyfriend attempt to produce clean drug tests, with monthly meetings with most of these people, and at least 5-7 court appearance for all.

        How does the neglect of these children not affect you financially and therefore personally?

        Like

        • wondering999 says:

          Zephyr, I’ll have to look for supporting links, but have some hearsay to consider. Back in the late 70s my boyfriend of the time told me that a friend and his wife were having difficulty conceiving although they were trying.
          The husband in that situation apparently had a low sperm count, and their doctor advised the man to wear boxers instead of briefs, and to cut out smoking marijuana because it lowers sperm count.
          So if that is true — smoking pot might lower testosterone and reduce the birthrate among THC users?
          Just speculation on my part. Would be interested to know if this is still medical opinion

          Like

  5. booger71 says:

    The growers need to greatly reduce the THC levels like we had in the 60’s

    Like

    • manickernel says:

      Just inhale less.

      Liked by 2 people

      • stella says:

        Why not just bypass it altogether? Seriously, why do we want to expose our children and grandchildren to something that might harm them? For what reason?

        Liked by 3 people

        • manickernel says:

          Prohibition worked out well. For some people.

          Liked by 1 person

        • booger71 says:

          I have, but people will smoke it, they will grow it, even both sets of my grandparents grew poppies when they were legal and made poppy tea. I tried my share growing up, like many kids back when I grew up. It is not the government’s job (especially the federal government) to tell people what they can eat, drink or smoke.

          Like

        • anthedohmy says:

          Then do be sure to make sure they bypass that mental health screening coming very soon to a school near you, if they can. All kinds of things can get your kids and grandkids flagged.

          Like

          • anthedohmy says:

            The suicide prevention army is out in full force right now. Billions of dollars are flowing in key states behind this effort. People have no idea what is being built, because nobody pays much attention to this arena, but we all should be.

            Like

          • stella says:

            One thing does not preclude the other. By all means, bypass all things that you perceive to be harmful. That includes drugs you don’t need.

            Drugs, like marijuana, are voluntarily introduced into the body. Government action is external.

            Like

    • zephyrbreeze says:

      Until they do, people are shaving off IQ points, smoking around their little kids who are also getting high, and ingesting pot and dying, along with college students.

      9 die in Colorado, and 12 die at Coachella

      Denver, Colorado and Coachella Valley, California – Marijuana candies, sold on the street as ‘Uncle Tweety’s Chewy Flipper’ and ‘Gummy Satans’ are taking the country by storm. Each candy is an emulsification of sweetened Jello, vodka and minced marijuana. Huffington Post reports that within a week, 9 college students have died from these marijuana candies.

      http://topekasnews.com/edible-marijuana-candies-kill-9-colorado-12-coachella/

      Like

      • manickernel says:

        The link to HuffPo only list two deaths, one which is still not clear as to cause. Never could figure out where he gets the coachella figures.

        Like

    • canadacan says:

      Pot contains arsenic

      Like

    • stella says:

      Did you watch the video?

      Like

      • manickernel says:

        Yes again. And on her position that pot can cause psychotic behavior I would argue the massive amounts of psychotic drugs we are prescribing our children for every possible symptom imagined or real is doing far more damage. I speak as a father whose daughter had a complete psychotic break after being on Allderal. Too many kids are on anti-depressants or a combination cocktail.

        Liked by 1 person

        • stella says:

          So …. because one thing is bad, we should approve of other bad things? I don’t follow your logic.

          Liked by 3 people

          • manickernel says:

            Not approve, legalize. Leave the approval to the individual. Locking people up, ruining their records, seizing their property over something that is less harmful than alcohol is hypocritical.

            Liked by 1 person

            • stella says:

              So because one thing is legal, we should “legalize” another thing that is potentially harmful?

              Like

              • booger71 says:

                Now doctors are saying that multi-vitamins can lead to cancer. Are you in favor of making them illegal too. You just can’t save everyone from every danger in life.

                Like

        • canadacan says:

          Apparently somebody has not been following the Trayvon Martin or other recent cases similar to it where the individual who was the perpetrator(i.e.Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown where the perpetrators )was high as a kite
          on marijuana.

          Like

          • anthedohmy says:

            You don’t have to be “high as a kite on marijuana” to rob houses. Completely “sober” people rob houses, too. I would imagine the really good robbers don’t leave fingerprints, stop to play the stereo in the middle of the robbery, or get the munchies in the middle of the robbery.

            Does this mean being stone cold sober leads to robbery?

            Like

    • Les says:

      Important sentence: The scientists warned that there may be other explanations for their findings and that they could not “definitively attest to whether this association [between persistent cannabis use and IQ decline] was causal”.

      They haven’t disproven it. The doctor stated the study she was referencing REMOVED people who had genetic/familial tendencies for the other factors that are known to affect IQ. You article mentions another factor: childhood trauma. Ask liberals and pro-potheads to come up with a good excuse for smoking often and they will always go back to some bs that happened when they were little.

      That article misinforms people. I wouldn’t use it as a serious source.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. zephyrbreeze says:

    Can we make a list of her points?

    The age of onset for schizophrenia in those who are susceptible, is lowered, earlier, for people who use pot.

    Liked by 1 person

    • zephyrbreeze says:

      The cognitive deficits are not only related to people with a predisposition for mental illness, but occur in the general population of people who use marijuana.

      Like

      • canadacan says:

        Stoners have no ambition, they lose their hair early ,they suffer from ED
        and the lungs become just as affected as -if not worse-as a heavy smoker.
        Autopsy on Trayvon Martin showed his lungs were absolutely black due to his smoking weed on a regular basis.
        Extremely high amounts of weed in one’s system can make a person psychotic an aggressive and affects their judgement

        Like

    • Be Ge says:

      Well, as far as going nuts really goes….Dr. Sasha Shulgin (lived until 88, perfectly sane, invented and then tried at least a few hundred different mind-altering substances), and before that, dr. Albert Hofmann (invented LSD, lived over a century, perfectly sane, gave lectures/speeches at scientific conferences aged 100+) kinda stated one thing about consciousness-altering substances. A substance user (and for certain combinations of substances and people, something like 1-time use is perfectly enough) definitely increases risk of getting a condition that requires psychiatrist’s assistance — if a genetic / congenital predisposition is out there. In extreme cases, people under wicked weed or some of Dr. Shulgin’s inventions may through themselves out of the window or get some other sort of acute psychosis (for which reason a trip sitter is actually a must have thing). Problem is, people with predisposition will most likely develop something sooner or later in their lives anyway, and you cannot save these folks by blocking their access to substances. On the other hand, I can well imagine a situation whereby an early (say, before 21) onset of something psychiatrically bad is, as cynic as it sounds, a public good, provided institutionalization is there.

      Like

      • I believe that is a matter of good genes or good luck in with a healthy gene pool. For example, my grandfather started smoking at 9 and lived to be 99. My Dad started smoking in the Marines. He quit a few years ago when diagnosed with heart disease. He is 75. My ex-father in law? He died at 65 of lung cancer. I don’t know when he started.

        As far as pot? Many people I knew smoked pot when we were teens and even a little later. I didn’t touch the stuff. A drink was enough. My cousin? He had what they called an addictive personality. He could never ever get high enough. He tried just about everything. He died at the age of 39 of an overdose. We still miss him 20 years later.

        There was recently an accident where I live in NY. Several teens died. The young man who was driving was found to be high as a kite. On pot. He is going to jail for 4 counts of vehicular manslaughter. He is only 18. I feel bad for him, his life is ruined. I feel worse for the families of the 4 dead kids.

        MADD and SADD has done a good job of getting good laws passed about drunking driving. People have learned to not drink in drive. I’ve not seen nor do I anticipate the same for driving while high.

        I am sorry this is so long. I think both side have a point but I see no reason to make this legal except maybe for the terminally ill. That oil that has almost no THC that kids who have seizures might be a true God send but it needs more studies.

        Like

      • anthedohmy says:

        People who lose a lot of sleep due to various circumstances can have one part of their brain go to sleep (into a dream like state) while other parts appear to be awake because the person’s eyes are open and they are talking. Is this sleep deprivation or insanity?

        One goes away with sleep, the other doesn’t.

        There are some documented incidents out there, not that documentation means much in this day and age, or any other.

        Like

  7. Justice_099 says:

    But didn’t you hear?!?! Pot cures cancer!!

    If that were even remotely possible, it would mean that pot alters DNA. Not exactly a good thing.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. zephyrbreeze says:

    People who use pot damage the pre-frontal cortex, the self-aware, self-observing part of the brain, and it changes personality. Others can observe the difference, but the user does not observe the difference.

    Like

    • manickernel says:

      I think you are confusing “damage” with “affects”. As for the rest that is the reason they smoke it. Navel gazing is all about being stoned.

      Like

      • zephyrbreeze says:

        They can see the damage on the fMRI. Those areas have REDUCED evidence of functionality. Dr. Amen’s brain scan photos have been around for years.

        Mr. Z went on a night ride with a veteran detective in LA to Skid Row. it was 10 square blocks of vagrants covering almost every inch of sidewalk with their tents and sleeping rolls. They saw the 14 year old sex workers, looking for drugs. The detective said: The one thing these thousands of vagrants have in common, almost to a person: They are all pot users.

        I get the impression that if marijuana supporters saw a billion destitute people smoking pot, they STILL wouldn’t have an issue with it.

        They see nothing wrong with 3 generation of family members living on disability as pot users, funded by hard working taxpayers?

        Like

      • zephyrbreeze says:

        The effects are long-term, sometimes permanent. The IQ reductions 7-8 points, are permanent especially for teens who smoke pot.

        Like

  9. Totally Domestic says:

    Be SOBER, be VIGILENT; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour.
    Pot smokers you have an enemy seeking to destroy you! Wake up!!
    They don’t call it a gateway drug for nothing! America has an enemy day & night to take up down. We don’t neen to be a Pot Nation!!!

    Like

  10. manickernel says:

    Jeez, got a reefer madness crowd here. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • stella says:

      I’ve actually smoked pot, but not for a long time. I can’t in good conscience advocate for legalization of a drug that is unregulated, and that can cause harm.

      I wonder why you think it’s just fine? And why is it necessary to portray people like me as part of the “reefer madness” crowd? Did we strike a soft spot?

      Liked by 5 people

      • nivico says:

        You’ve just hit on the point that makes me side with legalization…

        How unfair is it to send some folks to jail when odds are the judge, the prosecutor, the arresting officer, and most every other person in the courtroom has engaged in the exact same behavior at some point in their life?

        Liked by 1 person

        • stella says:

          Not relevant. They take the same chances you do. A cop doesn’t catch every speeder – does that mean that speeders should be ignored? Anyway, life isn’t fair. You break the law, you take your chances. Knowingly.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Justice_099 says:

          And actually, if you were on the stand for a pot related offense, wouldn’t that actually work IN your favor? You’d think you would want a sympathetic judge and jury.

          Like

      • anthedohmy says:

        Don’t join the FDA, then.

        Like

    • Les says:

      I am part of the random-drug-tested crowd. I’m not anti-pot or anti-booze, wish I could take a toke every now and then when I’m at a party. But I can’t, so I don’t. Because I self-regulate. Many people can’t self-regulate and they are a problem.

      Plus, some groups are already 15-30 (YES, 30!) IQ points behind the rest of us because of race (yep, true) and generational poverty. Each condition is worth 13-15 points or so, compound them and they are in trouble. Throw in some pot and we are ALL screwed because we have to take care of them forever.

      Ask Teahpooh and Brejuan.

      Like

      • stella says:

        I quit smoking a number of years ago. I wish I could have a cigarette now and then (less often as time goes by), but I know I can’t, so I don’t. My sister wasn’t able to quit, and she died of emphysema and related heart complications at age 60. Our mother lived to be 91. I imagine I’ll be somewhere in between. 60 is too young.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. stella says:

    A couple of things I wonder about:

    1. Progs hate smoking. They even hate and try to ban the smoking of e-cigarettes. Why do most of them support the smoking of marijuana as a legal activity? There are just as many (if not more) harmful substances in marijuana smoke.

    2. When THC the drug was (and probably still is) prescribed for medical use, why did marijuana advocates claim that it isn’t as “effective” as pot smoking?

    Liked by 5 people

    • Justice_099 says:

      They hate religion, homophobia, and fight for equality of women but love the Muslims.

      Since when does anything they do or think make sense?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dixie says:

        Maybe that’s all the marijuana talking……

        I’ve only been around marijuana once in my whole life (at a football game and it smelled vile)….my adult step children admit to smoking it but they don’t bring it here. They know better and I know better than to argue with them which is why I never researched pot. They have been arguing for years that there is no harm in it…..no more than eating an egg every morning for breakfast (that is seriously their argument), so thanks Stella for providing me with a little more information the next time the subject comes up.

        Passing a joint around and swapping spit with every tom dick and harry would not appeal to me regardless of what kind of high it might provide.

        It would seem that obamijuana is a prime example why pot would not be good for you. Has there ever been a less self-regulated person in the white house…..ever? His frontal cortex must be toast.

        Are the future leaders of our country going to be ignoramuses who can’t see themselves for what they really are?

        Liked by 2 people

    • anthedohmy says:

      Perhaps because it was more than just the THC, but that was the identifiable compound at the time the earliest studies were done? When TCH is isolated from the rest of the active compounds, it does not have the same effect on the Cannabinoid receptors as cannabis does?

      Just guessing.

      Like

  12. Les says:

    Disclaimer: I was born and raised in California. I probably smoked my weight in weed and was around for the “good stuff,” the sticky hydroponic stuff from Northern Cali. I have also been to Amsterdam when Amsterdam was still, well, Amsterdam. haha I’m not stuffy about marijuana, I take the more Libertarian, every state for itself view…BUT:

    The real problem with everyday smokers is motivation and weirdness. Most people don’t have the IQ points to burn (they just think they do) and aren’t high-functioning Type-A people. Driven folks are going to get their stuff done no matter what, they are hyper-motivated. I don’t have a problem with those kinds of professional folks who smoke a little at night. But we all know the regular, everyday smokers are people who want to be altered because they have some personal dysfunction. They put in enough labor to just get by and spend their lives caught up in a haze. Even worse, they raise drug-addicted kids. That’s messed up. If they dried out for a year or two, they would figure out how much of their life they wasted being high.

    Something is wrong with you if you feel the urge to be drunk or high everyday. You can mask it your entire life or you can fix it. Fixing it increases the quality of your life.

    I can’t stand to be around people who are stupid high or stupid drunk.

    Liked by 8 people

    • manickernel says:

      Perfect.

      Like

    • Justice_099 says:

      I’m not really ‘against’ marijuana either but also can’t stand people that consider it their entire lifestyle. You can’t even ask them why because they don’t even know why. My guess is getting stuck into a clique and doing what your friends do. And since most people don’t like to be around stinky potheads, they get stuck only being able to socialize with each other.

      9 times out of 10, you can tell someone is a pothead just by looking at them even when they are sober. We may not be able to put our finger on it, but obviously it has some physical affect on them.

      Like

      • Les says:

        Or when they turn on the air-conditioner in their car. I smell it in parking lots all the time.

        I’m sure they consider it profiling.

        Like

        • manickernel says:

          I am always amazed at all the smells I pick up while riding the Harley. Pot really sticks out. I associate BMW’s with it now.

          Best smell was in Alexandria, VA. Suddenly got overwhelming smell of bananas and coconuts. It was suntan oil on a girl in bikini in car. Never would have caught it otherwise.

          Other smells, not so nice, like pig trucks on I-20.

          Like

    • imreek says:

      Yes, and that is a good thing. There are a lot of chronically useless people in the U.S. While it would be wonderful if everyone was a goal oriented, upwardly mobile, ect, ect., person,this is not the case. I remember the 70s’ fairly well. I also remember stopping smoking because it interfered with making a living. Pretty much the same occurred with my friends. Pot was great for a 6 hour holiday from everything on a Fri. night but useless if something had to be accomplished.

      The drones got stoned most every day but generally stayed stuck in their parents basements or flop house apartments. The drunks got out in public and annoyed people with their behavior. The speed, heroin, and coke freaks ended up as thieves or prostitutes to afford their habits. This is a gross generalization true in generalization.

      Given that there is a limited amount of money and resources for prohibition, where should we apply our efforts? Why not concentrate on the drugs that have he most negative effects on society as a whole?

      My morals and ethics say that all self destructive behavior should be suppressed. My wallet says that this does not seem to have worked. I seem to have evolved from 70s’ hippie through overworked family man to old curmudgeon. Sorry, I have moved out of the village needed to raise ‘YOUR’ kids. I have done for my country and expect little done back for me. To the drones, go ahead and hurt yourself if you feel you must. But please do it in a way that leaves me alone. Exactly what is so wrong with the unemployable, uneducated, economically superfluous, GIMME crowd sitting in a room getting fat and looking at the pretty cartoons while giggling? Get rid of the meth and crack crowd instead. Leave me in peace to live my life.

      ( P.S. – Maybe the libtards will be so busy dreaming of their perfect world in a stoned out bliss that they will have less time or energy to mess with my world. )

      Like

    • anthedohmy says:

      What about people who are stupid sober? There isn’t all that much difference.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. manickernel says:

    Like

  14. dan says:

    I smoked in college.

    I have Irritable Bowel Syndrome, finally diagnosed freshman year at MTU. One thing the docs prescribed to help control flare ups was prescription narcotics. Not only did they not control the flare up, they made me violently ill. One of my friends suggested I try marjuania. After exhausting all other options I tried it.

    It worked.

    Not only did it help with the flare ups it also helped with my appetite. I went from an anemic 6′-2″ 145lbs to a healthy 180.

    I now have a job with a drug policy and testing. I don’t use THC products any more and my quality of life suffers. Fortunately, my employer has a very generous sick time policy.

    Like

  15. zephyrbreeze says:

    The experts who look at the brain, Dr. Amen and his colleagues who were pioneers in actually watching the brain as it is functioning via real time functional MRI’s say:

    “Although marijuana doesn’t necessarily pose the same immediate, life-threatening dangers as alcohol, we have seen that chronic, long-term use does cause significant brain changes—chiefly, slowed activity in the frontal and temporal lobes; areas of the brain involved with focus, concentration, motivation, memory, learning, and mood stability. ”

    “The problem with marijuana is that it’s not selective. Not only does it calm the parts of the brain that are overactive, it calms the entire brain—long-term—through a slow and insidious process.”

    See the photo of the marijuana damaged brain. The holes represent the areas that have lowest level of blood flow and functioning. A healthy brain looks completely smooth by comparison.

    http://www.amenclinics.com/blog/marijuana-causes-long-term-brain-changes/

    Like

  16. screwauger says:

    This is total psychobabble BS. Do they not understand that by now, there are literally a generation of folks who are heavy users that have great jobs, have well adjusted, well educated children, have productive and well respected places in their communities and are living proof that whatever effect it has, it’s not what they say it is. Granted you can refer them as “functional pot-a-holics” and there are outliers to everything. Are there heavy users that are losers that would neglect their children and suck off the system as a result? For sure there are. Same as with pain killers, same as with ETOH. Personally, I wish they would just leave it alone. It wasn’t broke before and now they are screwing with a system that worked. Stir it up!!

    Like

    • zephyrbreeze says:

      The problem is the massive cost of those who couldn’t walk the tightrope. The massive cost to society, not just financially, of housing, feeding and caring for the victims of pot, which can intoxicate children in the same household, should be calculated into the risk/reward equation.

      When your daughter brings home a boyfriend in his late teens, and explains to the family that he smokes a lot of pot, but he can handle it, You can’t tell me any rational parent would be happy to hear that. Besides, you heard the doctor in the video say that people lose self-awareness and don’t observe their own personality and functionality changes.

      Like

      • screwauger says:

        I heard what she said. Tell that to all of the alcoholics who pickle their brains and other organs. What cost is that? I have no idea but I know a chronic dope smoker does not end up with the physical toll and I would wager, not the emotional or mental toll either. And I bet a functional alcoholic would wonder what all the fuss is about.

        Like

    • stella says:

      What proof do you offer that it is “psychobabble BS”?

      I keep asking – what good reason is there to use mind-altering drugs that may (even if the risk is small) cause serious problems?

      Like

      • dan says:

        When the benefits out weigh the risks, as in my situation.

        Like

        • stella says:

          Benefits?

          Like

          • dan says:

            In my case it helped control a medical condition and improved my quality of life. I used it medicinally, not recreationally. I did not find the dissociation feel to be appealing. It helped me successfully complete college.

            Every medication has side effects, even tylenol or aspirin.

            Like

            • Justice_099 says:

              Tylenol and aspirin don’t get you high, so less likely to be abused.

              Like

              • Justice_099 says:

                I meant abused to the point of causing harmful side effects.

                Like

                • dan says:

                  The point is not that tylenol and asprin are less likely to be habit forming.

                  The point is that every substance we put in our bodies has a side effect. A person must conduct their own cost benefit-analysis to determine in their circumstance if the side effects outweigh the benefits of the substance.

                  In my particular case, THC helps control my health problem and I can deal with the side effects and use it in a responsible way. I used the same precautions a pharmacist would advise to anyone taking prescription narcotics.

                  Like

                • stella says:

                  Mixing regular old Tylenol and alcohol can cause liver failure. Most people don’t know that.

                  Like

              • dan says:

                Tylenol 3 with codine does…

                Like

                • Justice_099 says:

                  Which is why you need a prescription for it and it is illegal to have if you don’t.

                  You are not making any sense at all, Dan.

                  Like

                • dan says:

                  It’s probably because I’m in the middle of a maintenance outage at work and today was my 27th consecutive double shift. Stringing together a coherent thought has been interesting…

                  Like

          • dan says:

            A little more information.

            I’ve dealt with morning sickness every day for all thirty years of my life that I can recall since early childhood. The Dr’s don’t know why. IBS is a catch all diagnosis. Until I was in middle school, I thought it was normal to get sick in the morning and not be able to eat until lunch or late afternoon. My parents thought I was just being a lazy kid who didn’t want to get out of bed, eat breakfast and go to school. Until I explained what I dealt with and they took me to the first of what would turn out to be 8 years of Dr’s visits with no solution. When I started college I lost medical coverage under my parents. I didn’t have money to throw away at useless Dr’s visits and prescriptions.

            The first time I tried marjuania my symptoms went away within an hour. I do not know why it works. I was able to eat breakfast and start the day like any healthy person. I cried I was so happy. I had never had the experience of a normal morning that you all probably take for granted. Yes I was breaking the law. I freely admit that.

            If you’ll excuse me I need to get to bed so I can get up early enough tomorrow to get my nausea under control or barf my brains out before pulling myself up by my boot straps and starting day #28 of consecutive 16 hour shifts.

            Have fun trolling stella, may you hook a big one…

            Liked by 1 person

            • stella says:

              Do you have any hormonal imbalance? That is what causes morning sickness when you are pregnant. I think overactive thyroid can be a factor as well. I actually had pernicious vomiting – I couldn’t eat or drink anything at all (it came back) for almost two weeks. My doctor gave me a B12 shot, which helped immensely, although I still was sick in the morning.

              Like

              • anthedohmy says:

                The first case in the 70’s was the child of a doctor who used to be opposed to it, until his child was wasting away from chemotherapy. I am intimately familiar with the treating physician, a physician who stuck his neck out afterwards and wrote about that which he could not deny in the alleviation of human suffering.

                A couple of years ago a regular customer of a restaurant was passing from emphysema and was getting sicker and sicker by the day. She had stopped eating, though she used to go to the same restaurant every day for the company. Her husband would come and report about her decline with an “any day now” feeling about her passing. A suggestion was repeatedly made that she try this (also a brochodiaeator first prescribed for lung problems, ironically). “Oh no” the man kept saying, he couldn’t do that reefer stuff, until his wife’s suffering progressed to the point where one day he came back and pleaded for help.

                The next time he showed up, his elderly wife was with him for the first time in months. She polished off a huge meal, while he sat grinning, across the table. He was so grateful after that. This continued for several months, much longer than they they thought she would ever last. Her quality of life improved, as did his. I personally witnessed this.

                I wished I had introduced the idea to my mother when she was dying from emphysema.

                Was this “good”?

                It seemed so it the time. There are countless people with similar stories involving different conditions-many suffering with cancer or other debilitating illnesses. It isn’t just the hot boxing kids.

                Like

                • stella says:

                  That is why Marinol was developed – for sickness caused by chemotherapy. Doctors prescribe it just for that use.

                  ADD: dan has sickness that is unexplained, which is why I asked about hormone imbalance. It’s always better to know why something is happening before suggesting a treatment.

                  Like

                • anthedohmy says:

                  Patients report Marinol does not work in the same way. And Stella excellent point of understanding the systemic origins of something prior to willy nilly treating it.

                  Like

            • anthedohmy says:

              Ah, dan. Quite a story.

              Like

      • imreek says:

        Stella:
        There is no good reason to take risks that can destroy lives. You are absolutely right. But why should this risk be elevated above all others? Why allow young boys to play tackle football? Everyone knows about the pain an old football injury can cause. Lets ban all sports that can cause injury. Lets ban sex for those who can not afford pregnancy. Everything done not in moderation seems to have a cost. Drugs included. Everything has a risk.

        So far, drug prohibition has not worked. If it is to work, something other than what we have now has to be devised. Alcohol prohibition did not work. Alcohol sales control does not work well but has reduced the criminal element involved. Gun prohibition has not worked. Gun crimes are up. What kind of control would restrict gun use to only those not likely to use them against others? How do we as a society differentiate between self destructive and other destructive behavior. How did we as a society stop the alcohol, opium, dilaudid and cocaine problems in the 18 thru early 1900s’? Is there any society that has these issues under control? Are these societies ones we want to emulate?

        Self destructive behavior is stupid. Society destructive behavior is criminal. Creating a massive drug enforcement organization seems to have resulted in stronger, more expensive drugs that are still easily available. Our efforts have not worked. Would the ABC system used for alcohol work? something would, but what? We must do something but what we do now doesn’t seem to be the answer. Pot was essentially legal until Anslinger started the bureaucracy in the late ’40s. How do we get back to where it is an essentially unknown and little used drug among the majority?

        Like

        • stella says:

          Football and pregnancy have legitimate positive results, and are normal human activities. Why take risks with something that has no normal human use? Even alcohol has had legitimate, social and public health uses for centuries.

          Lots of things used to be legal, because there was no reason before that to make a law. Let’s see – there was cocaine, opium, and heroin, just to name three. In more recent times there is crack, that crazy potpourri, spice (drugs that resulted in cannibalistic and other crazy behavior, remember?), and probably others I have forgotten.

          Like

          • dan says:

            I see this as an issue of the Nanny State trying to legislate morality. I do not believe that is the place of government to interject.

            Now if you are willfully endangering others, I believe the punishment should be swift and harsh. Drive under the influence = felony & lose your licence permently w/ 50 state reciprocity. Expose minors and be subject to felony class child endangerment prosecution.

            Like

            • stella says:

              But marijuana is illegal in most states, and the big objection is that “innocent people” who break the law are punished.

              If marijuana has negative health consequences, especially on developing brains, and it clearly does, why do you consider laws against the use and sale of marijuana simply a legislation of morality?

              I think the biggest problem is people (and apparently you are one of them) who insist that marijuana is totally harmless, is never addictive, and never has lasting effects.

              Like

              • dan says:

                I do not deny that marjuania can be harmful, be addicting or have lasting side effects. That you state I believe such is incorrect and I feel you are putting words into my mouth, so to speak. Through out my posts in this thread I stated there is a cost benefit analysis that must be done. I would not be surprised to find that future research discovers certain people are genetically predisposed to THC addiction.

                A law prohibiting possession by minors would not be unreasonable. Similar in effect to the legal drinking age.

                Like

            • anthedohmy says:

              What happens if you go to a doctor who inadvertantly od’s you on something like dental anesthetic when he gives your more than he should because he has to get the tooth out that day? Is that willful? On either part?

              It’s really hard to know what to do, then. Do you “blame” the doctor who was trying to help you or take the hit?

              Like

          • imreek says:

            Football can lead to concussions and ligament damage. Lets restrict it to touch football only. Pregnancy can lead to abortions. Lets make birth control mandatory and allow pregnancy only when legally and medically approved. Marijuana has been used for centuries for PMS cramps. So what. Strychnine is poisonous and was available as a a tonic up till the ’40s. Atropine was available for sinus congestion until the ’60s. Belladonna is useful for retina examinations. Cocaine derivatives work better and are THE answer for gum surgery. Curare is used to paralyze people pre-operation. Castration was used to ‘cure’ repeated rape offenders until the ’30s. Might still work. Lobotomy cures depression. Breaking bones and stretching on a rack equivalent is used on short limbs.

            What does any of this have to do with a drug prevention law that is not working?

            Like

            • stella says:

              Already, private holding groups and financiers have raised millions of startup dollars to promote businesses that will sell marijuana and marijuana-related merchandise.

              Cannabis food and candy are being marketed to children and are already responsible for a growing number of marijuana-related emergency room visits. Edibles with names such as “Ring Pots,” “Pot Tarts,” and “Kif Kat Bars” are inspired by common candy and dessert products.

              Profitable companies such as Medbox (based in California), have indicated plans to open marijuana vending machines containing products such as marijuana brownies. The former head of strategy for Microsoft has said that he wants to “mint more millionaires than Microsoft” with marijuana and that he wants to create the “Starbucks of marijuana.”

              http://www.dailyworld.com/story/news/local/2015/04/19/myths-marijuana-use/26042289/

              Like

      • screwauger says:

        I have myself and my family as proof and I know another dozen people that have used marijuana every two hours of their waking life for 40 years and they are none of the things this woman (or many here) say. I realize, as she said, my responses will be considered ?making her point” but I only speak from my own experiences. I just don’t believe it has all of these negative effects unless of course, one is predisposed to being a deadbeat.

        Like

  17. zephyrbreeze says:

    “This 57-year-old physician had abused marijuana for 30 years. We performed this SPECT series because he had been unable to stop using without feeling very angry, irritable, agitated and anxious.

    “The first study (those images in the right column) was performed after he came to the clinic intoxicated from 3 straight days of heavy usage. The second study (those images in the left column) was performed after he abstained from marijuana usage for 1 month.”

    6 brain scan photos: 3 initial, 3 after weeks of abstinence (scroll down page to marijuana section)

    This scan series argues for the possibility of “self-medication,” but unfortunately this medication has the side effect of causing the potential for long term damage to his brain.

    http://www.amenclinics.com/the-science/spect-gallery/alcohol-and-drug-abuse/?category_id=129#alchA1

    Like

    • anthedohmy says:

      Amen gave a fabulous Ted talk recently about doctors treating an organ they don’t directly examine. He talked about a nephew who had an underlying brain cyst causing behavioral changes. The cyst went unrecognized until he jumped in.

      SPECT scanning has been controversial- – Amen was drummed out of medicine for a time, or got tired of all the opposition, this I cannot say. Are you familiar with the controversy? I never knew who was right or wrong in this one. They have a brain and they show changes and they say one is good and the other is bad, but what about the whole context and with how little they understand about the brain, is it possible that a part going dark every once in a while is good, or vice versa.

      3 straight days of heavy usage is the same as saying an individual had a cholesterol test after eating happy donuts morning, noon, and night for three straight days before the test, right?

      Does Amen have non-extreme scans? Has anybody taken up the mantle since then? Not keeping up with this…

      Like

  18. Just how is breathing in smoke into your lungs any kind good for you?

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Lordchamp says:

    There are many substances on this earth that can be abused that if used properly ARE beneficial in many ways. That even includes food and water. You can die from drinking to much water too quickly.

    There are many PROVEN ways that cannabis is very beneficial, especially medically, as is the case with many plants from nature. I personally believe that God created everything we as humans need when he created this earth. It was initially created in perfection so logically everything needed would have been included. Humans then proceeded to screw up as is our nature.

    That being said, it does take common sense to not overindulge in things that could hurt us if we do.

    Also, the government should definitely not be involved in what we choose to do with our liberty and freedom as long as it does not interfere with any one’s liberty and freedom. It’s called Rightful Liberty.

    Like

    • stella says:

      What about the protection of children?

      Like

    • Justice_099 says:

      He also created the tree of knowledge and commanded Adam and Eve not to eat from it.

      Look how that turned out. Just because it is here doesn’t mean he meant for people to put it in a pipe and smoke it.

      Like

    • zephyrbreeze says:

      What should be the punishment for parents who smoke pot, whose toddler have symptoms of secondary intoxication? Fines? Jail time?

      What if all the penalties are doubled for driving under the influence of pot, children ingesting pot, child neglect while under the influence? Maybe even tripled? Maybe there would less innocent collateral damage.

      Like

  20. yadent says:

    As one who has interacted with 10’s of thousands of inmate/patients over a 25 year span with access to their medical and psych records, the gateway drug for over 80% of them was….alcohol. At the institution I worked at over 50% of the inmates were ‘residents’ for drug law violations that involved no violence. That is alot of money and resources being utilized for individuals who have essentially harmed primarily themselves. An extremely expensive method of ‘drug rehabilitation’. As for the good doctor’s statement regarding society ultimately being responsible for peoples poor decisions, why should we be? Why should society involuntarily help people who make bad decisions whether it be poor eating decisions, drug usage, jumping off bridges, whatever?? The risks/benefits of ALL drug usage should be required knowledge for everyone, especially the young. And yes, minors should not have access to drugs unless prescribed….not that any law will stop them from gaining access. Lastly, in my former world, the vast amount of violence associated with drugs was not with it’s usage per se but with it’s distribution. One more ‘lastly’ point. In my seemingly warped sense of worldliness, the prevailing point will be the one with the most to gain financially………..

    Liked by 1 person

  21. zephyrbreeze says:

    I know of two families right now embroiled in issues surround marijuana use, and the abuse and neglect of their elementary school children: Both cases involve all the people mentioned below. In one case, 3 separate sets of grandparents have had to take in a young grandchild indefinitely. (One mother, 3 children, by 3 different fathers.) People want FREEDOM to smoke pot, and the result is that lots of other people, grandparents, taxpayers, end up LOSING freedom as a result.

    So when parents are using it, and the kids are being neglected because mom is zoned out, and the house is dirty, and the kids complain to the teacher that there is no food in the house. The teacher reports it which

    Triggers a “welfare check” by a POLICE OFFICER – Taxpayer funded $$$$
    which triggers a report to the CHILD PROTECTION WORKER, – Taxpayer funded $$$$
    which triggers a referral to the DIVISION OF CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES WORKER – Taxpayer funded $$$$
    which triggers involvement from the county ATTORNEY GENERAL, Taxpayer funded $$$$
    which triggers involvement from the GUARDIAN AD LITEM ATTORNEY FOR THE CHILDREN – Taxpayer funded $$$$
    which triggers the involvement of the COURT APPOINTED SPECIAL ADVOCATE FOR CHILDREN (CASA) SUPERVISOR – Taxpayer funded, $$$$ (although the CASA workers are volunteers)

    And of course there is the judge. Taxpayer funded $$$$

    This for ONE CASE, and the case drags on for a year, while mom and usually the boyfriend or father of at least one of the children, attempt to produce clean drug tests, with monthly meetings with most of these people $$$$, and at least 5-7 court appearance for all.

    How does the neglect of these children not affect you financially and therefore personally?

    People want FREEDOM to smoke pot, and the result is that lots of other people, grandparents, taxpayers, students end up LOSING freedom as a result.

    Like

    • Justice_099 says:

      Pot stirrer! You know the potheads are going to say all those things are the result of the war on drugs. “If we made pot legal, none of those thing would happen” (well, you know except the part about the children suffering, of course – they’ll just skip that part.)

      Like

    • zephyrbreeze says:

      “The first rule of tinkering is, of course, ‘save all the parts.’ But in dismantling the social fabric, the parts cannot all be saved, for one of them is time. Time, we were told, is a river flowing endlessly through the universe and one cannot step into the same river twice. Not only can we not undo actions taken in haste and in fear (the Japanese Internment), but those taken from the best reasons, but that have proved destructive (affirmative action); the essential mechanism of societal preservation is not inspiration, but restraint.”

      ― David Mamet, The Secret Knowledge: On the Dismantling of American Culture

      Like

    • manickernel says:

      I believe those parents had much greater problems than getting the munchies from pot and not leaving any food for the kids.

      Like

    • yadent says:

      I assume this all happened in a local where MJ usage was/is illegal? If so then the question of drug legality is inconsequential but that of parenting quality becomes the issue. All of the ‘triggers’ mentioned would have happened irregardless of the underlying cause if the ultimate outcome of that cause was child neglect.

      Like

      • zephyrbreeze says:

        The neglect happened because mother was using money, time and emotional resources for pot purchase and consumption. Too zoned out to grocery shop, too zoned out to wake up in the morning to get kids to school, too zoned out to get kids baths at nighttime so the kids were dirty with unkempt long hair, too zoned out to do laundry so kids were wearing dirty clothes to school.

        Connect the dots.

        Like

      • imreek says:

        Zephyrbreeze:
        So, how are the children if Rastafarians doing? The children of alcoholics? The children of survivalist cults? The children of single parent households? The children of Jim Jones pseudo religious cults? The children of two income money only couples? The children of stupid people? Exactly where is intervention mandatory?

        I want something besides bad examples. I want statistically relevant useful information. I have heard the save the children litany for 40+ years. Has anything been accomplished? What? I ABSOLUTELY support the goals. I have no information as to whether any have been accomplished. Again, I absolutely support goals. Give me something that works and I will donate of my time and money. I have neither to spare for that which does not work. Situational ethics, modern morality, police the world, modern education systems, the ‘new’ family structure, federal social engineering, and yes, the DEA system, does not seem to be working well.

        If there is data that shows something works, lets keep it. If there are side effects then lets concentrate on them. If something has not worked, stop wasting time and try something else.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Justice_099 says:

          “If there are side effects then lets concentrate on them. If something has not worked, stop wasting time and try something else.”

          or… just stop smoking it. You talk of wasting time, but apparently spend a lot of time trying to find a reason to justify doing it when the simpler, faster, and easier solution is to just not do it.

          Like

          • imreek says:

            Justice:
            I have stopped ‘doing it’. Haven’t smoked pot since somewhere in the late ’70s. With a single income with wife and children household I didn’t have the time to be unconcerned. With worries on my mind I couldn’t relax and enjoy. Same with many of my friends. Have been drunk three times in the last 35 years. Twice, deliberately. Same reasoning.

            You have a wonderful solution. For you. Works well for the majority of the population. Has worked well for me. I still have booze in the house and take an occasional finger or two of cognac before bedtime. Once I retire I may very well sit on my back porch and smoke a joint occasionally. I understand it is rumored to reduce aches and pains. I remember the day dreaming fondly. I will risk becoming a sex maniac mentally damaged drag on society.

            Until then, please stop spending MY money on YOUR goals in a way that does not seem to be working. Either make the methods work or leave me the chance to keep my money. The sooner I retire and turn into an alcoholic pot smoking tobacco using dead end couch potato the better for you and me. I can stop working my life away and the quicker I die the more you save on Medicare and SS.

            Like

            • Justice_099 says:

              Do you honestly believe that your taxes will go down by legalizing marijuana? Do you really think the government is going to lower your taxes?

              Like

              • imreek says:

                No, I don’t. But an insignificantly improved chance that it may be used productively is better than I see now. And perhaps one stupid teenager is able to get a minimum wage job now held by an illegal due to a lack of a felony use conviction? Fine, keep it illegal. I can work with this. Exactly what is the current law accomplishing?

                Anyone who wants drugs can get them. The only drugs I would have a problem obtaining on a street corner are those with legitimate prescription uses? Perhaps prescribe pot and sell it through pharmacies with a big pharma markup? How come I could drive through one of ‘those’ neighborhoods and get any illegal drug I want. Why do dealers not sell amoxycillin for my sore throat? Something is wrong with the current law. Fix it or trash it and try another answer.

                Like

        • zephyrbreeze says:

          The intervention works because the parents are threatened with the loss of their children. Within a year’s time, the children can be placed permanently with an adoptive family and have a real childhood with functional parents. That works for the kids.

          Like

    • All due respect, I don’t think its the pot that is the problem. Three kids by three different Dads, sounds like there are a lot of underlying issues there other than the pot.

      Liked by 2 people

  22. Justice_099 says:

    All this talk about the medicinal benefits of pot. Let’s be real. The number one reason people smoke pot is for recreation.

    Oxycotin is a great painkiller for those in deep chronic pain. Should we just make that available to every Tom, Dick, and Harry, too?

    Like

    • yadent says:

      One itty-bitty difference between the two, ‘pot’ is a naturally occurring, readily usable plant whereas Oxycotin and most pharmaceuticals not so much…….and as one who used to prescribe Oxy, if one wants it, one can find it rather easily without that RX.

      Like

  23. Angel Martin says:

    drugs are sorcery.

    Like

  24. zephyrbreeze says:

    American Academy of Pediatrics says:

    “Even if marijuana is legal in their state, parents should keep the drug out of their children’s hands and not use it in front of their children, according to the AAP.

    “Marijuana can harm a child’s developing brain and damage the lungs. It also causes learning and memory problems. Children who use marijuana often have trouble in school and with authority figures. About one in 10 teens who uses the drug becomes addicted.

    “We can’t predict who that 10% will be. I don’t think any parent would want their kid to become an addict,” said pediatrician Seth D. Ammerman, M.D., FAAP, a member of the AAP Committee on Substance Abuse.

    “Parents who suspect their teen might be using marijuana can watch for the following:

    changes in who their child hangs out with, poor school performance, less interest in school and hobbies;
    
    a change of behavior or appearance including red, glassy eyes;
    
    avoidance of family and spending more time alone;
    
    smells like marijuana; and
    
    pipes, papers, tubes and other drug paraphernalia."
    

    http://aapnews.aappublications.org/content/36/3/4.full

    Like

  25. wondering999 says:

    Interesting video, thank you Stella! I particularly like Crowder’s focus on being an educator.

    Have to get to work so I don’t have more time to compose thoughts about this, although it’s thought-provoking.

    What I do have is a link to some history of China’s Opium Wars, with notes about who profited (Where are FDR and Eleanor when I want them!!) I’m not holding them responsible for their family histories, that’s not my point — just that dealing in desirable substances, harmful or not, has made a lot of people fabulously wealthy and extremely influential.
    http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/war/opium-wars-kingpins.htm

    ” Franklin D. Roosevelt’s fortune was inherited from his maternal grandfather Warren Delano. In 1830 he was a senior partner of Russell & Company. It was their merchant fleet which carried Sassoon’s opium to China and returned with tea. Warren Delano moved to Newburgh, NY. In 1851 his daughter Sara Married a well born neighbor, James Roosevelt – the father of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

    “John Kerry’s maternal grandfather, James Grant Forbes, was born in Shanghai, China…

    “John Churchill (1650-1722), son of an impoverished country gentleman, was the greatest military leader that Britain has ever produced. He brilliantly led the combined armies of Britain, Austria and Holland against Louis XIV of France, and was created First Duke of Marlborough….

    Liked by 1 person

    • rashomon says:

      Just about every East coast family from that era has some connection through underwriting loans, ship building, investing in shares, distribution…whatever. Follow the money and most of their progeny are around today doing the same type of work in some way or another. The HSBC, Britain’s largest bank, was nailed, but Loretta Lynch (remember her? as in Eric Holder’s potential replacement) refused to prosecute them for laundering funds from the Mexican cartels and Middle East terrorists benefitting from such monies.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. zephyrbreeze says:

    “For something known as a “gateway” drug, marijuana can shut the door on opportunity, especially for college students.

    “The University of Maryland School of Public Health released a report last week that connects student marijuana use and problems with academic retention and performance.

    “It’s not rocket science, this stuff has been known for quite some time,” says Amelia Arria, director for the Center on Young Adult Health and Development.

    “The study followed 1,200 college freshmen over a 10-year period and found that substance use, “especially marijuana use,” contributed to “college students skipping more classes, spending less time studying, earning lower grades, dropping out of college, and being unemployed after college.”

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/06/07/marijuana-academic-problems/2399693/

    Like

    • imreek says:

      Absolutely true. And George Washington was a major distillery operator and made a complaint in his letters that his farm overseer let the hemp go until the pollen was freed and the potency was affected. The legacy poppies from Monticello are high in opium content cause that is what they were grown for. Messing up ones mind and body are stupid and stupid people do stupid things. Some people make money from stupid people. SO WHAT ELSE IS NEW? I accept the pro and con points. I accept the sound mind in a sound body goals.

      The goals and negative effects are not the issue. The methods of achieving the goals are the question. Modern drug prohibition started in the ’40s and ’50s. Has drug use gone down? Drug prevention was NOT implemented in other countries. How did drug use behave? Pot was legalized in Holland. How has this affected pot use among non tourist natives? Why and why not? Compare and contrast. What has worked? What has not? What are the positives in what we are doing? What are the negatives? The goal is laudable. The results are questionable.

      Liked by 1 person

    • manickernel says:

      It is only a “gateway” in the sense that hanging out with those that will smoke illegally will probably expose the user to other far more harmful drugs to experiment with. In the end, an addict is going to be an addict. My gateway drug was alcohol, and though I tried just about everything out there, including pot, LSD, cocaine, crack, and a lot more, my drug of choice was alcohol. In fact, I stopped smoking pot as it interfered with my drinking. Finally quit all of it in 94.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. rashomon says:

    I don’t know about the experiences of the rest of you, but in my world, if someone wants pot, cocaine, heroin, alcohol or pills of any kind, they will find them regardless of the legality, parental lectures, “just say no” programs and punishments of any kind. Restraint must come from the individual.

    Anita Alvarez, the States Attorney for Cook County, IL, has just announced an overhaul of her office’s policy on minor drug offenders, directing them to treatment vs. incarceration. The present system only clogged the courts and, according to her office, did nothing to control use of marijuana, cocaine and heroin.

    “In 2010 alone, more than 33,000 people were arrested in the county for marijuana possession — a rate of 91 per day that was tops in the nation, according to a recent study by the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois,” wrote the Chicago Tribune on April 20, 2015.

    All of these drugs have appropriate uses at appropriate times. Meanwhile, I have taken in foster children placed with me ONLY because their caretakers were addicts.

    That was a very informative video, stella. As for answers, I haven’t a clue.

    Like

    • imreek says:

      Incompetent people have kids. Perhaps due to financial incentives from society. Competent people limit their families. Perhaps due to financial dis-incentives.

      Drug use is open in many poor segments of society. Should AFDC be a sub section of the DEA? Does a drug arrest increase the chances for prolonged poverty? Does poverty increase drug use? Correlation or causation? Does poverty cause more damage than drug use? Visa Versa? Is there a feedback loop?

      I hate to say these words, but it may be a time for an open dialog. Exactly what are we trying to do. What have we accomplished. What is possible. How.

      Like

      • stella says:

        Did you watch the video? I have to ask. If you have an average child with an average IQ, how many IQ points do you think it is okay for your kid to lose? What is the cost to society? What I think is that we should have less financial incentive to have kids and sit at home on your ass.

        Like

        • manickernel says:

          There is a lot of conflicting evidence on the IQ issue, it is not settled by any means.

          http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/10/22/no-marijuana-use-doesnt-lower-your-iq/

          Like

          • manickernel says:

            “In particular alcohol use was found to be strongly associated with IQ decline,” the authors write. “No other factors were found to be predictive of IQ change.”

            Like

            • stella says:

              Young adults who used marijuana only recreationally showed significant abnormalities in two key brain regions that are important in emotion and motivation, scientists report. The study was a collaboration between Northwestern Medicine® and Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

              This is the first study to show casual use of marijuana is related to major brain changes. It showed the degree of brain abnormalities in these regions is directly related to the number of joints a person smoked per week. The more joints a person smoked, the more abnormal the shape, volume and density of the brain regions.

              Like

              • manickernel says:

                Interesting. Thought the sample group of only 40 users (20 who smoked, 20 who did not) is pretty small. As I said, the studies are conflicting. I am not saying smoking dope is laudable behavior, just that it should not be illegal. While the cartels may be paying for the DEA prostitutes, I imagine the taxpayers are still paying for their plane tickets. 🙂

                Like

          • stella says:

            Why take the chance? For what purpose?

            Like

          • stella says:

            Teens who start smoking marijuana early and do so frequently risk lowering their IQ scores, according to research from the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, which found evidence that early and frequent cannabis use can alter the structure of the developing brain.

            The research, part of a larger study due out in June, was released Monday — on April 20 — a day that has become a counterculture holiday to celebrate marijuana, as part of a bid to raise awareness about the negative effects of marijuana use among adolescents.

            http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/early-marijuana-use-can-lower-teens-iqs-research-shows

            Like

            • imreek says:

              Stella:
              I do not disagree with why take a chance. This is a very valid point. If anyone can come up with a way to stop drug ( and alcohol and tobacco ) use I would support it. I do NOT disagree with ending socially destructive behavior. I dislike programs that seem pointless, non-functional and wasteful.

              At the start of Ansligers’ anti pot crusade he estimated that 20 to 30 tons of Mexican pot was imported to the U.S. annually. Allowing for population growth, how much has the interdiction program reduced this? Has the availability been reduced? The potency? The breadth of use in society? Some can say that the problem would be worse if the law wasn’t implemented. This may very well be true. How has usage been in places that have no enforced law? Is pot a U.S. problem only? Where is it a problem and where is it of no concern. Why?

              From the 1870s on opiates were widely used in everything from hair tonics to baby medicines. Cocaine was used in soda and in skin inflammation reducers. During prohibition alcohol related crime increased but other drug use reduced. How did we do this?

              I know drug use is pointless and destructive. I have heard the message and there is no need to repeat it. The dispute is about how. Not what.

              Liked by 1 person

              • stella says:

                One of my biggest objections to legalization of marijuana is that there is a huge group of “business” people out there who are waiting to make a killing in the market. Illegal drug sellers are one thing. You ain’t seen nuthin’ yet. It will be the tobacco industry on steroids.

                Like

                • imreek says:

                  Stella:
                  Yes, it will be. Legalization will be immediately followed by government standardization ‘for the children’. This is happening now. This will be followed by self cultivation being made illegal. I suspect that the DC and other states one ounce maximum laws have this in mind. But if the choice I have is another upper 1% pirate or a facial tattoo gang banger?

                  Those who smoke now will continue. Those with testing type jobs will continue to work or be replaced. Those who are dis-inclined won’t change. Right now the gang banger is winning and society looses. The other way? Who knows. Perhaps the corp. will only be able to avoid 99% of the taxes. And they will have liability issues. If it is a total and absolute disaster then we will be back where we are now.

                  I think we are better off concentrating on the peripheral issues. Drunk/drugged driving is not an excuse. It constitutes pre meditated assault with a deadly weapon. Minor children testing positive during physicals constitutes child endangerment. Self cultivation constitutes illegal manufacture of a controlled substance. Somehow, somewhere there is an answer. The current answer is a pretense.

                  Like

  28. I’m not convinced there is a cause / effect relationship.
    I know people who use pot that others would be SHOCKED to find out they use pot. Upstanding members of my community, pillars of society, highly functioning folks, business owners, officers of banks, blah blah blah, and oh the scandal if people found out they were smoking a doobie at night after work!! But these are the same people slinging back martinis at the local hoity-toity bar and that is perfectly acceptable. Neither thing makes one wrong or right, but I don’t believe its the pot causing the social ills. I think those were already there and the pot is an attempt to medicate, just like the other things people do to medicate themselves.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. zephyrbreeze says:

    Parental use of marijuana is a risk factor in adolescent use.

    Parent substance use as a predictor of adolescent use: A six-year lagged analysis

    The present study investigated the role of parental use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana on lagged changes in the specific substance use of their adolescent offspring over a six-year period. The analyses also examined the relative influence of mothers and fathers and their interaction as moderated by marital status and age and gender of the adolescent. A generalized estimating equations approach, analogous to quasi-like-lihood, was employed to estimate regression coefficients via an iterative weighted least squares algorithm. Findings indicated that, when employed as time-varying covariates, parental substance use resulted in substance-specific effects on fluctuations in the adolescent’s own use. Age, parent marital status, and each parent’s marijuana use independently were jound to significantly affect adolescent marijuana use. In contrast, the complex relationship between parent and adolescent use of alcohol and cigarettes showed variation by substance, age, and gender of both parents and adolescents. Within a developmental context, the results suggest that parent use of substances must be considered risk factors with particular effects on their younger offspring. Thus, prevention efforts should be directed at middle childhood and include components aimed at parents as well as their children.

    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF02883392

    Does the science matter to the pro-pot advocates?

    Like

    • imreek says:

      Zephyrbreeze:
      Pro pot? Probably not. Anti pot? Probably not. Pro ‘anything’? Probably not. Anti ‘anything’? Probably not.

      The ‘yes or no but what about’ people in the middle? Very likely it does.

      The above is a good article with good data. My question then is what should these interventions be? Random in house drug tests? In school drug tests? Criminal or educational? Pot and/or alcohol and/or violent behavior and/or extreme philosophies and/or ? I no longer give much attention to the one issue absolute black or white position people.

      We seem to be stuck in logjam of absolutes. The workable answer is probably somewhere in the middle. A good business deal is where both parties are equally happy/unhappy. I suspect something along these lines is the optimum for a social contract. The absolutists arguments are getting repetitive, shrill, time consuming, and frankly, boring. It seems to be time to move along.

      Like

      • stella says:

        The video deals with brain impairment in young people caused by early marijuana use. Is this okay?

        Like

        • imreek says:

          stella:

          NO! It is NOT okay.
          My objection to the present law deals with its’ apparent lack of results and possible negative side effects. Is a 40 more year continuation of a program that seems to be non functional desirable? Except for a few things that marijuana may or may not be medically useful for there is no valid reason to use.

          Okay, I accept that and agree. Now, how can use be decreased or stopped? The present system does not seem to be working. Give me some alternates other than ‘they shouldn’t’. Has ANY system worked? I need some alternates. The question of whether drug use is good or bad has been answered. There is no need to repeat it. The question of how to stop it has been asked. There has not been a workable answer. The question of is it possible to stop it has been asked. There has not been an answer.

          Like

          • stella says:

            Legalization will simply create a new tobacco industry. Is that what you want?

            Like

            • imreek says:

              Stella:
              Illegalization has created a new violent mafia. Is this good? ABC stores cut down on moon shine. Is a pot control store workable? I don’t know. I will freely admit that I am not smart enough to give THE answer. I am smart enough to ask questions. The DEA answer doesn’t satisfy me. Something MUST work. The problems now didn’t always exist. The government is still singing the same one note song after 40 years. And I am too old to waste much more time.

              Liked by 1 person

  30. zephyrbreeze says:

    Associations Between Biologically Confirmed Marijuana Use and Laboratory-Confirmed Sexually Transmitted Diseases Among African American Adolescent Females

    Abstract
    Background: Numerous studies have examined the association between adolescents’ marijuana use and their high-risk sexual behaviors and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). However, the validity of the findings is questionable because most of the studies relied on self-reporting for measurement of marijuana use and key outcome (i.e., STDs).

    Goal: The goal was to investigate associations between biologically confirmed marijuana use and laboratory-confirmed STDs and condom use.

    Study Design: African American females adolescents (n = 522) completed a self-administered survey and face-to-face interview. The adolescents provided urine and vaginal swab specimens that were analyzed for marijuana metabolites and STDs, respectively.

    Results: Among the study subjects, 5.4% tested positive for marijuana. These adolescents were more likely to test positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.4) and Chlamydia trachomatis (AOR = 3.9). They were more likely to have never used condoms in the previous 30 days (AOR = 2.9) and to have not used condoms consistently in the previous 6 months (AOR = 3.6).

    Conclusion: The findings represent unique biologic evidence that STDs and sexual risk behavior may co-occur with marijuana use. Interventions designed to reduce adolescents’ risk of STDs and HIV infection should address marijuana use.

    Like

    • manickernel says:

      That is bad science. Were the families from identical social backgrounds? Two parents or one? On welfare or working?

      Like

    • imreek says:

      So, in other words, people that live risky lives have bad things happen. I guess if a person has multiple sex partners and doesn’t care enough to use condoms they may not care about other things. They probably drink, smoke and use drugs. They may not have stable home lives or employment history. They may choose to reside in high crime areas. They may have a higher risk of unplanned pregnancy. The study seems to show that higher use ( 5.4% ??? ) of marijuana should be addressed by proper birth control counseling. Correlation is not causation. The lack of proper condom use does not cause an increase in pot use.

      5.4% Really? I wasn’t aware that drug use was so trivial. I had heard figures above 10% in middle class schools. What are African American females doing to get use this low?

      Like

  31. Matt Musson says:

    I don’t like it. But – I don’t like tobacco either. However, I do believe that people should be free to make their own choices on pot. Before 1912 the US government never believed it had the authority to tell people what they could put in their own bodies.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Angel Martin says:

      bath salts all the way, because freedom…

      Like

      • brometheus says:

        bath salts will never be stopped. It is interesting you brought them up. considering all they are doing is changing the structure of the the drug every time they make one illegal. It is a game of whack-a-mole. By making one illegal the chemists make a new possibly more harmful compound and use the human race as the guinea pigs. So right here we can show that the drug laws are doing more harm than good. When the first so called “bath salts” were produced in New Zealand. They sold something like 4 billion hits and had no deaths. then the oppressive hand of the state came in. made the first compound illegal and then we started seeing the deaths from the new untested drugs. Drug use will never be stopped. We would be better served to allow the safer compounds to be sold legally then allow closet chemists to run rampant.

        Like

        • stella says:

          Wrong. Legalization will create an industry that makes the tobacco industry look like small potatoes. And the illegal drug sellers will still be there.

          Like

    • imreek says:

      Matt:
      Yes and No. It didn’t restrict what one could put in others bodies either. Thus pure food and drug laws and ingredient labeling. I may disagree with someones decision on what they do with their lives. I have a duty to restrict their decision inflicted on un-knowing others. I support a persons right to suicide. I support free speech. I do not support the right to set ones self on fire in a crowded theater. The pot/tobacco/alcohol/guns/ect. question is about where a persons right to individual behavior intersects with those of others. Rights come with obligations. The question is not your rights or my rights. My question is how to maximize your rights to and my rights from simultaneously. A tricky juggling act.

      Like

      • stella says:

        Hmmmm. If I am for drug prohibition then I am a right winger busy body. If I then object to supporting those who require support because of their life choices, I am a meanie. A progressive told me so just yesterday. I can’t win no matter what I do, I guess.

        Like

        • imreek says:

          Stella:
          I guess you are right. An absolute lockout win is probably impossible. Personally I don’t mind being thought of a a right wing meanie. I don’t mind being thought of as a libtard either. It is what it is. I do like being thought of as practical. I am for WORKABLE drug prohibition. I am for WORKABLE social safety nets. I am for continual monitoring and adjusting for function and side effects.

          Philosophically I am for the perfect answer. Realistically I am for something that works now and the continuing revisiting of the problem. Evaluate effectiveness and adjust as necessary. If it works, move on to the next problem. If it doesn’t, try something else.

          I am also for warm spring days, puppy dogs and playful kittens.
          Is climate change law and free range pet programs the ONLY possible answer to my wants? And are my wants societies’ only goals? I guess I will have to be a tin foil hat right wing religious socialist. I’ve gotten over the hurt feeling.

          Liked by 1 person

  32. czarowniczy says:

    I wouldn’t touch this debate with a borrowed bong. If we just look at substance use air is a gateway drug, every addict I’ve known has used it first.
    I am not a fan of jailing users as much as I am public execution of sellers – and a slow, agonizing and public execution for those who sell within 1000-feet of a school. Most of the heavy users I’ve run over (not literally, though the option was tempting) had problems that preceded the drugs, though more than a few were just party animals. I’d bet that in Louisiana the numbers of drug users and alcoholics would decline were mental health services available at a 1st World level and so much of our culture (why else do tourists come?) weren’t built around the personal abandonment of self-control.
    Certain people are going to be addicted to something regardless, it’s in their genes or personalities. The subject of doctors, nurses and other medical workers being addicted bubbles to the surface every now and then and then is quickly stomped down into the depths again. One hospital we dealt with almost has a DEA diversion specialist there 24/7, diversion from patient stocks to workers’ pockets was that bad.
    We had at least two of those temporary Oxy-clinics-in-a-trailer set up where docs were writing oxy scrips bu the hundreds daily, the addicted would motor in from hundreds of miles around once the word was out on the internet. Locals knew what was going on – you don’t have an office set up just off the interstate on Monday and the parking lot full of dozens of cars for weeks on end starting on Tuesday. Local drug stores were selling more oxy than aspirin and even though they’re required to report suspicious sales it always seems to take a while. Ditto with weed – I’ve seen the narcs busting dozens of sellers a day at a popular fest while having been told that officers were told to lay off busts for weed at another whee it might be a bit more of an expected accoutrement.
    I think we need a bit more research on WHY people are addicted to everything from weed to coffee and some agreement by the medical and legal professions as to what’s acceptable. We can’t even get the lawmakers to just stand shoulder-to-shoulder and uniformly decry the glamorous drug culture Hollywood and the music industry sell. Lemme know when Willie Nelson goes on the wagon without smoking the hay.

    Like

    • stella says:

      I agree about the addictive tendencies, genetic or otherwise. My mother used to say the same. She was addicted to bananas, and said that her addictive personality wouldn’t allow her to drink alcohol (or partake in any other mind altering substances).

      Like

    • imreek says:

      Let me know when the ‘leaders’ stop drinking and whoring while you are at it !

      Like

      • czarowniczy says:

        Problem is that to many of our ‘leaders’ the term ‘whore’ is a job description

        Like

        • imreek says:

          I agree. Guess I have to vote for the difference between high priced escort and crack whore. Not a very palatable choice though !

          Like

  33. Plain Jane says:

    Incredible video suitable for the drug-free libertarian grandchild to the “anti-everything that is questionable” grandchild. Thank you for posting. .

    Like

  34. zephyrbreeze says:

    Surge in percentage of people using marijuana after legalization

    “As marijuana legalization took hold in Colorado, the estimated percentage of regular cannabis users in the state jumped to the second-highest level in the country, according to new federal data.

    “When asked, roughly one out of every eight Colorado residents over the age of 12 reported using marijuana in the previous month. Only Rhode Island topped Colorado in the percentage of residents who reported using marijuana as frequently.”

    http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_27212493/marijuana-use-increases-colorado-according-new-federal-survey

    Like

  35. wondering999 says:

    Following link is about opium, not marijuana, but interesting:
    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/808432_2
    “…In Victorian times, for example, opium consumption was almost universal in England. It was sold as a soothing medicine for babies, and added to beer for farm workers. In the first world war, a large number of fighters in the trenches were sustained by opium. When the French Army mutinied in 1917, it was directly because supplies of morphine were withheld from the troops.”

    Like

    • imreek says:

      wondering 999:
      Thank you. Relates well to my stated arguments in other comments. If you ( OR ANYONE ) find references to how this was stopped, please post them. In all of human history and cultures someone must have found an answer. I hope it is not a cultural cycle type of thing that happens and stops irregardless of what we do.

      Like

  36. Daniel says:

    Our brains make us who we are as a species and who we are as a culture and who we are as individuals. What’s more, as life goes on our brains change and for whatever cause, whether pollution or poison (is there a difference?) or as some would say “age” our brains degrade in performance. How much of our brains cane we “safely” give up? How much future can anyone predict to know the answer to THAT?

    I did watch the video. It changes nothing. Whether the effects are temporary or they have some permanent residual effect, it’s a risk and a needless one.

    My perspective is admittedly tainted. I have extreme discomfort under the influence of just about any drug whether it is alcohol or marijuana, I simply do not feel at all comfortable with it. Some people find pleasure and joy in the experience. I simply feel less stable and less in control of my body. I come at this from a mildly autistic perspective. So I can never “enjoy” it.

    But from ANY perspective, I cannot see why such pleasure is a good idea. There are many safe pleasures out there. Some people find fresh air and exercise to be addictive and life-filling and it does offer a sense of “high.” It works great on me and a lot of other people who would be considered ordinary. Eating “healthy” foods also offers a terrific boost though I wouldn’t generally call it a “high” though people have suggested I am rather “bouncy” when I’ve had foods rich in iron and B vitamins.

    I like being happy but I don’t see the value in it if I know there are risks and dangers — even tiny, minor ones.

    I say let it be legal. I just don’t want any part of it.

    Like

  37. czarowniczy says:

    I gotta revisit this ‘addiction’ thing – I just picked 20-feet of strawberry plants and managed to get 2 quarts into the house. Wonder if the have a Malibu treatment center for that…..

    Liked by 1 person

  38. grits64 says:

    COPD and lung cancer. Let’s try that on for size. Back in the day, I was very energetic and artistic when I had my ‘medication’ but now have to substitute this with albuterol and other prescribed Meds. This is not a good thing, IMHO

    Like

    • stella says:

      No, it isn’t. As bad as, or worse, than cigarette smoking.

      Like

    • anthedohmy says:

      I have had episodic asthma since childhood surgeries to the neck region. When I get a cold or flu and have any congestion I can’t stop coughing, cannot sleep, feel like I can barely breath. Albuterol and other medications worked for a time and then stopped. I found that one vape would provide hours of relief, as it has bronchodilating properties. If I was high when I finally went to sleep, I didn’t know it.

      I have early stage emphysema, after my mother and my grandfather died from it. All my older siblings smoked as did my whole neighborhood. I had no idea what I was doing when I started emulating those around me. I wish my mother had quit after she watched her father die a horrible death, but she was unable to. That was what did it to me when I watched her. I was able to stop cold turkey and the cycle has been broken in my children. I found out a few years later I was too late. Though the youngest of all the smokers in my house, I am the first one with the diagnosis. Yes it is my fault for smoking cigarettes. I am responsible for experiencing the consequences of my behavior. But I still can ask for mercy.

      In the back of my mind I am hoping this provides relief later, as I have observed it do for others.

      High is an interesting word worthy of definition in context.

      Like

      • stella says:

        My sister died of emphysema at age 60, which is when I quit (I’m 18 years younger). I was a very heavy smoker, and I do have scar tissue and evidence of emphysema in my lungs (CT scans via NIH study). My sister had also had serious pneumonia as a baby, with some lung damage. Perhaps your asthma had a similar effect. Better to quit when you did, as you have probably lived longer as a result.

        Like

  39. Jesus, I can’t listen to that woman. I struggled to deal with her nonsense and got up to 28 minutes , “…are we even going to have a functional republic?” and almost had to go buy a new monitor at that point and I don’t even smoke weed 😉

    This woman would have no problem pumping your kids with some of the most dangerous chemicals that weed can’t even compare to.

    Liked by 1 person

    • stella says:

      How do you know that? And even if it is true, what bearing does it have on the subject being discussed?

      Like

      • I’m pretty certain anti-psychotics will win the battle of “dangerousity” against weed. We can never truly know scientifically anyway because the studies would be so outrageously unethical, the world would never stand for it. What does that have to do with the subject? Well given the subject presented is all over the place and coming from the hypocrite featured in the video I say lots actually.

        Like

        • stella says:

          Which hypocrite is that, d-man? Are you saying that the woman who annoys you is misrepresenting the facts (lying)? Do you have a particular dislike for persons in her profession, or is it her in particular?

          ADD: By the way, what is your take on the subject of this post – Marijuana – Is it good for you?

          Like

          • The supposed doctor, the guy is a facilitator but clearly she’s the hypocrite. She has no right to lecture on the supposed woes of weed while at the same time turning kids into supposed ADHD patients to pump them full of Ritalin. And do you think “…are we even going to have a functional republic?” is a rational argumentation of fact? It’s not, it’s hyperbolic, fear mongering, fallacious etc.

            Like

          • “ADD: By the way, what is your take on the subject of this post – Marijuana – Is it good for you?”

            That isn’t the subject. If it were I wouldn’t know how to answer. Is it good for me? In what regard? Legally speaking no it’s not as it could land me in prison, make me lose a job, not gain employment, be socially ostracized etc. so I guess in those aspects it’s not good for me.

            Like

            • stella says:

              That is exactly the subject, D-man. It’s the title of the post. Apparently you don’t have much of an opinion about it.

              Like

              • I gave plenty of opinion. I gave you a direct answer as to how weed is not good for me. It is not the subject, the subject is how can we scare people away from this weed. I also have no interest in trying to reason with “…are we even going to have a functional republic?” Gee, we have a functioning republic with nuclear weapons and she’s worried about weed.

                Like

  40. hebejg says:

    Mrs. Stella,
    I don’t post much but I read this site daily.
    I want you to know that I appreciate what all you and your fellow mods do hear as it is often a thankless task.
    Let it also be known that I ride with 95% of the conervatism that resides here.
    However, on this point in particular, I must respectfully agree to disagree with you.
    I live with something called Rheumatoid Arthritis. I hope that none of y’all do. But for those of us that have had the experience of having a “flare-up” that lasts for every second of every minute for 3-4-5 daze (yeah, pun) , I’ll be the first to tell you that you would eat a fresh cat tird or an old one covered in cat litter if you knew it would just bring you SOME relief.
    I find just such relief in marijuana. I have been on Lortabs, Percosets, Oxycontin, Fentanyl patches, etc. ad nauseum. Some were prescribed post knee replacement yrs ago and some have been more recently prescribed for the R.A.
    THESE drugs can be the road to ruin if one is not careful. They work quite well at first until a tolerance has been built up, then you need more to get the relief you had when you first started taking them. Well, if you do that, you wind up short of pills at the back end of your prescription.
    So, when faced with this situation, one either goes on the street to get what one needs to make up for that shortage or one sits there and deals with unmedicated pain as best as one can.
    The worst part of that is dealing with the “Jones” that your body feels because now it has addicted your mind AND body. Through the grace of Almighty God I made it out of that meat grinder none the worse for wear but much wiser.
    I went through a 4 day, no sleep Jones in March of 2011 when i said “ENOUGH”. I could tell you up to the minute what was happening in Japan when their catastrophic earthquake hit Fukujima at the very same time as I was going through my Jones (withdrawls).
    Opiates will grab you by the shorty-hairs and drag you through the coals.
    I digress but my point is that now I have a handle on this R.A. for now through the use of Enbrel AND marijuana.
    I have 60 Percosets sitting on the counter, untouched so far. I will not hesitate to take them if I need to but for now it’s a “In Case Of Emergency, Break Glass” type of situation.
    I am 48 yrs. old. I am a veteran. I am a very proud father of three sons. One at Ole Miss on a band scholarship and one that will be at Ole Miss next year on an academic scholarship. The youngest is completing his freshman yr. in high school.
    Yes, I smoke marijuana when I can now and it really does help me with my pain TO BE SURE.
    I am a closet smoker, my young’uns don’t know about it because of the stigma attatched to it.
    All I am asking is to please don’t castigate me for what I do.
    I know what it’s like to be piss-drunk and I know what it’s like to be stoned tooda bone. Trust me, you are better off being stoned than drunk if you have functions to perform that require any coordination, stamina or concentration.
    I respect your thoughts M’am but when you throw an all encompassing blanket on everybody that smokes pot, THAT is where you are wrong.
    I will close now in saying that I hope you are never in these types of pain but if you are, don’t fear the reefer (close to the Blue Oyster Cult somg but no cigar). You may find that it helps you more you ever thought it would.
    Please don’t kick me outta the TreeHouse, I love it up here.
    OK, I’ll crawl back into my lowly “pothead” hole now.
    Y’all have a good day/evening.

    Liked by 1 person

    • stella says:

      I’m sorry you are in pain. Since you have tried everything else, it seems, have you asked your doctor to prescribe medical marijuana for your pain? I can see why you would pursue anything to relieve your pain, so I suggest that you ask your doctor about it, if you have not. The subject of this post – Marijuana! Is it Actually Good For You? – really doesn’t pertain to you. It obviously isn’t “good” for you, although it relieves your pain. It is also true that marijuana causes problems for others, including but not limited to changes in the brain, lung cancer, and emphysema. My aim in creating this post was to discuss these various aspects – all of the bad things, as well as some good things about marijuana. Many people who are pro marijuana use – in fact, I would say most – use marijuana for the pleasurable feeling it gives them, and deny that there are any side effects at all.

      Like

      • hebejg says:

        Mrs Stella,
        I long for the day when the great state of Mississippi recognizes medical marijuana but for now I have to smoke what i can get.
        Don’t get me wrong, I don’t live stoned, hell, I can’t hardly find it as all my rowdy friends have settled down. But when I can, I get at least an ounce at a time which will last me a couple of months.
        Would I rather have marijuana that is regulated, free of pesticide and whatever else?
        ABSOLUTELY.
        As far as long term affects, when you are in pain you don’t think about that. The here and now is much more important.
        I am just doing the best I can trying to play the hand that I’ve been dealt.
        And thank you for bringing this to a topic of discussion. All debate is healthy as long as all sides are heard with open ears. Only then can an individual decide for themselves where they lie on said topic.
        I hope I have not ruffled any feathers but I do feel the need to let my opinion be known as I seem to represent an unheard many.

        Liked by 1 person

        • stella says:

          Medical THC is available (and has been for a long time) through a regular physician. Not the smoking kind, however.

          Like

          • tessa50 says:

            If that is true, why all the fights in states that want to legalize it for medical use only? What am I missing here?

            Like

            • stella says:

              There is a difference between a drug derived from marijuana that contains THC and prescribed by a physician, and using a plant that is dried and rolled into a cigarette as a “drug” for medical use. The former is called, for example, Marinol or dronabinol. The latter is called marijuana.

              ADD: I think most of the people who are advocating for “medical” marijuana are more interested in opening a door to make growing, procuring, and using marijuana easier for the casual drug user. Not to mention the profit motive. Few are interested in the sick.

              Liked by 1 person

          • anthedohmy says:

            Few could actually obtain it and people repeatedly reported the synthesized version did not work in the same way the natural version did. It is a myth that smoking is the only route of administration. We smoke meats, before consuming them, BTW. A degree of separation, but one wonders, even standing over the BBQ inhaling all that smoke! Vaporizers heat it past the smoke point, and it can be mixed reality into foods and teas, though that seems to produce a stronger psychoactive effect in some individuals.

            Like

            • anthedohmy says:

              I am interested in the sick. I am interested in functioning for as long as possible, not lying in a bed needing somebody to wait on me, or like my father, with Alzheimer’s not knowing what day it was or where he was and turning into a meanie on my mother after a long marriage of peace.

              Like

            • stella says:

              Smoking meat isn’t considered a particularly healthy way to cook (tasty, not healthy).

              Like

    • grits64 says:

      Hey, you can get around $7 a pill on those percocets, lol. I don’t care for the pills either and I’m glad that the cannabis was not ‘addictive’ -I’m living proof but sure do miss it. It was for pleasure-not pain, sorry for yours- smoke on!!

      Like

      • hebejg says:

        C’mon now grits64. That is $7 I don’t need. I’ll not be contributing to the infernal mess that prescription painkillers confound this society with.
        I’d just as soon flush’em all than sell one.
        Now if I KNOW that you are past a 5 on the pain scale, you are more than welcome to a dozen or so. Free of charge.
        Other than that you can eat one of them cat tirds of which I spoke.

        Liked by 2 people

  41. texan59 says:

    Miss Stella, you have outdone yourself today. My hat is off to ya. It appears you stirred up quite a hornet’s nest of discussion. Me and the boys salute you.

    Like

  42. rashomon says:

    So, mizz stella, do we get a summary of this input? Lady, you do know how to stir up a hornet’s nest.

    But have to admit, I’m looking forward to the next one. CTH is better than tending to any other form of information, debate or argument now available. One has to do some homework or smack down is inevitable. Bunch of smart cookies here.

    Like

  43. whippet1 says:

    I am sick to death of all the ignorant pro – legalization potheads. While many of us tried different drugs when we were young and stupid and thought we were. 6 feet tall and bullet proof, we grew up and realized the risk isn’t worth it . I know this all too well. My older brother started smoking pot in the late 60’s and 70’s as a teen. This later led to uppers, downers and finally his killer drug, cocaine. He was a college graduate, Marine Captain and funny as hell. And he’s dead. Cardiac arrest due to massive cocaine overdose at 35. My family’s life has never been the same since that day. Anyone who has lost a loved one knows the feeling, but when its because of useless drugs it’s devastating. I hope to see him again when my time has come. I will hug him like I’ve never hugged him before and then I’ll punch him square in the face for the hell he put us through. Anyone that doesn’t understand that getting high creates the need for bigger and better highs is delusional. I knew my brother well enough to know that his last high was the biggest rush of his life.

    Like

    • canadacan says:

      Losing a loved one like that is horrible. I know my best friend lost her husband to alcohol/drugs. What a waste.
      Funny,well read and all the potential and talent in the world.

      Liked by 1 person

  44. talkaftercarefulthought says:

    Stella this is a societal problem that the “I want what makes me feel good, with no repercussions ME ME ME” group gloms onto, a sibling in spirit to Abortion, and they are rabid beyond reason with defending their position. However when a person is a zealot they have two back pockets full of well-rehearsed arguments and wordsmithing (not a baby, zygote, blastocyst, embryo, lump of cells, still not a baby) trickery that are hard to counter to people that just know wrong is wrong without zealously having counter argument(s) for a person you’d never convert/convince otherwise. How can ANYONE look at a society where smoking a cigarette is more nefarious than say kicking a puppy but smoking pot is almost a necessary qualification to be president and not know there’s just too much irony for pot to be good for us? So similar to a society that can disassociate so completely with their offspring that abortion can be almost celebrated, where babies are now murdered past a point that they are undeniably able to survive outside the womb. Thank You for this post, and the slings and arrows that have come your way from all the Spicoli emulators, due to said post. I’m sure I’ll shake my head for a long time if my state legalizes pot, 1st at the obvious irony and 2nd at the pot heads that will dump from the dark holes they’re in now out into the streets and society.

    Liked by 1 person

  45. anthedohmy says:

    PubMed Study: Cannabis Slows or Halts Alzheimer’s Progression

    <a href=”http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17828287>PubMed: …Cannabinoids… providing neuroprotection and reducing neuroinflammation, whilst simultaneously supporting the brain’s intrinsic repair mechanism

    Exploiting Cannabinoid-Induced Cytotoxic Autophagy to Drive Melanoma Cell Death

    Cannabinoids reduce ErbB2-driven breast cancer progression through Akt inhibition.

    Sometimes, it does have medicinal value. We would know more had the government not prevented all that research in prior years.

    Like

    • anthedohmy says:

      grr checked my links twice, need to find my glasses!

      Like

    • stella says:

      I’m sure it does. Doesn’t support everybody (99% aren’t sick) self medicating.

      Like

      • anthedohmy says:

        There is evidence that endocrine disruptors in widespread plastic and pesticide usage are making many more than 99% of people sick. Many are in the dark on this one.

        It’s funny this “self medicating” thing. I can go do a doctor who can prescribe me into near death, based on my telling him how I feel, but I can no longer, as I could for thousands of years prior to all the legislative bodies, make a salve or a plant or figure out what I need. I have to go to a doctor to get “permission” to test my own blood, and then I have to have a “license” to analyze it. I think that is silly. I figured out a tumor Stanford missed with the aid of a doctor who let me tell him what blood tests I needed him to write me a permission slip to get.

        We have turned “self medicating” into a taboo, when I am not convinced it is a reasonable one, though it does support the Medical Industry and the Pharmaceutical Industry. I look back at my father’s Alzheimer’s and wonder if it was brought on by the drugs (no longer in use) he was prescribed in the 60’s and 70’s. “Doctor medicating” is causing as much, if not more harm than self medicating in a portion of the population. Some even dare write about it.

        But the stoners, who sit around and get stoned all day and procrastinate, I see this, too. Not sure I want to toss the Alzheimers, breast cancer, melanoma, crohn’s , rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions where people get genuine relief-sometimes life saving relief. It is these people who pushed this movement along, often good hard working people who never imagined themselves as pot smokers until the thing hit.

        Speaking of procrastination, gotta get back to work!

        Like

        • anthedohmy says:

          *many more than 1%

          Like

        • stella says:

          Here’s some stats for you. One hundred years ago, just after my mother was born, the life expectancy in the U.S. was 52.5 years for men, and 56.8 years for women. In 2013, the ages are 76.4 and 81.3, respectively. Most of the gain we have seen are due to improved diet, vaccines, and antibiotics. I haven’t given up on pharmaceuticals yet. You can medicate yourself all you want, but it didn’t turn out so well in the not so distant past.

          Like

          • anthedohmy says:

            I replied to this, but it disappeared. I have learned not to question that which disappears, but rather accept the authority behind it. Yet every once in a while I wonder, ‘what if it was my mistake?’ rather than a The Problem of WordPress? Wish not to be rude or pushy, either.

            Like

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